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Child Poverty Increasing
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ ( Publisher's URL )
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00000838/00001
 Material Information
Title: Child Poverty Increasing
Series Title: Family Album Radio
Physical Description: Fact Sheet
Creator: Smith, Suzanna D.
unknown
Publisher: University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences, EDIS
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2012
 Notes
Abstract: “When we think of poor children, the images of starving children across the world may come to mind. However, the numbers of children living in poverty right here in the U.S. might surprise you…” This is a transcript of a two-minute Family Album Radio broadcast.
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Diana Hagan.
General Note: "Publication #FAR5012"
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00000838:00001

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PAGE 1

When we think of poor children, the images of starving children across the world may come to mind. However, the numbers of children living in poverty right here in the U.S. might surprise you. According to a recent study by the National Center for Children in Poverty, in 2004, 13.5 million children, or 18% of all children in the U.S., lived in poverty. Between 2000 and 2004, the number of children in poverty increased by more than 10% (Douglas-Hall & Koball, 2006). Looking at regional dierences across the country, the Midwest experienced the biggest increases in child poverty, adding over half a million children to the poverty rolls of the region and driving the upsurge in the nations child poverty rates. is regions upswing came mostly among children whose parents were employed, and those who did not have a college education. One possible reason is that well paid manufacturing jobs in the region have been replaced with service jobs with lower earnings and fewer benets. e South has the largest number of children living in poverty, almost 5.5 million (Douglas-Hall & Koball, 2006). As a country, we have a history of programs to assist poor children. e National Center for Children in Poverty advocates policies that promote jobs with livable wages and better benets, oer state and federal programs that give families some nancial support, and strengthen regional economies: policies designed to build a safety net for poor children and their families. Child Poverty Increasing1Suzanna Smith2 1. This document is FAR5012, one of a series of the Family Youth and Community Sciences Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Broadcast as program 526. Published on EDIS March 2012. In the interest of time and/or clarity, the broadcast version of this script may have been modied. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.u.edu 2. Suzanna Smith, associa te professor, Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or aliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Millie Ferrer-Chancy, Interim Dean Credits: George Doyle

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2 Listening, learning, and living together: its the science of life. Family Album is a co-production of University of Florida IFAS Extension, the Department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences, and of WUFT-FM. If youd like to learn more, please visit our website at http://familyalbumradio.org To listen to the radio broadcast: http://www.radiosource.net/radio_stories/526.mp3 http://www.radiosource.net/radio_stories/526.wavResourcesDouglas-Hall, A., & Koball, D. (2006). e new poor: Regional trends in child poverty since 2000. National Center for Children in Poverty. New York: Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Retrieved September 18, 2006, from http://www.nccp.org/media/npr06_text.pdf