Role of Librarians in the Development of Computer-Mediated Social Networks: Challenges and Lessons Learned from VIVO I...
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00000456/00001
 Material Information
Title: Role of Librarians in the Development of Computer-Mediated Social Networks: Challenges and Lessons Learned from VIVO Implementation and Outreach
Physical Description: Conference presentation
Creator: Garcia-Milian, Rolando
Norton, Hannah F.
Auten, Beth
Tennant, Michele R.
Ferree, Nita
Holmes, Kristi L.
Davis, Valrie
Schaefer, Nancy
Conlon, Mike
Johnson, Margeaux
VIVO Collaboration
Publication Date: 2011
 Notes
Abstract: VIVO is an open-source semantic web application that facilitates discovery in the scholarly environment. VIVO allows scientists to discover meaningful information, visualize their research networks, and locate and communicate with potential collaborators across disciplines, both within an institution and at the national level. VIVO is different from other computer-mediated social networks for scientists in that the system harvests many types of data from authoritative resources (e.g. bibliographic databases, human resources systems, institutional and federal grants databases) and can be supplemented with manual data entry. Biomedical and science librarians at a number of institutions, including the University of Florida have played a key role in the process of VIVO development, implementation, outreach, and ontology mapping based on their specific set of skills and knowledge of the campus research community. In this study, nine librarians were interviewed and asked to identify perceived challenges, skills gained, and lessons learned during the VIVO implementation and outreach process. From these interviews, main ideas were identified and grouped into seven topics: interaction with technology, teamwork and team dynamics, changing nature of the project, workload balance, engaging with the wider community, project management, and communication. Lessons learned by this project team are relevant to librarians working on large-scale projects, particularly those in the realms of innovative technology and facilitating collaboration.
Acquisition: Collected for University of Florida's Institutional Repository by the UFIR Self-Submittal tool. Submitted by Rolando Milian.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the submitter.
System ID: IR00000456:00001

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VIVO


National
Networking


Role of Librarians in the Development

of Computer-Mediated Social

Networks:


Rolando Garcia-Milian

Hannah F. Norton, Beth Auten, Valrie I. Davis, Nita Ferree, Kristi L.
Holmes, Margeaux Johnson, Nancy Schaefer, Michele R.Tennant,
Mike Conlon, VIVO Collaboration

This project funded by the National Institutes of Health, U24 RR029S22,
"VIVO: Enabling National Networking of Scientists."


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What is VIVO?


VIVO


enb":' g national
networking of scientist


VIVO is an open-source semantic
web application that enables the
discovery of research and
scholarship across disciplines in
an institution.


VIVO contains detailed profiles
of researchers that display
items such as publications,
teaching, and grants. These
profiles are linked to each other
and to additional departmental
information.


VIVO supports faceted searching
for quick retrieval of data. This is a
powerful search functionality for
locating people and information
within or across institutions.





What is VIVO?

* Some history:
VIVO originated at Cornell University in 2003 as an open
source product.
Through a $12.2 million grant from the National Institutes
of Health, 7 partner institutions, led by the University of
Florida, are expanding VIVO for national use.
* The Goal:
Improve all of science by providing the means for sharing and
using current, accurate, and precise information regarding
scientists' interests, activities and accomplishments.
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How does VIVO work?


External data sources:
* Publication warehouses e.g. PubMed,
Web of Science, Scopus
* Grant databases: e.g. NSF/ NIH
* National Organizations: AAAS, AMA


Internal data sources:
* Human Resources
* Sponsored Research
* Institutional Repositories
* Registrar System
* Faculty Activity Systems
* Events and Seminars


stored as RDF triples
using standard ontology


Faculty and unit
administrators can
then add additional
information to their
profile.


VIVO data is available for reuse by web pages, applications,
and other consumers both within and outside the institution.











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Health Outcomes and Policy, Faculty 2008- -,
Health Outcomes and Policy, Research Associate Professor
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Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Associate
Director 2009 2010
Information Technology, Associate CIO, IT Architecture 2008 2010
Information Technology, Director of Data Infrastructure 2002 2010
Health Science Center, Chief Information Officer 1997 2002
MarCon Global Data Solutions, Chief Technical Officer 1997 2002


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Role of librarians


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Aim and methods


Analyze the challenges and
barriers librarians have
encountered during VIVO
implementation and outreach


Investigate the impact of VIVO
on librarian's professional
development and skill sets


9 librarians interviewed
Open questions: challenges, skills gained,
lessons learned


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Identified areas of discussion





Interaction with technology


Challenges:
VIVO requires some aptitude for technology
Interaction between librarians and information technology
specialists


New Skills:
Learning about semantic web / technical aspects of the project
Familiarity with terminology (e.g. Linked Open Data, SPARQL)
Learning to interpret the progress of the project and translate for
end users

Lessons Learned:
Ensuring each team member's understanding increases individual
input and problem solving, strengthens the end product





Changing nature of the project


Challenges:
Working with a product that is in development
Roles and responsibilities have shifted


New Skills:
Team leaders have learned to hire individuals with the right skill sets
for each position


Lessons Learned:
Be flexible and agile, get use to making changes to the original plan
because it is required by the technology
Feel comfortable working with beta versions of the product





Workload balance


Challenges:
Balancing the work on the VIVO project with regular job duties (e.g.
teaching and reference services)
Large amount of travel for some team members

Observations:
Compensate by letting colleagues outside the project team know what
is going on
Interest in VIVO has offered librarians opportunities to present at local,
regional, and national meetings advancing their careers

Lessons Learned:
Delegate work giving away something finite instead of portions of an
ongoing project.
Learning new skills and technologies prepares librarians for new library
directions (e.g. support for e-science / translational science initiatives)





Engaging with the wider community


Challenges:
Navigating campus political environment for those in leadership positions
Contacting and engaging faculty


Opportunities:
Pretext for presenting on other library initiatives/services: Open Access,
Institutional Repositories, ILL services
Gained more visibility within departments: more contacts and
consultations from faculty
Developing connections at the national level with team members and
partner institutions (e.g. Annual VIVO Conferences)





Engaging with the wider community



New Skills:
Learned more about institution's various cultures (e.g. working with
administrators)
Increased librarians' level of comfort in talking to people across the
scholarly spectrum


Lessons Learned:
Librarians have a better understanding of the different needs, concerns,
and driving forces that affect campus administrators, departments data
stewards, and faculty











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Project management


Challenges:
Little previous experience on a project of this magnitude
Very difficult to know what to expect and how to prepare



New Skills:
Better ability to prioritize
More efficient decision making process
More task-driven orientation, centered around an action plan


Lessons Learned:
The team would benefit from a team member with training and/or
experience in project management
A project of this size should be fully integrated within the library
system or a particular library department





Communication


Challenges:
Communicating across diverse groups within the team and user
populations
Includes engaging in writing and oral communication through
presentations and papers.

New Skills:
Identify the appropriate information for specific and diverse audiences
Enhanced skills in summarizing and organizing both oral and poster
presentations

Lessons Learned:
Talk openly as a team
Use every possible communication channel (from phone calls to
teleconferencing)
Empathy is important when navigating multidisciplinary conversations





Teamwork and team dynamics


Challenges:
Massive, multi-team, and multi-institution project

Implementation


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Teamwork and team dynamics


New Skills:
STeam became more efficient, developing trust and unifying against
common challenges



Lessons Learned:
Those in leadership positions learned that not over-reacting to
setbacks helps the team move forward
Help team members see the positive without disregarding what
they have to say





Teamwork and team dynamics &


Skills required in collaborative scientific
research teams (Stagel & Salas, 2008)


SLeadership


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High tolerance
for change


Communication
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Understanding
team members'
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The VIVO team has learned many of these skills in the process so it is better
prepare for new multidisciplinary team projects in the future


Communication
by leadership
of expectations


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ealn nat0l
vivo ~ newrkn of scetit


Second Annual VIVO Conference


Register at vivoweb.org/conference

Register at vivoweb.org/conference


SGAYLORD NATIONALS
RESORT & CONVENTION CENTER


THANK YOU!




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