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Elements of Research Misconduct
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00000672/00001
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Title: Elements of Research Misconduct
Physical Description: Conference Presentation
Creator: Wrublewski, Donna ( Author, Secondary )
Leonard, Michelle ( Author, Primary )
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Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Donna Wrublewski.
Publication Status: Unpublished
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Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00000672:00001

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Elements of Re search Mi Sc onductMichelle Leon Ar d Donna W rublewski This material is based upon work supported by the Na tional Sc ience F oundation under Grant No. 1033002

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Be nguSezen(2010) S Am imAnghaie(2011) Pat Ti umChiranjeevi(2008)

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Academic Misconduct cases at UF over the past 3 yearsIncidencePlagiarism: 1. Copying without attribution (stealing) 2. Cut and paste / patchwriting 3. Misquoting 4. Self plagiarizing 5. Insufficient paraphrasing

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PrecedenceMcCabe, D. L. Sci. Eng. Ethics 1997, 3 433-445. McCabe, D. L. Int. J. Educational Integrity 2005 1.Students who “cut and paste” from either print or electronic sources at least once in the last three years 2005 study of 63,700 undergrad, 9,250 grad students 1997 study of 1,946 students• Turning in copied material as their own work • Fabricating or falsifying a bibliography • Turning in work done by someone else.

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Prior Work in UF Libraries• Faculty demand– Previous copyright & fair use instruction by Michelle Leonard• Regular part of Library Instruction • Remediation tool • Other librarians found opportunity to develop further, applied for grant from the NSF Ethics Education in Science and Engineering divisionSlide from Plagiarism Workshop, courtesy of Michelle Leonard

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NSF Grant Proposal: “Gaming Against Plagiarism”• Gaming Against Plagiarism –led by Associate University Librarian Michelle Leonard as PI, team includes librarians and game designers • Online, self directed, interactive game providing a role adapting environment in which Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) graduate students learn to recognize and avoid plagiarism • Awarded full amount ($298,000) for 2 years • Team Organization:– Content Development – Game Development – Assessment: (a) content (b) usability

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Goals & Objectives• Influence ethical behavior • Impact of peer behavior, institutional norms, and cultural practices on plagiarism • Awareness of falsification & fabrication of data • Satisfy America COMPETES Act, Section 7009 • “Be collaboratively designed, tested, and evaluated through a multi disciplinary iterative development process by recognized experts in graduate science education, gaming, academic integrity, and educational digital media production” • Open source –allow each institution to customize to its own code of conduct, policies, and branding but maintain common focus on what constitutes responsible conduct of research

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Why Gaming?• Universal among college aged students • Teenagers: game playing is universal and can facilitate social discussions and “can incorporate many aspects of civic and political life” (Lenhartet al., 2008) • Similar real life scenarios were used by Lloyd and van de Poel(2008) to create a collaborative design game with engineering students “to give students ‘practical’ experience of ethical decision making in the process of design

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Project PhasesCredit: MargeauxJohnson, GAP Co PI

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Environmental Scan (Phase 1)• Focus Groups • STEM Grad Student Survey –“Perceptions of Plagiarism”– Students perceptions of the amount and severity of plagiarism on campus, workload appropriateness, and faculty practices

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STEM Grad Student Survey “Perceptions of Plagiarism”The Good News…Amount of work is reasonable for year & program Agree Not Sure Disagree Assignment difficulty appropriate for year & program Assessments effective at helping learn concepts

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STEM Grad Student Survey “Perceptions of Plagiarism”The Bad News… Agree Not Sure Disagree Plagiarism is a serious problem Investigation is fair & impartial Faculty change assignments regularly Vigilance in discovering & reporting incidents

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Project Phases Credit: MargeauxJohnson, GAP Co PI

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Inclusion of Broader Ethics• America COMPETES Act –UF Certification for RCR • Faculty have different needs from grad students – how do they do research? “And if undergraduates majoring in science are isolated, 31% report falsifying laboratory data.”McCabe, D. L. Int. J. Educational Integrity 2005 1.

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Promoting Responsible Conduct in Research• Sponsor an ethics workshop on campus –Fall 2011 • Develop a workshop and research guide on ethics and responsible conduct in research http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/stemrcr

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Take Home Message• Plagiarism and research misconduct are widespread • Librarians as ethics watchdogs– Raise profile on campus – Contribute to academic integrity, university policies• Subject specific knowledge may be useful to identify different types of misconduct across different fields • Contribute to open source community • Started as a game –life of its own now (research guide, ethics symposium)

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Credits• PI: Michelle Leonard • Co PIs: MargeauxJohnson, Amy Buhler, James Oliverio, Dr. Ben deVane • Team: Denise Bennett, Dr. Rick Ferdig, Dr. Don McCabe, Melody Royster, Dr. Donna Wrublewski • GAP Blog: http://blogs.uflib.ufl.edu/gap • Responsible Conduct of STEM Research Guide: http://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/stemrcr