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PAGE 1

Gaming Against Plagiarism: A Partnership between the Library and Faculty Amy G. Buhler, Margeaux Johnson, Michelle Leonard, and Ben DeVane University of Florida

PAGE 2

The Project Denise Bennett Amy Buhler Ben DeVane Alyssa Diekman Richard Ferdig Michelle Leonard Don McCabe Anton Yudin Matthew Carroll Donna Wrublewski Margeaux Johnson Doug Levey Melody Royster James Oliverio Jonathan Tietz

PAGE 3

Why Plagiarism? 1997 study of 1,946 students 2005 study of 63,700 undergraduates and 9,250 graduate students 75% Engineering 64% Natural Sciences 62% Undergrads 59% Grad Students

PAGE 4

Why A Game?

PAGE 5

The Project Plan A NALYSIS Identify the problem & establish goals for the project D ESIGN Determine content & establish prototypes D EVELOPMENT Create the product I MPLEMENTATION Place the product into practice E VALUATION Assess the product

PAGE 6

The Project Plan

PAGE 7

Building the Content Amy Buhler Alyssa Diekman Michelle Leonard Doug Levey Don McCabe Denise Bennett Donna Wrublewski Margeaux Johnson Melody Royster

PAGE 8

Building the Content Level One Identify major types of plagiarism List basic rules to avoid plagiarism Identify data falsification and fabrication Level Two Explain the potential consequences of research misconduct both academically & professionally Level Three Apply the rules to increasingly complex scenarios Recognize and acknowledge differences in cultural approaches to plagiarism

PAGE 9

Designing the Game Ben DeVane James Oliverio Anton Yudin Jonathan Tietz Matthew Carroll

PAGE 10

Designing the Game Level One: Identify Level Two: Consequences Level Three: Complexity Game Three: Investigate & Argue Game Two: Manage Plagiarism Game One: Identify & Race

PAGE 11

Designing the Game Game Three: Investigate & Argue Game Two: Manage Plagiarism Game One: Identify & Race

PAGE 12

Designing the Game

PAGE 13

Testing the Game 3 week test cycle: WEEK 1 WEEK 2 WEEK 3 Design team develops prototype Develop protocols Schedule participants Conduct user testing Write Usability Report

PAGE 14

The Project Plan

PAGE 15

References McCabe, D. L. (2005). Cheating among college and university students: A North American perspective. International Journal for Educational Integrity, 1 (1), 2/16/2010. Retrieved from http://www.ojs.unisa.edu.au/index.php/IJEI/article/view/14 McCabe, D. L (1997). Classroom cheating among natural science and engineering majors. Science and Engineering Ethics, 3 (4), 433 445. doi:10.1007/s11948 997 0046 y Whittington, J. & Colwell, J. (2009). Should a cyberethics class be required?: Plagiarism and online learning. Proceedings from the 2009 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Retrieved from http://soa.asee.org/paper/conference/paper view.cfm?id=10919 Jones, S. (2003). Let the games begin: Gaming technology and college students Washington, D.C.: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project. Retrieved from http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2003/Let the games begin Gaming technology and college students.aspx Federation of American Scientists. (2006). Summit on educational games: Harnessing the power of video games for learning Washington, D.C.: Federation of American Scientists. Retrieved from http://www.fas.org/gamesummit/Resources/Summit on Educational Games.pdf Green, C.S., Pouget A., Bavelier D. (2010) Improved Probabilistic Inference as a General Learning Mechanism with Action Video Games. Current Biology, 20(17), 1573 1579. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2010.07.040 Dick, W., Carey, L., & Carey, J. O. (2005). The systematic design of instruction Boston: Pearson/ Allyn and Bacon. Foss, M., Buhler, A.G., Johnson, M., Levey D.J., & Oliverio J.C. (2010, March 1). Gaming Against Plagiarism (GAP) Development Proposal Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098766/00001

PAGE 16

Thank You To Follow the GAP project: http:// blogs.uflib.ufl.edu/GAP This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1033002



PAGE 1

Gaming Against Plagiarism: A Partnership between the Library and Faculty Amy G. Buhler, Margeaux Johnson, Michelle Leonard, and Ben DeVane University of Florida

PAGE 2

The Project Denise Bennett Amy Buhler Ben DeVane Alyssa Diekman Richard Ferdig Michelle Leonard Don McCabe Anton Yudin Matthew Carroll Donna Wrublewski Margeaux Johnson Doug Levey Melody Royster James Oliverio Jonathan Tietz

PAGE 3

Why Plagiarism? 1997 study of 1,946 students 2005 study of 63,700 undergraduates and 9,250 graduate students 75% Engineering 64% Natural Sciences 62% Undergrads 59% Grad Students

PAGE 4

Why A Game?

PAGE 5

The Project Plan A NALYSIS Identify the problem & establish goals for the project D ESIGN Determine content & establish prototypes D EVELOPMENT Create the product I MPLEMENTATION Place the product into practice E VALUATION Assess the product

PAGE 6

The Project Plan

PAGE 7

Building the Content Amy Buhler Alyssa Diekman Michelle Leonard Doug Levey Don McCabe Denise Bennett Donna Wrublewski Margeaux Johnson Melody Royster

PAGE 8

Building the Content Level One Identify major types of plagiarism List basic rules to avoid plagiarism Identify data falsification and fabrication Level Two Explain the potential consequences of research misconduct both academically & professionally Level Three Apply the rules to increasingly complex scenarios Recognize and acknowledge differences in cultural approaches to plagiarism

PAGE 9

Designing the Game Ben DeVane James Oliverio Anton Yudin Jonathan Tietz Matthew Carroll

PAGE 10

Designing the Game Level One: Identify Level Two: Consequences Level Three: Complexity Game Three: Investigate & Argue Game Two: Manage Plagiarism Game One: Identify & Race

PAGE 11

Designing the Game Game Three: Investigate & Argue Game Two: Manage Plagiarism Game One: Identify & Race

PAGE 12

Designing the Game

PAGE 13

Testing the Game 3 week test cycle: WEEK 1 WEEK 2 WEEK 3 Design team develops prototype Develop protocols Schedule participants Conduct user testing Write Usability Report

PAGE 14

The Project Plan

PAGE 15

References McCabe, D. L. (2005). Cheating among college and university students: A North American perspective. International Journal for Educational Integrity, 1 (1), 2/16/2010. Retrieved from http://www.ojs.unisa.edu.au/index.php/IJEI/article/view/14 McCabe, D. L (1997). Classroom cheating among natural science and engineering majors. Science and Engineering Ethics, 3 (4), 433 445. doi:10.1007/s11948 997 0046 y Whittington, J. & Colwell, J. (2009). Should a cyberethics class be required?: Plagiarism and online learning. Proceedings from the 2009 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Retrieved from http://soa.asee.org/paper/conference/paper view.cfm?id=10919 Jones, S. (2003). Let the games begin: Gaming technology and college students Washington, D.C.: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project. Retrieved from http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2003/Let the games begin Gaming technology and college students.aspx Federation of American Scientists. (2006). Summit on educational games: Harnessing the power of video games for learning Washington, D.C.: Federation of American Scientists. Retrieved from http://www.fas.org/gamesummit/Resources/Summit on Educational Games.pdf Green, C.S., Pouget A., Bavelier D. (2010) Improved Probabilistic Inference as a General Learning Mechanism with Action Video Games. Current Biology, 20(17), 1573 1579. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2010.07.040 Dick, W., Carey, L., & Carey, J. O. (2005). The systematic design of instruction Boston: Pearson/ Allyn and Bacon. Foss, M., Buhler, A.G., Johnson, M., Levey D.J., & Oliverio J.C. (2010, March 1). Gaming Against Plagiarism (GAP) Development Proposal Retrieved from http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098766/00001

PAGE 16

Thank You To Follow the GAP project: http://blogs.uflib.ufl.edu/GAP This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1033002


Gaming Against Plagiarism: A Partnership between the Library and Faculty
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00000579/00001
 Material Information
Title: Gaming Against Plagiarism: A Partnership between the Library and Faculty
Physical Description: PowerPoint Presentation
Language: English
Creator: Buhler, Amy
Johnson, Margeaux
Leonard, Michelle
DeVane, Ben
 Notes
Abstract: Instilling the values of research and professional ethics is one of the most important roles played by an academic institution. Holding students to a high level of academic integrity supplies the foundation for these values. As detailed in the March 2009 PRISM article “The Pull of Integrity,” engineering colleges across the country are confronting the problem of plagiarism. As libraries develop their research support role they should collaborate with faculty to educate students on the ethics of research as outlined in their institutional honor codes and specifically by national policies. Examples of such policies include the National Science Foundation’s America Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science Act, or the America COMPETES Act, that was effective January 2010. This Act requires that institutions applying for NSF grants must “provide appropriate training and oversight in the responsible and ethical conduct of research” to students and researchers. With these requirements, librarians can fill the role of how to educate today’s researchers by teaching the proper way to conduct research and cite sources to avoid any form of plagiarism. This paper will discuss the rationale for, recent activities, and future of the recently awarded National Science Foundation grant in which the Library formed collaborative partnerships with other entities on campus to combat plagiarism. This grant will create an online, self-directed, interactive game that will provide a role-adopting environment in which Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) graduate students will learn to recognize and avoid plagiarism. The game will employ a social constructivist pedagogical approach in its design. To scaffold players’ development of expertise, this framework will emphasize learning principles associated with customizable and experiential cognitive action, cyclical and meaningful feedback, identity-linked narrative engagement, and “just-in-time” delivery of information. In addition, the game will make use of strategies intended to influence students’ ethical behavior, and it will explore the impact of peer behavior, institutional norms, and differing cultural practices on plagiarism. It will be collaboratively designed, tested, and evaluated through a multi-disciplinary iterative development process by recognized experts in graduate science education, gaming, academic integrity, intellectual property rights, and educational digital media production.
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Amy Buhler.
Publication Status: Unpublished. Originally presented at the 2011 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference.
Funding: This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1033002.
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Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is licensed with the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivative License. This license allows others to download this work and share them with others as long as they mention the author and link back to the author, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.
System ID: IR00000579:00001

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References



* McCabe, D. L. (2005). Cheating among college and university students: A North American perspective. International Journal for Educational Integriy, /(I),
2/16/2010. Retrieved from http://www.ojs.unisa.edu.au/index.php/IJEI/article/view/ll4

* McCabe, D. L. (1997). Classroom cheating among natural science and engineering majors. Science and Engineering Ethics, 3(4), 433-445. doi:l0.1007/sl 1948-
997-0046-y

* Whittington, J. & Colwell, J. (2009). Should a cyberethics class be required?: Plagiarism and online learning. Proceedings from the 2009 American Society for
Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition. Retrieved from http://soa.asee.org/paper/conference/paper-view.cfm?id= 10919

* Jones, S. (2003). Let the games begin: Gaming technology and college students. Washington, D.C.: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project.
Retrieved from http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2003/Let-the-games-begin-Gaming-technology-and-college-students.aspx

* Federation of American Scientists. (2006). Summit on educational games: Harnessing the power of video games for learning. Washington, D.C.: Federation of
American Scientists. Retrieved from http://www.fas.org/gamesummit/Resources/Summit on Educational Games.pdf

* Green, C.S., Pouget, A., Bavelier, D. (2010) Improved Probabilistic Inference as a General Learning Mechanism with Action Video Games. Current Biology,
20(17), 1573-1579. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2010.07.040

* Dick, W., Carey, L., & Carey, J. 0. (2005). The systematic design of instruction. Boston: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.

* Foss, M., Buhler, A.G., Johnson, M., Levey, D.J., & Oliverio, J.C. (2010, March I). Gaming Against Plagiarism (GAP) Development Proposal Retrieved from
http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00098766/00001




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