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The Science and Economics of Solid Waste: A Solid Waste Management Assessment of Two Rural Towns in Guatemala
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00000968/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Science and Economics of Solid Waste: A Solid Waste Management Assessment of Two Rural Towns in Guatemala
Physical Description: Proposal
Creator: Max J. Krause
Leila Boukari
Evan Kusch
Publisher: UF Libraries
Place of Publication: Gainesville, FL
Publication Date: 05/29/2012
 Notes
Abstract: A team of Environmental Engineering students traveled to San Juan Chamelco and Tactic, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala in October 2011 to complete a scientific assessment of the current solid waste management system and give recommendations to the community that they could realistically implement. Although the science in their recommendations is sound, the economics need to be right before the municipalities will invest in new land and, potentially, new equipment.
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Kirtana Mohan Rajan.
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Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: IR00000968:00001

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I CUBED PROGRAM INTERDICIPLINARY RESEA RCH PROJECT AWARDS APPLICATION FORM http://i3.institutes.ufl.edu/ 1 PROJECT INFORMATION : Project Title: Project S tart D ate: Project E nd D ate: Total Budget requested: T eam member for correspondence with the I Cubed Program: TEAM INFORMATION : Participa nt 1 Name: UFID: Gatorlink email address: Mailing Address: Phon e: Degree: M.A. M.S. PhD Major: Expected graduation date: Academic Department : Faculty Advisor: Email : If you are funded by NSF wh at is the name of the program: I a m a Teaching Assistant Research Assistant Other, specify Participant 2 Name: UFID: Gatorlink email address: Mailing Address: Phone: Degree: M.A. M.S. PhD Major: Expected graduation date:

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I CUBED PROGRAM INTERDICIPLINARY RESEA RCH PROJECT AWARDS APPLICATION FORM http://i3.institutes.ufl.edu/ 2 Academic Department : Faculty Advisor: Email: If you are funded by NSF wh at is the name of the program: I am a Teaching Assistant Research Assistant Other, specify Participant 3 Name: UFID: Gatorlink email address: Mailing Address: Phone: Degree: M.A. M.S. PhD Majo r: Expected graduation date: Academic Department : Faculty Advisor: Email: If you are funded by NSF wh at is the name of the program: I am a Teaching Assistant Research Assistant Othe r, specify Participant 4 Name: UFID: Gatorlink email address: Mailing Address: Phone: Degree: M.A. M.S. PhD Major: Expected graduation date: Academic Department : Faculty Advisor: Email:

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I CUBED PROGRAM INTERDICIPLINARY RESEA RCH PROJECT AWARDS APPLICATION FORM http://i3.institutes.ufl.edu/ 3 If you are funded by NSF wh at is the name of the program: I am a Teaching Assistant Research Assistant Other, specify ABSTRACT L imit abstract to no more than 2 50 words describing the project in non technical language. PROPOSAL NARRATIVE & TIMELINE IMPORTANT: Submit proposal narrative and timeline as separate attachment s along with your application. NARRATIVE: Limit proposal narrative to 4 pag es, single spaced. The narrative should describe the problem to be addressed, the proposed research objectives and methods. Also provide references to the existing literature. The narrative should emphasize the feasibility of the project. I ndicate prior

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I CUBED PROGRAM INTERDICIPLINARY RESEA RCH PROJECT AWARDS APPLICATION FORM http://i3.institutes.ufl.edu/ 4 pr eparation or previous related work undertaken. Describe the contribution of each team member to the project and how this project relates to on going research being undertaken by team members outside the scope of this project (if applicable). Discuss the si gnificance of the research in relation to the current state of knowledge if known. For those projects involving undergraduate students, please describe what mentoring will be provided to the participating undergraduate student(s) and how they benefit from their involvement in the project. TIMELINE: Develop a timeline (limit to 1 page) including interim reporting benchmarks, for the proposed research project. PROJECT BUDGET Provide itemized project budget using below template. The research project should b e based on funding up to a maximum of $2,500 The award may be used to hire an undergraduate student for this project, pay for research related travel, buy/rent equipment and supplie s data processing and other Provide a budget justification for each requ ested budget line item including cost per individual if travel, type of equipment and supplies required for the project, etc. NOTE: Requested funds CANNOT Budget Item Requested from I Cubed Salary to hire an und ergraduate student Travel to the site Project related equipment and supplies Data processing Other ( please specify ) Total Direct Costs (sum of the above line items) Budget Justification:

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PROJECT BUDGET NOTE: Requested funds CANNOT be used to pay any team members’ salaries. Budget Item Requested from I Cubed Salary to hire an undergraduate student $ Travel to the site Airfare1,756.00 $ In country vehicle and gasoline for one week300.00 $ Enterprise to/from airport84.00 $ Project related equipment and supplies $ Data processing $ Other (please specify) Translator/guide (5 days, $80/day)260.00 $ Lodging (driver, team and translator, 6 nights)400.00 $ Total Direct Costs (sum of the above line items)2,800.00 $ ICubed Budget JustificationRequested Salary to hire undergrad, data entry, field work $ Travel Tue, Aug 14 MCO to GUA – 1 stop Wed, Aug 22 GUA to MCO – 1 stop Travelers Max J Krause, Graduate, Environmental Engineering Sciences $ TBD, Undergraduate, Environmental Engineering Sciences 439.00 $ Evan Kusch, Graduate, Master of Science in Management 439.00 $ Leila Boukari, Graduate, Masters in Entrepreneurship TBD, undergraduate, Business Administration 439.00 $ R.Scott Livengood, Asst. Professor, Warrington College of Business Administration 439.00 $ Timothy Townsend, Professor, Environmental Engineering Sciences $ Enterprise Minivan, University rate 42$/day 42.00 $ Need rental for departing and arriving (2x) 42.00 $ In country vehicle, driver and gasoline estimate from in country contact300.00 $ Project related equipment and supplies $ Other (please specify) NGO Translator/guide260.00 $ Lodging (driver and team) estimate from in country contact400.00 $ Total Direct Costs (sum of the above line items)2,800.00 $ Notes 1. Theamounts shown in this budget may not fully cover the amount estimated (such as for lodging). They are only the amounts being requested for I Cubed funding. 2. Other sources of funding will be explored including corporate donations from local and national engineering companies that we have had previous support from. Companies include Jones Edmunds, CH2MHill, Jacobs Engineering, CDM, Koogler and Associates, Golder Associates, and Water and Air Research. Additionally, we will seek out funding from our professional organizations Air & Waste Management Associaiton (AWMA) and Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA).Airfare for Max Krause and Tim Townsendwillbe paid for in this manner. 3.Flight rates will change subject to the final travel date but this is a good estimation. On the previous visit, flight was approx. $400. 4. The EESundergraduate will be selected at a later date by Max Krause and Professor Tim Townsend. The student will forgo a salary for paid travel and accomodations, the opportunity to gain real world experience and the potential for co authorship of a journal article or poster presentation. 5. The MSE undergraduate will be selected at a later date by Professor Scott Livengood, based on credentials and performance in his course, Business Plan Formation. The student will forgo a salary for paid travel and accomodations, the opportunity to gain real world experience and the potential for co authorship of a journal article or poster presentation.

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1 The Science and Economics of Solid Waste: Solid Waste Management Assessment of Two Rural towns in Guatemala Max J. Krause, Leila Boukari, Evan Kusch, Dr. R.Scott Livengood, Dr. Timothy G. Townsend Project Summary A group of Environmental Engineering students, coordinating with the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources (MARN), traveled to San Juan Chamelco and Tactic, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala in October 2011 to complete a scientific assessment of the current solid waste management system and give recommendations to the community that they could realistically implement. Although the science in their recommendations was sound, the economics need to be right before the municipalities will invest in new land and, potentially, new equipment. This grant would allow a team of Environmental Engineering students (EES), Master of Science in Entrepreneurship students (MSE), and their professors to undertake a second assessment trip to solidify a feasible waste management system for the two towns in Guatemala. This project seeks to engage students from diverse educational backgrounds for the benefit of people most of the current team has yet to meet. The goal of this initiative will be to identify ways of increasing the recovery of recyclables (through public recycling bins or other means) and adding real and perceived value to the collection and disposal services of solid waste. To increase the likelihood of adoption, the team will partner with the local non governmental organization (NGO) CHOICE Humanitarian1, who currently operates in Alta Verapaz, Guatemala. Solid Waste The first step in beginning any solid waste management system is determining the quantities and types of waste that must be managed. Waste characterization is usually divided into residential, commercial, and industrial wastes. The 2011 team initially selected San Juan Chamelco and Tactic on the basis that they would not be dealing with industrial, and therefore, potentially hazardous waste. Residential waste is anything that might be commonly disposed of from a home on a day to day basis. This can vary daily (cleaning supplies or food waste), seasonally (holidays), geographically (U.S. vs. Korea), and demographically (low or high income, college students, families, etc.). Typically, because of the variety of items, most of this would be considered landfillable material. Commercial waste (in this case, waste from the markets) is usually less diverse from a single location than residential waste. The waste composition studies revealed similar results between both towns as well as when comparing market waste to residential waste. Waste Composition Study and Current Practices Being agrarian communities, it was not surprising to see organic waste as the major component of the waste stream (See Figure 2). Organic waste is classified (in this project) as food scraps and yard waste which quickly biodegrades. This component of the waste stream would be well suited for composting. In all four of the waste composition studies performed by the 2011 team, food and yard waste comprised 60% 70% of the waste stream. As expected, plastic bottles did not contribute to a large portion of the waste by weight (though there was a large amount by volume), and they are 1 http://choicehumanitarian.org/guatemala.php Figure 1. Families scavenge for recyclables in the San Juan Chamelco dump.

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considered valuable by the scavengers (people sorting through the dumps searching for recyclables). Glass bottles are reused in a country wide deposit system similar to bottle bill states in the U.S., thus no significant amount of glass was found in the waste stream. There was a noticeable amount of plastic film, but recycling of this material is not thought to be available. Paper products and cardboard constituted a large portion of the waste but without size reducing grinders it was decided this would ultimately need to be landfilled. Throughout the composition studies, no hazardous or biomedical waste was found. After characterizing the waste, a simplified chart was made to determine percentages that would be composted, recycled or landfilled, as shown in Figure 3. The large amount of organics suggests that a composting system could be effectively implemented, as long as there was daily maintenance. Additionally, the active scavenging by families on the tops of the dumps indicates there are markets for recyclable materials like plastic bottles, aluminum, copper and glass. This is not well represented in Figure 3, because these percentages are based on mass. Food scraps and paper products far outweigh plastic bottles and aluminum cans. Glass, the heaviest of recyclable materials, does not enter the waste stream because of the national deposit system. Bottles are kept at the stores or restaurants, used and then returned to the manufacturer, where they are cleaned and reused. Plastic bottles and aluminum cans are scavenged from the waste as it’s brought to the dump by the waste haulers. The scavengers spend hours a day, opening and looking through bags to collect plastic bottles and aluminum cans which can be sold. In many instances, this is their only source of income. The Economics of Solid Waste It is important to note that current residential waste collection in San Juan Chamelco and Tactic is privately run. Collection occurs twice per week and is 25 – 30 Quetzales per month ($3 – 4USD). Participation in this service is voluntary and is not surprisingly very low. Most people dispose of their garbage themselves (See Figure 4). Furthermore, this service is only for collection. The waste haulers dump in the same ravine as most of the townspeople. The scavengers go to the dumpsite because that’s where most of the garbage invariably winds up. Organics 61.6% Plastic Film 6.7% Landfill 16.5% Paper 12.4% Plastic Bottles 0.9% Metals 0.4% Glass 1.5% Figure 2. San Juan Chamelco market waste composition, percentage by mass. Compost 61% Recycle 3% Landfill 36% Figure 3. Proposed waste disposal methods for San Juan Chamelco, percentage by mass.

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0% 7% 19% 41% 31% 3% 2% 14% 25% 35% 18% 7% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% Municipal Service Private Service BurnedThrown anywhere BuriedOther San Juan Chamelco Tactic Figure 4. Current methods of waste disposal (MARN, 2011). As previously stated, the amount and activity of scavengers indicates a strong market for recyclable materials. There are still several unknowns which will need to be identified during the trip, such as the current prices of recyclable materials in Guatemala, which materials are recyclable, and if the scavengers are getting a fair price for the materials. This project will also seek to determine if there is any organization among families, groups of families, or towns regarding recycling collection and markets. This project will require further coordination with the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources (MARN, with whom we have a positive relationship) to find other recycling markets in other cities such as Coban, Guatemala City, Antigua, and Puerto Quetzal. Gaining more insight into the larger industry of recycling within the entire country will help to determine where the recyclables are going, who they are being sold to and if there is competition in the market among exporters. Taking this data into account will determine if attempting to unite the scavengers under a single association, union, or other type of social venture would increase their political strength to demand fair market value for the materials as well as potential stable employment contracts with the municipalities; the scavengers could eventually take on a more direct role in operating and managing the landfill itself, providing a service to their own community. The team will examine options of source separation of waste, organics and recyclables (3 bin system similar to that found on UF campus) versus the single waste stream operation that they currently operate, where sorting of recyclables is needed, but it’s easier for residents to participate. This is a common predicament in the United States. Recovery of recyclable materials is always higher when the waste is a single stream2. However, requiring workers to sort through waste is time and labor intensive. On the other hand, when residents separate their waste, not as many recyclable materials are recovered but it’s easier to get those materials to market. Previous Project and Background In October 2011, a team of Environmental Engineering Sciences (EES) students traveled to Guatemala to assess two rural towns’ problems associated with solid waste. In Guatemala, as in many developing countries, environmental regulations either do not exist or are not enforced. While many people acknowledge the problems regarding improper management of solid waste, there are few solutions available to them. MARN addressed areas of concern within the Ro Cahabn watershed and after talks, two small towns were decided upon, based upon indications that the EES team would have the most potential impact and response. The team visited San Juan Chamelco and Tactic in Alta Verapaz, Guatemala with the primary goal of making recommendations that would create sustainable solid waste management (SWM) systems within the towns. 2 http://www.epa.gov/wastes/nonha z/municipal/pubs /msw2009rpt.pdf p.157

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Over the course of 5 days the team met and coordinated with the head of MARN, the mayors of the respective towns, the waste collectors and haulers, students from the local schools, and the scavengers at the dumps. The team broke into 5 groups that each had separate tasks and objectives to complete in the short time span of the trip. Waste characterization studies were conducted to determine the composition of the waste, which would dictate what solutions would be applicable. The Collection team followed the waste collectors on their daily routes to determine participation rates. The Education team visited the local schools to talk with students to gauge awareness of solid waste issues. Another team was responsible for assessing the current dumps identifying the hazards and methods to which they could be safely and effectively closed. The Design team was responsible for siting an area for a new, actively managed landfill that would have the basic designs to prevent environmental contamination of waste and provide a safe working area for the employees. Much of the work occurred simultaneously, maximizing the use of each day within the community. Max Krause (Lead Student) focused his efforts on the waste characterization studies that analyzed the residential and market waste (See Figure 2). His previous experience performing waste composition studies in Gainesville, FL and in Cabaret, Haiti proved invaluable to the less experienced team. After a successful assessment trip in 2011, recommendations were drawn up by the team. As of now, the towns have yet to act on them, either because of a political change or economic reasons. Conclusion This grant would allow our team to offer valuable strategic waste management systems that are personalized for these two towns. We will direct them where they ask for help and also note what their grievances are and adjust our recommendations to best fit their social and political system. There are always concerns, when interacting with other societies, of bringing about unintended (i.e. negative) consequences. The team will develop a metric to examine the cause and effect relationships of proposed changes before final recommendations are made to the communities. This trip will be part of an ongoing effort with these towns to build mutual trust. Our partnership with the NGO CHOICE Humanitarian will ensure a sustained presence in the towns, will indicate our dedication to the project, and motivate the municipalities to continue their efforts towards proper solid waste management. Using the resource of data and knowledge from the October 2011 trip, and the team we are assembling for the proposed trip, we believe we can increase not only the quality of life in these towns, but their awareness in the value of recycling and properly managing their waste. The results of this project can only come about from the collaborative efforts of scientists and entrepreneurs that will use firsthand data to implement an economically viable solid waste management system. The Graduate Research Team Max Krause is a doctoral student in Environmental Engineering Sciences and has been involved with engineering projects in Bolivia (2010), Haiti (2011) and now Guatemala (2011). His dissertation will include chapters related to solid waste management in the developing world and the difficulties of moving from an unregulated dump to a managed landfill. Leila Boukari holds a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration, and is currently pursuing a Master’s in Entrepreneurship. Leila has several years of management experience in small businesses, which have taught effective tools in communication and strategic thinking skills. Evan Kusch is a graduate student of business management with an emphasis on entrepreneurship and social awareness. He has international experience working and volunteering in South Korea (2010) and has negotiation and project management experience through his professional involvements. In addition, he has studied Latin American cultures and societies in undergraduate coursework and will bring this interdisciplinary background to assist the team.

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TaskMayJuneJulyAugustSeptemberOctoberNovemberDecemberJanuaryFebruaryMarchApril Determination of tasks, objectives Interim Report Assessment Trip (tentative travel date) Data collection Compiling data Business Plan development Poster creation Draft Final Report Submit Final Report to I3 Draft recommendations for municipalities Final recommendations, plans given to municipalities Timeline (months) Time (hours)TuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturdaySundayMondayTuesdayWednesday 8:00 AM Travel to San Juan Chamelco Travel to Tactic Travel to Anigua Travel to airport 9:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:00 PM LunchLunchLunchLunch 1:00 PM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM 5:00 PMHotelHotelHotelHotelHotel 6:00 PMHotelHotel Talk w/scavengers Meet w/CHOICE NGO Talk w/Puerto Quetzal recyclers Businesses closed, free day in case of missed opportunities (Coban), also final meeting w/CHOICE NGO Proposed Assessment Trip Timeline Travel to Alta Verapaz, Guatemala Arrive in Guatemala City Meet w/MARN, Talk w/scavengers Travel to Puerto Quetzal Flight departing GAU, Guatemala City to MCO, Orlando, FL Meet w/Mayor and garbage collectors Meet w/ Guatemala City Recyclers Meet w/ Guatemala City Meet w/Mayor and garbage collectors Talk w/antigua recyclers

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Leila Boukari P.O. Box 28, Alachua, FL 32616, 352.262.6538, leilacboukari@gmail.com Education University of Florida – Gainesville, Florida Masters of Science in Entrepreneurship May 2012, Beta Gamma Sigma honor recipient Saint Leo University – Saint Leo, Florida Bachelors in Business Administration, Management May 2010, graduated magna cum luade, Florida Bright Futures Scholarship recipient Saint Petersburg College women’s basketball scholarship recipient, 2006 2007, Florida Bright Futures Scholarship recipient Experience Professional Experience Santa Fe College, Support Specialist II, March 2010 January 2012 Sage, eTapestry, Access database management, assist with campus tours for donors, donor relations and cultivation, webmaster responsible for front end content creation. Facebook and Twitter creator and manager, as well as event photographer and videographer. Composed weekly reports of donors giving level data, and preparation of Vice President’s correspondence. Responsible for the recommendation and management of a software data conversion project. Project Management including planning, developing and executing assignments at fundraising events; i.e. VIP event coordination. Implemented an internal streamlined donor tracking process. Used Excel, PowerPoint, Word, Prezi, for daily duties. Skilled in Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator. Alachua County Today, Office Manager, May 2007 – March 2010 Maintained accounts receivable and payable, scheduled advertisements, coordinated meetings, prepared correspondences, and planned community events. Accountable for focusing the office for weekly deadlines and project management for advertising campaigns. Managed a team of 4 6 interns, scheduled writing assignments, team collaboration workshops and deliverables. Responsible for monitoring customer and client relationships; phone, meeting, walk in customers. Software used: QuickBooks, Access, Word, Photoshop, AccountScout. United States Department of Agriculture, Rural Development, Student Intern, July 2009 – October 2009 Created feasibility study grant fact sheets to be used in presentations, created and updated PowerPoint’s proposals, created and implemented new filing system processes, maintained access application database, and assisted in community outreach programs. Software used: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access. Leadership Skills As a Business Team Leader of Integrated Technology Venture at the University of Florida, I have been responsible for developing market analyses and business plan formation for a patented product for the University of Florida; project launch planned for later this year.

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The Foundation for The Gator Nation An Equal Opportunity Institution Warrington College of Business Administration 255 Stuzin Hall Hough Graduate School of Business PO Box 117168 Thomas S. Johnson Master of Science in Entrepreneurship Program Gainesville, FL 32611 7168 352 273 0338 352 846 2170 Fax www.cba.ufl.edu/mse April 3, 2012 To Whom It May Concern, I am writing to enthusiastically express my s upport for Leila Boukari’s (UFID 06292159) application for the ICubed Graduate Student Interdisciplinar y Research Award. Leila is currently a student in the Thomas S. Johnson Master of Science in Entrepreneurship Program in the Colle ge of Business, and I serve as her academic advisor. She is an intelligent, affable, and dr iven individual who would be an asset to any project she undertakes. Leila has consistently demonstrated her ability to think creatively, while utilizing her entrepreneurial skillset to execute on her creative vision. Finding innovative, economically feasible, and envi ronmentally sustainable methods of managining waste in these small Guatamalen towns presents unique challenges th at require a high le vel of ingenuity, cultural sensitivity, and a strong work ethic. Leila would thrive in this role because she has the creative insight, strong interpersonal skills, marketing know how, and the analytical business mi ndset necessary to create a sustainable solution to the problem while ensuring its adoption by lo cal stakeholders. The Entrepreneursh ip Program will assist in any way that we can in her efforts, and she has our total support. Please do not hesistate to contact me with any questions you may have. Sincerely, Chris Tassin Director – Entreprene urship Degree Programs

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nrnnnnrrrrr nr r r !!"!#$%&'()rrn n&*+,-.#!!/"!#$ ./"./0..$ ./$1#/!"0, 222'3''4& March 30, 2012 To Whom It May Concern, I am writing to express my support for Leila Boukar i’s (UFID 06292159) application for the I-Cubed Gr aduate Student Interdisciplinary Research Award. She is a model student in our prog ram, and would be an asset to such a project. The Entrepreneurship Program will assist in any way that we can in her efforts. Plea se do not hesistate to contact me with any question s you may have. Sincerely, Chris Tassin Director – Entrepreneurship Degree Programs

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EVAN KUSCH 845 SW FIFTH AVENUE Gainesville, FL, 32601 (754) 422-5137 kusch.evan@gmail.com Education June 2012 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, Hough Graduate School of Business GAINESVILLE, FL Master of Science in Management (MSM) Member: Poe Ethics Fellow December 2009 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GAINESVILLE, FL Bachelor of Arts (BA) in English Graduated cum laude Elected to Golden Key Honors Society for out standing academic performance (GPA: 3.73, top 15% of class). Minor in Teaching English as Second Language Mar. 2010 MILTAN ENGLISH ACADEMY INCHEON, SOUTH KOREA to Sept. 2010 English Teacher Effectively adapting to new environments, improving academic performance with interactive activities, and successfully contributing to th e growth of this well-established academy. Organizing events to enable stronger communica tion and cultural exchanges with faculty and staff. Utilizing interpersonal, organizational, and me diating skills in order to enhance personal work environment. Full-time position while volunteering with pscore.org, an organization set up to teach North Korean immigrants. Jan. 2006 KUSCH ENTERPRISES, INC. WEST PALM BEACH, FL to Nov. 2008 Property Manager Managing multiple projects, negotiating profit maximizing contracts, and increasing positive relationships with faculty and staff. Accountable for twenty properties throughout Florida and Georgia in excess of $10M. Purchasing and selling properties, developing mortgage loans, conducting comparative market analysis for a variety of properties. Providing exceptional service and promoting total quality satisfaction, customer retention and stimulating repeat/referral business. Nov. 2001 R.E.E.L. WEB ADVERTISING, INC. FORT LAUDERDALE, FL to Nov. 2006 Owner / President Directly responsible for client management, revenue generation, and communicating ideas to customers and employees for this web design and advertising company. Built relationships with businesses in order to retain new clients and encourage referrals and renewals. Utilized superior communication skills in order to maintain customer satisfaction with over one hundred clients on a monthly basis. Prioritized projects in order to streamline our web design production process and ensure customer loyalty. Additonal Licensed Real Estate Agent, Mortgage Broker, and General Contractor Skills Proficient in Microsoft Office, Excel, PowerP oint; QuickBooks; Adobe Suite; Final Cut Pro; Volunteer TEDX; Groove Shark; STOP! Children’s Cancer; PSCORE.org; Pledge 5 Foundation; Work Disability Resource Center; Children Beyond Our Borders, Foreign Language Organization; and English Language Institute.

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Graduate Research Assistant Contatct Information 220 A.P. Black Hall maxjkrause@gmail.com P.O. Box 116450 Office: (352) 392-6223 Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences Cell: (239) 691-2110 University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6450 Fax: (352) 392-3076 Education Ph.D., Environmental Engineering Advisor: Tim G. Townsend, Ph.D., P.E. December 21, 2015 Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences (Expected) Engineering School of Sustainable Infrastructure and Environment University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 M.E., Environmental Engineering Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences December 21, 2013 Engineering School of Sustainable Infrastructure and Environment (Expected) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 B.S., Evironmental Engineering Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences December 21, 2010 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 Professional Laboratory Safety Coordinator Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences Nov. 2011 Present University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 Field Engineer USA-WINNER Program March 2011 Aug. 2011 Petion-ville, Haiti CADD Technician Jones Edmunds and Associates, Gainesville, FL May 2008 October 2009 Gainesville, FL 32641 Survey Crewman Barraco and Assocaites, Inc. May 2006 August 2007 Fort Myers, Florida 33901 Afilliations Air & Waste Management Association UF Student Chapter Treasurer 2011 Present Engineers Without Borders-UF Webmaster 2011 Present Bolivia Project Team Lead 2008 2009 Local Projects Chair 2007 2008 Max J. Krause, EIT 1/1

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Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences P.O. Box 116450 Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering Program 333 NEB Timothy G. Townsend Ph.D., P.E. Gainesville, FL 32611 6450 Professor Phone: (352) 392 0846 Email: ttown@ ufl.edu Fax: (352) 392 3076 March 30 2012 Subject: Letter of Support for Max Krause for Interdisciplinary Research Award Interdisciplinary Research Award Committee : I am please d to pro vide a letter of recommendation for Mr. Max Krause for an I Cubed Graduate Student Interdisciplinary Research Award Max is currently pursuing his PhD in the Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences at the University of Florida. I am serving his advisor. Max is currently involved in several research projects related to waste management, and over the course of the coming six months we will narrow down his topic for PhD research. It is my opinion that Max is an excellent candidate for this award. He did very well in his undergraduate environmental engineering studies, and he continues this progress into graduate school. Given my observations of professionalism, work ethic, and passion toward the field of waste management, I am confident th at he will be a very successful researcher. It is worth to society as indicated by h is service to the UF Engineers without Borders chapter. Max has also accompanied me on senior design class trips to Haiti and Gua temala where he was instrumental in planning and execution, as well as over all mentoring of the undergraduate students. Max i s a strong communicator and has stepped into a leadership and training role in our Department. In summary, I rank Max as an excel lent candidate for the award. I have no doubt that he will be a successful engineer and future contributor to the University of Florida as an academic and a professional and I highly recommend him to you. I will assi st Max as necessary to successfully complete his proposed objective, including necessary guidance, review and use of laboratory space and field equipment Best regards, Timothy G. Townsend