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Title: The Jamaica Outpost
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Language: English
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Publisher: GL Publishing
Place of Publication: Kingston, Jamaica
Creation Date: February 2005
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News for the Jamaican lesbian, all-sexual and gay community
]lumel Issue 9
^\\i Hammca O^utpoat
Establisbed in June 2DD4 ISSN D799-I72X
Kingston, Jamaica
FEBRUARY2DD5
GiDbal HeadlinGS
Canadian justice minister
says no referendum on gay
marriage bill.

German scientists have dis-
covered a new inhibitor that
blocks the natural production of
a human enzyrre, essential fa
the survival of the HIV virus in
the human body.

Researchers at the Univer-
sity of Illinois at Chicago in the
U.S. have confirrred that sirri-
larity between genes of gay
brothers appear to influence
that sexual orientation.

U.S President George W.
Bush reiterates his SLqxrt for
the amendrrent to the U.S.
constitution that vw3uld ban
same-sex marriages.
The Jamaica DutPnst
P.D. 554D, Kingston B, Jamaica
TeI: 87B-8B4-I85B
Email: jamaicaDutpostUbotmail.com
Publication Team:
Jason Simmonds
Publication Coordinator

Antbony Hron
Publication Assistant

Kaitb Hollar
Editing Assistant

A montbly publication by GL Publisbing
Visit us online at:
www.jamaicaDutpDst.CDm
GLBT TSUNAMI RELIEF EFFORT WITH A JAMAICAN CONNECTION
By Antbony Hron, Tbe Jamaica QutPost Contributor
The recent devastation in the
wake of the Decentier 2B^
tsunarri in the Indian Ocean
has HDtivated many individuals
and organisations to lend assis-
tance in the stricken
area. Many of our readers may
remerrba Enily Paul wfx)
spent several years in Jamaica
serving as the first Programme
Coordinator for the Jamaica
Forum for Lesbians, All-
Sexuals and Gays (J-FLAG)
and for laying the foundation of
todays \Afomen for \Afomen
group.

For the past 3 years, she has
been living with her partner in
Colombo, Sri Lanka where she
has also been active with the
GLBT community through vol-
untea work with sipport and
advocacy organisation
\Afomen's Scpport Q-oup Most
recently, she helped her part-
Emily Paul (right) and partner i^osanna Flamer Caldera (Phntn nnurtnsy nf E. Paul)
ner, Rosanna Flamer Caldera,
former coordinator of the
\Afomen's Support Croup and
current Co-Secretary General of
the International Lesbian and
Gay Association, launch Equal
Q-ound, a new GLBT organiza-
tion, and joined the Foundation
for Co-Existence (FCE), a chari-
table organisation working to pro-
mote peaceful dialogue and inter-
action between the various fac-
tions involved in the country's
recently ended twenty-year civil
war. Neither Enily nor Ffcsanna
were prepared for wfiat was to
happen.
(See Connection on page 2)
THE MISUNDERSTANDING OF JAMAICA'S CULTURE
By Jason Simmonds, Tbe Jamaica QutPost Contributor
It seems like the vwjrd culture has
been popping ip more and more
in my face of late. In more than
one of my courses at the univer-
sity, in books I have been reading,
the local newspapers and the list
could go on and on. I decided to
stop for a morrent to reflect on
this thing called'culture'.

Tfie Odord Senior Dictionary
(God foitid I use the foreign dic-
tionary here!) explains the word
'culture' as the customs and civili-
zation of a particular people or
groip, giving the V\fest Indian
culture as an exarrple. Ffcibert
Lado, in his 1957 book entitled '
Linguistics Across Cultures',
desaibes culture as the v\ays of
a people. Tvw3 absolutely distinct
sources and yet both explana-
tions of wfiat 'culture' is seem to
be the same to me. Tfierefore,
the daim that homopfxibia is a
part of Jamaica's culture would
technically be correct, right? In
fact, if we really examine the
general view of the Jamaican
ptblic, it seems dear that hostil-
ity toward homosexuals is really
of the people. If it is not en-
trendied in the Jamaican Consti-
tution that we should hate, beat
and kill homosexuals, then how
could we explain the passage of
this seemingly "cultural" practice
from generation to generation?

(See Misunderstanding on page 3)


The Jamaica DutPost
February 2DD5 Volume I Issue 9 Kingston, Jamaica
Page 2
(Connection... Continued from page l)
Boxing Day in Colombo began as any other warm, sunny and
lazy. Soon, however, reports of an unusually large "tidal wave" be-
gan to filter in. Qued to the news reports, the severity of the situation
became dearer But the overwhelming extent of the devastation did
not paralyze the people of Sri Lanka Axording to Enily, the people
of Sri Lanka responded to the catastrophe with immediacy second to
none. Through cooperative strategies, local organizations and citizen
volunteers took charge of all relief efforts during the first week since
the government took some time to organize more formal efforts.
vythin hours of the disaster, friends of their
organisations headed to the east and south of
the island to deliver food and pharmaceutical
supplies to the affected communities and set
up medical stations to receive and care for the
injured. Efforts to coordinate their operation
was made easier thanks to calls and SMS
mess^es they received on their cellular
phones to identify and locate drop-off points for
the relief supplies. Tfie tremencbus contribu-
tions of the Sri Lankan people in the face of
death and destruction were amazing for both
Enily and Ffcsanna. They soon found them
selves working 12 and 13 hours per day, mak-
ing calls for donations, ipdating people on
their progress, writing emails, ipdating web-
sites, attending meetings on how to use funds
in the relief and rehabilitation efforts, organiz-
ing and supervising volunteers, coordinating
work efforts and filling food sacks during the evenings for delivery to
the devastated areas.

'Tfie magnitude of the catastrophe that affected Sri Lanka on Box-
ing Day is something that is hardly describable," said Ffcsanna in a
release to The Jamaica OutPost. Sfie further informed us that mem-
bers of Equal Q-ound have contributed not only their time but have
also bought relief supplies and donated them to larger organisations
that send trucks to the northern, eastern and southern regions of the
island. Many of the gay spaces in the south and in Negombo, a dty
north of Colonto, were severely damaged or completely destroyed
by the tsunani. Ffcsanna affirms that it will take Sri Lanka many
years to rebuild its economy and for the people of Sri Lanka to com-
pletely recover from the emotional toll that the disaster has taken on
them

Being involved with an NGO has put Enily "in the thick of it". Yet
despite the physically and emotionally draining work, Enily believes
there is some level of honour to actually experience the generosity of
the 'everyday dtizen' as well as that of the global community. Fie-
Rosanna out in tbe field (Pboto courtesy of E. Paul)
fleeting on the September 11 terrorist attacks on the US in 2001,
which she points out pales in comparison to the total destruction
the tsunami wrought in South Asia, Enily reiterates the way peo-
ple from all over the world, wfiether they were directly affected or
not, felt as though the disaster happened to them People from
all over the globe shared the sense of loss, hurt and emptiness
that followed.

Enily, upon closing her communication, remarks: 'Tfie outpour-
ing of support from abroad has been amazing. Personally,
Ffcsanna and I received letters from all over the world expressing
concern and sharing stories of how peo-
ple were giving wfiat they could financial
or otherwise. It was special to feel such a
sense of 'oneness'. It was like a web of
love and support was being spun around
the world."
Hopefully this web of support will not di-
minish in the months and years ahead, as
the work to recover continues. Tfie Ja
maica OutPost encour^es all our read-
ers to contribute to the recovery effort,
now and in the future. \Afe have listed sev-
eral ways for you to contribute directly to
the organisations that Enily and Ffcsanna
work for. \Afe can assure you that all do-
nations will go to those in need.
Any comments?
Hease send to
jamaicaDutpost@hotmail.com
A
I
J\
GL sa
f
V worldOutgsmes
Rendez-Vous
Montreal 2006
jDin in tliE discussiDf] m THURSDAY pEbruary ID fpDmDPMtDlDPM www.jamaicaDutpDst.CDm Creating and maintaining bealtby same-gender relationsbips in a bomopbobic climate. DUTFDRUM


The Jamaica DutPost
February 2DD5 Volume I Issue 9 Kingston, Jamaica
Page 3
J-FLAG UNDERGOES MAJOR RESTRUCTURING
By Jason Simmonds, Tbe Jamaica QutPost Contributor
TTie island's gay rights advo-
cacy organisation, TTie Ja
maica Forum fa Lesbians,
All-Sexuals and Gays (J-
FLAG), started the New Year
under a new management
team. TTie new management
committee now has a total of
six members, led by two team
leaders, h^lene and Gareth.
TTie aganisation also has a
salaried administrative assis-
tant, who will carry out day-to-
day activities in the office and
help to maintain the available
help-line. Tfie restructuring
also induded a change of
office space, from what used
to be the resource room to a
more private office still within
the JAS offices. Some high-
lights at the aganisation dur-
ing 2004 indudes representa
tions at two maja confa-
ences for human rights de-
fenders in Europe; one spon-
saed by the European Union
and another by AFC intana-
tional. JFLAG was also pre-
sent at the Latin Amaican
Human Rghts Defenders
Confaence held in Sao
Paulo, as one of two repre-
sentatives of human rights
advocates in Jamaica. TTie
organisation is currently
being represented on a U.S.
speakers' tour organized by
CUTfront, a program ty
Amnesty International on
GLBT human rights. Efforts
to contact J-FLAG about the
nature of the mess^e they
will be presenting during the
tour v\ere unsuccessful.
Notice of Disclaimer
Tbe views and opinions expressed in
tbis newsletter are not a reflection of
tbose of tbe publisber. Tbe publisber
cannot be bold liable for any offence as
a result of any sucb views.
(Misunderstanding Cont'd from page 1)
Let's take a look at our Jamaican dialect, for exarrple. Take a visit to
any of our sdnols one fine day and cfieck to see if any of the black-
boards have the word 'Patois' as the subject for the day f^ne, I thee
dedare. Nat one a dem Oh, excuse me! f^vertheless, the vast ma-
jority of us Jamaicans are so fluent in our 'colourful' language! Is the
Jamaican Creole not a cultural element of our sodety? In fact, IViss
Lou (aka the Honourable Dr. Louise Bennett-Coverley) has actually
shown the Jamaican people and the vorld alike that the Jamaican
dialect is indeed a very irrportant aspect of our culture making refer-
ences along the way to the many sayings her 'Auntie FtoacNe' told
her.

In a letter to the editor of TTie Jamaica Qeaner dated CGtober 6,
2004, one S Escoffery, wfio resides in Brooklyn f^Jew YorK encour-
ages Jamaica to maintain her culture. He further reproves requests for
any cfiange thereof, be it by multinational gay rights organisations or
corrpanies like Puma wfien they issue codes of conduct to Dancehall
artistes, calling these requests an insult to Jamaica, her people and
her culture. His admonition was in response to the many protests last
year against the Dancehall artistes wfio have been spreading the pre-
dous gospel that another aspect of Jamaica's culture is homopfxibia
Rerrenioer Sfiabba Fianks? Don't worry. You are not alone here for I
don't either!! VUiat is the lesson we have learnt?

As Jamaica observes Back History Month (following the culture of the
African Americans of the USA) let's look at the following quote made
by IVbrtin Luther King, Jr.:

"In the end we will rerrenioer, not the words of our
enemies, but the silence of our friends."
FOCUS ON: Emily Paul
By Antbony Hron, Tbe Jamaica ButPost Contributor
Emily first carre to Jamaica in 1998 as part of a study abroad pro-
gram offered at the Sdnol for International Training (SIT) in the U.S
It was then that she began working with Jamaica's lesbian and fe-
male bisexual corrmunity through a support group founded by Ja-
maica AIDS Support (JAS). At the end of her studies, she returned to
the US but moved back to Jamaica in June of 1999. This tirre, she
volunteered with JFLAG, soon becoming the VUjrreris Coordinator,
and was errployed by JAS to develop their worren's group. Wth
Emilys help, JFLAG received a small grant from the Astraea Foun-
dation. TTie organisation hired Enily as their first Programme Coordi-
nator in 2000 and she brought her V\fonBris Q'oup portfolio with her.
TTiese were exdting times for LGBT advocacy; and Emily was in-
volved in most of the efforts. She ran the small office and Hotline,
organised monthly soda! gatherings for the conmunity and bi-weekly
support n^etings for the won^n, and helped legitimize JFLAGs
vork locally and abroad. One of her last major acconplishnBrts be-
fore returning to the U.S. in October of 2001 v\as to submit a suc-
cessful grant proposal to the Qobal Fund for V\fonBn, which allowed
the V\fomeris Group to test its wings as an independent organisation,
rechristened 'V\fonBn for V\fonBn'. Although Emily made many great
contributions during her time in Jamaica, for those wfio knew her,
she will be renumbered most fondly for her wonderful, enthusiastic
spirit, her willingness to help anyone in need, and her capacity to
treat everyone with love and respect. TTie Jamaica OutPost extends
its sincerest thanks and blessing to Emily for all her efforts on behalf
of the LGBT conmunity here and abroad.
This issue is dedicated to the Memorv
OF Robert Cork


The Jamaica DutPost
February 2DD5 Volume I Issue 9 Kingston, Jamaica
Page 4
HealtbS Wellness
DEPRESSION AND THE GLBT COMMUNITY

This may seem to be the most was sexually active with other men. been 'cultured to believe. You,
inopportune tinB to talk about It was unrelenting. I becanB se- too, have a right to life. You, too,
depression. It is for we because verely depressed, f^ one could should feel free to live, to shine,
it has been too late for a friend, reach through to we. I thought no to fly to smile and to love. I
Hence, this is for the many wfio one else understood wfiat I was would like to share with you a
are still alive amongst us. Wien going through. I knew no other gay few lines from one of ny very
I v\as a teenager and realized I person to talk to. And the bottom favourite songs:
was gay it was the most trau- line was this: I v\as afraid of soda! 'Wen the shadows
matic thing I thought could have rqection and potential harm I e^/en are dosing in
happened to we, ever. I v\as so started to entertain thoughts of put- And your spirit diminishing
afraid to talk to anyone about the ting an end to it all. Just remembayouire not alone
feelings I was having. I v\ent to And love will be thae
one of the traditional high I turned to myself for help. I started To guide you home"
sdnols that had very good guid- finding v\ays to help myself from I recommend you get a copy of
ance coundllors but I v\as still within. I would spend my free tine 'Anytime You f^Jeed A Friend by
afraid of 'letting ouf the seaet I just thinking about ny life, wfiat I Mariah Carey and listen to this
had inside. Although people wanted to becone wfien I left high song carefully in the darK alone.
could have looked at ne and sdnol. TTiat becane ny own form I cannot tell you wfiat you will
wondered if I was gay ny public of escapism One thing is certain. I discover. TTiat part is your fate
behaviour to refute such a 'slant' have survived it all. Through the and you are the sole bearer of
taught we to deny the true 'me' thick and the thin, I made it through the key to your destiny.
to nyself. It made we very sad. the pain and the lack of inner self-
I went to church. I prayed for ny worth. Brothers, sisters, your life is "Love will make it alri^."
'siri to go away even before I worth more than wfiat you have IVbriah Carey
HealtbS Wellness
DEPRESSION AND THE GLBT COMMUNITY

This may seem to be the most was sexually active with other men. been 'cultured to believe. You,
inopportune tine to talk about It was unrelenting. I becane se- too, have a right to life. You, too,
depression. It is for we because verely depressed, f^ one could should feel free to live, to shine,
it has been too late for a friend, reach through to we. I thought no to fly to smile and to love. I
Hence, this is for the many wfn one else understood wfiat I was would like to share with you a
are still alive amongst us. Wien going through. I knew no other gay few lines from one of ny very
I v\as a teenager and realized I person to talk to. And the bottom favourite songs:
was gay it was the most trau- line was this: I v\as afraid of soda! "Wien the shadows
matic thing I thought could have rqection and potential harm I e^/en are dosing in
happened to we, ever. I v\as so started to entertain thoughts of put- And your spirit diminishing
afraid to talk to anyone about the ting an end to it all. Just remembayouire not alone
feelings I was having. I v\ent to And love will be thae
one of the traditional high I turned to myself for help. I started To guide you home"
sdnols that had very good guid- finding v\ays to help myself from I recommend you get a copy of
ance coundllors but I v\as still within. I would spend ny free tine 'Anytime You f^Jeed A Friend by
afraid of 'letting ouf the seaet I just thinking about ny life, wfiat I Mariah Carey and listen to this
had inside. Although people wanted to becone wfien I left high song carefully in the darK alone.
could have looked at ne and sdnol. TTiat becane ny own form I cannot tell you wfiat you will
wondered if I was gay ny public of escapism One thing is certain. I discover. TTiat part is your fate
behaviour to refute such a 'slant' have survived it all. Through the and you are the sole bearer of
taught we to deny the true 'me' thick and the thin, I made it through the key to your destiny.
to nyself. It made we very sad. the pain and the lack of inner self-
I went to church. I prayed for ny worth. Brothers, sisters, your life is "Love will make it alri^."
'siri to go away even before I worth more than wfiat you have IVbriah Carey
IntBrnatiDnal Nbws
U.S. BLACK GAY ADVOCACY GROUP UNVEILS NEW VISION
Wien: Jan 6,2004.
FromVUiere: Kingston

Ian [Boyne's] view of homo-
sexuality is not new to the fra-
ternity and brings to the fore-
front lan's perception of even
his relationship; the so call str8
men think that wonen are to be
good cooks, hone keepers and
give them sex f^Jow because a
man does not fit in that slot then
tsNO men together must be only
to have sex with each other. It
is therefore our responsibility to
cfiange this perspective, but
how can v\e convince them? I
doubt they will ever understand.
I must tell you that lan's ability
to be heard is that of his affilia-
tion with the media, because
otherwise wfiat he wrote is just
as dumb as the illiterate on the
street. TTie man is an educated
idiot with respect to gay issues
and just wants to be heard.
SPECIAL NDTICE
V\fe are conpiling a directory of
Caribbean GLBT organizations.
Hease contact us with informa-
tion about the GLBT organiza-
tions in your conmunity.

Last Month's DutPoll Results
Do you plan to live a less dos-
eted life in 2005?

YES 52% ND 3B% UNSURE 12%
Question:
Are you personally acquainted
with anyone living with the HIV
virus or AIDS?

Yes/r^Jo

VCFTE ONUNE
vwwv.jamaicaoutpost.com
Qickon:OutPoll
A new statement of mis-
sion and vision for the U.
S. based National Black
Justice Coalition (NBJC)
has been approved by
the organisation's Board
of Directors at an annual
board retreat in Washing-
ton D.C. this year. The
new mission and vision
statements of the organi-
sation includes a re-
commitment to advocat-
ing for equal marriage
rights within African
American communities as
well as a continued focus
on other issues that affect
and relate to the Black
gay, lesbian, bisexual
and transgender (GLBT)
community. The an-
nouncement was made
on February 1, to coin-
cide with the month-long
celebrations of Black His-
tory Month in the United
States of America. The
adoption of a new motto,
"Fairness for Our Families,"
was also a part of the re-
newal and refocus of the
organisation for 2005.

"I am very pleased that we
will continue to be engaged
in public policy and public
advocacy on marriage and
other issues this year," af-
firms Board President Keith
Boykin, in a release from
the organisation, highlight-
ing the need for GLBT
families, including those of
African decent, to be
equally regarded with the
dignity and respect as het-
erosexual families. He fur-
ther pointed out that the
current concept of family is
not single-dimensional and
by this accord, fighting for
fairness for Black GLBT
families in every aspect will
be a priority throughout
2005.

The National Black Justice
Coalition is a civil rights or-
ganization of Black lesbian,
gay, bisexual and trans-
gender people and our allies
dedicated to fostering equal-
ity by fighting racism and ho-
mophobia. The Coalition ad-
vocates for social justice by
educating and mobilizing
opinion leaders, including
elected officials, clergy, and
media, with a focus on Black
communities.


For more information,
please visit their website:
www.nbjcoalition.org