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Blooms & STEMs: Cultivating Ethical Practice Through an Online Game
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00001076/00001
 Material Information
Title: Blooms & STEMs: Cultivating Ethical Practice Through an Online Game
Physical Description: Conference Papers
Creator: American Library Association (ALA) ( Conference )
Johnson, Margeaux
Leonard, Michelle
Buhler, Amy
Royster, Melody
GAP Team
Publication Date: 2012
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: GAP
Pedagogy
Games-based learning
Plagiarism
Research Ethics
Research Misconduct
Game
Genre:
Spatial Coverage:
 Notes
Abstract: Librarians at the University of Florida take a proactive role in educating Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) graduate students about Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR). As part of the NSF Ethics Education in Science and Engineering program, the Marston Science Library received a two year grant to design a video game to engage STEM graduate students with research ethics. The Gaming Against Plagiarism (GAP) project completes development in Spring 2012 and will be made available as an open source resource for educators and librarians by Fall 2012. This poster maps the levels of the game (three mini-games) directly to the pedagogical levels in Blooms Taxonomy to demonstrate how scaffolding basic concepts early on in game play can prepare students to face more complex challenges. Games-based learning environments contribute to this form of scaffolding, and the pedagogy also translates well to traditional face-to-face and online information literacy instruction.
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Margeaux Johnson.
Publication Status: Published
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00001076:00001

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vvvvvv vvvvvv vvvvvv ABSTRACT Librarians at the University of Florida take a proactive role in educating Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) graduate students about Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR). As part of the NSF Ethics Education in Science and Engineering program, the Marston Science Library received a two year grant to design a video game to engage STEM graduate students with research ethics. The Gaming Against Plagiarism (GAP) project completes development in Spring 2012 and will be made available as an open source resource for educators and librarians by Fall 2012. This poster maps the levels of the game (three mini games) directly to the pedagogical levels in Blooms Taxonomy to demonstrate how scaffolding basic concepts early on in game play can prepare students to face more complex challenges. Games based learning environments contribute to this form of scaffolding, and the pedagogy also translates well to traditional face to face and online information literacy instruction. ? Blooms STEMS & Cultivating Ethical Practice Through an Online Game Margeaux Johnson, Michelle Leonard, Amy Buhler, Melody Royster, and the GAP Team University of Florida Marston Science Library NSF ISS EESE Grant #1033002 http://blogs.uflib.ufl.edu/gap/ BLOOM S TAXONOMY STEM Ethics Mid Level: APPLICATION High Level: EVALUATION Low Level: KNOWLEDGE Game assessment Acknowledgements Our goal is to make the game a fun and active approach to understanding ethical decision making. Throughout the development and game design phases, librarians conducted three distinct types of assessment: focus groups usability testing pre/post tests with game play FOCUS GROUPS Prior to the design of the game, the grant team including the librarians and game developers, conducted a focus group of STEM graduate students. Participants ranging from players with no gamgame that they would find both educational and entertaining. The results from the focus group helped define the type of game we would develop. USABILITY TESTING After the development of each of the three mini games, the time to completion, and playability. Additionally, players answered questions on content comprehension related to playing modules within the game through semi structured interviews. The ultimate purpose of usability testing was to provide support and feedback to the design team throughout the development process. PRE/POST TESTS With the completion of game development in Summer 2012, the game is currently in the final evaluation phase. During this phase librarians recruited STEM graduate students from other U.S. institutions to play the entire game and complete a pre game test and a post game test, using the same questions. This will gauge if players learned any new knowledge from the game. The library team is monitoring and analyzing these results through August 2012. GAP Team: Denise Bennett Matthew Carroll Ben DeVane Rick Ferdig Don McCabe James Oliverio Donna Wrublewski Jonathan Yuhas The first mini lower order skills of Blooms taxonomy, Comprehension and Knowledge In this board game style level, players have the choice to cheat in the forms of plagiarizing, falsifying data, and fabricating data (PFF) as they race to beat their opponent to present data at a campus science convention. If a player is caught cheating, then there are repercussions. On the board they face peer reviews, or pop quizzes that help students relate PFF to specific examples. By engaging with the forms of cheating and the pop quizzes students begin to distinguish between types of research misconduct in scientific disciplines. When the player wins the game, it is revealed that research ethics breeches are epidemic on the campus and as a result graduate students will be working in the Research Misconduct Office in game 2 where they will categorize violations into types of misconduct. Mini order skills related to Application as they identify definitions and classify them into various categories for the Research Ethics Office. This retro arcade style game gives students drill practice as they work with more nuanced definitions of plagiarism. The player collects papers as they arrive at the office and delivers them for review. A one sentence summary related to the type of misconduct is provided and the player must examine the evidence, compare it to the definitions, and classify the misconduct. Students are rewarded for accuracy, consistency, and speed with game upgrades. The advanced level features a leader board where overall best scores are displayed. The goal of the game is to help students construct an understanding of the complex evidence that they will need to gather when they are promoted to Research Detective in the third mini game. The third and most complex mini with the high order skills of Synthesis and Evaluation Players become research misconduct detectives and explore complex cases in depth. They travel throughout campus collecting resources and comparing them to suspected texts. Students must examine the evidence, judge if a violation occurred, and formulate an accusation if there is misconduct. The process of assessing the passages and justifying their decision requires critical thought. To win the game students are forced to confront an egregious violator who takes the form of a tenured professor. Through this accusation of a person of high status students realize that research misconduct occurs at all levels. RCR in the sciences includes the related issues of Fabrication, Falsification, and Plagiarism (FFP). These issues are complex ambiguous. One approach to teaching research ethics in STEM is to introduce the underlying concepts of FFP and then to discuss case studies that introduce shades of gray. The GAP game employs this approach and presents: Data fabrication Data falsification Stealing Misquoting Insufficient paraphrasing Patch writing Self plagiarism. Knowledge Comprehension Application Synthesis Evaluation Analysis $ The Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: the Classification of Educational Goals, a framework for designing educational objectives. Using Blooms Taxonomy, librarians on the GAP team developed learning objectives to enable STEM graduate students to conceptualize the complex issues surrounding research ethics. In the series of mini games, players scaffold concepts from the lower levels of Blooms (Knowledge understanding the actions that constitute research misconduct) to the higher levels of Blooms (Evaluation judging clues in research ethics cases and justifying decisions) Bloom, B. S. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of educational goals New York: Longmans, Green.