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Not Just Another Pretty Reef: The Gainesville Florida Reef, a Satellite of the Worldwide Hyperbolic Crochet Coral Reef ...
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00001140/00001
 Material Information
Title: Not Just Another Pretty Reef: The Gainesville Florida Reef, a Satellite of the Worldwide Hyperbolic Crochet Coral Reef Project
Physical Description: Conference Proceedings
Creator: Annual Regional SAIL Meeting for the International Association of Aquatic and Marine Science Libraries and Information Centers (IAMSLIC), Galveston TX, April 2011 ( Conference )
Bennett, Denise ( Author, Primary )
Leonard, Michelle ( Author, Primary )
Publisher: University of Florida Libraries
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
Publication Date: 2011
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Abstract: In partnership with the Institute for Figuring, we are "crocheting a coral reef: a woolly celebration of the intersection of higher geometry and feminine handicraft, and a testimony to the disappearing wonders of the marine world." The Gainesville Florida Reef, a satellite of the Worldwide Hyperbolic Crochet Coral Reef, project not only shows the beauty of reefs but serves to: Foster scientific communication through the visual arts; Raise awareness of the fragility of our coral reefs and the entire ecosystem; Support learning by creating physical models of geometric principles; Connect several areas on campus, including fine arts, mathematics and ecology and environmental sciences through collaboration and mutual interest; Encourage local community and alumni involvement through creating, observing and learning. The Marston Science Library will host a satellite reef exhibition from April through October 2011, which will include a reception and speakers.
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Denise Bennett.
Publication Status: Unpublished
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00001140:00001

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In partnership with the Institute for Figuring, we are "crocheting a coral reef: a woolly celebration of the intersection of higher geometry and feminine handicraft, and a testimony to the disappearing wonders of the marine world." The Gainesville Florida Reef, a satellite of the Worldwide Hyperbolic Crochet Coral Reef, project not only shows the beauty of reefs but serves to: Foster scientific communication through the visual arts Raise awareness of the fragility of our coral reefs and the entire ecosystem Support learning by creating physical models of geometric principles Connect several areas on campus, including fine arts, mathematics and ecology and environmental sciences through collaboration and mutual interest Encourage local community and alumni involvement through creating, observing and learning The Marston Science Library will host a satellite reef exhibition from April through October 2011, which will include a reception and speakers. http://tinyurl.com/crochetreef Photos courtesy of Denise Bennett and Barbara Hood. Denise Bennett & Michelle Leonard Marston Science Library University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Sample corals Work as many rows or starting chains as you like; the bigger, the better! Use different colors for each row, or just for the last row. Decrease your n (inc more frequently) in the last 2 3 rows to create a slight ruffle. Add a picot trim (ch 3 between each sc) in the last row or 2 to create more ruffle. NOT JUST ANOTHER PRETTY REEF: THE GAINESVILLE FLORIDA REEF A SATELLITE OF THE WORLDWIDE HYPERBOLIC CROCHET CORAL REEF PROJECT Abstract PHASE 4 IMPLEMENTATION Oakland University Design Team develops prototypes of game for user testing/ feedback and incorporates user feedback into design. Bleached coral indicate a stressed environment. When the symbiotic algae that normally provide color to the coral are expelled, the coral themselves appear bleached. As the exhibit evolves we will pull out the brightly colored coral and leave the bleached ones on display to deliver a strong environmental message. These hyperbolic planes (one increase in every 5 stitches) are each made with equal parts of orange and blue yarn. The first yarn created 22 rows, but the border yarn only lasted for 4 rows. What an amazing illustration of the rate of hyperbolic growth! We are also experimenting with non hyperbolic shapes such as the tube sponge (above), and sea fan, sea anemone, and staghorn coral.