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Diving into the Depths of Research Misconduct: Exploring Games-Based Learning in STEM Education
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00001146/00001
 Material Information
Title: Diving into the Depths of Research Misconduct: Exploring Games-Based Learning in STEM Education
Physical Description: Conference Poster
Creator: Johnson, Margeaux
Leonard, Michelle
Royster, Melody
Wrublewski, Donna
Buhler, Amy
Publication Date: 2012
 Notes
Abstract: As we dive into the murky depths of research misconduct in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines, students need to develop an understanding of complex and challenging situations surrounding plagiarism, data falsification, and data fabrication. A possible approach to teaching STEM research ethics in a flexible online environment is gaming. As part of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Ethics Education in Science and Engineering (EESE) program, the Marston Science Library at the University of Florida received a two-year grant award to create an online game (Gaming Against Plagiarism) that engages STEM graduate students with research ethics. This poster details the process of planning, designing, and developing the game, as well as the results from formative (usability testing) and summative evaluation. The Gaming Against Plagiarism (GAP) project completed development in Spring 2012 and will be made available as an open source re-source for STEM educators.
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Margeaux Johnson.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00001146:00001

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Diving into the Depths of Research Misconduct: Exploring Games Based Learning in STEM Education Margeaux Johnson Michelle Leonard Melody Royster Donna Wrublewski Amy Buhler and the GAP Team* NSF EESE 1033002 Abstract As we dive into the murky depths of research misconduct in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines, students need to develop an understanding of complex and challenging situations surrounding plagiarism, data falsification, and data fabrication. A possible approach to teaching STEM research ethics in a flexible online environment is gaming. As part of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Ethics Education in Science and Engineering (EESE) program, the Marston Science Library at the University of Florida received a two year grant award to create an online game (Gaming Against Plagiarism) that engages STEM graduate students with research ethics. This poster details the process of planning, designing, and developing the game, as well as the results from formative (usability testing) and summative evaluation. The Gaming Against Plagiarism (GAP) project completed development in Spring 2012 and will be made available as an open source resource for STEM educators. Why a Game? Gaming employs active learning on behalf of students. The instructional design of games has the potential to emphasize teaching methods grounded in constructivist approaches to learning. Unlike students in traditional classroom lectures, game players have the ability to learn at their own pace and make contextualized decisions. Furthermore, student engagement with content can be increased through gaming. Play the Game! The Games GAP consists of 3 mini games which scaffold research misconduct knowledge for STEM graduate students by developing skills and testing them in increasingly complex scenarios. \ A librarian served as the Principal Investigator for the GAP project and library involvement was essential in all 5 phases of the grant plan. Librarians were uniquely suited to contribute to the Content Development and Usability Testing Phases. Content Development: Science librarians at UF have an extensive history in providing instruction for STEM students in the area of research misconduct including face to face classes and online tutorials. Serving as the content experts, librarians played a critical role in obtaining, assessing, and analyzing the literature, STEM academic plagiarism cases, and other available plagiarism games. This information accompanied by the results of a plagiarism perceptions survey, assisted in focusing core concepts and served as the foundation for the scripts of all three games. Usability Testing: science programs allowed us to recruit diverse participants for focus groups, user tests, and other forms of formative evaluation. Content: Decide on content to be covered in game. Create pop quizzes, definitions, and case studies. Begin pre production visualization of game design. Evaluation The game evaluation phase included both summative and formative assessment to determine the overall success of the grant. The formative evaluation, which took the form of user testing examined the outcomes from game play, benefits from playing the game, and future research. Additionally, player feedback through usability testing assisted with the design and development of the games. A pre/post survey collected demographic information and KSA (knowledge, skills, and attitudes) of players regarding the content. The summative evaluation provided insight Into whether the project team accomplished the goals outlined in the grant. Cheats and Geeks Players learn about plagiarism, data falsification, and data fabrication as they compete to be the first one on campus to present their research in this electronic board game. Pop quizzes hidden on the board test basic concepts. Frenetic Filing In a race against the clock, players are challenged to review specific types of misconduct and identify them as stealing, misquoting, patchwriting, insufficient paraphrasing, self plagiarism, data falsification, or data fabrication. Correct answers earn upgrades and competitive high scores. Murky Misconduct Filling the role of a plagiarism detective, players review passages suspected of research misconduct, gather evidence, and develop a case to accuse plagiarists. *The GAP Team: Denise Bennett, Matthew Carroll, Ben DeVane, Rick Ferdig, Don McCabe, James Oliverio, and Jonathan Yuhas Bibliography: Ferdig, R. (2012) Formative and Summative Evaluation of the NSF Gaming Against Plagiarism Grant. Unpublished Report. 1 2 3 4 5 For more information about the GAP project, visit our blog: http://blogs.uflib.ufl.edu/gap Or play the game: http://uflib.ufl.edu/games/ The Grant The grant plan was divided into 5 overlapping phases with Development and Formative Evaluation as ongoing efforts throughout the grant period. Design: Develop 3 online mini game prototypes via an iterative process to incorporate feedback. Usability: Test each prototype with STEM grad students for playability and content. Evaluation: Conduct pre/post testing related to Knowledge Skills Attitudes (KSAs) at partner institutions. Implementation: Distribute completed game to partner institutions and use game at UF. Note: This game is Flash based and may be incompatible with some devices. Results A total of 68 participants in various science disciplines from 5 states took the pretest, played all three games, and took the post test. The educational consultant for the grant concluded that : 1) There was not a significant difference in learning based on pre and post test scores for the overall sample. 2) There was a significant difference in test scores between users based on their country of origin, but the responses varied greatly. Conclusion In the final report, the educational game consultant concluded area should look at long term testing of such games. Research and development would also focus on the continued impact of cultural and historical systems of understanding and addressing