<%BANNER%>
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00000719/00002
 Material Information
Title: Fiscal Year 2012-2013 RCM Comprehensive Budget Review : The George A. Smathers Libraries
Physical Description: Budget Proposal
Creator: Russell, Judith C.
Keith, Brian W.
Botero, Cecilia
Bruxvoort, Diane
Schipper, Rachel
Publisher: The George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Florida
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: RCM
Genre:
Spatial Coverage:
 Notes
Abstract: This document supports the 2012-2013 budget for the George A. Smathers Libraries. It describes the Libraries mission, objectives and organization. It provides three scenarios for the 2012-2013 budget: flat funding, a 5% budget reduction, and an optimized budget. It also suggests alternative sources of funding for the Libraries.
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Judith Russell.
Publication Status: Published
General Note: This updated version loaded on 1/11/2012 and, per the request of the UF CFO, provides separate budget reporting for the UL, HSCL, and administrative elements of the Smathers Libraries.  The original version posted online on 12/15/2011 is available at http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00000719/00001.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00000719:00002


This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

Fiscal Year 2012-2013 Budget Review: The George A. Smathers Libraries January 11, 2012

PAGE 2

Page i Table of Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................. ................... 11.Strategic Value ............................................................................................................... ......... 1The Health Science Center Libraries .......................................................................................... 32.Objectives .................................................................................................................... ........... 43.Organization .................................................................................................................. .......... 44.Programs ...................................................................................................................... ........... 6Scholarly Resources and Research Services ............................................................................... 6Special and Area Studies Collections ..................................................................................... 6Government Documents and Maps ....................................................................................... 11Library West (The Humanities a nd Social Sciences Library) .............................................. 11Marston Science Library ....................................................................................................... 12Departmental Libraries ........................................................................................................ 12Technology and Support Services ............................................................................................ 13Acquisitions .................................................................................................................. ........ 13Cataloging and Metadata ...................................................................................................... 14Access Support................................................................................................................. ..... 14Digital Services and Shared Collections ............................................................................... 15Information Technology ....................................................................................................... 16Facilities an d Security ....................................................................................................... .... 16Administrative Support Units and Programs ............................................................................ 17Office of the Dean of University Libraries ........................................................................... 17Human and Financial Resources ........................................................................................... 18Development and Advancement ........................................................................................... 19Health Science Center Libraries ............................................................................................... 20Supplemental Data About Library Programs and Services ...................................................... 20Acquisition of Libr ary Materials .............................................................................................. 255.2012-2013 Budget Scenarios ................................................................................................ 292012-2013 Projected Annual Uses of Funds Statement: University Libraries ......................... 292012-2013 Projected Annual Uses of F unds Statement: HSC Libraries .................................. 312012-2013 Projected Annual Uses of Funds St atement: Administrative (Inclusive of Acquisitions and Interim Storage Facility) ............................................................................... 33Pre-Approved Increases in the Libraries RCM Base Budget ................................................... 35

PAGE 3

Page ii Smathers Libraries 2012-2013 B udget With Flat Funding ....................................................... 36The Materials Budget .......................................................................................................... .. 36The Salary Budget.............................................................................................................. ... 39The Operations Budget ......................................................................................................... 39Pre-Approved Increases in the Libraries RCM Base ............................................................ 40Smathers Libraries 2012-2013 Budget With 5% Less Funding ............................................... 42The Materials Budget .......................................................................................................... .. 42The Salary Budget.............................................................................................................. ... 44The Operations Budget ......................................................................................................... 45Pre-Approved Increases in the Libraries RCM Base ............................................................ 47Smathers Libraries 2012-2013 Budget With Increased Funding .............................................. 48The Materials Budget .......................................................................................................... .. 48The Salary Budget.............................................................................................................. ... 53The Operations Budget ......................................................................................................... 54Non-Recurring Investments .................................................................................................. 54Pre-Approved Increases in the Libraries RCM Base ............................................................ 556.Additional Sources of Funding for the Libraries .................................................................. 56Increase DSR Funding .......................................................................................................... .... 56Dedicate a Library Allocation from th e Existing Student Technology Fee ............................. 56Dedicate a Library Allocation from Annual Tuition Increases ................................................ 56Establish a Student Library Fee ............................................................................................... 57

PAGE 4

Fiscal Year 2012-20 13 Budget Review: The George A. Smathers Libraries Page 1 Introduction The George A. Smathers Libraries have two main components under RCM, the Health Science Center Libraries (HSCL) and the University Libraries (UL). Under RCM, the HSCL is funded through units of the Health Sciences Center. The University Libraries are funded through the university’s other academ ic and research units, with the exception of the Levin College of Law, which suppor ts its own library, the Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center. The Legal Information Center is not part of the George A. Smathers Libraries and, therefore, is not included in this review. Historically, funding was provide d directly to the Libraries prior to the allocation of appropriated funds to the Colleges. Under RCM, the budget for the Libraries is still determined by the President and the Senior Vi ce Presidents. Using a weighted formula, the Libraries budget is prorated and each Colle ge is allocated an am ount that represents its portion. For the purposes of transparency, th e funds are first credited to each College and then immediately debited to establish the Libraries budget. 1. Strategic Value More than any other campus enterprise, the Libraries embody the distinct characteristics of the university and its mission across all di sciplines: to devel op the human intellect through teaching and learning a nd to contribute through rese arch to the expanding body of human knowledge. While the nature of lib raries has changed in the current digital environment, this core mission has not: The Ge orge A. Smathers Libraries are dedicated to supporting the university’s threefold missi on of teaching, research, and service. The Libraries continue to adju st services and facilities to create supportive learning environments for students and teaching a nd research support for faculty through: Offering technologically sophisticated learning and research commons on campus and hosting equivalent virtual environments for remote access; Conducting information literacy programs to enable students to recognize when information is needed and have the ab ility to locate, evaluate, and use it effectively, as well as providing othe r subject-specific instruction; Integrating library materials and services into the course management system; Providing a wide-range of schol arly resources in print and electronic formats to support the full range of research and academic programs of the university; Digitizing unique research materials and co llaborating in digita l scholarship; and Operating the institutional repository as a permanent portal to access the digital scholarly output of UF students and faculty.

PAGE 5

Page 2 As library services are integrated into the in formation infrastructure of the university, the Libraries become a major partner in the institutional sh ift of resources to support collaborative interdisciplinary teaching and res earch. The libraries of the University of Florida (UF) continue their traditional role in knowledge management while expanding support for learners and scholars in a digital world. The Smathers Libraries provide a place for st udents to access information and to create projects and presentations fo r their coursework, updating te chnology as often as feasible to provide fast, reliable access. The library is a welcoming, comfortable, and functional meeting place. As books and journals become available electronically, space is reconfigured to serve lear ning through information comm ons with high end computing and production software, and through group and individual study spaces. Library staff and library-designed interfaces provide person alized service through in-house circulation and reference services as well as chat and email reference and electronic library guides. In Library West, graduate student s have an entire floor designate d for their exclusive use. The Libraries strong focus on customer service is flexible and changing as service desks are consolidated and staff is deployed to e ngage library users, either in person or virtually. Librarians teach students how to find reliable information a nd use it effectively. They are becoming increasingly integrated into the curricula by working with academic faculty in curriculum planning and teaching. The Libr aries are working to achieve seamless integration of library resources and instruc tion into the curricul um, shifting resources significantly toward digital material rather than print or analog, selecting information resources learners can trust and making the re sources as mobile and portable as possible, including availability th rough handheld devices. The Libraries operate an institutional repos itory (IR@UF) as a portal for archiving and accessing digital scholarly and institutional information. Users can search across all materials in the repository simultaneously as well as submit their own documents to the repository. The Smathers Libraries are a ke y component of the open access movement on campus, and an important campus resource for fair use, intellectual property, privacy, confidentiality, intellectual freedom and information policy issues. These are roles the Libraries currently assume in support of scholarly research and publishing, but new roles are under active investig ation: embedding library content, services and librarians within researchers' regular workflows, redefining re ference services as research consultation, and engaging researchers in the identification of primary research data sets that merit long-term preservation and access. In the mi dst of rapid and often unpredictable change, the Smathers Libraries remain a critical part ner in the research en terprise by anticipating, understanding, and addressing the challenges and opportunities inherent in new research practices. The libraries at UF fill the ro le of the intellect ual ombudsman as they bring disciplines together in a rapidly changing environment. By teaching information literacy, hosting digital content, and providing technology a nd research consultation, the Libraries offer

PAGE 6

Page 3 learners and researchers venue s to explore the breadth and depth of information and to create new knowledge. The Li braries provide mechanisms for engaging in intellectual content and instruction for developing inform ation literacy skills. Libraries organize and preserve stored information and serve as the steward of the institutional record and culture. The library is the place where l earning and research are unrestrained by disciplinary boundaries. The Health Science Center Libraries The mission of the Health Science Center (H SC) Libraries is to serve the information needs of the six colleges of Health Scien ce Center as well as the affiliated hospitals, clinics and research centers. Like the Universi ty Libraries, the HSC Libraries assist the colleges in fulfilling their educational a nd research mission by obtaining high quality information resources in all formats, although th e preferred format is digital when that is available and affordable; offering searching and information management expertise; and providing instruction to facil itate the acquisition of information literacy and lifetime learning skills. The HSC is charged with bot h clinical and community outreach missions, which the HSC Libraries actively support. The HSC Libraries employ liaison librarians to support the specific information needs of the six colleges. Liaison libra rians are the “personal librarians” for the students, faculty, researchers, clinicians, staff and administrators of the HSC. These liaison librarians work with faculty to embed information literacy and access to high quality information resources into the curriculum. They also: Serve as members of college-level curriculum committees; Teach classes and workshops on inform ation-related tools and resources; Provide house-call information services to faculty, researcher and clinicians and in-depth information consultations for lib rary users, both in person and virtually; Create online tutorials and subject guides for the various disciplines; Select and acquire materials for purchase or license by libraries to support the full range of disciplines and re search of the HSC; and Plan new initiatives based on need. In addition to primary liaison services, the HS C Libraries offer other specialized services. The Clinical Research Librarian works closely with clinical and tran slational researchers, in particular, those involved in the university’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI). She serves as a critical bridge between the clinical and research enterprise. The Consumer Health and Co mmunity Engagement Librarian delivers information to students and faculty, providing them with the skill sets required to identify and evaluate such information in order to share it with their patients. The Clinical Librarian at the Borland Librar y in Jacksonville provides inform ation at the point of care.

PAGE 7

Page 4 2. Objectives In fulfilling our mission, the Smathers Libraries objectives are to: Provide greater access to electronic collections while continuing to build and improve access to collections in all formats to meet the increasingly interdisciplinary research, clinical and teaching needs of the university; Support the academic success and devel op the information literacy of an increasingly divers e student population; Repurpose spaces for study and collaboration in library buildings allowing students to work individually or in groups in an effi cient, safe environment; Expand technology and user services to enhance access to library resources for both on campus and remote patrons; Support graduate student and faculty re search needs through digitization of research materials, expanded liaison pr ograms, and improved access to scholarly publishing; and Build a system of data curation to support faculty in fulfilling federal mandates and enhancing curation and accessibili ty of their research product. Additional objectives specifi c to the Health Science Ce nter Libraries include: Partner with the university’s CTSI, pr ogram to accelerate the delivery of the researchers’ work to the clinician and then to the community, and if warranted, back to the researcher; Serve as the bridge that unites the c linical, research, e ducation and outreach missions of the university by providing high quality information resources, offering searching and information manageme nt expertise, and distributing digital information through avenues such as the Institutional Repository; Support the clinical enterprise by prov iding specialized services, such as assistance in the creation of systematic reviews, which are essential to evidence based practice; and Provide health literacy services in the community through the HSC Libraries consumer health and outreach. 3. Organization The organization chart for the Libraries, with faculty and staff FTE counts as of December 15, 2011, is presented on the following page.

PAGE 8

Page 5

PAGE 9

Page 6 The staff of the Libraries consists of more than 85 library faculty; 170 professional, technical and clerical staff; 26 Other Pers onal Services (OPS) st aff; and 206 student assistants. Librarians at the University of Florida are tenure accruing faculty. All have graduate degrees in Library Science or In formation Studies, and/or a gr aduate degree in a relevant subject area. Some teach for-credit course s and they often provide instruction and learning aids that are incorporated into cour ses. The library faculty serves the university community in the following roles: General and specialized reference experts; Faculty and department liais ons and outreach coordinators; Instructors as part of courses, wo rkshops and/or personalized one-on-one sessions; Collection managers and curators; Preservation, cataloging, acquisiti on and digitization experts; Clinical research liaisons; and Principle investigators and grant participants. 4. Programs The George A. Smathers Libraries are organized into three major divisions. From left to right on the organization chart provided above, the divisions are Scholarly Resources and Research Services; Technology and Support Services; and th e Health Science Center Libraries. In addition, there are Admini strative Support Units and Programs, including the Office of the Dean; Human and Fina ncial Resources; and Development and Advancement. The responsibilities of each unit are described below. Scholarly Resources an d Research Services The Scholarly Resources and Research Serv ices division oversees the University Libraries collections and public services. The di vision is organized into five departments: Special and Area Studies Collections, Govern ment Documents and Maps, Library West (the Humanities and Social Sciences Library), Marston Science Library, and Departmental Branches (Archi tecture and Fine Arts, Edu cation, Journalism, and Music libraries). The mission of the Scholarly Resour ces and Research Serv ices division is to serve the academic community through access to and services utilizing the University Libraries research collections. Special and Area Studies Collections The Special and Area Studies Collections (S ASC) department encompasses two units: Special Collections (rare books, archives, a nd manuscript collections) and Area Studies (interdisciplinary collections pertaining to geographical, na tional or cultural regions). These collections directly support a variet y of academic disciplines and research programs. As a public institution, access is afforded to researcher, students and unaffiliated patrons in ways that is not us ually permitted in private collections, making

PAGE 10

Page 7 these materials especially valuable to schol arship. For example, the Suzy Covey Comic Book Collection directly supports the Comic Studies Program offered by the Department of English, but its holdings are open to all having an interest in the field. The Special Collections unit of SASC includes the Baldwin Li brary of Historical Children's Literature, the P.K. Yonge Librar y of Florida History, the General Manuscript Collection, the Harold and Mary Jean Ha nson Rare Book Collection, the University Archives, the Architecture Archives, and the Popular Culture Collect ions (including the Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts and the Suzy Covey Comic Book Collection). Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature The Baldwin Library contains more than 93,000 volumes published in Great Britain and the United States from th e early 1700s through the present. Its holdings of more than 800 early American imprints is the second largest such collection in the U.S. Begun by Ruth Ba ldwin, this assemblage of literature, printed primarily for children, offers many topics for research: education and upbringing; family and gender roles; civi c values; racial, religious, and moral attitudes; literary style and format; a nd the arts of illustrations and book design. A great strength of the collec tion is the many English and American editions of the same work, e.g. 300 editions of Robinson Crusoe The importance of the collection was recognized in 2008 with the placement of the third UF Historical Marker. P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History The P.K. Yonge Library is the state' s preeminent Floridiana collection and includes a diverse array of primary sour ces. It has collected the largest North American collection of Spanish colonial documents concerning the southeastern United States, particularly materials on Florida from early Spanish exploration through 1821. In addition, it is the single most comprehensive repository for early and current Florida newspapers. The P.K. Yonge Library has always had a close association with scholars working in prehistory, et hnohistory, and archaeology. The holdings of colonial ma terials contain many essentia l sources of information on indigenous life in Florida, and the libra ry has specialized for a number of years in collecting materials on the Seminoles and on the 19th Century Seminole Wars. The library is the most important repository for political papers related to Florida outside of the State Archives. It is also a major repository for books, maps, reports, explorer's notes and other manuscr ipt material on Florida's environment, the Everglades, the Cross-Florida Barg e Canal, conservation efforts, geology, wildlife, fisheries, river surveys, and forestry. General Manuscripts Collection The General Manuscripts Collection c onsists of more than one thousand manuscript groups and individual manuscrip ts, filling more than a mile of shelving and covering a wide array of subject interests. These include General Manuscripts, along with manuscripts in th e specialized area of Florida History

PAGE 11

Page 8 and University Archives. General Manuscrip ts are a diverse collection of over one hundred groups. Literary papers, creative wr iting, and papers related to literature comprise the majority of the Genera l Manuscripts collection. A second major emphasis is the Caribbean and Latin Amer ica. The Braga Brothers Collection, for example, is an archive of the Cuban s ugar industry, believed to surpass any found outside Cuba. Africa and the study of its peoples and lands is a subject area of increasing emphasis for General Manuscripts Other major areas of focus include social activism, the human sciences including anthropology and psychology, natural science and enviro nmentalism, broadcasting, drama, and the arts. Harold and Mary Jean Hanson Rare Book Collection The Harold and Mary Jean Hanson Rare B ook Collection is one of the finest in the nation. It is an invaluable resource fo r primary printed materials and is utilized by students, faculty, resear chers at the university a nd other research centers throughout the country and abroad. The books range in date from the 15th Century through the contemporary era. S ubject strengths in clude New England authors (Parkman Dexter Howe Coll ection of literature and related cultural/historical topics for the 17th-19th Centuries); classical literature in early printed editions; Restora tion literature; 18th Centur y poetry, prose and drama; Irish literature of the 19th and 20th Centuries; and sele ct 20th Century British and American poetry and fiction. The hi story of science collection provides researchers with access to an important selection of works dealing with botany and agriculture from the 16th Century onwar d as well as the scientific revolution in 17th-Century Europe and biological studies from 19th-Century Germany. Book arts and the history of the book includ e special bindings, fine presses, book illustration, proofs and engraved wood bloc ks by Eric Gill and John Buckland Wright, and fore-edge paintings. Other subj ect areas materially represented in the collections include social and military history, theology, travel, and landscape architecture. In addition to traditional rare books, the depa rtment also is fortunate to hold several special print collections. University Archives The University of Florida Archives is th e official custodian of the university's historically significant public records in cluding the administrative files of past presidents. In addition to public records, it collects the pape rs and records of individuals and organizations associated with the uni versity in both print and electronic formats. The Archives also maintains files of yearbooks, newspapers, official publications, photogr aphs, artifacts, and record copies of theses and dissertations produced at the university. The Office of Archives and Records Manage ment is a new unit, which integrates the University of Florida Archives, es tablished in 1951; the Office of Records Management which was created in 1986 as a unit of the Office of Academic Affairs; and the Health Science Center Archives which was es tablished in 2003 in the Office of the Vice President of Health Affairs. This integrated University Archives allows for the efficient transfer of historical records from individual

PAGE 12

Page 9 offices, improving the university’s reco rds-keeping and providing documentation on the institution’s significant policy d ecisions and important milestones. The Archives serves an important role in the university’s public and community relations campaigns, and provides genera tions of alumni a shared sense of community and history. Architecture Archives As a partnership between the Smathers Li braries and the School of Architecture since 2004, the Architecture Archives ha s become a leading repository for historical records pertaining to the ar chitects and architecture of Florida. Activities to date have focused on a ha ndful of important collections, including the archives of Alfred Browning Parker Kenneth Treister, Rufus Nims, Darrell Fleeger, and the Carrre and Hastings firm. The collections support scholarly research, historic preservation, and the education of future students. Popular Culture Collections The Popular Culture Collections consist of the Belknap Collection for the Performing Arts, the Suzy Covey Comic Book Collection, and the Jim Liversidge Collection. The Belknap Collection was donated in 1953 by Sara Yancey Belknap, a New York librarian and an av id patron of the ar ts. Since then the collection has grown by acquisition as well as through donations from artists, libraries, and interested i ndividuals. Nearly 85% of the holdings are ephemera from 19th and 20th Century America and Eu rope. The archives include more than 60,000 playbills, programs, posters, photographs, costume and stage designs, clippings, newsletters, theatrical scra pbooks, sheet music, recordings, prints, scripts, and advertising circulars. The co llection also contains reference works, rare and large pictorial volumes, and perf orming arts periodicals. The Suzy Covey Comic Book Collection is still growing, and is useful for those interested in the history and development of sequential ar t formats, particularly in the United States. It includes original and reprint comic books, stri ps, caricature s and related items. The collection holds items from ev ery recognized “Age” of comics as well as every genre, including daily humor st rips and political satire as well as superhero, funny animal, and underground co mics. The Jim Liversidge Collection includes memorabilia and artifacts cove ring politics, televi sion, theatre, film, music, sports and day-to-day current events of the past 50 years. The collection is comprised of almost seven thousa nd items, including scrapbooks, photos, programs, posters, campaign buttons, sheet music, news clippings, audiovisual recordings, artifacts and over 400 book titles. The Area Studies unit of SASC includes th e Latin American Collection, the African Studies Collection, the Isser and Rae Price Li brary of Judaica, and the Asian Studies Collection. The holdings are significant in te rms of quantity and qua lity. The collections support the university’s academic pr ograms and scholars worldwide.

PAGE 13

Page 10 Latin American Collection The Latin American Collection supports the Center for Latin American Studies and other academic programs. It is am ong the largest and most distinguished collections of Latin American materials in the U.S. and has been described as the finest collection of Caribbeana in the worl d. Because of Florida' s cultural past, the University of Florida has a long tradition of Latin American studies, dating back to the establishment of the university's Inter-American Inst itute in 1930. In 1951, the Libraries accepted national responsibil ity for collection Caribbean and West Indian material, aided by federal and priv ate support. Librarians in the 1950s and 1960s traveled extensively acquiring a nd microfilming newspapers, official gazettes and rare books from many national ar chives. There is also deep coverage of Brazil, Mexico, Central America, A ndean nations and the Southern Cone. African Studies Collection The African Studies Collecti on supports the UF Center fo r African Studies. It is recognized as a unique resource within th e Libraries, and ranks among the best such collections in the U.S. The collection numbers upwards of 130,000 volumes and over 500 journal titles published in many languages that are located throughout the campus libraries. Books and periodicals, audio and video recordings, newspapers, microfilm, rare books, manuscripts, maps and atlases, computer data files, government documents and a variety of other formats support research and teaching. The collection fac ilitates inter-disciplinary and applied approaches to the study of the continent w ith current scholarshi p and materials of historical interest in a vast array of academic and professional fields. Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica The Price Library of Judaica was forma lly dedicated in Ma rch 1981 to support the teaching and research missions of the Center for Jewish Studies at the University of Florida. The library is named for I sser and Rae Price, whose sons, Jack and Samuel Price, established a fund in s upport of the library. The Library’s core collection is the Rabbi Leonard C. Mi shkin Library, which at the time of purchase, was the largest private library of Judaica and Hebraica in the U.S. The Mishkin collection was supplemented by two major acquisitions – the Shlomo Marenof Library and the i nventory of Bernard Morgen stern's bookstore in New York City. The library has built upon th ese acquisitions and is taking its place alongside the well-respected and mature J udaica collections on other American campuses. With few exceptions, the Price Library holds most of the important scholarly landmark literature and classic texts in Jewish studies. It has become a collection without peer in the southeastern United States. Asian Studies Collection The Asian Studies Collection supports the Asian Studies Program at the University of Florida, which includes Ea st and South Asian hi story; East, South and Southeast Asian languages and literatu res; East, Southeast, South and Central Asian religions; and Asian-related areas within other human ities and social science fields. The Asian Studies Collect ion serves the research and curricula

PAGE 14

Page 11 needs of the Asian Studies faculty, the As ian-related M.A. and Ph.D. students in the separate disciplines, and undergraduates working in various aspects and stages of Asian Studies. Government Documents and Maps The Government Documents department se rves as the Regional Federal Depository Library for the State of Florida and the Ca ribbean serving over forty selective Federal Depository Libraries in Florida, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. As the Regional Depository, the department is required by la w to receive and retain permanently all publications published by the federal gove rnment and distributed by the U.S. Government Printing Office via the Federal Depository Program. The Federal Documents collection has close to two million documents in paper, microfiche, and microprint formats. The department is also one of two depositories in Florida for European Union documents and is a depository for publications of the state of Florida. The department also houses a unique collection of planning documents published by counties and cities in Florida. Located within the Government Documents department, The Map & Imagery Library is among the top five academic map libraries in the United States with over 500,000 maps and 200,000 aerial photos and satellite images The library also provides Geographic Information Services (GIS) and spatial data and the computer workstations and software to support patron use of GIS. The Map & Imag ery Library is in continual collaboration with the Libraries Digital Services unit to digi tize as much of the collection as possible in order to provide patron access anywhere at any time. Extensive aerial photography coverage of Florida, from the 1930s to th e present, is a top requested resource and invaluable to consultants and researcher s... Maps ranging from the 15th century to present day are an asset to historians as we ll as the general public. Specialties of the collection include Florida, La tin America, the United States Africa, and the Holy Land. Library West (The Humanities and Social Sciences Library) Library West is the largest branch in the Ge orge A. Smathers Libraries with a capacity for 1.7 million print volumes and current hold ings of over 1.1 million print volumes and 2.2 million volumes overall with the inclusion of microforms. It is the home of the Humanities and Social Sciences collectio ns, including business, as well as 80,000 volumes from the Price Library of Judaica and an important collection of microforms with an emphasis on historical Florida newspapers. The collections support over 128 academic programs at both the undergraduate, graduate, and research levels. Renovated in 2006, the Library West building includes seating for 1,400 and a large Information Commons comprised of over 140 public com puter workstations. Two ADA/Media rooms outfitted with 42-inch monitors and assis tive equipment and media production software, as well as another 18 high performance work stations in the open computer area, are available for users with disabilities and for students engaged in media presentations or projects. A number of well-a ttended special educational ev ents are held throughout the year in the commons area, establishing Librar y West as a hub of activity on campus in addition to its role as the primary destinati on for assistance and research materials in the humanities and social sciences.

PAGE 15

Page 12 Marston Science Library Named for Robert Q. Marston, the seventh pres ident of the University of Florida (19741984), the Marston Science Library (M SL) contains over 500,000 books and 5,000 journals and provides access to 160 online data bases covering the agricultural, physical and life sciences, as well as engineering and co mputer science. The library was built in 1987 to consolidate several discipline specific science libraries, the oldest of which was the agricultural library established in 1905. The collections support over sixty academic programs at both the undergraduate, graduate, and research levels. MSL also cooperates in developing history of science collections in Special Collections as well as science collections in Government Documents, th e Map and Imagery collection, the Health Science Center collection, and the Digita l Library Center online collections. MSL librarians have been instrumental in digiti zing IFAS agricultural publications, Florida Geological Survey publications the Florida Museum of Na tural History Bulletin and other specialized science collections. As onlin e access to journals and reference materials has expanded, freeing space in the buildi ng, MSL has created additional group study space for students, including five new study rooms, improved meeting rooms, and the introduction of large screen monitors for group use. Departmental Libraries The Departmental Libraries are Architecture and Fine Arts, Education, Journalism and Communications Library, and Music. Thes e units are physically housed in the corresponding colleges and are e ffectively integrated into their academic programs and activities. Architecture and Fine Arts Library Located in Fine Arts Building A, the collections of AFA Library primarily support academic programs associated with the School of Architecture, departments of Interior Design, Landscap e Architecture, and Urban and Regional Planning, the School of Art and Art Hi story, and the M.E. Rinker School of Building Construction. In addition to bound volumes, the library houses over 1,400 architectural drawings and phot ographs; 20,000 microf orm units; and 6,000 art post cards. The library also houses over 1,000 historic preservation documents created by the UF School of Architectur e and several hundred student projects each from landscape and construction disciplines. AFA’s specialized video collection consists of over 1,500 cataloged titles plus about 500 uncataloged tapes of visiting speakers or cla ss lectures. AFA’s periodical collection includes about 2,700 titles with approximately 250 current subscriptions. Education Library The Education Library is located in Norman Hall. Its collection supports 26 academic degree programs in the College of Education. Significant materials in the Education Library incl ude the Children's Book Collection, the K-12 Textbook Collection, the ERIC Documents Microfiche and several other microfiche and a video collection. The collection cons ists of more than 145,000 monographic

PAGE 16

Page 13 volumes, approximately 600 journal subscr iptions, both print a nd electronic, and more than 585,000 microfiche. Allen H. Neuharth Journalism and Communications Library The Allen H. Neuharth Library is locate d within the College of Journalism and Communications in Weimer Hall. It serves the students, faculty, and staff in the College by supporting the inst ructional and research programs of the college, including the Departments of Advertis ing, Journalism, Public Relations, and Telecommunication. Due to space limitati ons, older titles in the circulating collection of books are housed in Library West or remote storage, while newer titles and all of the core reference and re search materials supporting the fields of journalism and mass communicatio ns are available on-site. Music Library The Music Library is located in the Musi c Building. It supports the research needs of the School of Music's faculty, students a nd staff, as well as those in other areas. The School of Music has been in existe nce as an administrative unit since 1948. At that time, materials, particularly scores and recordings, to support music courses were purchased by and housed in the department. The Music Reading Room began primarily as a listening facility, staffed by a music faculty member and an employee of the Office of Inst ructional Resources. Comparatively few books on music were purchased as part of the general libra ry collection. The Music Reading Room became part of th e Libraries in 1972 and has progressed from a reading room used primarily as a listening facility to a research branch library. The collection now contains musi c monographs and periodicals, scores, sound recordings (compact discs, 33 rpm records, and cassettes), video recordings (VHS, DVD, and laser discs). Technology and Support Services The Technology and Support Services division co nsists of the following functional units serving the University Libraries: Acquisi tions; Cataloging and Me tadata; Access Support; Digital Services and Shared Collections; In formation Technology; and Facilities and Security. The mission of the Technology and S upport Services division is to enable the Libraries technology infrastructur e to work in support of the information needs of the University of Florida community and to provide vital infrastructure services to all library units, thus ensuring that the Smathers Libr aries serve as a catalyst for research and discovery. Acquisitions The primary mission of the Acquisitions Departme nt is to efficiently acquire research materials in a variety of formats that suppor t the academic and professional programs of the University of Florida. The departme nt is responsible for managing license agreements; enhance technical services workflow s; track usage statistics; process serials, standing orders and series; oversee several a pproval plans that ac quire print monographs and E-Books; and launch and manage a variety of projects to improve user access, assist

PAGE 17

Page 14 collection management, and implement cost-e ffective measures. The department manages the allocation and expenditures of a multimillio n dollar materials budget in an automated environment, and is the home of the Gifts and Exchange Programs. The department is also responsible for developi ng and monitoring several patron driven selection programs (PDAs) that acquire print monographs, DVDs, and E-Books based directly upon patron usage and user requests. Cataloging and Metadata The Cataloging and Metadata Department supports the academic programs of the university by organizing, describing, a nd providing physical processing for the books, journals, electronic resources, sound and video recordi ngs, microforms, maps, and other material purchased or recei ved by the library system. The department catalogs approximately 25,000 titles per year in compliance with national standards of bibliographic control and in keeping with es tablished cataloging pr iorities. In addition, the department oversees the lo ading of e-resource and micr oform packages resulting in the addition of thousands of records to th e library catalog each year. Original record contributions to OCLC, an international bibli ographic database, number 5,000 annually. The department participates in internati onal cooperative catal oging programs including CONSER, BIBCO, NACO, SACO, and AGRICOLA. The department is leading a major effort to catalog over 300,000 federal documents in storage prior to integration into the SU S Shared Collection. As of October 2011, 78,604 titles (109,496 items) have been added to th e catalog. Additional subs tantial projects are underway to improve access to other collectio ns housed in storage with the goal of facilitating a smooth transition to the shared f acility. As a pilot participant in the SUSwide project to physically merge the catalog records of all eleven institutions in the coming year, department personnel are fully e ngaged in all prepara tions and contribute significantly to the decision-making. The department guides SUS participation in international cooperative programs, including spearheading and coordinating the Florida NACO Funnel, a cooperative program for a dding authoritative acces s points to the Library of Congress authority file, which now includes UF, USF, FSU, UNF, and FIU. Beginning March 2011, the department implem ented a policy to include the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication in al l of its original cataloging records. The records are considered public domain with unrestricted downstream use for any purpose. Each month an updated complete file of a ll CC0 designated original records is posted online for public access. The department actively supports the Libraries development efforts by cataloging numerous unique coll ections and providing virtual bookplates for endowments and individual acquisitions, such as titles donated this year by Robert L. Egolf, Graham and Brian Child, John Thor bjarnarson, Marjorie A. and Ann Lindell, Gordon “Stumpy” Harris, the Panama Canal Mu seum, and the Institute of Black Culture. Access Support The Access Support unit provides leadership in the development, coordination and provision of services th at facilitate user acc ess to information resources. Access Support serves as the central point for distribution a nd clarification of polic ies and procedures for user access services. The unit supports sc holarly research within the academic

PAGE 18

Page 15 community through interlibrary loans, which include lending scholarly resources to other libraries, borrowing scholarly resources fo r UF patrons from other libraries, and supporting distance learners re search needs through documen t delivery services; and Course Reserves, which include making availa ble for student study, pr int and electronic resources selected by faculty for specific course work. Access Support personnel instruct students, faculty, and staff in copyright co mpliance and obtain copyright permissions for course reserve and interlibrary loan materials. Digital Services and Shared Collections A new department was formed in 2011 in rec ognition of the synergies of our services, which are designed to assure access and longterm preservation to scholarly content in both physical and digital forms. This de partment encompasses preservation and conservation; development of shared colle ctions, both print and digital, built through collaboration with other academic libraries in Florida; and sophisticated digitization services. The Digital Services unit is among the larg est in the southeastern United States, managing over 7.55 million pages of digital content. It develops, manages, and publishes digital content from curatorial collections in support of academic programs, digital scholarship and digital humanities projects. In addition to providing conversion and ingest capabilities, the unit faci litates awareness and coordina tes instruction in scholarly use and development of digital technologies and their applicati on to collection and publishing services. The University of Florida Digital Collection (UFDC) is the set of digital collections hosted by UF, including the Digital Librar y of the Caribbean, an international collaborative, as well as the state-wide Flor ida Digital Newspaper Library. With rare children's literature books, unique manuscrip ts and letters, antique maps, museum objects, herbarium specimens, photographs, or al histories, arch itectural drawings, recordings of speeches and songs, videos of performances, and more, UFDC offers many resources for research and discovery from anywhere in the world. Over two hundred versions of Robinson Crusoe ; over 1.75 million pages of Florida and Caribbean newspapers; and, over 6,000 photographs from th e University of Florida Archives are significant in that they are co -located, have a browse capabi lity, and are cross-referenced and searchable sets. In 2010-2011, Digital Services added 1.85 m illion pages of content to UFDC in comparison to 1.3M the previous year. This growth can be attributed, in part, to an increase in partner contributions, a simplif ied newspaper processing workflow, and an increase in the amount of born digital cont ributions. Between June 30, 2010 and July 1st, 2011 over 117,000 pages of born digital conten t were added and the University of Florida Institutional Repository grew by approximately 870,000 pages, the latter including materials self-submitted by UF faculty and materials harvested by or digitized within the facility. Contributions from ex ternal partners, including a new partnership with the Law Library Microfilm Consortium (LLMC), increased the content within the collaborative Digital Library of the Caribbean project by over 200,000 pages.

PAGE 19

Page 16 The Preservation and Conservation unit is res ponsible for the mainte nance and repair of analog archival and library materials, keeping them maintained for use through commercial library binding and a full service conservation lab for disaster recovery and environmental control of the collections. To meet the core responsib ility of maintaining the physical collections, preser vation and conserva tion provide such services as repair and restoration, binding and rebinding, deaci dification, encapsulation, construction of protective enclosures, and environmental m onitoring. The unit responds to questions from the University and the general public relating to the conservation of books, paper, and photographic materials. Over 30,000 reels of print master microfilm are housed in environmentally correct storage, fulfilling requests for sales and interlibrary loan of these items, with an ongoing project to convert selected microf ilm content to digital format. Since the fall of 2001, the University of Florida has required electronic theses and dissertations (ETD). Preservation staff is responsible for ETD submissions, tracking access parameters and answering student inqu iries. In 2008, a retrospective dissertation scanning project was initiated to digitize thes es and dissertations previously submitted to the Libraries in print. In 2010-2011 over 1,395 ad ditional dissertations were scanned and made available on the Internet. This projec t was expanded to include Health Science Center titles in 2010. Information Technology The Information Technology Department se rves as the focal point for planning, managing and coordinating computer-based information reso urces that support University Libraries operations The department consists of units dedicated to Software Development, Web Services Server and Network Management, and Hardware Support. Working with librarians and subject speci alists, Information Technology Department employees have created protot ypical solutions to enable Federal Depositories to access exchange lists, have implemented a system to remotely image the more than 400 public workstations within the Libraries and support access to the more than 3.8 million virtual visitors a year to the Smathers Librarie s web site. Through the Altiris software and licensing management system, 430 staff workst ations are imaged and maintained by the Information Technology Department. Information Technology personnel serve on stat e-wide advisory committees and work with the Florida Center for Library Auto mation (FCLA), Northeast Florida Library Network (NEFLIN) and others to insure access and connectivity. Facilities and Security The Libraries Facilities and Security Departme nt is responsible for all facility planning, construction, maintenance, security, signa ge, accountable property, office supply distribution, and a system-wide mail and courier service for the Smathers Libraries. This includes over 568,977 square feet of building space. Recent re novations have occurred in several of the branch libraries including substantial renova tions in the Marston Science

PAGE 20

Page 17 Library. There are plans for the constructi on and renovation of a high density storage facility located within six miles of main campus to house an SUS Shared Collection that over time will include over 4.5 million items. Renovations of the Health Science Center Library and the Smathers Library (L ibrary East) are also planned. Administrative Support Units and Programs The administrative support units and progr ams include the office of the Dean of University Libraries, as well as the offi ces of the Assistant Dean for Human and Financial Resources and the Associate D ean for Development and Advancement. Office of the Dean of University Libraries In addition to administrative support, the o ffice of the Dean includes the SUS Shared Collection and the Auxiliary Library Facility (ALF); th e Academic and Scholarly Outreach unit; the Kuali OLE project, and th e Emerging Technology Librarian (currently vacant) SUS Shared Collection and the Auxiliary Library Facility (ALF) In October of 2007, the Board of Gover nors of the Florida State University System (SUS) approved a request to build a high density storage facility at the University of Florida to provide space fo r a shared research collection for the SUS libraries. The plan called for a high density “Harvard” model storage facility with a capacity of 4.5 to 5 million print volu mes. The new facility will provide one central shared repository enabling SU S and other academic libraries more effectively manage little used, but still important, print collections and free on campus space to better accommodate mu ch needed seating and public space within their individual campuses. In January 2012, the Libraries will begin managing a leased facility to provide additional space for the shared research collection for the SUS libraries until th e high density storage facility is constructed. The George A. Smathers Libraries have a medium density Auxiliary Library Facility (ALF) located four miles from the main campus which holds 1.2 million low circulating library materials and serv es as storage for other materials pending processing. The new high density facility will be built adjacent to ALF and the existing ALF building will be renovated and repurposed. It will serve as the processing space for moving materials into high density and retrieving them. It will also house the digitization, preservation and conservation operations currently located on campus in the Smathers Library (Library East). These operations will continue to support the Libr aries as well as materials in the SUS Shared Collection. Some space in the renova ted ALF building will be reserved for UF library resources that are not appropr iate for the Shared Collection, including materials from the University Archives and Special Collections. Access to materials for UF patrons will be possible through a campus library or by appointment in an onsite reading room, but the primary means of access for other patrons will be through unmediated borrowing services of the SUS and interlibrary loan.

PAGE 21

Page 18 Academic and Scholarly Outreach The newly created Academic and Scholar ly Outreach unit is responsible for overseeing the Libraries scholarly comm unications and open access initiatives, including the administration of the UF Open Access Publishing Fund Pilot Project, Open Access Week programming, policy development, and outreach to faculty, students, and staff on open acce ss issues and use of the Institutional Repository. The unit is also responsible fo r the coordination of the Libraries many instruction and outre ach activities for the campus community. Kuali OLE For academic libraries in Florida, the Kuali Open Library Environment (OLE) holds the promise of a common, cost-effective, open source system that libraries can use to more effectively collaborate and manage their materials. The system will focus initially on the acquisition of pr int and digital resources, with the agile capacity to be adapted to financial and ot her content systems at each participating institution. The OLE project is developing a commun ity-source library management system that will define a next-generation t echnology environment based on a thoroughly re-examined model of agile library busine ss operations. The University of Florida is a founding member of this Mellon Founda tion funded project that includes nine Florida partners: Florida International University, Florida State University, New College of Florida, Rollins College, Univer sity of Central Florida, University of Miami, University of South Florida and Florida Center for Library Automation. Human and Financial Resources This office supports the human resources a nd fiscal services for the Libraries. Human Resources The Human Resources Office provides gui dance and support to employees and managers on human resources policies and procedures. Core services and competencies include: fostering diversity ; administering effort reporting and other compliance programs; recruiting and reta ining faculty, staff and OPS employees; overseeing the completion of personnelrelated documentation and record retention; administering employment and appointment related transactions; administering faculty and staff evalua tion programs responsive to department needs and challenging to employee skill s; working with faculty, staff and managers on sensitive employee relations issues; supporting faculty through the key processes for tenure and promoti on; maintaining a training program committed to continued education and staff development; professional development and personal leave admini stration; and benef its administration. Fiscal Services The Fiscal Services Office supports the operations of the various library units, departments and programs and ensures e ffective interaction with various UF financial offices and officials by providing timely and accurate business

PAGE 22

Page 19 information and advice that enhances decision making by those in leadership positions throughout the Smathers Librarie s. Fiscal Services operations are designed to provide high-level customer service, to ensure stewardship of library assets and to leverage libr ary resources to the best possible outcome for library patrons by increasing the tr ansparency and general unde rstanding of the source and availability of the Libraries financia l resources and how they are used and managed through a variety of regular fina ncial reports available on the Fiscal Services website. Development and Advancement This office supports the development, public relations, and grants management for the Libraries. Development The Development Office designs, impleme nts and manages the fundraising and donor relations program and participates in strategic planning for development in support of the University’s and Librar ies’ mission and objectives. Working collaboratively with the library deans, chairs, library faculty members, and development officers in other college s and schools, the unit has primary responsibility for directing library effo rts that encompass major gifts, donor stewardship, development of public s upport groups, coordination of fundraising events, and relations between the Librarie s, its Library Leadership Board, the University of Florida and the UF Foundati on, Inc. The office is responsible for the identification, qualification, cultivation, so licitation and the stewardship of gift prospects. Communications The Communications Office generates and coordinates public relations efforts on behalf of the Libraries as a whole and indi vidual programs, events and initiatives. This office works closely with the library administration, library faculty and staff, UF News Bureau, the UF Foundation, Inc. a nd other university colleges and units to disseminate information about the Libraries to support donations, promote library educational, academic and social activities, and provide information about library personnel, programs and achieveme nts to the university, the general public and other communities and partners at the local, state and national levels. Grants Management The Grants Program promotes an increas e in grant-funded pr ojects in order to meet the goals and mission of the Univer sity and the Libraries. The program coordinates policies, proce sses and support mechanisms fo r grant activities for the Libraries. The unit works with library st aff, faculty, functional teams and project teams to identify opportunities and to expa nd the Libraries grants and support for other fundable projects, while building pa rtnerships and grantsmanship capacity on campus. The program actively develops collaborative relationships with organizations locally, regionally, and nationally to increase project funding opportunities. The program also is res ponsible for supporting the collection and

PAGE 23

Page 20 compilation of data, timely submission of proposals and the monitoring of awards. Health Science Center Libraries The Health Science Center Libraries provide services and programs to support the Colleges of Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Public Health and Health Professions, and Veterinary Medicine; the Mc Knight Brain Institute; the University of Florida Genetics Institute; the Emerging Pathoge ns Institute; the Institute for Child and Health Policy; the Institute of Aging; Shands HealthCare; the University of Florida/Shands Cancer Center; the University of Florida Physicians Clinics (12 primary and 21 specialty care); and the North Florid a Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) program. The HSC Libraries also support hea lth-related research by providing up-to-date research content and information access a nd management support. Since 1999, the HSC Libraries have operated a liaison librarian program to facilitate partnerships with academic faculty and programs by designating a lib rarian as the primary point of contact for each HSC college or department. Health Science Center Library (Gainesville) Located in the Communicor e Building of the Health Science Center, the HSC Library serves the academic, clinical, and research needs of over 11,000 students, faculty and staff of the six health scien ce colleges. In additi on, it serves Shands HealthCare, medical institutions, outr each programs, and distance learning. Borland Health Science Center Library (Jacksonville) The Borland Health Sciences Library, located on the Jacksonville campus, is a branch of the Health Sciences Center Li braries. It provides services and programs to support the Colleges of Medicine, Nurs ing, and Pharmacy. In addition, Borland provides services to member institutions including Shands Jacksonville Medical Center, Memorial Hospital and th e University of St. Augustine. Veterinary Medicine Reading Room The Veterinary Medicine Reading Room is located in the College of Veterinary Medicine Building to provide the College of Veterinary Medicine faculty and students with on-site resources. Although the HSLC does not staff the Reading Room, it does fund, acquire and catalog the materials in all formats that are housed in the Reading Room or accessibl e online. The Veterinary Medicine liaison librarian, who is an HSCL faculty me mber, serves as the subject specialist and provides expert reference assistance to the faculty, staff and students. Supplemental Data About Libr ary Programs and Services The following tables provide an overview of the 2010-2011 expenditu res for materials, operations, staffing, and administration of the George A. Smathers Libraries; library funded and maintained IT resources for library patrons; and statistics for library usage, space allocation and hours.

PAGE 24

Page 21

PAGE 25

Page 22

PAGE 26

Page 23

PAGE 27

Page 24 The Libraries are open each w eek to the public for a combin ed total of 557 hours, and over three million people visite d the Libraries last year, bu t these numbers do not reflect the full usage of the collections and servic es. The library website receives hundreds of thousands of hits each year from UF staf f, faculty, and student s who use the library through the VPN or EZProxy.

PAGE 28

Page 25 Acquisition of Library Materials The primary purpose of library collections is to provide content to support every discipline that is taught and every field in which UF conducts research. The following charts reflect the breakdown of 2010-2011 expe nditures for materials by material type and academic discipline from both appropriate d funds and support from the Division of Sponsored Research. This is the last fu ll year for which data is available.

PAGE 29

Page 26

PAGE 30

Page 27

PAGE 31

Page 28

PAGE 32

Page 29 5. 2012-2013 Budget Scenarios 2012-2013 Projected Annual Uses of Funds Statement: University Libraries Table continued on next page

PAGE 33

Page 30

PAGE 34

Page 31 2012-2013 Projected Annual Uses of Funds Statement: HSC Libraries Table continued on next page

PAGE 35

Page 32

PAGE 36

Page 33 2012-2013 Projected Annual Uses of Funds Statement: Administrative (Inclusive of Acquisitions and Interim Storage Facility) Table continued on next page

PAGE 37

Page 34

PAGE 38

Page 35 Pre-Approved Increases in th e Libraries RCM Base Budget The provost has pre-approved tw o increases to the Librarie s RCM base budget, one to replace technology funding prev iously provided by the Flor ida Center for Library Automation (FCLA) and the other to support offsite long term retention of low-use library materials through a collaborative collection. FCLA Funding: $360,707 The Libraries maintain the largest number of public workstations on campus (552), but receive no centralized IT f unding. Instead, the Libraries re lied heavily on technology funding provided by the Florida Center for Li brary Automation (FCLA) to sustain and refresh its technology. At the direction of th e SUS provosts, FCLA eliminated its direct support for technology to the SUS libraries. As a result, the Smathers Libraries have lost critically needed recu rring funds. Whether the Libraries current base budget is flat or decreased in 2012-2013, the FCLA funding must be replaced in the Libraries budget in order to sustain the current level of service, including periodic replacement of public access computers and peripherals. Consequently, the Provost has authorized an increase in the Libraries recurring base budget for IT expenses equivalent to the 2010-2011 FCLA funding level for the Libraries: $360,707 per year. Proposed Distributio n of Technology Funds : UL HSCL Smathers Total $312,727 $47,980 $360,707 Offsite Storage Funding: $1,058,820 The Libraries are managing a l eased facility for offsite l ong term retention of low use library materials through a collaborative coll ection. The materials will be retained and made available as long as the need for them exists, thereby allowing the libraries at UF and other Florida universities to consider withdrawing duplicates of these items from their library collections and to rely with confidence on access to the retained copies. Onethird of the print collection from the HS CL has already been removed and will be transferred to the shared collection. Removing print journals would result in the eventual conversion of an additional 11,000 square feet in HSCL into public spaces for students. Similarly, moving print journals and government documents would result in the eventual conversion of approximately 23,000 square feet in Marston into public spaces for students. The estimated annual operating costs for the facility will be reduced to the maximum extent possible by seeking support from othe r participating Florid a universities, but uncertainty about the timing and amount of t hose payments necessitates planning for the full amount of the anticipated expenses for the coming year. Consequently, the Provost has authorized an increase in the Librar ies recurring base budget for offsite storage

PAGE 39

Page 36 expenses of $1,058,820 per year. Since both the UL and HSCL will receive significant benefit from this facility, the costs wi ll be allocated proporti onally through RCM. Flat Funding – Smathers Libraries The George A. Smathers Libraries have two main components under RCM, the Health Science Center Libraries (HSCL) and th e University Libraries (UL). Under RCM, the HSCL is funded through units of the Health Sciences Center. The University Libraries are funded through the university’s other academic and research uni ts, with the exception of the Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center which is supported by the Levin College of Law and, therefore, not included in this review. For the purpose of this RCM review, the Smathers Libraries are presented in a combined budget, but where appropri ate, the data is also reported separately for the two components. The budgets of the Libraries, part icularly the HSCL, are inadequate to manage its facilities and address patron needs for materials and services. Price increases well above the rate of inflation chronically deplete purchasing power for library materials. In 2010-2011, several critical faculty and staff positions were filled, making the Libraries better prepared to meet the needs of students and faculty, but essentially eliminating the historic use of salary savings to cover inadequacies in the operations and materials budgets. Accordingly, in planning for a flat budget, operations and, to an even greater extent, collec tions are negatively impacted. The Materials Budget Despite protecting the material s budget through the past budget reductions, lost buying power due to high rate increases fo r library materials, which wi ll total well over $600,000 in 2012-2013 alone, is extremely problematic. The 2012-2013 er osion will be in addition to $2.8 million in lost buying power from 2007-2008 through 20112012, as shown in the table below. Fiscal Year Materials Inflation Rate Lost Buying Power Cumulative Loss 2007-2008 4.68% $485,841 $485,841 2008-2009 6.32% $672,756 $1,158,597 2009-2010 3.74% $386,189 $1,544,786 2010-2011 5.83% $650,963 $2,195,749 2011-2012 5.06% $598,077 $2,793,826 2012-2013 5.07% $629,011 $3,422,837 Cumulative Lost Buying Power: UL HSCL Smathers Total $2,818,425 $604,412 $3,422,837

PAGE 40

Page 37 As a result of this situation the Libraries have had no opportunity to maintain, much less develop, suitable collections. The Libraries are unable to purchase and license th e range of print and electronic resources, which are core to an academ ic library’s capacity to support a research enterprise with the breadth and depth of this university. The impact of this has spanned the Smathers Libraries, affecting support for all disciplines. Current Lost Buying Power: The lost buying power for 2011-2012 material s was covered using one-time funding from unfilled salaries. Since that was one-time f unding, in 2012-2013 the Libraries will experience the effects of two years of lost buying power. In addition, the 2011-2012/2012-2013 1% budget recall of appropriated funding will further reduce the materials budget. As a result of, a flat budget in 2012-2013 there will be a $1.5 million decrea se in the materials budget – equivalent to a 12.7% cut. The result of the lost buying power due to incr eases in materials prices is reflected in the following table: UL HSCL Smathers Lost buying power 2011-2012 $494,415 $103,662 $598,077 Lost buying power 2012-2013 $520,024 $108,987 $629,011 1% cut effective in 2012-2013 $231,472 $40,847 $272,319 Totals: $1,245,911$253,496 $1,499,407 Though the lost buying power impacts the entire colle ctions budget, a substa ntial portion of the Electronic Resources (E-Resources) budget is for materials licensed and purchased in large journal packages. These are ofte n acquired through consortia and under multi-year contracts and, therefore, cannot be easily cut by UF independent ly. As a result, Print Monographs (books) and Print Serials (journals) experien ce a highly disproportionate reducti on as a result of lost buying power. However, with the extent of the cut out lined here, the Libraries may be forced to cancel one of the large journal packages, such as the Wiley/Blackwell journals, losing access to hundreds of titles. The choice of which package to cut could be a matter of timing of the contracts rather than a function of need for the specific journal titles, and will certainly cut into core collections that Libraries have managed to protect in the past. In the event of a flat materi als budget for the Smathers Librar ies, the cuts resulting from 20122013 lost buying power might be implemented as follows: Fund UL Cut HSCL Cut Total Cut E-Resources $556,708 $53,496 $610,204 Print Serials $300,000 $200,000 $500,000 Print Monographs $300,000 $0.00 $300,000 Binding Serials $89,203 $0.00 $89,203 Total $1,245,911 $253,496 $1,499,407

PAGE 41

Page 38 In considering the options for cutting the materials budget there are three possible scenarios: devastating print while protecting electronic resources, balancing cuts to print and electronic resources, or protecting print at the ex pense of a major journal package. While it is tempting to declare electronic resource s the wave of the futu re, and print resources unnecessary, many books and serials in the humanities and social sciences ha ve not yet made the transition to electronic access, a nd a deep cut in the print resour ces would greatly endanger the Libraries ability to maintain a research collecti on and to serve students, faculty, and researchers in these areas. The HSCL has already eliminat ed monograph spending and thus could only take cuts from the E-Resources and Print Serials. The print serials the HSCL continue to receive represent core materials which have not been converted to onl ine formats due to cost. Many of the electronic resources provided by the Libraries are only affordable when purchased in bundled packages under multi-year contracts. As a result, even a 10% cut in the E-Resources budget would be difficult to accomplish in a single budget year wit hout resorting to the cancellation of a major journal pa ckage which would similarly enda nger the Libraries ability to provide access to research mate rials needed by the sciences. Binding, while once considered a necessity for maintaining the in tegrity of the print journal collection, must be given a lower priority as the budget tightens. Despite this, the loss of this important conservation processing for current materials will regrettably reduce th eir lifespan and accessibility for students and researchers. Based on all of the above, the Libraries would need to balance this majo r cut between print and electronic resources in an attempt to balance the research needs of the university, cutting approximately 7% of electronic resources and 33% and 27% respectively for print serials and print monographs. This is a devastating cut, reducing the total materi als budget by 12.7%. To identify exactly how the cuts would be accomplis hed library liaisons would work closely with acquisitions staff and faculty to determine the op tions for what can be cut, and the options for what can be saved. The following list is a sample of the type of ma terials that might be cut, in addition to the acquisition of one-third fewer m onographs and print serials. American Physical Society journal package American Society of Civil Engineers journal package CAB abstracts Digital Campus Emerald Full Text EBMR (Evidence Based Medicine Reviews) Journal Citation Reports Web Karger Publishing Pack agesample titles American Journal of Nephrology Cytogenetic and Genome Research Lippincott Wilkins and Williams Publisher Packagesample titles: Academic Medicine American Journal of Nursing

PAGE 42

Page 39 Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise Neurosurgery Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery Spine Mary Ann Liebert Publishe r Package-sample titles: Human Gene Therapy Journal of Neurotrauma Mental Measurements Yearbook National Research Council of Canada journal package Optics infobase Oxford University Press journals PsycArticles PsycBooks Royal Society of Chemistry journal package Science Online Springer Protocols Current Content STAT!-Ref Thieme Publisher Package The Sciences and Health Sciences are heavil y dependent on electronic access and would be deeply impacted by these losses. Again, subject se lectors would work in di rect consultation with academic faculty to identify of the actual databases and journa l packages to be eliminated. To summarize, continued lost buying power for 2012-2013, resulting from even a flat budget, will further compromise a mate rials budget already weakened by past lost buying power and budget cuts. The cumulative effect would amount to a 12.7% decrease in materials for 20122013. The Salary Budget The Libraries have hired conservatively for several years, using funding from key vacant positions rather than taking cuts in the Materials Budget. Last y ear, however, the Libraries filled several critical faculty and staff positions. Ev en with these additions the Libraries remain understaffed to provide core services. In the even t of a flat budget, the Smathers Libraries, will continue to fill a small number of critical vacancies, with particular emphasis on subject specialists and liaisons w ith academic departments, in order to restore essential services for faculty and students. The Operations Budget Maintenance: The library facilities are extensive (nearly 475,00 0 square feet of usab le space, containing 3,800 upholstered chairs, and over 41,000 s quare feet of shelving for ma terials) and amongst the most heavily used on campus (3 million in-person visitors each year). Student spaces include open areas, restricted-study graduate st udent areas, group meeting rooms and individual study carrels.

PAGE 43

Page 40 The current funding for operations is inadequate to maintain these spaces and the amount of upkeep services provided by UF Physical Plant ha s been historically in adequate and is now further reduced. While the Libraries attempt to mitigate the impact, the students and researchers suffer from unclean and inadequately maintained facilities and the lack of periodic cleaning of the shelving damages the library materials over time. The current operations budget permits limited repa inting and cleaning of upholstery, primarily to address extreme situations. It does not allow for routine, scheduled clean ing and maintenance of public spaces. With a flat budget for 2012-2013, th e estimated shortfall in annual expenses required for maintenance is $837,323. Technology: The Libraries are technology hubs. The Libraries maintain 982 workstations, 107 scanners, and 78 networked printers with 300 individual printers All equipment is supported by the University Libraries and HSCL information te chnology hardware support units. The Libraries utilize over 90 terabytes of server space for archival and operational purposes. Costs for virtualization and back -up with CNS were $150,120 in 2010-2011. It is anticipated that costs for virtual CNS hosting and back-up will drop in cost due to CNS efficiencies, but given current grow th patterns of digital resources, the expectation is for costs to remain at the $150,000 level for the coming year Based on volume increases for digital collections, including the addition of electronic th eses and dissertations, costs are expected to rise in successive years. The Libraries maintain the larg est number of public workstati ons on campus (552), but receive no centralized IT funding. Instead, the Librarie s relied heavily on technology funding provided by the Florida Center for Library Automation (FCL A) to sustain and refre sh its technology. At the direction of the SUS provosts, FCLA eliminat ed its direct support for technology to the SUS libraries in 2011-2012. With a flat budget fo r 2012-2013, the estimated shortfall in annual expenses required for technology is $360,707. Pre-Approved Increases in the Libraries RCM Base The FCLA funding must be replaced in the Librar ies budget in order to sustain the current level of service, including periodic re placement of public access com puters and peripherals. As noted in Section 5 above, the Provost has authorized an increase in th e Libraries recurring base budget for IT expenses equivalent to the 2010-2011 FC LA funding level for the Libraries: $360,707 per year. The Libraries are managing a leased facility for offsite long term retention of low use library materials through a collaborative collection. The estimated annual ope rating costs for the facility will be reduced to the maximum extent possibl e by seeking support from other participating Florida universities, but uncertainty about the timing and amount of those payments necessitates planning for the full amount of the anticipated expenses for the coming year. As noted in Section

PAGE 44

Page 41 5 above, the Provost has authorized an increase in the Libraries recurring base budget for offsite storage expenses of $1,058,820 per year.

PAGE 45

Page 42 5% Less Funding – Smathers Libraries $1.31 Million The George A. Smathers Libraries have two main components under RCM, the Health Science Center Libraries (HSCL) and th e University Libraries (UL). Under RCM, the HSCL is funded through units of the Health Sciences Center. The University Libraries are funded through the university’s other academic and research uni ts, with the exception of the Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center which is supported by the Levin College of Law and, therefore, not included in this review. For the purpose of this RCM review, the Smathers Libraries are presented in a combined budget, but where appropri ate, the data is also reported separately for the two components. The budgets of the Libraries, part icularly the HSCL, are inadequate to manage its facilities and address patron needs for materials and services. Price increases well above the rate of inflation chronically deplete purchasing power for library materials. In 2010-2011, several critical faculty and staff positions were filled, making the Libraries better prepared to meet the needs of students and faculty, but essentially eliminating the historic use of salary savings to cover inadequacies in the operations and materials budgets. Accordi ngly, when modeling for a 5% cut for the next fiscal year, collections (materials) and library h ours would suffer most directly as a result of the cuts. The Materials Budget The impact of material cuts on library patrons is intensified by lost buying power due to high rates of cost increases for library material s. These increases wi ll total over $600,000 in 20122013 alone. This is in addition to $2.8 milli on in lost buying power from 2007-2008 through 2011-2012. Fiscal Year Materials Inflation Rate Lost Buying Power Cumulative Loss 2007-2008 4.68% $485,841 $485,841 2008-2009 6.32% $672,756 $1,158,597 2009-2010 3.74% $386,189 $1,544,786 2010-2011 5.83% $650,963 $2,195,749 2011-2012 5.06% $598,077 $2,793,826 2012-2013 5.07% $629,011 $3,422,837 As a result, the Libraries ha ve had no opportunity to mainta in, much less develop, suitable collections. The Libraries are una ble to purchase and license the range of print and electronic resources, which are core to an academic library ’s capacity to support a research enterprise with the breadth and depth of UF’s. The impact of th is has spanned the Smathers Libraries, affecting support for all disciplines.

PAGE 46

Page 43 Although the lost buying power im pacts the entire collections budget, the majority of the Electronic Resources budget is for materials licensed and purchased through consortia and, therefore, cannot be easily cut by UF independent ly although the depths of the cuts discussed here may require the cut of a large journal pack age. As a result, Print Monographs (books) and Print Serials (journals) experien ce a highly disproportionate reducti on when we adjust for lost buying power or budget cuts. In the event of a 5% cut, the proposed reductions in the materials budget for 2012-2013, including those made as a result of lost buying power, are: UL HSCL Smathers Lost buying power 2011-2012 $494,415 $103,662 $598,077 Lost buying power 2012-2013 $520,024 $108,987 $629,011 1% 2012-2013 recall $231,472 $40,847 $272,319 Materials portion of 5% cut $317,606 $57,668 $375,274 Totals: $1,563,517 $311,164 $1,874,681 The application of these reductions by material type is represented in the table below: Fund UL Cut HSCL Cut Total Cut E-Resources $774,314 $111,164 $885,478 Print Serials $350,000 $200,000 $550,000 Print Monographs $350,000 $350,000 Binding $89,203 $89,203 Total $1,563,517 $311,164 $1,874,681 As in the flat budget scenario, the University Libraries would distribute the additional cut between E-Resources, and print serials and m onographs. The HSCL would eliminate 100% of print serials in the flat budget scenario, so a dditional cuts must come from the E-Resources funding. With a 5% reduction, print serials and monograph cuts, 36% and 31% respectively, make it impossible for the Libraries to maintain the print collections necessary to support a top research university. Further, the 10.3% cut in E-Resources will be extremely difficult to implement without cutting a major journal package. Lost buying power and the additional cut to materials as a share of an overall 5% cut resu lt in the equivalent of a loss of 15.8% of the materials budget in 2012-2013. As in the flat budget scenario, liaison librarian s, acquisitions staff and academic faculty would work together to determine which materials would be cut. The following list is a sample of the type of titles that might be cut, including a large journal package. Th is is in addition to purchasing and subscribing to 40% fe wer monographs and print serials. Wiley/Blackwell journal package American Physical Society journal package American Society of Civil Engineers journal package CAB abstracts Digital Campus Emerald Full Text

PAGE 47

Page 44 EBMR (Evidence Based Medicine Reviews) Journal Citation Reports Web Karger Publishing Pack agesample titles American Journal of Nephrology Cytogenetic and Genome Research Lippincott Wilkins and Williams Publisher Packagesample titles: Academic Medicine American Journal of Nursing Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise Neurosurgery Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery Spine Mary Ann Liebert Publishe r Package-sample titles: Human Gene Therapy Journal of Neurotrauma Mental Measurements Yearbook National Research Council of Canada journal package Optics infobase Oxford University Press journals PsycBooks Royal Society of Chemistry journal package Science Online Springer Protocols Current Content STAT!-Ref Thieme Publisher Package-sample titles Seminars in Respiratory & Critical Care Synlett Synthesis To summarize, the impacts to materials of a 5% library budget cut, when combined with the 2012-2013 lost buying power, would result in a loss of $1.9 million from a materials budget already weakened by prior lost buying power and budget cuts. The cumulative effect would amount to a 15.8% decrease in materials for 2012-2013. The Salary Budget The Libraries have hired conservatively for several years using funding from key vacant positions rather than taking cuts in the Materials Budget. Last y ear, however, the Libraries filled several critical faculty and staff positions. Ev en with these additions the Libraries remain understaffed to provide core services. A 5% overall budget reduction would necessitate deep cuts to the salary budget with conc omitant effects to core services. In the event of a 5% cut in the budget for the Smat hers Libraries, the proposed reductions in the salary budget for 2012-2013 are:

PAGE 48

Page 45 Proposed Salary Cuts : UL HSCL Smathers Total $730,000 $90,000 $820,000 The application of these reductions is represented in the table below: Do not fill: Vacant UL Tenure Faculty Liaisons $175,000 African American Studies Emerging Technologies Physics Do not fill: Vacant UL Staff Positions $120,000 Government Documents IT Programmer Elimination of UL Staff positions Departmental Libraries staff – 9 positions $395,000 OPS Budget for Departmental Libraries $40,000 Elimination of HSCL Staff positions Public Services staff – 1.5 positions $90,000 Total:$820,000 The initial $295,000 cut for the Univ ersity Libraries listed above could be achieved by keeping key staff and faculty positions vacant, thus avoiding some layoffs. However, the depth of the cut required at 5% would not be possi ble without a sizeable number of layoffs. The closing of the four Departmental Libraries – Architecture and Fine Arts, Edu cation, Journalism, and Music – would provide the ability to eliminate staff salaries, OPS budgets, and Operations budgets, reducing expenditures by just ove r $500,000. The services and the ma jority of the collections of these libraries would be incorpor ated into Library West, with so me materials going to off-site storage. Education students and faculty would s ee the most negative impact as they are furthest from Library West, but all student s and faculty in these areas woul d be adversely affected. This incorporation of additional materials and use of Library West by hundreds of additional students, without additional staff, would place the branch at or beyond capacity, and would remove the potential of improving the current shortage of study and collabor ation space. This is an unsatisfactory solution, but is indicative of th e severe impact a 5% cut would have on library services. HSCL would achieve its portion of cut by reduc ing hours, closing on Saturdays and Sunday, and reducing staffing for the service desks: processi ng materials, managing Inter-Library Loan and document delivery, and assisting library users. The Operations Budget The University Libraries would realize a relative ly small cut in the Operations Budget resulting from reduced costs from the closing and integration of all Departmental Libr aries. As described

PAGE 49

Page 46 in the flat budget scenario, the Libraries con tinue to experience in creasing costs and eroding funding in maintenance. Even by allocating the ma jority of the 5 percent cut to materials and staff eliminations, the Libraries operations budg et will become increasingly inadequate. Maintenance: The library facilities are extensive (nearly 475,00 0 square feet of usab le space, containing 3,800 upholstered chairs, and over 41,000 s quare feet of shelving for ma terials) and amongst the most heavily used on campus (3 million in-person visitors each year). Student spaces include open areas, restricted-study graduate st udent areas, group meeting rooms and individual study carrels. The current funding for operations is inadequate to maintain these spaces and the amount of upkeep services provided by UF Physical Plant ha s been historically in adequate and is now further reduced. While the Libraries attempt to mitigate the impact, the students and researchers suffer from unclean and inadequately maintained facilities and the lack of periodic cleaning of the shelving damages the library materials over time. The current operations budget permits limited repa inting and cleaning of upholstery, primarily to address extreme situations. It does not allow fo r routine, schedule clean ing and maintenance of the public spaces. There is already an estimat ed shortfall of $837,323 in annual expenses required for maintenance. Technology: The Libraries are technology hubs. The Libraries maintain 982 workstations, 107 scanners, and 78 networked printers with 300 individual printers All equipment is supported by the University Libraries and HSCL information te chnology hardware support units. The Libraries utilize over 90 terabytes of server space for archival and operational purposes. Costs for virtualization and back -up with CNS were $150,120 in 2010-2011. It is anticipated that costs for virtual CNS hosting and back-up will drop in cost due to CNS efficiencies, but given current grow th patterns of digital resources, the expectation is for costs to remain at the $150,000 level. Based on volume incr eases for digital collections, including the addition of electronic theses and dissertations, costs are expected to rise in successive years. The Libraries maintain the larg est number of public workstati ons on campus (552), but receive no centralized IT funding. Instead, the Librarie s relied heavily on technology funding provided by FCLA to sustain and refres h its technology. At the direct ion of the SUS provosts, FCLA eliminated its direct support for technology to the SUS libraries. As a result, the Smathers Libraries have lost a total of $360,707 in recurring funding. Library Reduction University Libraries $70,000 HSCL $45,000 Total: $115,000

PAGE 50

Page 47 Pre-Approved Increases in the Libraries RCM Base The FCLA funding must be replaced in the Librar ies budget in order to sustain the current level of service, including periodic re placement of public access com puters and peripherals. As noted in Section 5 above, the Provost has authorized an increase in th e Libraries recurring base budget for IT expenses equivalent to the 2010-2011 FC LA funding level for the Libraries: $360,707 per year. The Libraries are managing a leased facility for offsite long term retention of low use library materials through a collaborative collection. The estimated annual ope rating costs for the facility will be reduced to the maximum extent possibl e by seeking support from other participating Florida universities, but uncertainty about the timing and amount of those payments necessitates planning for the full amount of the anticipated expenses for the coming year. As noted in Section 5 above, the Provost has authorized an increase in the Libraries recurring base budget for offsite storage expenses of $1,058,820 per year.

PAGE 51

Page 48 Increased Funding – Smathers Libraries: Recurring: $5,086,160 Non-Recurring: $319,600 The George A. Smathers Libraries have two main components under RCM, the Health Science Center Libraries (HSCL) and th e University Libraries (UL). Under RCM, the HSCL is funded through units of the Health Sciences Center. The University Libraries are funded through the university’s other academic and research uni ts, with the exception of the Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center which is supported by the Levin College of Law and, therefore, not included in this review. For the purpose of this RCM review, the Smathers Libraries are presented in a combined budget, but where appropri ate, the data is also reported separately for the two components. The budgets of the Libraries, part icularly the HSCL, are inadequate to manage its facilities and address patron needs for materials and services. Price increases well above the rate of inflation chronically deplete purchasing power for library materials. In 2010-2011, several critical faculty and staff positions were filled, making the Libraries better prepared to meet the needs of students and faculty, but essentially eliminating the historic use of salary savings to cover inadequacies in the operations and materials budgets. Accord ingly, when modeling for an improved budget for the next fiscal year, both collections (materials) and library faculty and staff are identified for significant increases in investment. The Materials Budget Decreasing and tightly constrai ned budgets combined with hi gh rate increases for academic journals and other library materials have cause d the Libraries to lose over $3 million in buying power since 2007-2008. Fiscal Year Inflation Rate Lost Buying Power Cumulative Loss 2007-2008 4.68% $485,841 $485,841 2008-2009 6.32% $672,756 $1,158,597 2009-2010 3.74% $386,189 $1,544,786 2010-2011 5.83% $650,963 $2,195,749 2011-2012 5.06% $598,077 $2,793,826 2012-2013 5.07% $629,011 $3,422,837 As a result the Libraries ha ve had no opportunity to mainta in, much less develop, suitable collections. The Libraries are una ble to purchase and license the range of print and electronic resources, which are core to an academic library ’s capacity to support a research enterprise with the breadth and depth of UF. The impact of th is spans the Smathers Libraries, affecting all disciplines.

PAGE 52

Page 49 Cumulative Lost Buying Power: UL HSCL Smathers Total $2,818,425 $604,412 $3,422,837 This lost buying power should be restored by increasing the Libraries base budget for materials. The restored materials funding would be allocated across mate rial types in the following proportions: Proposed Recurring Expenses: The funding would be used for new and retroact ive purchasing and licensing to restore the collection to the depth it would currently have if the material s budget had been increased to cover lost buying power each year since 2007. A large increase is pr ojected for electronic journals since journal publica tion remains at the core of re search dissemination, and it is essential that researchers across the univers ity have access to a broad, diverse and current collection. E-books are core to scientific research and are becoming increasingly important in both the Humanities and Social Sciences. Databases provide aggregation of additional journals and research publications and back files pr ovide depth. Although ba ck files are one-time purchases, the Libraries have had so little opportun ity to build collections that back files will require years of funding to build a collection worthy of a highly ranked institution, therefore it should be included as recurring funding. Planned growth in funding for materials is n eeded to maintain the purchasing power once restored and provide for an incr eased materials budget over time to allow the Libraries to address the evolving needs of the academic and research units. Future needs for sustainable funding for materials beyond 2012-2013 are addressed in the ”Alte rnative Funding for the Libraries” section of this document. The following are examples of how the restor ed materials funding would be spent in 2012-2013. Journals Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation Cell Cycle Chinese Academic Journals/Century Journals Project Current Gene Therapy Endocrine Practice Evidence Based Medicine Reviews Fund Increase Databases $1,4000,000 E-Journals $770,000 E-Books $400,000 Print Monographs $100,000 Electronic Back files $750,000 Total $3,420,000

PAGE 53

Page 50 Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America HFSP Journal Immunologic Research International Journal of pharmaceutical compounding International Review of Cytology Journal of American Academy of Audiology Journal of Cardiovascul ar Computed Tomography Journal of Clini cal Psychiatry Journal of Hospital Librarianship Journal of Knee Surgery Journal of Neuroradiology Journal of Pediatric Endo crinology and Metabolism Journal of the American Associat ion for Laboratory Animal Science Journal of Visualization Journal of Visualized Experiments Neurocritical Care Neuropsychopharmacology Pink Sheet: Prescription pharmaceuticals and biotechnology Reviews in the Neurosciences Veterinary Clinics of Nort h America: Equine Practice Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice Databases ArtBibliographies Modern Black Abolitionist Papers Cabell's Directory of Educa tional Curriculum and Methods Cabell's Directory of Educati on Psychology and Administration Cabell's Directory of Educationa l Technology and Library Science Classical Scores Library Congressional Research Digital Collection Counseling and Therapy in Video CSH Protocols Current Protocols in Bioinformatics Current Protocols in Cytometry Current Protocols in Human Genetics Current Protocols in Immunology Current Protocols in Microbiology Current Protocols in Nucleic Acid Chemistry Current Protocols in Pharmacology Current Protocols in Stem Cell Biology Current Protocols in Toxicology Design and Applied Arts Index Dynamed Early European Books

PAGE 54

Page 51 EdITLib (Education & Informa tion Technology Digital Library Education in Video (Ale xander Street Press) Embase Emedicine Facts and Comparisons Online Faculty of 1000 Medicine FirstConsult Gideon Global GIS Database Goldfranks Toxicologic Emergencies Handbook of Injectable Drugs Harrison's Practice Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) JAMAEvidence Lexicomp MADCAD Materials Connexion Medicine Complete Micromedex Mosby's Nursing Consult Natural Standards NAXOS streaming audio Newsbank Access World News Research Collection Opera in Video Oxford University Press Archives-Medicine Oxford University Press Archives-Science Pediatric Care Online Pharmacy Library Procedures Consult Proquest Historic Newspapers RISM RIPM Scopus Up-to-Date Video on Demand through Films for the Humanities VisualDX Books Springer E-Book annual packages Faculty-driven monograph acquis ition – print and electronic Access Emergency Medicine Briggs: Drugs in Pre gnancy and Lactation Comprehensive Heterocyclic Chemistry III Encyclopedia of Biostatistics Foundation in Diagnostic Pathology Medicine and Dentistry

PAGE 55

Page 52 Neuroscience Peer VII Physicians Evaluation and Educational Review in Emergency Medicine RedBook Online Synthesis Lectures, collection 4 Back Files Elsevier journal back files American Geophysical Union Journal American Journal of Physiology (before 1997) Annals of Behavioral Medi cine (earlier than 1997) Biomedical and Life Sciences Journal Chemical Engineering Journal Chemistry and Materials Science Journal Computer Science Journal Earth & Environmental Science Journal Earth and Planetary Sciences Journal Energy and Power Journal Engineering Journal High Energy/Nuclear Physic s and Astronomy Journal Inorganic Chemistry Journal Journal of Chemical Ecology (earlier than 1997) JSTOR Arts & Sciences VI JSTOR Arts & Sciences VIII JSTOR Arts & Sciences IX JSTOR Business III LWW Nursing Archive Materials Science Journal Mathematics Journal Neuroscience Journal Physical and Analytical Chemistry Journal Physics and Astronomy Journal Times Literary Supplement Historical Archive 1902-2005 Sage Journal Back files Providing this restored funding to the Libraries would strengthen the infrastructure and help increase the university’s standing in the academic and research communities. Offering faculty, students, researchers and clinicians anywhere and anytime access to information enhances their ability to carry out the university’s goals. A ccess to information plays a strategic role in a number of the university’s key activities including successful re search initiatives, distance learning initiatives, quality heal th care and increased patient safety initiatives and educational initiatives including the establishment of new pr ograms. It is well documented that we are experiencing an explosion of info rmation and it is the library’s ro le to deliver the most current and relevant information available, which in turn allows the university to fulfill its mission. Lost buying power and flat materials budgets have hamp ered the ability of th e Libraries to support these academic and research endeavors.

PAGE 56

Page 53 The Salary Budget The Libraries have hired conservatively for several years using funding from key vacant positions rather than taking cuts in the Materials Budget. Last y ear, however, the Libraries filled several critical faculty and staff positions. Ev en with these additions the Libraries remain understaffed to provide core services. A variety of positions are needed to bring the Libraries to full service – a level permitting the appropriate s upport of the university’s academic and research missions. Proposed Recurring Expenses: UL HSCL Smathers Total $566,000 $260,000 $826,000 The application of these increases is represented in the table below: Additional recurring positions n eeded to bring the Libraries up to a full service staff: Liaison librarians for underserved colleges and departments (2 faculty) Bio-informatics Librarian supporting the scie ntific intersection of biology, computer science, and information technology (1 faculty) Data Curation Librarian to identify, store, de scribe (curate), retrie ve and re-use data, particularly data not available in public or government repositor ies. This is comparable to the program at Johns Hopkins University Libr aries Digital Research and Curation Center ( http://ldp.library.jhu.edu/dkc ), providing support for researchers in meeting federal mandates and enhancing curation and accessibilit y of their research product. (1 faculty and 2 staff) Acquisitions Librarian to research and proc ure e-resources, mana ge cost centers and coordinate vended purchases (1 faculty) IT Expert to develop library-specific software applica tions (1 staff) Establishment of a Digital Scholarship unit, comparable to those at the University of Virginia ( http://www2.lib.virginia.edu/scholarslab/index.html ), the University of Nebraska-Lincoln ( http://cdrh.unl.edu/ ) and Brown University ( http://library.brown.edu/cds/ ). The unit will support area specific needs as with EScience and the Digital Humanities, develop ne w digital projects with faculty, developing new forms of digital scholarly publishing, and build tools and systems that support digital information and scholarly activ ity. (1 faculty and 1 staff) Faculty 4 @ $65,000* $260,000 2 @ $75,000*$150,000 Staff 2 @ $45,000*$90,000 4 @ $65,000*$260,000 OPS 2 FTE @ $15,000$30,000 Security Guards $36,000$36,000 Total: $826,000 *Includes benefits

PAGE 57

Page 54 Expanded library hours in Library West to 24 /5 (open to patrons from Sunday morning through Friday evening, as well as during the da y on Saturday). A pilot of this model is being funded by Student Government for Libr ary West for spring 2012. (2 staff, 2 FTE OPS and expanded contract security services for overnight shifts) The Operations Budget Maintenance: The library facilities are extensive (nearly 475,00 0 square feet of usab le space, containing 3,800 upholstered chairs, and over 41,000 s quare feet of shelving for ma terials) and amongst the most heavily used on campus (3 million in-person visitors each year). Student spaces include open areas, restricted-study graduate st udent areas, group meeting rooms and individual study carrels. The current funding for operations is inadequate to maintain these spaces and the amount of upkeep services provided by UF Physical Plant has been historically inade quate and its services have been further reduced by budget changes. The Libraries major needs include: Rotating repair and painting of walls with an average service of once every 5 years ($712,272) Upholstery cleaning for public s eating with an average servic e every other year ($28,163) Shelving and materials to be dusted and cleaned once per year ($96,888) Increased recurring funding would be used to paint and repair walls, clean upholstery, and dust and clean library stacks. None of this upkeep is funded or routinely handled at present. The estimated annual expense for this is $837,323. Proposed Recurring Expenses: UL HSCL Smathers Total $726,690 $110,633 $837,323 Non-Recurring Investments Non-recurring funding would be used for Year 2 of a 3-year project to de-duplicate and catalog materials already in the Auxiliary Library Facility (ALF) for transfer to the High Density Facility (HDF). (3 time-limited staff and 6 FTE OPS) Proposed Expenses: UL HSCL Smathers Total $319,600 $319,600

PAGE 58

Page 55 Pre-Approved Increases in the Libraries RCM Base The above requests for increases in recurring an d non-recurring funding for the Libraries are in addition to the increases in the Libraries RCM base that were pre-approved by the Provost. Those increases are documented in Secti on 5 above, and include $360,707 per year for technology previously funded by FCLA and $1,058,820 per year managing a leased facility for offsite long term retention of low use library materials through a co llaborative collection. Time-Limited Staff 2 @ $65,000* $130,000 1 @ $45,000*$45,000 OPS Staff 6 FTE @ $20,000$120,000 Operational Expenses $24,600$24,600 Total: $319,600

PAGE 59

Page 56 6. Additional Sources of F unding for the Libraries In order to expand library serv ices to support the fu ll breadth and depth of this university, the Libraries need additional sources of f unding to supplement the amount available from appropriated funds. This is particularly important for the materials budget, which continues to be eroded by lost buying party when the Libraries should be adding content to support scholarship and rese arch throughout the university. Four alternatives are described below. Impl ementation of one or more of these options would provide additional critically needed funding for the Libraries. Increase DSR Funding DSR funding for the Libraries is now establis hed as a percentage of the IDC received by UF, so it will expand (and contract) with gr ant funded research. This 2010 change reflects a recognition that research at UF is depe ndent on access to extremely expensive, but essential, scholarly resources for which the annual increases in license fees are ongoing and cumulative while the Libraries material bud get from state funds is not. Unfortunately, the percentage currently allocated is not suffi cient to cover the subscription to the most heavily used online e-journal package for research, Elsevier Science Direct. Having DSR fully fund the Elsevier Science Direct elec tronic journal packag e would not only more appropriately reflect the Librar ies contribution to sponsored research, but also allow the Libraries to increase access to other materi al of significant valu e to researchers. Dedicate a Library Alloca tion from the Existing Student Technology Fee The Libraries maintain the largest number of public workstations on campus, at least comparable to all of the CIRCA labs and inst ruction facilities, but currently receive no centralized IT funding. The Student Technology Fee is a new source of revenue for student-oriented technology expenses, and a por tion should be allocated to the Libraries to maintain its public service technology. Dedicate a Library Allocation from Annual Tuition Increases The Libraries are core to the University’s academic and research enterprise. The University was successful in obtaining auth orization from the Legislature for annual tuition increases to correct historic unde rfunding and the documented disparity between UF and its peer institutions. As peer revi ew analysis has shown, the Libraries are also chronically and historically underfunded, even when considering th e underfunding of the University as a whole compared to its peer institutions. This compromises the Libraries ability to meet the service and information resource needs of UF students, faculty and researchers. Dedicating a por tion of the additional revenue generated by the annual tuition increase as new recurring funding for the Libraries woul d benefit all campus programs by allowing for predictable growth and planned strategic investment in appropriate library services a nd resources. Over time, this wo uld correct the disparity in access to library resources experienced by UF students, faculty and researchers compared to those at peer institutions.

PAGE 60

Page 57 Establish a Student Library Fee Other than DSR funding, there is current ly no mechanism for expanding library resources over time. A Library Fee, applied to student credit hours or by FTE, should be established to ensure a new and sustainabl e source of funding for the Libraries in addition to the appropriated funds now received.