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Title: Fiscal Year 2013-2014 Budget Review: The George A. Smathers Libraries
Physical Description: Budget Report
Creator: Russell, Judith; Keith, Brian; Bruxvoort, Diane; Botero, Cecilia; and Schipper, Rachel
Publisher: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Florida
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Subjects / Keywords: RCM
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Abstract: The FY 2013-2014 Budget Review for the Smathers Libraries provides documentation for three budget scenarios: a flat budget, a 5% budget cut and an optimal budget. This is the annual budget document submitted to the RCM Budget Review Committee.
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Judith Russell.
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Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00001359:00001


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FY 2013-2014 RCM Budget Review for the Smathers Libraries ( PDF )


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Fiscal Year 20132014 Budget Review: The George A. Smathers Libraries December 2012

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Page i Table of Contents Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 1 1. Strategic Value of the Smathers Libraries .............................................................................. 1 The Health Science Center Libraries .......................................................................................... 3 2. Objectives ............................................................................................................................... 4 3. Organization ............................................................................................................................ 4 4. Services ................................................................................................................................... 6 5. 20132014 Budget Scenarios .................................................................................................. 8 20132014 Projected Annual Uses of Funds Statement: Smathers Libraries ............................. 8 20132014 Projected Annual Uses of Funds Statement: University Libraries ........................... 8 20132014 Projected Annual Uses of Funds Statement: Health Science Center Libraries ........ 9 20132014 Projected Annual Uses of Funds Statement: Administration (Inclusive of Acquisitions and Interim Storage Facility) ................................................................................. 9 Pre Approved Increases in the Libraries RCM Base Budget ................................................... 10 6. Smathers Libraries 20132014 Budget With Flat Funding ................................................... 11 The Materials Budget ................................................................................................................ 11 Cumulative Lost Buying Power: ........................................................................................... 11 The Salary Budget .................................................................................................................... 15 The Operations Budget ............................................................................................................. 16 Maintenance of Public Space in the Libraries: ..................................................................... 16 Technology: .......................................................................................................................... 16 Pre Approved Increases in the Libraries RCM Base ................................................................ 16 7. Sma thers Libraries 20132014 Budget With 5% Less Funding ........................................... 17 The Materials Budget ................................................................................................................ 17 The Salary Budget .................................................................................................................... 21 The Operations Budget ............................................................................................................. 21 Maintenance of Public Space in the Libraries: ..................................................................... 21 Technology: .......................................................................................................................... 21 Pre Approved Increases in the Libraries RCM Base ................................................................ 21 8. Smathers Libraries 20132014 Budget With Increased Funding .......................................... 22 The Materials Budget ................................................................................................................ 22 The Salary Budget .................................................................................................................... 26 The Operations Budget ............................................................................................................. 27

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Page ii University of Florida OpenAccess Publishing Fund: .......................................................... 27 Maintenance of Public Space in the Libraries: ..................................................................... 28 9. Additional Sources of Funding for the Libraries .................................................................. 29 Establish a Student Library Fee ................................................................................................ 29 Increase Funding from the Division of Spons ored Research ................................................... 29 Dedicate a Library Allocation from the Existing Student Technology Fee ............................. 29 Dedicate a Library Allocation from Annual Tuition Increases ................................................ 30 Addendum: 20132014 Hyperion Submissions ............................................................................ 31 University Libraries .................................................................................................................. 31 Health Science Center Libraries ............................................................................................... 34 Administration .......................................................................................................................... 36

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Fiscal Year 2013 2014 Budget Review: The George A. Smathers Libraries Page 1 Introduction The George A. S mathers Libraries have two main components under RCM, the Health Science Center Libraries (HSCL) and the University Li braries (UL). Under RCM, the HSCL is funded through units of the Health Science Center. The University Libraries are funded through the universitys other academic and research units, with the exception of the Levin College of Law which supports its own l ibrary, the Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center The Legal Information Center is not part of the George A. Smathers Libraries and, therefore, is not included in this budget review Historically, funding was provided directly to the Libraries prior to the allocation of appropriated funds to the Colleges. Under RCM, the budget for the Libraries is still determined by the President and the Senior Vice Presidents. Then, using a weighted formula, the Libraries budget is prorated and each College is allocated an amount that represents its portion. For the purpose s of transparency the funds are first credited to each College and then immediately debited to establish the Libraries budget. 1. Strategic Value of the Smathers Librar ie s More than any other campus e nterprise, the Libraries embod y the distinct characteristics of the university and its m ission across all disciplines: to develop the human intellect through teaching and learning and to contribute through research to the expanding body of huma n knowledge. While the nature of libraries has changed in the current digital environme nt, this core mission has not: The George A. Smathers Libraries are dedicated to supporting the universitys threefold mission of teaching, research, and service. The Libraries co ntinue to adjust services and facilities to create supportive learning environments for students and to provide teaching and research support for faculty through: Offering t echnologically sophisticated learning and research commons on campus and hosting e quivalent virtual environments for remote access ; Conducting i nformation literacy programs to enable students to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use it effectively as well as providing other subject spec ific instruction ; Integrating library materials and services into the course management system; Providing a wide range of scholarly resources in print and electronic formats to support the full range of research and academic programs at the university; Di gitizing unique research materials and collaborating in digital scholarship ; and Operating the institutional repository as a permanent portal to access the digital scholarly output of UF students and faculty

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Page 2 As library services are integrated into the information infrastructure of the university, the Libraries become a major partner in the institutional shift of res ources to support collaborative interdisciplinary teaching and research. The S mathers L i braries continue their tra ditional role in knowledge management f or the Univer s ity of Florida while expanding support for learners and scholars in a digital world. The Smathers Libraries provide a place for students to access information and to create projects and presentations for their coursework, updating t echnology as often as feasible to provide fast, reliable access. The library is a welcoming, comfortable, and functional meeting place. As books and journals become available electronically, space is reconfigured to serve learning through information commons with high end computing and production software, as well as for group and indivi dual study space s Library staff and library designed interfaces provide personalized service through inhouse circulation and reference services as well as chat and e mail reference and electronic library guides. In Library West graduate students have an entire floor designated for their exclusive use. The Libraries strong focus on customer service is flexible and changing as service desks are consolidated and staff is de ployed to engage library users, either in person or virtually. Librarians teach students how to find reliable information and use it effectively. T hey are becoming increasingly integrated into the curricula by working with academic faculty in curricul um planning and teaching. The Libraries are working to achieve seamless integration of library resources and instruction into the curriculum shifting resources significantly toward digital material rather than print or analog, selecting information resources learners can trust and making the resources as mobile and portable as possible, including availability through handheld devices. The Smathers L ibraries operate a n institutional repository (IR@UF) as a portal for archiving and accessing digital scholarl y and institutional information. Users can search across all materials in the repository simultaneously as well as submit their own documents to the repository. The Libraries are a key component of the open access movement on campus, and an important campus resource for fair use, intellectual property, privacy, confidentiality, intellectual freedom and information policy issues. These are roles the Libraries currently assume in support of scholarly research and publishing, but new roles are under active investigation: embedding library content, services and librarians within researchers' regular workflows, redefining reference services as research consultation, and engaging researchers in the identification of primary research data sets that merit long term preservation and access. In the midst of rapid and often unpredictable change, the Smathers Libraries remain a critical partner in the research enterprise by anticipating, understanding, and addressing the challenges and opportunities inherent in new rese arch practices. At UF, the L ibraries fill the role of the intellectual ombudsman as they bring disciplines together in a rapidly c hanging environment. By t eaching information literacy, hosting digital content, and providing technology and research consult ation, the Libraries offer

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Page 3 learners and researchers venues to explore the breadth and depth of information and to create new knowledge. The Libraries provide mechanisms for engaging in intellectual content and instruction for developin g information literac y skills. Libraries organize and preserve stored information and serve as the steward of the ins titutional record and culture. The library is the place where learning and research are unrestrained by disciplinary boundaries. The Health Science Center Libr aries The mission of the HSCL is to serve the information needs of the six colleges of Health Science Center as well as the affiliated hospitals, clinics and research centers Like the University Librarie s the HSCL assist the colleges in fulfilling their educati onal and research mission by obtaining high quality information resources in all formats although the preferred format is digital when that is available and affordable; offering searching and information management expertise ; and providing instruc tion to facilitate the acquisition of information literacy and lifetime learning skills. The Health Science Center is charged with both clinical and community outreach missions, which the HSCL actively support The HSCL employ liaison librarians to suppor t the specific information needs of the six colleges. Liaison librarians are the personal librarians for the students, faculty, researchers, clinicians, staff and administrators of the Health Science Center These l iaison librarians work with faculty to embed information lite racy and access to high quality information resour ces into the curriculum They also: S erve as members of collegelevel curriculum committees ; T each classes and workshops on informationrelated tools and resources ; P rovide house cal l information services to faculty research er s, and clinicians and in depth information consultations for library users both in person and virtually; C reate online tutorials and subject guides for the various disciplines ; S elect and acquire materials for purchase or license by libraries to support the full range of disciplines and research of the Health Science Center ; and P lan new initiatives based on need. In addition to primary liaison services, the HSCL offer other specialized services The Clinical Research Librarian works closely with clinical and translational researchers, in particular, those involved in the universitys Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI ) serving as a critical bridge between the clinical and research enterprise. The Consumer Health and Community Engagement Librarian delivers information to students and faculty, providing them with the skill sets require d to identify and evaluate such information in order to share it with their patients The Clinical Librarian at the Borland Library in Jacksonville provides information at the point of care.

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Page 4 2. Objectives In fulfilling our mission, the Smathers Libraries objectives are to : Provide greater access to electronic collections while continuing to build and improve access to collections in all formats to meet the increasingly interdisciplinary research clinical and teaching needs of the university ; Support the academic success and develop the information literacy of an increasingly diverse student population; Repurpose spaces for study and collaboration in library buildings allowing students to work individually or in groups in an efficient, safe environment ; Expand technology and user services to enhance access to library resources for both on campus and remote patrons ; Support graduate student and faculty research needs through digitization of research materials, expanded liaison programs, and improved access to scholarly publishing ; and Build a system of data curation to support faculty in fulfilling federal mandates and enhancing curation and accessibility of their research product Additional objectives specific to the Health Science Center Libraries include: Partner with the universitys CTSI program to accelerate the delivery of the researchers work to the clin ician and then to the community, and if warr anted, back to the researcher; Serve as the bridge that unites the clinical, research, education and outrea ch missions of the university by providing high quality information resources, offering searching and in formation management expertise and distributing digital information through avenues such as the Institutional Repository; Support the clinical enterprise by providing specialized services such as assistance in the creation of systematic reviews, which are essenti al to evidence based practice; and Provide health literacy services in the community through the HSCL consumer health and outreach. 3. Organization The George A. Smathers Libraries are organized into three major divisions. From left to right on t he organization chart provided below, the divisions are Scholarly Resources and Research Services; Technology and Support Services; and the Health Science Center Libraries. In addition, there are Administrative Support Units and Programs, including the Off ice of the Dean; Administrative Services and Faculty Affairs ; and Development and Advancement. The organization chart for the Libraries, with faculty and staff FTE counts as of December 2012, is presented on the following page

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Page 6 The staff of the Librari es consists of 86 library faculty; 170 professional, technical and clerical staff; 13 Other Personal Services (OPS) staff; and 149 student assistants. Librarians at the University of Florida are tenure accruing faculty. All have terminal degrees in Libr ary Science or Information Studies, and/or a graduate degree in a relevant subject area. Some teach for credit courses and they often provide instruction and learning aids that are incorporated into courses The l ibrary faculty serves the university community in the following roles: General and specialized reference experts ; Faculty and department liaisons and outreach coordinators ; Instruct ors as part of c ourses workshops and/or personalized one onone sessions; Collection managers and curators ; Preserv ation, catalog ing acquisition and digitization experts ; Clinical research liaisons ; and Principle investigators and grant participants 4. Services The George A. Smathers Libraries provide a great variety of services in support of teaching and learning, a s well as research and scholarship. The table below provides a listing of essential services along with annual usage statistics where possible. Although the list is not exhaustive it gives an idea of the breadth and depth of services offered by the Librari es to University of Florida staff, students and faculty. Service Usage statistic s Accessibility for general library usage and study Over 3 million people annually Staff service points for information reference and circulation 17 service points Face to face reference service 19,483 consultations Virtual reference services (chat and e mail) 7,326 sessions Circulation of library materials 699,440 items Borrow books and articles for UF patrons 20,820 items Loan books and articles to others 26,444 items

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Page 7 Service, continued Usage statistic s continued Provide a d iscovery tool for searches across databases and other resources 637,182 searches Purchase databases for access to electronic content 889 databases Number of searche s by library users 2,566,935 searches Number of full text articles retrieved 2,577,085 articles Study space, group study, and computer access across campus Seating for individual study 4 452 seats Group study rooms 56 rooms Instruction labs 6 lab s w/103 computers General use computers 314 computers Computers with high end software 30 computers Microform computers/printers /viewers 16 machines Netbooks and iPads available for checkout 80 Netbooks and iPads Scanners 34 scanners Media production rooms for student use 2 rooms Presentations to groups for library orientation/instruction 977 sessions 23,423 attendees Copyright consultations 93 consultations Reserve materials for individual courses 15,766 items Digitized library cont ent for increased access 870,736 new pages / y ea r 8,115,477 pages total Provide access to print and electronic journals 141,195 titles Provide research guides by subject and course ( LibGuides ) 423 by subject 75 by course

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Page 8 5. 2013 -2014 Budget Scen ario s 2013-2014 Projected Annual Uses of Funds Statement: Smathers Libraries A summary of the 20132014 Budget Sce n a rios for the entire Smathers Libraries is provided in the table immediately below. Flat 5% Cut Optimal Faculty Salaries and Benefits $ 7,169,705 $7,169,705 $7,628,565 TEAMS/USPS Salaries and Benefits $8,645,810 $8,645,810 $8,894,095 Other Personal Services $358,527 $358,527 $358,527 Other Operating Expenses $1,754,260 $1,754,260 $2,691,583 Library Resources $8,671,447 $7,356,460 $12,4 71,447 Total Expense $26,599,749 $25,284,762 $32,044,217 The official submission for the budget for the Smathers Libraries is reported to the university in three segments: University Libraries, Health Science Center Libraries and Administration. A summ ary of the 2013 2014 Budget Scenarios for each of these units, along with explanatory notes, is provided separately in the tables below and in more detail in Sections 6, 7 and 8. 2013-2014 Projected Annual Uses of Funds Statement: University Libraries Flat 5% Cut Optimal Faculty Salaries and Benefits $4,818,991 $4,818,991 $4,999,342 TEAMS/USPS Salaries and Benefits $5,919,661 $5,919,661 $6,167,946 Other Personal Services $297,214 $297,214 $297,214 Other Operating Expenses $1,575,036 $1,575,036 $2,30 1,726 Library Resources $7,119,810 $5,994,719 $10,083,810 Total Expense $19,730,712 $18,605,621 $23,850,038 5% Cut Scenario Includes : $1,125,091 cut to Library Resources Optimal Scenario Includes : $180,351 increase in Faculty Salaries and Benefits f or 1 African America Collection curator and 2 Liaison Librarians (Physics and Animal Sciences) $248,285 increase in TEAMS/USPS Salaries and Benefits for 2 IT Experts and 2 Political Papers and Special Collections Archivists $726,690 increase in Operating Expense for Repairs and Maintenance $2,964,000 increase in Library Resources to Restore Lost Buying Power

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Page 9 2013-2014 Projected Annual Uses of Funds Statement: Health Science Center Libraries Flat 5% Cut Optimal Faculty Salaries and Benefits $957,266 $957,266 $1,160,538 TEAMS/USPS Salaries and Benefits $1,295,389 $1,295,389 $1,295,389 Other Personal Services $61,313 $61,313 $61,313 Other Operating Expenses $179,224 $179,224 $289,857 Library Resources $1,551,637 $1,361,741 $2,387,637 Total Expense $4,044,829 $3,854,933 $5,194,735 Flat Scenario Includes: $300,000 preapproved increase to 2013 2014 base (applied to Library Resources) 5% Cut Scenario Includes: $189,896 cut to Library Resources Optimal Scenario Includes: $203,273 increase in Faculty Salaries and Benefits for 2 Clinical Librarians and 1 BioInformatics Librarian $110,633 increase in Operating Expense for Repairs and Maintenance $836,000 increase in Library Resources to Restore Lost Buying Power 2013-2014 Projecte d Annual Uses of Funds Statement: Administration (Inclusive of Acquisitions and Interim Storage Facility) Flat 5% Cut Optimal Faculty Salaries and Benefits $1,393,448 $1,393,448 $1,468,685 TEAMS/USPS Salaries and Benefits $1,430,760 $1,430,760 $1 ,430,760 Other Operating Expenses $100,000 Total Expense $2,824,207 $2,824,207 $2,999,444 Optimal Scenario Includes: $75,237 increase in Faculty Salaries and Benefits for 1 Data Curation Librarian $100,000 increase in Operating Expense for re curring funding for the UF Open Access Publishing Fund

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Page 10 Pre-Approved Increases in the Libraries RCM Base Budget The Senior Vice President for Health Affairs has pre approved an increase of $300,000 in recurring funds to the HSCL RCM base budget effective FY 20132014. This increase is being applied to the M aterials budget of the HSCL .

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Page 11 6. Smathers Libraries 2013 -2014 Budget With Flat Funding Flat Funding Smathers Libraries $26,599,748 The George A. Smathers Libraries have two main components unde r RCM, the Health Science Center Libraries (HSCL) and the University Libraries (UL). Under RCM, the HSCL is funded through units of the Health Sciences Center. The University Libraries are funded through the universitys other academic and research units, with the exception of the Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center which is supported by the Levin College of Law and, therefore, not included in this review For the purpose of this RCM review the Smathers Libraries are presented in a combined budget, but where appropriate, the data is also reported separately for the two components. The budgets of the Libraries, particularly the HSCL, are inadequate to maintain its facilities and address patron needs for materials and services Price increases well above the rate of inflation chronically deplete buying power for library materials. In 2012 2013, the Libraries received a 5% budget decrease, resulting in the closure of the Music and Journalism branch libraries and the elimination of other positions This cut eliminated the strategic accumulation of salary savings which has historically been used to cover inadequacies in the O perations and Materials budget s As a result in planning for a flat budget for 20132014, operations through continued underfunding an d, to an even greater extent, collections through reductions in content, are negatively impacted The Materials Budget Cumulative Lost Buying Power: Despite protecting the Materials budget through the past budget reductions, lost buying power due to high rate increases for library materials, which will total over $550,000 in 20132014 alone, is extremely problematic. The 20132014 erosion will be in addition to $1.07 million in lost buying power from 20112012 and 20122013 as shown in the table bel ow. Fiscal Year Materials Inflation Rate Lost Buying Power Cumulative Loss 2011 2012 4.78 % $ 530,664 2012 2013 4.84 % $ 540,693 $ 1,071,357 2013 2014 4.82% $554, 721 $ 1,626,080 As a result of this chronic situation the Libraries have had no opportunity to maintain, much less develop, suitable collections. The Libraries are unable to purchase and licens e the range of print and electronic resources which are core to an academic librarys capacity to support a research enterprise with the breadth and dept h of this university The impact of this has spanned the Smathers Libraries, affecting support for all disciplines

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Page 12 20132014 Effect from Lost Buying Power : The lost buying power for 20112012 and 20122013 materials were covered using one time funding f rom salar y s avings Since that was unsustainable funding, in 20132014 the Libraries will experience the cumulative effects of three years of lost buying power. The distribution of that lost buying power between the University Libraries and the HSCL is r eflected in the following table: UL HSCL Smathers Lost buying power 2011 2012 $ 428,927 $ 101,737 $5 30,664 Lost buying power 2012 2013 $ 444,226 $ 96,467 $ 540,693 Lost buying power 2013 2014 $452,523 $102,200 $554,723 Total: $1,325,676 $300,404 $1,626,08 0 As a result, a flat budget in 20132014 will actually equate to a $1,626,080 decrease in the Libraries ability to purchase materials ( notwithstanding the authorized $300,000 increase for the HSCL described above in Section 5). To sustain the current resources for our faculty and students, the Materials budget need s to be increased to $10,252,887. R epresentation s of the M aterials budget s for the Smathers system, University Libraries and HSCL with lost buying power restored are provided in the following three charts :

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Page 14 Though the lost buying power impacts the entire Materials budget, a substantial portion of the Electronic Resources budget is for materials licensed and purchased in large journal packages.1 The loss of any one of the major journal packages would result in the loss of access to hundreds of journals titles cutting deeply into a core journal collection us ed extensively by our students and faculty. Print monographs and print serials will also be at risk as we attempt to accommodate the continued erosion of buying power In the event of a flat Materials budget for the Smathers Libraries the cuts resulting from cumulative lost buying power might be implemented as follows: Fund UL Cut HSCL Cut Total Cut E Resources $516,000 $ 300,000 $ 816,000 Print Serials $480,000 $480,000 Print Monographs $330,000 $330,000 Total: $1,326,000 $ 300,000 $1,626,000 While it is tempting to declare electronic resources the wave of the future, and print resources unnecessary, many books and serials in the humanities and social sciences have not yet made the transition to electronic access, and a deep cut in the print resources would greatly endanger the Libraries ability to maintain a research collection and to serve students, faculty and researchers i n those areas. The HSCL has already eliminated all print spending, so will only be able to take cuts from E Resources. The University Libraries must still purchase monographs and print serials Even if this was not the case the two print budgets together are insufficient to accommodate the entire erosion in buying power Many of the electronic resources provided by the Libraries are only affordable when purchased in bundled packages. To make up a deficit of this magnitude the Libraries would most likely need to cancel a major journal package such as Elsevier, Wiley, or Springer which would similarly threaten the Libraries ability to provide access to research materials needed by the sciences. Based on all of the above, the Libraries would need to balanc e this effects of this major deficit between print and electronic resources in an attempt to address the research needs of th e whole university community It would require elimination of approximately 10% of electronic resources and 40% each for print seri als and print monographs. This is a devastating cut, reducing the buying power of the appropriated funds available to support the Materials budget by more than 15% To identify exactly how the cuts would be accomplished liaison librarians would work closel y with academic faculty and units on final decisions. The following list is a sample of the type of materials that might be cut in addition to the acquisition of 40% fewer monographs and print serials : American Physical Society journal package 1 These materials are often acquired through consortia and involve multi year contracts. However, in anticipation of this lack of funding for the collections budget in 2013 2014 the Libraries signed no multi year contracts for major journal packages in 2012 2013.

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Page 15 American Society of Civil Engineers journal package CAB abstracts Digital Campus Emerald Full Text EBMR (Evidence Based Medicine Reviews) Journal Citation Reports Web Karger Publishing Package s ample titles American Journal of Nephrology Cytogenetic and Genome Re search Lippincott Wilkins a nd Williams Publisher Package s ample titles: Academic Medicine American Journal of Nursing Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise Neurosurgery Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery Spine Mary Ann Liebert Publisher Package sample t i tles: Human Gene Therapy Journal of Neurotrauma Mental Measurements Yearbook National Research Council of Canada journal package Optics infobase Oxford University Press journals PsycArticles PsycBooks Royal Society of Chemistry journal package Science Online Springer Protocols Current Content STAT! Ref Thieme Publisher Package The Sciences and Health Sciences are heavily dependent on electronic access and would be deeply impacted by these losses. Again, liaison librarians would work in direct consultat ion wi th academic faculty to identify the actual databases and journal packages to be eliminated. To summarize, by 20132014, the cumulative lost buying power even with a n otherwise flat budget will further compromise a Materials budget already weak ened by budget cuts in the last two years and the continuing loss of buying power To sustain the current resources for our faculty and students, the Materials budget needs to be increased to $10,252,887. The Salary Budget The Libraries have hired conservat ively for several years using funding f rom key vacant positions rather than applying budget cuts to the Materials budget Last year, with the 5% budget

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Page 16 cut the Libraries eliminated several staff positions primarily through the closure of the Journalism a nd Music branch libraries With these losses the Libraries remain understaffed to provide core services. In the event of a flat budget the Smathers Libraries, will continue to fill a small number of critical vacancies, with particular emphasis on subject specialists and liaisons with academic departments, in order to restore essential services for faculty and students but will not accumulate salary savings in support of the Materials budget The Operations Budget Maintenance of Public Space in the Libraries : The library facilities are extensive (nearly 475,000 square feet of usable space, containing 3,800 upholstered chairs, and over 41,000 square feet of shelving for materials) and amongst the most heavily used on campus ( 3 million in person visitors each year) Student spaces include open areas, restricted study graduate student areas, group meeting rooms and individual study carrels. The current funding for operations is inadequate to maintain these spaces and the amount of upkeep services provided b y UF Physical Plant has been historically inadequate and is now further reduced. While the Libraries attempt to mitigate the impact, the students and researchers suffer from unclean and inadequately maintained facilities and the lack of periodic cleaning o f the shelving damages the library materials over time. The current O perations budget permits limited repainting and cleaning of upholstery, primarily to address extreme situations. It does not allow for routine, scheduled cleaning and maintenance of publ ic spaces. With a flat budget for 20132014, t he estimated shortfall in annual expenses required for maintenance is $837,323. Technology : The L ibraries are technology hubs All equipment is supported by the University Libraries and HSCL i nformation t echn ology hardware s upport unit s Additionally, t he Libraries utilize over 90 terabytes of server space for archival and operational purposes. Based on volume increases for digital collections, including the addition of electronic theses and dissertations, cos ts are expected to rise in successive years. The Libraries also maintain the largest number of public workstations on campus Despite these commitments, the Libraries receive no centralized IT funding. The costs for these services pose a challeng e for the university and given the strains on the Libraries Staffing and Materials budgets may prove unsustainable. Pre-Approved Increases in the Libraries RCM Base As noted in Section 5 above the Senior Vice President for Health Affairs has preapproved an in crease of $300,000 in recurring funds to the Libraries RCM base budget effective FY 20132014. This increase is being applied to the Materials budget of the HSCL

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Page 17 7. Smathers Libraries 2013 -2014 Budget With 5% Less Funding 5% Less Funding Smathers Libr aries ( $1.31 Million ) The George A. Smathers Libraries have two main components under RCM, the Health Science Center Libraries (HSCL) and the University Libraries (UL). Under RCM, the HSCL is funded through units of the Health Sciences Center. The Uni versity Libraries are funded through the university s other academic and research units, with the exception of the Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center which is supported by the Levin College of Law and, therefore, not included in this review For the pu rpose of this RCM review the Smathers Libraries are presented in a combined budget, but where appropriate, the data is also reported separately for the two components In 2012 2013 the Libraries received a 5% budget cut This was accomplished by closing two branches (Music and Journalism), and eliminating staff positions in addition to making a relatively small cut in the Materials budget As a result of the branch closures and staff cuts the Libraries are well below optimal staffing to maintain even cor e services for the staff, students and faculty of the university Therefore, a 5% budget cut in 20132014 would by necessity be applied to the Materials budget Combined with multiple years of cumulative lost buying power described in the Flat Budget scen ario above this cut would be a devastating blow to the ability of the Libraries to support teaching and research and the effects would be felt throughout the university. The Materials Budget In the event of a 5% cut the proposed reductions in the Materials budget for 20132014, and the result s of lost buying power, are: UL HSCL Smathers Lost buying power 2011 2012 $428,927 $101,737 $530,664 Lost buying power 2012 2013 $444,226 $96,467 $540,693 Lost buying power 2013 2014 $452,523 $102,200 $554,723 5% budget cut $1,125,091 $189,896 $1,31 4 987 Total: $2,450,767 $490,300 $ 2,9 41 ,0 67 As a result, a 5% budget cut in 20132014 will actually equate to a $2,941,067 decrease in the Libraries ability to purchase materials ( notwithstanding the authorized $300,000 increase for the HSCL described above in Section 5). To sustain the current resources for our faculty and students, the Materials budget need s to be increased to $10,252,887. Representations of the Materials budgets for the Smathers system, Univ ersity Libraries and HSCL with lost buying power restored are provided in the following three charts:

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Page 19 The likely application of these reductions by material type is represented in the table below: Fund UL Cut HSCL Cut Total Cut E Resources $1, 2 30 ,000 $500,000 $1,716,000 Print Serials $720,000 $720,000 Print Monographs $500,000 $500,000 Total: $2,4 50 ,000 $500,000 $2,9 50 ,000 As in the flat budget scenario the University Libraries would attempt to distribute the additional cut between E R esources, and print serials and monographs. The HSCL eliminated all print purchasing in last years budget reduction, so their cut would have to come from electronic resources. With a $1.31 million overall reduction on top of the lost buying power two thi rds of the remaining allocation for print serials and monograph would be eliminate d, mak ing it impossible for the Libraries to maintain the print collections necessary to support a top research university Further, the substantial cut in E R esources will b e impossible to implement without cutting a major journal package. Three of the major journal packages, Elsevier, Wiley, and Springer were all up for renewal on multi year contracts, but the Libraries deferred instead signing only one year contracts, sin ce a cut of this size would require the cancellation of one of these packages. As in the flat budget scenario liaison librarians, acquisitions staff and academic faculty would work together to determine which materials would be cut In addition to a sub stantial reduction in purchasing and subscribing to monographs and print serials, the following list is a sample of the type of titles that might be cut including one of the large journal packages :

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Page 20 Elsevier Science Direct journal package Springer journal package Wiley journal package American Physical Society journal package American Society of Civil Engineers journal package CAB abstracts Digital Campus Emerald Full Text EBMR (Evidence Based Medicine Reviews) Journal Citation Reports Web Karger Publishing Package s ample titles American Journal of Nephrology Cytogenetic and Genome Research Lippincott Wilkins a nd Williams Publisher Package s ample titles: Academic Medicine American Journal of Nursing Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise Neurosurgery P lastic & Reconstructive Surgery Spine Mary Ann Liebert Publisher Package sample t itles: Human Gene Therapy Journal of Neurotrauma Mental Measurements Yearbook National Research Council of Canada journal package Optics infobase Oxford University Press journals PsycBooks Royal Society of Chemistry journal package Science Online Springer Protocols Current Content STAT! Ref Thieme Publisher Package sample t itles Seminars in Respiratory & Critical Care Synlett Synthesis To summarize, the impacts to materia ls of a 5% library budget cut, when combined with the cumulative lost buying power, would result in a loss of nearly three million dollars from a Materials budget already weakened by prior lost buying power and budget cuts To sustain the current resources for our faculty and students, the Materials budget needs to be increased to $10,252,887.

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Page 21 The Salary Budget In 2011 2012, the Libraries received a 5% budget cut, resulting in the clos ure of two branches and the elimination of staff positions As a result of this and historic underfunding for staffing, the Libraries are well below optimal staffing to maintain even core services for the staff, students and faculty of the university Accordingly, no cuts are currently proposed to the S alary budget. The Oper ations Budget Maintenance of Public Space in the Libraries: The library facilities are extensive and amongst the most heavily used on campus. The current funding for operations is inadequate to maintain these facilities and the amount of upkeep services provided by UF Physical Plant has been historically inadequate and is now further reduced. While the Libraries attempt to mitigate the impact, the students and researchers suffer from unclean and inadequately maintained facilities and the lack of periodic cleaning of the shelving damages the library materials over time. The current Operations budget permits limited repainting and cleaning of upholstery, primarily to address extreme situations. Accordingly, no cuts are currently proposed to the Operations budget. Technology : The Libraries are technology hubs All equipment is supported by the University Libraries and HSCL i nformation t echnology hardware s upport unit s The Libraries maintain the largest number of public workstations on campus, but receive no centralized IT funding. Due to inadequate current funding, no cuts are proposed to the technology funding Pre-Approved Increases in the Libraries RCM Base As noted in Section 5 above, t he Senior Vice President for Health Affairs has preapproved an inc rease of $300,000 in recurring funds to the Libraries RCM base budget effective FY 20132014. This increase is being applied to the Materials budget of the HSCL

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Page 22 8. Smathers Libraries 2013 -2014 Budget With Increased Funding Increased Funding Smathers L ibraries: Recurring: $5,444,468 The George A. Smathers Libraries have two main components under RCM, the Health Science Center Libraries (HSCL) and the University Libraries (UL). Under RCM, the HSCL is funded through units of the Health Sciences Center The University Libraries are funded through the universitys other academic and research units, with the exception of the Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center which is supported by the Levin College of Law and, therefore, not included in this review F or the purpose of this RCM review the Smathers Libraries are presented in a combined budget, but where appropriate, the data is also reported separately for the two components. The budgets of the Libraries, particularly the HSCL, are inadequate to manag e its facilities and address patron needs for materials and services. Price increases well above the rate of inflation chronically deplete buying power for library materials. Accordingly, when modeling for an improved budget for the next fiscal year, fundi ng for both materials and library faculty and staff positions are identified for significant increases in investment. The Materials Budget Cumulative Lost Buying Power: Decreasing and tightly constrained budgets combined with high rate increases for a cademic journals and other library materials have caused the Libraries to lose nearly $4 million in buying power since 2007 2008. Fiscal Year Materials Inflation Rate Lost Buying Power Cumulative Loss 2007 2008 4.68% $485,841 $485,841 2008 2009 6.32% $ 672,756 $1,158,597 2009 2010 3.74% $386,189 $1,544,786 2010 2011 5. 69 % $ 635,231 $2,1 80 017 2011 2012 4.78 % $ 530,664 $2, 710,681 2012 2013 4.84 % $ 540,693 $3, 251,374 2013 2014 4.82% $554,723 $3,806,097 As a result the Libraries have had no opportunity to maintain, much less develop, suitable collections to meet the needs of our faculty and students The Libraries are unable to purchase and licens e the range of print and electronic resources necessary to support a research enterprise with the breadth and depth of t his univer sity The impact of this spans the Smathers Libraries, affecting all disciplines

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Page 23 This lost buying power should be restored by increasing the Libraries base budget for materials. The restored materials funding would be allocated across material types in the following proportions : P roposed Recurring Expenses: The f unding would be used to maintain crucial current journal packages as well as for new and retroactive purchasing and licensing to restore the collection to the depth it would currently have if the Materials budget had been increased to cover lost buying power each year since 2007. A large increase is projected for electronic journals since journal publication remains at the core of research investigation and dissemination s o it is essential that researchers across the university have access to a broad, diverse and current collection. E books are core to scientific research and are becoming increasingly important in both the Humanities and Social Sciences. Databases provide aggregation of additional journals and research publications and back files provide depth. Although back files are one time purchases, the Libraries have had so little opportunity to build collections that back files will require years of funding to build a collection worthy of a highly ranked institution, therefore it should be include d as recurring funding. Planned growth in funding for materials is needed to maintain the buying power once restored and provide for an increased Materials budget over time to allow the Libraries to address the evolving needs of the academic and research units. Future needs for sustainable funding for materials beyond 20122013 are addressed below in Section 6: Alternative Funding for the Libraries The following are examples of how the restored materials funding would be spent in 20122013. Journals A void cancellation or reduction in available titles from the Elsevier Science Direct, Springer or Wiley journal package s Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation Cell Cycle Chinese Academic Journals/Century Journals Project Endocrine Practice Gastrointestina l Endoscopy Clinics of North America HFSP Journal Immunologic Research International Journal of pharmaceutical compounding Fund Increase Databases 1,000,000 E Journals 1,800,000 E Books $500,000 Print Monographs $200,000 Electronic Back files $300,000 Total $3,80 0,000

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Page 24 International Review of Cytology Journal of American Academy of Audiology Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Journal of Clinical Psychiatry Journal of Knee Surgery Journal of Neuroradiology Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Journal of Visualization Journal of Visualized Experiments Neurocritic al Care Neuropsychopharmacology Pink Sheet: Prescription pharmaceuticals and biotechnology Reviews in the Neurosciences Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice Databases ArtBibliographies Modern Black Abolitionist Papers Cabell's Directory of Educational Curriculum and Methods Cabell's Directory of Education Psycholo gy and Administration Cabell's Directory of Educational Technology and Library Science Classical Scores Library Congressional Research Digital Collection Counseling and Therapy in Video Current Protocols in Cytometry Current Protocols in Human Genetics C urrent Protocols in Immunology Current Protocols in Microbiology Current Protocols in Nucleic Acid Chemistry Current Protocols in Pharmacology Current Protocols in Stem Cell Biology Current Protocols in Toxicology Design and Applied Arts Index Dynamed Ear ly European Books EdITLib (Education & Information Technology Digital Library Education in Video (Alexander Street Press) Embase Emedicine Facts and Comparisons Online Faculty of 1000 Medicine FirstConsult

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Page 25 Gideon Global GIS Database Goldfranks Toxicologi c Emergencies Handbook of Injectable Drugs Harrison's Practice Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) JAMAEvidence Lexicomp MADCAD Materials Connexion Medicine Complete Micromedex Mosby's Nursing Consult NAXOS streaming audio Newsbank Access World News Research Collection Opera in Video Oxford University Press Archives Medicine Oxford University Press Archives Science Pediatric Care Online Pharmacy Library Procedures Consult Proquest Historic Newspapers RISM RIPM Scopus Up to Date Video on Demand through Films for the Humanities VisualDX Books Springer E Book annual packages Faculty driven monograph acquisition print and electronic Access Emergency Medicine Briggs: Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation Comprehensive Heterocyclic Chemistry III Encyclopedia of Biostatistics Foundation in Diagnostic Pathology Medicine and Dentistry Neuroscience Peer VII Physicians Evaluation and Educational Review in Emergency Medicine RedBook Online Synthesis Lectures, collection 4 Back Files Elsevier journal back files

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Page 26 Ameri can Geophysical Union Journal American Journal of Physiology (before 1997) Annals of Behavioral Medicine (earlier than 1997) Biomedical and Life Sciences Journal Chemical Engineering Journal Chemistry and Materials Science Journal Computer Science Journal Earth & Environmental Science Journal Earth and Planetary Sciences Journal Energy and Power Journal Engineering Journal High Energy/Nuclear Physics and Astronomy Journal Inorganic Chemistry Journal Journal of Chemical Ecology (earlier than 1997) JSTOR Arts & Sciences VI JSTOR Arts & Sciences VIII JSTOR Arts & Sciences IX JSTOR Business III LWW Nursing Archive Materials Science Journal Mathematics Journal Neuroscience Journal Physical and Analytical Chemistry Journal Physics and Astronomy Jour nal Times Literary Supplement Historical Archive 1902 2005 Sage Journal Back files Restoring this funding to the Libraries would strengthen the university s infrastructure and help increase its standing in the academic and research communities Offering faculty, students, researchers and clinicians anywhere and anytime access to information enhances their ability to carry out the universitys goals. Access to information plays a strategic role in a number of the universitys key activities including succe ssful research quality health care and increased patient safety as well as distance learning a nd other educational initiatives a nd the establishment of new programs. It is well documented that we are experiencing an explosion of information and it is the librarys role to deliver the most current and relevant information available, which in turn allows the university to fulfill its mission. Lost buying power and flat Materials budget s have hampered the ability of the Libraries to support these academic and research endeavors. The Salary Budget The Libraries have hired only critical positions for years applied budget cuts disproportionately to salary funding, and used funding from key vacant positions rather than making cuts in the Materials budget Last year, the Libraries took further cuts in staff positions to achieve the 5% cut. As a result, the Libraries remain understaffed to provide core services. A variety of positions are needed to bring the Libraries to full service a level permitting the appropriate support of the

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Page 27 universitys academic and research missions. The most critical of these requirements are represented by the positions proposed below. Proposed Recurring Expenses: UL HSCL Smathers Total $503,873 $203,273 $707,146 The application of these increases is represented in the table below: Additional recurring positions needed to bring the Li braries up to a full service staff: African American Collection curator supporting the new major in African American studies (1 faculty) Liaison librarians for underserved colleges and departments : Physics and Animal Sciences ( 2 faculty) Bio informatics L ibrarian supporting the scientific intersection of biology, computer science, and information technology (1 faculty) Clinical librarian s at H ealth Science center in Gainesville and Shands Jacksonville delivering information resources services directly to the point of care to f acilitate effective decision making ( 2 faculty) Data Curation Librarian to identify, store, describe (curate), retrieve, and re use data, particularly data not available in public or government repositories This is comparable to the program at Johns Hopkins University Libraries Digital Research and Curation Center ( http://ldp.library.jhu.edu/dkc ), providing support for researchers in meeting federal mandates and enhancing curation and accessibility of their res earch product. (1 faculty) IT Expert s to develop software applications to increase the accessibility of library materials ( 2 staff) Political Papers and Special Collections Archivist to process and make available these unique and valuable collections which are underutilized due to the limited accessibility (2 staff) The Operations Budget University of Florida Open-Access Publishing Fund: The University of Florida OpenAccess Publishing (UFOAP) Fund supports the goal of making UF research finding s immediately, freely and globally available. When funds are not available from other sources, the UFOAP Fund will assist UF authors by paying reasonable article processing fees for publishing in open access journals and for a portion of paid access fees Faculty 7 $ 458,861 Staff 4 $248,285 Total: 11 $ 707,146 *Includes benefits

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Page 28 charged by other publishers. Articles that comply with the eligibility criteria will be funded on a first come, first served basis. The UFOAP Fund was established with non recurring funds at the direction of the Provost as a test of concept. The program has proven popular and successful. In order to sustain the program, the Libraries require $100,000 in recurring funding for O pen A ccess support Maintenance of Public Space in the Libraries: The library facilities are extensive (nearly 475,000 square feet of usable sp ace, containing 3,800 upholstered chairs, and over 41,000 square feet of shelving for materials) and amongst the most heavily used on campus ( 3 million in person visitors each year) Student spaces include open areas, group meeting rooms individual study carrels and e xclusive graduate student study areas The current funding for operations is inadequate to maintain these spaces and the amount of upkeep services provided by UF Physical Plant has been historically inadequate and its services have been furth er reduced by budget changes The Libraries major needs include: Rotating repair and painting of walls with an average service of once every 5 years ( $712,272) Upholstery cleaning for public seating with an average service every other year ( $28,163 ) She lving and materials to be dusted and cleaned once per year ( $96,888) Increased recurring funding would be used to paint and repair walls, clean upholstery, and dust and clean library stacks. None of this upkeep is funded or routinely handled at present. The estimated annual expense for this is $837,323. Proposed Recurring Expenses: UL HSCL Smathers Total $726,690 $110,633 $837,323

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Page 29 9. Additional Sources of Funding for the Libraries In order to expand library services to support the full breadth and depth of this university, the Libraries need additional sources of funding to supplement the amount available from appropriated funds. This is particularly important for the Materials budget which continues to be eroded by lost buy ing power when the Libraries should be adding content to support scholarship and research throughout the university Four altern a tives are described below Implementation of one or more of the se options would provide additional critically needed funding for the Libraries. Establish a Student Library Fee T here is currently no mechanism for expanding library funding over time other than increasing charges to the colleges A Student Library Fee, applied to student credit hours or by FTE, should be established to ensure a new and sustain able source of funding for the Libraries in addition to the appropriated funds now received. Unlike the Smathers Libraries, many academic research libraries are funded through such fees. A recent survey revealed the average and median of those fees were in excess of $10 per student credit hour (SCH). If UF were to implement a fee based on $5 per undergraduate student credit hour and $7.50 per graduate student credit hour, the funds generated would exceed $6 million per year. The Libraries feel this is a via ble source of alternative funding because of the visibility of library services and because of a growing commitment on the part of Student Government to the Libraries at UF. In fact, SG has committed to fund the additional cost required to make Library Wes t available 24 hours a day from Sunday through Thursdays. Increase Funding from the Division of Sponsored Research R esearch at UF is dependent on access to extremely expensive, but essential, scholarly resources for which the annual increases in license fees are ongoing and cumulative while the Libraries Materials budget from appropriated funds is not. Unfortunately, the Division of Sponsored Research ( DSR ) funding currently allocated is not sufficient to cover even the subscription to the most heavily used online journal package for research Elsevier Science Direct. Having DSR fully fund the Elsevier Science Direct electronic journal package would not only more appropriately reflect the Libraries contribution to sponsored research, but also allow the L i braries to increase access to other material s of significant value to researchers Dedicate a Library Allocation from the Existing Student Technology Fee The Libraries maintain the largest number of public workstations on campus, at least comparable to all of the CIRCA labs and instruction facilities, but currently receive no centralized IT funding. The Student Technology Fee is a new source of revenue for student oriented technology expenses, s o it is appropriate that a portion be allocated to the Libraries to maintain its public service technology.

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Page 30 Dedicate a Library Allocation from Annual Tuition Increases The Libraries are core to the university s academic and research enterprise. The university has had success in obtaining authorization for annual tuition increas es to correct historic underfunding and the documented disparity between UF and its peer institutions. As peer review analysis has shown the Libraries are also chronically and historically underfunded, even when considering the underfunding of the univers ity as a whole compared to its peer institutions. This compromises the Libraries ability to meet the service and information resource needs of UF students, faculty and researchers. Dedicating a portion of the additional revenue generated by the annual tuit ion increase as new recurring funding for the Libraries would benefit all campus programs by allowing for predictable growth and planned strategic investment in appropriate library services and resources Over time, this would correct the disparity in acce ss to library resources experienced by UF students, faculty and researchers compared to those at peer institutions.

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Page 31 Addendum: 2013 2014 Hyperion Submissions The tables inserted below represent the fund allocations submit ted to the University of Flor ida budget system using the Hyperion software. They are included here to document the detailed allocation of funds for each of the three budget scenarios: Working Cut ( 5%), Working Optimal (increase) and Working Flat. The system requires three separate su bmissions: University Libraries, Health Science Center Libraries, and Li br ary Administration University Libraries

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