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Selecting Pigs for Youth Swine Shows
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00000906/00001
 Material Information
Title: Selecting Pigs for Youth Swine Shows
Physical Description: Fact Sheet
Creator: Myers, Nicholas
Marshall, Timothy T.
Walker, William R.
Prichard, David Louis 1956-
Heltemes, Bill
Decubellis, Chris
Estevez, Brian Joseph
TenBroeck, S. H.
Carr, Chad
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2012
 Notes
Abstract: Are you interested in participating in a swine show? This 8-page fact sheet will help youth exhibitors determine how and where to purchase a project pig and provide information on what the student should look for when purchasing the pig in order to do well.
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Diana Hagan.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: "Publication #4H-SWG-04"
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Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00000906:00001

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4H-SWG-04 Selecting Pigs for Youth Swine Shows1Nicholas Myers, Timothy T. Marshall, William R. Walker, David L. Prichard, Bill Heltemes, Chris Decubellis, Brian Estevez, Saundra H. TenBroeck, and Chad Carr2 1. This document is 4H-SWG-04, one of a series of the 4-H Youth Development Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Revised April 2012. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.u.edu 2. Nicholas Myers, graduate student, Department of Animal Sciences; Timothy T. Marshall, former faculty member, Department of Animal Sciences; William R. Walker, former faculty member, Department of Animal Sciences; David L. Prichard, former faculty member, North Florida Research and Education Center, Quincy, FL; Bill Heltemes, Extension agent IV, Northeast Region; Chris Decubellis, Extension agent III, Gilchrist County; Brian Estevez, Extension agent I, Suwannee County; Saundra H. TenBroeck, associate professor, Department of Animal Sciences; and Chad Carr, assistant professor, Department of Animal Sciences; Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or aliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A&M University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Millie Ferrer-Chancy, Interim DeanIntroductionis publication will help youth exhibitors determine how and where to purchase a project pig and provide information on what the student should look for when purchasing the pig in order to do well in a swine show. Youth interested in participating in a swine show will learn how to answer the following questions: 1. Where should I buy my project pig? 1. Should I contact a swine producer or work through my club or chapter to buy a group of pigs? 2. What breed or cross should I buy? 3. What should my pig look like on the day of the show? 4. How do I select a pig to t the feeding period dictated by the show? 5. What traits will be important to evaluate as I choose my pig? Youth interested in participating in a swine show should complete these steps before starting the project: 1. Search the Internet for resources from these livestock websites: http://www.thejudgingconnection.com/education.php http://www.breedersworld.com/swine/index.html http://www.showpig.com/ 2. Attend project pig selection clinics and workshops. You can contact your county or surrounding counties for potential programs. 3. Attend shows in your county or surrounding counties to observe how a show works. 4. Participate on your county livestock judging team. 5. Visit area producers. At the end of this guide there is a space for you to record the activities you completed and write about how they helped you with your swine project.Pig Selection FAQsWhat are your goals for the youth market hog project?If you want to learn how to raise a pig, have fun, and participate at the fair, then any healthy market hog from modern commercial genetics will provide that experience.

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2But if you want to be competitive in the show you will need to consider several other factors when you choose your pig. ese factors are discussed later in this publication.How should I approach purchasing my rst project pig?If you are a rst-time youth exhibitor, then you should visit with your County Extension Oce to see if an Extension agent, volunteer leader, or agricultural instructor in your area customarily purchases a group of pigs for local youth. If this is case, then you should get an animal this way. is is the best option for rst-year exhibitors who have no previous experience working with food animals. Youth exhibitors should be encouraged by leaders to work independently from the group once they have gained experience with the pig project.What about a pig sale?Youth prospect pig sales are very common in many areas of the country and are becoming more common in the southeastern United States. First-time youth exhibitors and their families should visit a prospect pig sale before going to a sale intending to purchase a pig. is will hopefully prevent families from being caught up in the excitement of the live auction and spending more money on a pig than they intend.Where should I purchase project pigs?You can avoid many problems by obtaining pigs from a reputable producer. Purchasing pigs directly o the farm reduces some risks of problems, as opposed to visiting a sale where there are pigs from multiple breeders. Pigs purchased from a sale will be stressed during handling and transportation, and exposed to pigs from other farms, making them more susceptible to becoming sick. Additionally, purchasing directly from the producer allows a better opportunity for the youth to build a relationship with the producer.What things should I look for at the farm?You may choose a pig with excellent genetics, but if the pig becomes sick, it will likely never reach its full potential. erefore, you certainly want to start with a healthy pig. Do not buy pigs that are coughing or scratching, or that look unthriy. If more than 10%% of the producers pigs appear sick during your visit, be very hesitant to purchase a pig at that location, even if the pig you select appears healthy. Ask the producer for specic information about the vaccination and parasite control program. If you are buying pigs from out of state, make sure you have proper health certication prior to coming home.What daily gain should I expect?It is best to use a conservative estimate to guard against sickness, poor quality feed, injuries, or other unplanned problems. Remember, it is easier to slow a pigs rate of gain than to increase it. A good rule of thumb is 1.7 pounds of gain per day for modern market hogs, with a range from 1.4 to 3 pounds per day.What weight pig should I buy?To answer this question you must know the following: 1) the length of the feeding period; 2) the expected daily gain; and 3) the ideal nal show/slaughter weight. e product of the rst two (length of the feeding period and the expected daily gain) will provide the total pounds gained during the feeding period. en subtract the total pounds gained from the ideal nal weight to calculate the purchase weight of the pig. Students can estimate the ideal nal show/slaughter weight by using the information in the traits to evaluate section of this guide (look under growth/rib capacity/volume, as well as leanness/maturity). Most modern pigs should have an estimated nal show weight of at least 250 lbs. Example: 100-day feeding period 2.0 lbs/day average daily gain 270 pounds ideal nal weight 100 x 2.0 = 200 pounds gained during feeding period 270 200 = 70 pound purchase weightShould I purchase a barrow or gilt?Gilts (young females) will maintain lean growth longer than barrows (young castrated males). However, barrows should exhibit faster growth than gilts (National Pork Producers Council 1995), so the decision is up to the exhibitor.Should I purchase a purebred or crossbred pig?Crossbred progeny from purebred parents are genetically superior to their parents, especially for lean growth, because of heterosis or hybrid vigor (Lush 1945; Olson 2008). If

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3the show is divided by weight, then purebreds shown with crossbreds are at a genetic disadvantage (Olson 2008).What other questions should I ask the producer? 1. What was this pigs farrowing date? 2. May I see the dam and/or sire? 3. How much does the pig weigh currently? 4. How have pigs from this sow performed previously?Ideal Market HogBefore you can select a young pig, you must rst know what you are trying to produce. is is why it is good to know what an ideal market hog looks like. What should my pig look like on the day of the show?Symbol III is the ideal market hog that symbolizes protability for every segment of the industry (Figure 1; National Pork Board 2005). According to the National Pork Board, is hog has correctness of structure, production, performance, function, livability, attitude, health, optimum lean yield, and produces the best quality, safest pork that provides the optimum nutrients for human nutrition. Some of the production criteria for this ideal barrow are listed below: 1. A live weight of 270 lbs by 156 days of age 2. A feed eciency of 2.4 lbs of feed per lb of live weight 3. A 10th rib fat thickness of 0.70 in and loin eye area of 6.5 in2 Parts of a pigIn order to discuss project pig selection, you must be familiar with the important body parts of the pig. ese are shown in Figure 2.What traits will help me select a young pig that will mature to look similar to Symbol III?e important traits to evaluate for young pigs are as follows:en Musclingen Growth/Rib Capacity/Volumeen Leanness/Maturityen Design/Feet and Leg SoundnessMUSCLINGMuscling is the most important trait in a market animal and is also the easiest to evaluate. Muscle is what you are selling to the consumer; therefore, only pigs with aboveaverage muscle thickness should be selected. Muscling is best evaluated by examining the hog from the ground up Figure 1. This hog, known as Symbol III, is the ideal market hog for every segment of the industry. Credits: National Pork Board, 2005. Figure 2. The important body parts of the pig. Credits: UF Animal Sciences

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4and from the rear forward. Heavy and well-muscled pigs will have a square, expressive shape when viewed from behind, with a deep groove down their top and a thick, full hip and ham. A light-muscled pig will have an inverted V shape when viewed from the rear. Figure 3 shows a very heavily muscled pig on the le, a well-muscled pig in the middle, and a very light-muscled pig on the right.GROWTH/RIB CAPACITY/VOLUMEIt is very challenging to assess a young pigs genetic potential for growth. First, eliminate any pigs with obvious defects such as ruptures or structural defects. ese will not perform normally and will certainly be discounted in the show ring and at the packer. Watch for the defects shown in Figure 4, which include a pig with an umbilical hernia on the le, a pig with a scrotal hernia in the middle, and a pig with kyphosis or hump-back on the right. You certainly should ask the breeder about the growth of the sire and dam and select pigs from parents with aboveaverage growth. Secondary indicators of growth include the length of the body, length of the cannon bone (collectively referred to as frame), cannon bone circumference, and rib capacity/volume. Small-framed or very large-framed pigs will generally grow slower than pigs with a more middle-of-the-road frame size. Narrow-chested pigs with little body capacity and small cannon bone circumference will tend to grow slowly. Wide-chested and big-bodied pigs with very large cannon bone circumference will oen be lower set and earlier maturing, and can grow slower, especially aer they begin to deposit fat faster than muscle. Figure 5 shows a gilt on the le whose secondary indicators of growth suggest she should be a nice project; a gilt in the middle that is too large-framed, low-volumed, and likely too slow-growing; and a barrow on the right that is too short-boned, too short-bodied and likely too slow-growing. Figure 6 shows a pig on the le whose secondary indicators of growth suggest he should be a nice project; a lowvolumed gilt in the middle that will likely remain lean to a heavy weight and will likely be too slow-growing; and a wide-chested, big-bodied barrow on the right that will likely have too much 10th rib fat thickness by 280 lbs.LEANNESS/MATURITYAny pig with signicant fat deposition at less than three months of age and less than 90 lbs is genetically inferior. However, length and height are good indicators of nishing weight. A tall, long-bodied pig will remain leaner to a heavier weight than a short, low-set pig. Assuming a similar environment, the barrows in Figure 7, from le to right, will have 0.75 in fat thickness at the 10th rib by approximately 250, 275, and 290 lbs, respectively. us, the ideal nal show/slaughter weights for the pigs depicted would Figure 3. From left to right: a heavily muscled pig, a well-muscled pig, and a very light-muscled pig. Credits: ADM Alliance Nutrition and University of Florida Figure 4. From left to right: a pig with an umbilical hernia, a pig with a scrotal hernia, and a pig with kyphosis or hump-back. Credits: Dr. Todd See, North Carolina State University. Figure 5. From left to right: a gilt with secondary growth indicators that suggest she will be a good project; a likely slow-growing, lowvolumed gilt with a large frame; a likely slow-growing barrow that is short-boned and short-bodied. Credits: National Swine Registry Figure 6. From left to right: a pig with secondary indicators of growth that suggest he should be a nice project; a low-volumed gilt that will likely remain lean to a heavy weight and will likely be too slowgrowing; and a wide-chested, big-bodied barrow on the right that will likely have too much 10th rib fat thickness by 280 lbs. Credits: National Swine Registry

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5be approximately 5 lbs less than each of those projected weights. Dierences in body volume and cannon bone circumfer ence have become very popular points of selection for youth market hog judges over the past ve years. ese traits are relevant to growth and maturity when the animals evaluated display extensive variation, such as the two mature boars depicted in Figure 8. However, when the animals evaluated display less variation for these traits, the amount of emphasis placed on these traits becomes the opinion of individual judges.DESIGN/FEET AND LEG SOUNDNESSA correctly structured, well-designed pig with all joints at the proper angles will walk eortlessly and athletically, as if all the pieces t together. e pig should hold its head up, have a level top line when walking, have clean joints with no evidence of swelling, and place its feet on all four corners of its body. Figure 9 depicts two pigs that appear to t the previous description. Pigs with structural problems severe enough to induce stress and obviously restrict mobility will have poorer growth than pigs with acceptable soundness. e more ill-structured the pig, the less likely they will become a heavy weight market hog and the more likely they will have problems during handling and loading at home, at the show, or during the pre-slaughter period (Ritter et al. 2006). Figure 10 displays dierences in front leg structure. e pig on the le has a correct angle to the shoulder, knee, and pastern; the pig in the middle is very straight-shouldered, over at the knee, and straight-pasterned; and the pig on the right has excessive slope to the shoulder, is set too far back at the knee, and is weak-pasterned. e structural defects shown in the middle and right picture could lead to pain from arthritic joints or an injured dew claw, potentially aecting growth performance. Figure 11 displays dierences in rear leg structure. e pig on the le has the correct set to the hip, hock, and pastern; the pig in the middle is very straight from the hock to the pastern; and the pig on the right has excess set to the hock and is weak-pasterned. e structural defects shown in the middle and right picture could lead to pain from arthritic joints or an injured dew claw, potentially aecting growth performance. Figure 12 displays dierences of the feet and hocks. e foot on the le has even-sized toes with slight spread, and the proper slope and cushion to the pastern to allow the foot to set squarely on the oor. e next two feet display defects; the second foot has an ulceration above the toe and swelling around the knee, and the third foot has a much smaller inside toe. e hock displayed in the le picture shows swelling on the right hock, and the picture on the right displays swelling on the inside of the le hock. e Figure 7. From left to right, these barrows will have a 0.75 in fat thickness at the 10th rib by approximately 250 lbs (left), 275 lbs (middle), and 290 lbs (right). Credits: National Swine Registry Figure 8. Two mature boars showing extensive variation in body volume and cannon bone circumference. Credits: Swine Genetics International Figure 9. A correctly structured pig will hold its head up, have a top level line when walking, and place its feet on all four corners of its body. Credits: National Swine Registry Figure 10. From left to right: a pig with the correct angle to the shoulder, knee, and pastern; a straight-shouldered pig that is over at the knee and straight-pasterned; and a pig with excessive slope in the shoulder that is set to far back at the knee and is weak-pasterned. Credits: National Hog Farmer Magazine, 2009a.

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6defects shown in the four pictures on the right can lead to lameness, potentially aecting growth performance. Many pigs bred for youth shows are heavier muscled than most commercial pigs. is added muscle mass can negatively aect the pigs length and comfort of stride, but does not necessarily aect growth performance. Since a large percentage of pigs exhibited today have excellent carcass merit, judges of large, competitive market hog shows will place more emphasis on the dierences in structural design and feet and leg soundness. In Figure 13, the gilt on the le is too straight in her knee and hock, and her spine is too rigid; the next gilt is very short-hipped, straight-hocked, and appears possibly too heavily muscled; the next gilt is very broken in her top line aecting how the pieces t together compared to the ideal; and the gilt on the right is very straight-shouldered and over at the knee. e structural dierences shown in these pictures could aect growth performance and would almost certainly aect the length and comfort of stride of the pigs as they grow and mature. ose dierences could aect how each pig places competitively in the market hog show.SummaryIf youth exhibitors want to learn how to raise a pig, have fun, and participate in a pig show, they should select a healthy pig at the correct weight for the feeding period and make sure the pig appears to be growing normally and has no overt defects. But if youth exhibitors are looking to be competitive in the pig show (in addition to having fun and learning about raising a pig), then they need to select a pig with all of the previous traits as well as other traits such as a good combination of muscle, volume, leanness/maturity, and feet and leg soundness. Figure 11. From left to right: a pig with the correct set to the hip, hock, and pastern; a pig that is very straight from the hock to the pastern; and a pig that has excess set to the hock and is weak-pasterned. Credits: National Hog Farmer Magazine, 2009a. Figure 12. From left to right: a foot with even-sized toes and a slight spread; a foot with an ulceration above the toe and swelling around the knee; a foot with a much smaller inside toe; this hock shows swelling on the right hock; this hock shows swelling on the inside left hock. Credits: National Hog Farmer Magazine, 2009b. Figure 13. From left to right: a gilt that is too straight in the knee and hock with a rigid spine; a short-hipped, straight-hocked gilt that appears too heavily muscled; a gilt broken in her top line aecting how she matches the ideal; and a straight-shouldered gilt that is over at the knee. Credits: National Swine Registry

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7Activity Summary1. What activities did you complete to help you in selecting your show pig? 2. What breed or crossbreed did you decide on for the show? 3. What gender did you decide on for the show? 4. What factors inuenced or helped you with the decision?

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8Additional Informationen Best Practice Checklist for Management of a Swine Show for Youth (http://edis.ifas.u.edu/an274)en Conducting a Successful Livestock Show for Youth (http:// edis.ifas.u.edu/an268)en Educational Opportunity for Showing Market Animals by Breed (http://edis.ifas.u.edu/an250)en Incorporating Growth Performance with Youth Market Hog Shows (http://edis.ifas.u.edu/an257)en Ultrasound and Carcass Merit of Youth Market Hogs (http://edis.ifas.u.edu/an252)ReferencesLush, J. L. 1945. Animal Breeding Plans Ames: Iowa State College Press. National Hog Farmer Magazine. 2009a. Conformation and Structural Soundness Guidelines for Replacement Gilts. Accessed March 27, 2012. http://nationalhogfarmer.com/ posters/ConformationGiltsPosterJan09Eng.pdf National Hog Farmer Magazine. 2009b. Selecting for Feet and Leg Soundness in Replacement Gilts. Accessed March 27, 2012. http://nationalhogfarmer.com/ posters/200902NHFpostereng1.pdf. National Pork Board (NPB). 2005. Symbol III: A Standard of Excellence. Des Moines, IA: National Pork Board. National Pork Producers Council (NPPC). 1995. Genetic Evaluation: Terminal Line Program Results. Des Moines, IA: National Pork Producers Council. Olson, T.A. 2008. Crossbreeding Programs for Beef Cattle in Florida. BUL326. Gainesville: University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. http://edis.ifas.u.edu/ an055. Ritter, M.J., M. Ellis, J. Brinkmann, J. M. DeDecker, K.K. Keaber, M.E. Kocher, B.A. Peterson, J.M. Schlipf, and B.F. Wolter. 2006. Eect of Floor Space during Transport of Market-weight Pigs on the Incidence of Transport Losses at the Packing Plant and the Relationships between Transport Conditions and Losses. J. Anim Sci. 84:2856-64.