• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Cover
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 About the author
 Lesson 1 - Earthquakes, hurricanes...
 Lesson 2 - Musical diversity in...
 Lesson 3 - Comparative government:...
 Lesson 4 - International economics:...
 Lesson 5 - The Caribbean in American...
 Lesson 6 - European exploration,...
 Lesson 7 - Diversity in Caribbean...
 Lesson 8 - Caribbean folkways through...






Diversity in the Caribbean:An Interdisciplinary Approach to Teaching the Region
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/IR00000267/00001
 Material Information
Title: Diversity in the Caribbean:An Interdisciplinary Approach to Teaching the Region
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Vinat, Daniel
Publisher: Latin American and Caribbean Center, Florida International University
Place of Publication: Miami
 Notes
Funding: Support for the development of the technical infrastructure and partner training provided by the United States Department of Education TICFIA program.
 Record Information
Source Institution: Florida International University ( SOBEK page | external link )
Holding Location: Florida International University ( SOBEK page | external link )
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: IR00000267:00001

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Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Introduction
        Page 3
        Page 4
    About the author
        Page 5
    Lesson 1 - Earthquakes, hurricanes and tsunamis in the Caribbean
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Lesson 2 - Musical diversity in the Caribbean
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Lesson 3 - Comparative government: A Caribbean case study
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Lesson 4 - International economics: The Caribbean in the global economy
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Lesson 5 - The Caribbean in American history
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Lesson 6 - European exploration, the colonization of the Caribbean and its long-lasting effects
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Lesson 7 - Diversity in Caribbean art
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Lesson 8 - Caribbean folkways through short stories
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
Full Text
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Diversity in the Caribbean:

An Interdisciplinary Approach to
Teaching the Region
Page I 1


Table of Contents
Pages 3-5 Introduction to Diversity in the Caribbean: An Interdisciplinary
Approach to Teaching the Region
Pages 6-13 Lesson 1: Earthquakes, Hurricanes and Tsunamis in the Caribbean
Pages 14-17 Lesson 2: Musical Diversity in the Caribbean
Pages 18-22 Lesson 3: Comparative Government: A Caribbean Case Study
Pages 23-28 Lesson 4: International Economics: The Caribbean in the Global
Economy
Pages 29-36 Lesson 5: The Caribbean in American History
Pages 37-41 Lesson 6: European Exploration, the Colonization of the Caribbean
and its Long-Lasting Effects
Pages 42-61 Lesson 7: Diversity in Caribbean Art
Pages 62-66 Lesson 8: Caribbean Folkways through Short Stories
Page I 2


Introduction
The Caribbean takes its name from that of the Carib, an ethnic group present in
the Lesser Antilles and parts of adjacent South America at the time of European
contact. The islands of the Caribbean are also known as the West Indies because
when Christopher Columbus landed there in 1492 he believed that he had reached the
Indies (in Asia). The region consists of the Antilles, divided into the larger Greater
Antilles which bound the sea on the north and the Lesser Antilles on the south and east
(including the Leeward Antilles), and the Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos Islands,
which are in fact in the Atlantic Ocean north of Cuba, not in the Caribbean Sea. The
diversity in the region comes in the form of its geography, its people, its governments,
its economy and its culture. Each island has its own unique flavor that makes it different
from the others. Through this region, one can see the lasting impact colonization has
had and how different the experience for each island had been. By studying the region,
one can appreciate the mixture of African, European and Native cultures that create the
tapestry of Caribbean life. Even though the region is currently globalizing itself through
organizations such as CARICOM, each island still struggles to prosper and sustain their
people.

This publication allows teachers to use the region as a teaching tool in a variety
of subject areas. The target audience is students from grades 6-12. All lessons are
modifiable for higher and lower achieving students. These lessons provide background
information as well as classroom activities that allow for individual, small group, large
group, creative as well as technological learning. Teachers can use these lessons as a
unit on the region or can use one of the lessons to teach their content area information
through the use of the Caribbean as a case study. All lessons include state and
national standards as well as all required materials for the execution of the lesson.
Students will become exposed to a variety of primary and secondary resources in order
to complete a variety of activities, from maps, to letters, to pictures to journals and
government issued documents. In all the lessons students will utilize reading and
mathematics benchmarks, reinforcing skills tested through the FCAT. The lessons
cover the following subject areas:

Science- Physical Science/Earth and Space

Social Studies- World History/American History/Government/Economics

Language Arts- World Literature

Fine Arts- Visual Arts/Music
Page I 3


This publication is made possible through support from The Latin American and
Caribbean Center (LACC) at Florida International University and the U.S. Department of
Education Title VI Grant. LACC was founded in 1979 to promote the study of Latin
America and the Caribbean in the State of Florida and throughout the United States. By
forging linkages across the Americas through high quality education, research aimed at
better understanding the most urgent problems confronted by the region; national and
international outreach; and meaningful dialogue between different ethnic communities,
nationalities and cultures that claim the Americas as their homeland, LACC works to
remain one of the top Latin American and Caribbean Centers in the world.

LACC draws upon the expertise of one of the largest concentrations of Latin
American and Caribbean Studies scholars of any university in the country, spanning a
multitude of disciplines. LACC faculty associates produce important scholarship in such
areas as migration; U.S./Latin American relations; trade and integration in the Americas;
indigenous cultures; economic stabilization and democratization; sustainable
development; religion; environmental technology, and arts and humanities.

Many of the primary resources used in this curricular resource are available
through The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC), which is a cooperative digital
library for resources from and about the Caribbean and circum-Caribbean. dLOC
provides free and open access to digitized versions of Caribbean cultural, historical and
research materials currently held in archives, libraries, and private collections. This
collection is a partnership between Florida International University and the University of
Florida.
Page I 4


About the Author
Daniel Vinat is a National Board Certified Social Studies Teacher at Felix Varela
Senior High, where he teaches World History as well as American Government and
Economics. He has been teaching for nine years and recently received his Gifted
Education endorsement. Daniel has a bachelor's degree in Social Studies Education
from Florida International University. He is currently the secretary of the Miami Dade
County Council for the Social Studies, where he assists in the organization of
conferences and professional development opportunities for Social Studies teachers. In
2010, he worked with dLOC to develop Social Studies specific activities related to the
primary documents in the collection. During the summer of 2010, he worked with the
Division of Social Sciences and Life Skills for Miami Dade County Public Schools to
develop the scope and sequence for the new World History curriculum that aligns with
the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards for Florida. Daniel has also worked with
Pearson to develop the Social Studies Teacher Certification exam as well as grade
National Board Certification Exams. Daniel was recognized for his outstanding work as
the recipient of the Miami Dade Council for the Social Studies High School Teacher of
the Year in 2008. He has also twice been awarded 2"^ place for his lesson plans in the
Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta Miami Branch Lesson Plan of the Year Contest.
Additionally, he was recently awarded the Governor's Award for his entrepreneurial
lesson plan from the Florida Economics Council.
Page I 5


Lesson 1: Earthquakes, Hurricanes and Tsunamis in the Caribbean

Science Standards (Florida Next Generation Science Standards):

SC.912.E.6.2: Connect surface features to surface processes that are responsible for
their formation.

SC.912.E.6.3: Analyze the scientific theory of plate tectonics and identify related major
processes and features as a result of moving plates.

SC.912.E.6.4: Analyze how specific geologic processes and features are expressed in
Florida and elsewhere.

SC.912.E.6.5: Describe the geologic development of the present day oceans and
identify commonly found features.

SC.912.E.7.4: Summarize the conditions that contribute to the climate of a geographic
area, including the relationships to lakes and oceans.

SC.912.E.7.6: Relate the formation of severe weather to the various physical factors.

SC.912.E.7.2: Analyze the causes of the various kinds of surface and deep water
motion within the oceans and their impacts on the transfer of energy between the poles
and the equator.

SC.912.E.7.6: Relate the formation of severe weather to the various physical factors.

Objectives:

The student will be able to:

Identify the major climate region in the Caribbean and it characteristics.

Explain how geological features such as mountains, hills, volcanoes, lakes,
rivers, islands and bays are formed.

Locate geographical features on a map, specifically those found in the
Caribbean.

Discuss how natural forces, such as plate tectonics, change landforms.

Understand the relationship between climate, geography and natural disasters.

Track natural phenomena, such as hurricanes, earthquakes and tsunamis on a
map.

Page I 6


Use primary and secondary sources to evaluate the impact of natural disasters
on the Caribbean.

Materials:

Computer with internet access

LCD projector

Computer paper/poster paper

Crayons/markers/colored pencils

Scissors

Science textbook

Overhead projector

Atlas

Books on hurricanes, earthquakes, volcanoes and tsunamis

Procedures:

1. Introductory Activity- Using the following National Geographic Website:
http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/caribbean-
photos/#/caribbean-island-beach 2900 600x450.jpg

Show students the following pictures:

1. Trinidad and Tobago

2. Dominica

3. Shipwreck, Bahamas

4. Scott's Head, Dominica

5. Samana Cay, Bahamas

6. Malecon, Havana

7. Dominica

8. Trinidad and Tobago

Page I 7


9. Mushroom Rock, Barbados
10. Tobago
For each picture ask students to write down their response to the following two
questions:
A. What geographic features do you see?
B. Where in the world do you think this picture was taken?
The teacher should refer back to the pictures for the answers and discuss with the
class.
2. The teacher introduces the following concepts through a lecture and discussion:
a. Climate regions- specifically tropical
b. Plate tectonics and geographic formations
c. Geographic features
d. How natural disasters form-earthquakes, tsunamis and hurricanes
** The teacher should use the Caribbean as the focus point for each of the topics
3. The teacher has students use their science textbook, atlases as well as online
resources to look for the following features in the Caribbean:
a. Mountains
b. Rivers
c. Lakes
d. Bays
e. Fault lines
f. Large bodies of water
g- Volcanoes
h. Name of each island
These are helpful online resources for students to complete the assignment:
Page I 8


http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthguakes/world/?regionlD=27 US Geological Survey-
earthquake information and maps

http://stormcarib.com/climatoloqv/ Caribbean Hurricane Network with information and
maps

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/ National Hurricane Center with current and historical
information

http://www.cdera.org/doccentre/hazards.php The Caribbean Disaster Emergency
Response Agency Hazard Fact sheets

http://www.geo.tu-freiberg.de/hvdro/oberseminar/pdf/Raik%20Bachmann.pdf-THE
CARIBBEAN PLATE AND THE QUESTION OF ITS FORMATION: Institute of Geology,
University of Mining and Technology Freiberg, Department of Tectonophysics

ftp://hazards.cr.usgs.gov/maps/sigegs/20100112/CaribbeanforHaitiV2 lo.pdf -
Seismicity of the Earth 1900 2007 Caribbean Plate and Vicinity Map


http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/reports/reprints/Parsons PAG 165.pdf Tsunami Probability in
the Caribbean Region: Pure and Applied Geophysics

http://www.ioc-
tsunami.org/files/CARTWS meeting Venezuela/presentations/3 6 %20US%20Ppt%20
tsunami%20todav%20Caribbean%20Risk110506.pdf- PowerPoint TSUNAMI El
Peligro Olvidado The Forgotten Danger! "Olvidado" A Risk to Life Assessment: Risk-to-
The Very High Caribbean Risk -UNESCO IOC/ICG


Once they have located these features they are to label them on a blank map of the
world.(http://www2.fiu.edU/orgs/w4ehw/atlantic%20tracking%20map%20full%20basin.p
df this blank map of the Caribbean is courtesy of NOAA) After they have labeled their
map, students are to write down three observations they make from looking at the map.
The teacher will ask students to share their observations with the class. The discussion
should focus on how the people of each of these islands have to adapt their living
conditions based on the geographic features that surround them.

4. Break your students up into three groups- (Tsunami, Hurricanes, Earthquakes)

5. As a group they must develop a presentation on their assigned natural
phenomenon.
Page I 9


Each presentation must include the following content:

a. How is their natural disaster formed?

b. What areas of the Caribbean are most affected by the natural disaster
assigned to their group?

c. How do we measure or track their type of natural disaster?

d. Use a map to label significant occurrence of your particular natural
disaster.

e. Explain positive and negative effects related to your natural phenomenon.

Each group presents their findings to the class. (Each group should use their
textbook, atlases, and other print or online research materials)

6. Concluding Activity- Students use primary documents to analyze the effects
natural disasters have on the Caribbean. Using the Digital Library of the
Caribbean, each student chooses a primary document. For their document they
must write down the following:

a. Name of document.

b. Type of document (photo/map/newspaper/government document/etc).

c. Type of natural disaster related to the document.

d. Country origin of the document.

e. Is the document factual or biased? How do you know?

f. How does your knowledge of the Caribbean region and natural disasters
help you understand your document?

The teacher should use the following documents:

-|-.,. Town and harbour of St. Thomas, West Indies, the scene of the recent
destructive hurricane.
Date: 1867
Author: Jackson, M. (Illustrator)
Format: 1 page
http://www.dloc.com/ufdc/?a=dloc1 &b=IR00000137&v=00001

Title: Moravian parsonage, St. Thomas, after the hurricane
Date: 1918
Page I 10


Author: Taylor, Clare E.
Format: 1 page
City: Charlotte Amalia (V.I.)
http://www.dloc.com/ufdc/?a=dloc1&b=CA01300810&v=00001

Title: Hurricane Safety Rules (1970)
Author: Dominica. Ministry of Home Affairs
Format: 1 page
http://www.dloc.com/ufdc/?a=dloc1&td=hurricane&b=UF00072702&v=00001

Title: Hurricane precautions
Author: Dominica. Ministry of Home Affairs.
Publisher: Dominica. Ministry of Home Affairs.
Format: 2 pages
http://www.dloc.com/ufdc/?a=dloc1&td=hurricane&b=UF00072709&v=00001

-|-.,. Plate 11 from Part IV of the Grands Voyages, first published in 1594 with
German or Latin text.
Date: 1594
Author: Bry, Theodor de.
Format: 1 page
http://www.dloc. com/ufdc/?a=dloc1 &b=UF00101781 &v=00001

-p,. Great earthquake disaster: Corner King and Harbour streets, Kingston,
Jamaica. W. I.
Date: [1907?]
Format: 1 page
http://www.dloc. com/ufdc/?a=dloc1&b=IR00000117&v=00001

J... Devastation wrought by the terrific earthquake in tropical Kingston,
Jamaica.
Date: 1907
Format: 1 page
http://www.dloc. com/ufdc/?a=dloc1&b=IR00000118&v=00001

Kingston, Jamaica, destroyed by earthquake and fire : appalling scene of
Title: havoc, wrought by seismic shocks and flames, on January 14th, in
Harbour Street, the city's chief business avenue
Date: 1907
Author: Bengough, William
Format: 1 page
http://www.dloc. com/ufdc/?a=dloc1 &b=IR00000120&v=00001
Title: The earthquake at Kingston: seventeen hundred lives were lost and
Page I 11


millions in property destroyed by shock and fire on January 14.
Date: 1907
Format: 1 page
http://www.dloc.com/ufdc/?a=dloc1&b=CA50100006&v=00001

Title: The Late Terrible Hurricane at St. Thomas, West India Islands.
Date: New York: Frank Leslie, 1867.

Format: 1 Picture

http://www.historical-museum.org/exhibits/visions/nhd/hurricane.htm

Title: 1918 tsunami, shows the damage done by the tsunami to wooden structures
located along the shore at Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. University of Southern
California- Tsunami Research Center

Date: 1918

Format: 1 Picture

http://www.usc.edu/dept/tsunamis/caribbean/webpages/1918prphoto l.html

Title: Damage caused by the 1918 tsunami to homes along Puerto Rico's western
shore (possibly at Mayaguez). University of Southern California- Tsunami
Research Center

Date: 1918

Format: 1 Picture

http://www.usc.edu/dept/tsunamis/caribbean/webpages/1918prphoto 2.html

Each student shares his/her document with one other student. Using the document and
their findings, the pair creates a Venn Diagram comparing and contrasting the two
countries and the two disasters. The teacher holds a class discussion on the diversity
of the Caribbean in terms of geography based on their documents.

Assessments:

What follows is a list of assignments that students can do either as class work or
homework:

1. If it is Hurricane season, have students use the news programs or the NOAA
website to track current storms. If it is not the season, students can use the
NOAA website to track previous storms based on intensity and trajectory.
Page I 12


2. Have students create an informational brochure on a particular natural disaster
and a Caribbean country affected by it. The brochure should have general
information on the disaster, safety precautions as well the effects of the disaster
on that country.

3. Have students pick a Caribbean country and ask them to create a 3-D model of
a geographic feature found on that island. The model should be accurate and
should be accompanied by research information.
Page I 13


Lesson 2: Musical Diversity in the Caribbean
Music BenchmarksfSunshine State Standards):
MU.A.2.4 The student performs on instruments, alone and with others, a varied
repertoire of music.
MU.A.3.4 The student reads and notates music.
MU.C.1.4 The student understands music in relation to culture and history.
MU.D.1.4 The student listens to, analyzes, and describes music.
MU.D.2.4 The student evaluates music and music performance.
MU.E.1.4 The student understands the relationship between music, the other arts, and
disciplines outside the arts.
MU.E.2.4 The student understands the relationship between music and the world
beyond the school setting.
Objectives:
The student will be able to:
Identify Caribbean music by its place of origin, melodies, styles and language.
Play a piece of Caribbean music from sheet music.
Discuss the history and development of a variety of Caribbean music styles.
Identify instruments used in a piece of Caribbean.
Analyze the European, African and Native influences in Caribbean music.
Look for evidence of Caribbean influence in modern pop music.
Use primary and secondary sources to understand the history and the uses of
Caribbean music in their culture.
Materials:
Computer with internet access
LCD projector
Page I 14


Computer paper/poster paper

Crayons/markers/colored pencils

Scissors

Overhead projector

Dictionaries

Books on Caribbean music and musical instruments

Procedures:

1. Introductory Activity- The teacher plays a music sample from the Caribbean. (An
option: Caribbean Island Music: Songs and Dances of Haiti, the Dominican
Republic and Jamaica) As the students listen to the clip they are to answer the
following questions:

a. What instruments do you hear?

b. For what occasion do you believe the music is played?

After the clip, ask the students to write their responses on the board

2. The teacher gives a lecture and have a class discussion on the following topics:

a. History of Caribbean music

b. Mixture of Native, African and European influences

c. Uses of Caribbean music

d. Instruments used

e. Beats, tone, themes used

f. Diversity in music styles

3. Place students in groups and assign each group a style of Caribbean music.
Students should use their notes, as well as online and print resources to create a
mind map for their style of music. They mind map should include pictures,
drawings and words (no full sentences/paragraphs). The maps should include
the following components:

a. History of their style of music

Page I 15


b. Mixture of Native, African and European influences

c. Uses of their style of music

d. Instruments used

e. Beats, tone, themes used

Once the groups are done, they present their mind maps to the rest of the class.

These are resources that your students can use for this activity:

http://worldmusic.nationalgeoqraphic.com/view/paqe.basic/home/en US This is the
National Geographic site dedicated to World Music. You can search by genre or
country. The site includes biographies, histories as well as audio and video clips.

http://www.bahamas.gov.bs/BahamasWeb/Culture/sitehome.nsf/Subiects/Junkanoo
This is the Bahamian government's site dedicated to Junkanoo music. The site
includes the origin and history of the music.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/music/worldmusic/africanandcaribbeanre
v5.shtml This is the BBC Bitesize music website. This site offers a listing of
traditional Caribbean genres of music along with general information about each
genre.

Caribbean Currents: Caribbean Music from Rumba to Reggae by Peter Manuel,
2006. This is a comprehensive book detailing the history as well as the stylistic
components of various Caribbean genres through writing and pictures. The book
also offers sample sheet music along with lyrics.

4. The teacher gives students the lyrics to Bob Marley's Buffalo Sollder
(http://www.metrolvrics.com/buffalo-soldier-lvrics-bob-marlev.html) The teacher
plays the song and video (http://new.music.vahoo.com/videos/-2157759 ) and
asks students to follow along with the music. Ask students to:

a. Look for 5 words they do not know and find the definition to the words.

b. Discuss the major themes of the song.

c. Draw a picture to represent the theme of the song.

5. Concluding activity- The teacher selects one piece of Caribbean music for
students to learn how to play. The teacher passes out sheet music and reviews
with students the parts of the music, tempo, and the range, as well as the
instruments involved. (This could be a great opportunity to work with the school's
Page I 16


dance program in terms of putting together a corresponding dance number for
the music selected)

Assessments:

What follows is a list of assignments that students can do either as class work or
homework:

1. Have students research (using your school's media center as well as online
research tools) the creation and development of an instrument used in Caribbean
music. Ask students to create a pictorial timeline of their research.

These are online resources students can use for this assignment:

http://www.bbc.co.Uk/schools/gcsebitesize/music/worldmusic/africanandcaribbeanrev3.s
html This is the BBC Bitesize music website. This site offers a listing of traditional
Caribbean instruments along with their place or origin.

2. Have students find a current piece of music (popular music) that is influenced by
one of the genres of Caribbean music. Ask the students to bring the piece of
music to class and orally present the connections.

These are online resources students can use for this assignment:

http://www.bbc.co.Uk/schools/gcsebitesize/music/worldmusic/africanandcaribbeanrev6.s
html This is the BBC Bitesize music website. This site offers information about
Caribbean music's influence in modern popular music.

3. Have students research a Caribbean artist (using your school's media center as
well as online research tools). The students use their research to create a bio
poem on their artist, which they present to the class.

These are online resources students can use for this assignment:

http://worldmusic.nationalgeographic.com/view/page.basic/music/en US?directorv=artis
ts&lavout=azmusic This is the BBC Bitesize music website. This site offers
biographical information about a variety of Caribbean music artists.
Page I 17


Lesson 3: Comparative Government: A Caribbean Case Study

Social Studies Benchmarks (Next Generation Sunshine State Standards):

SS.912.C.1.1: Evaluate, take, and defend positions on the founding ideals and
principles in American Constitutional government.

SS.912.C.2.2: Evaluate the importance of political participation and civic participation.

SS.912.C.2.16: Analyze trends in voter turnout.

SS.912.C.4.1: Explain how the world's nations are governed differently.

SS.912.C.4.4: Compare indicators of democratization in multiple countries.

Objectives:

The student will be able to:

Identify the major government classifications.

Explain the four methods of developing of a state.

List the four characteristics of a state.

Compare a state to a nation.

Use primary and secondary sources to identify various governments of the
Caribbean.

Compare Caribbean governments in terms of government structure, voting
requirements and turnout, legal system and political parties.

Utilize Caribbean governments to analyze effectiveness of American
government.

Analyze current events (through newspapers and magazines) to understand the
application of government systems.

Materials:

Computer with internet access

LCD projector

Computer paper/poster paper

Page I 18


Crayons/markers/colored pencils

Scissors

US Government textbook

Overhead projector

Atlas

Books on Caribbean countries

Large wall world map

Procedures:

1. Introductory Activity- The teacher plays the "Paperclip Game" with students to
introduce the concept of government.
(http://ofcn.org/cvber.serv/academv/ace/soc/cecsst/cecsst147.html) After the
game, the class has a discussion about what government is, the role of
government and the application of law in society.

2. The teacher will give a lecture and have a class discussion on the following
topics:

a. Definition of Government

b. State vs. Nation

c. Development of states

d. Government classification: Unitary, Federal, Confederacy, Presidential,
Parliamentary, Dictatorship, Democracy

e. Types of Government: Democracy, Republic, Monarchy, Oligarchy,
Theocracy

f. Comparative Government

3. Ask students to use print and online resources to research the government
structure of two Caribbean countries. For each country they need the following
information:

a. Type of government

b. When and how are elections held
Page I 19


c. Voting eligibility and voter turnout

d. Branches of Government

e. Legal system

f. Political parties

These are online resources students can use for this assignment:

http://www.electionguide.org/ This is the Election Guide website. Through this site
students can get information of the type of government for countries as well as
upcoming election and past election results.

http://aceproiect.org/ This is the Electoral Project Network ACE Project. This site
offers students in-depth political information on countries including government
structure, voting qualifications, voting processes, and political parties.

https://www.cia.gov/librarv/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html This is the CIA
Factbook. Students can select a country and research its governmental structure.

http://countrvstudies.us/caribbean-islands/ This is the site by Sandra W. Meditz and
Dennis M. Hanratty, editors. Caribbean Islands: A Country Study. Washington: GPO for
the Library of Congress, 1987. In this site students can research general information
about the government of all the Caribbean countries.

http://www.caribbeanelections.com/learning/politics.asp This is the Caribbean
Elections site by Unison Global Corporation. The site explores the concepts of liberal
and conservative as well as specific election information for certain Caribbean
countries.

http://memorv.loc.gov/frd/cs/cxtoc.html This is A Country Study: Commonwealth of
Caribbean Islands site by the Library of Congress. This site offers general information
about Caribbean countries.

Students should present their research in either a PowerPoint or a poster presentation.
After the presentation the class has a discussion on the differences in terms of
governments in the Caribbean. Students then compare those governments to that of
the United States using a Venn Diagram or an essay.

4. Prepare the class for a debate. Divide the class into two teams and go over the
rules of a debate. Have students research the topic, using print and online
resources for the debate.
Page I 20


The debate question: Does the use of popular culture in elections have a positive
or negative effect on a country's election?

These are online resources that can be used for this activity:

http://www.iamaicaelections.com/general/2007/cartoons/ This is Jamaica's Election
Website. This site includes political cartoons.

http://networkngott.org/index.php?option=com content&view=article&id=8<emid=12 -
This is the site for The Network of NGOs of Trinidad and Tobago for the Advancement
of Women. This site offers a great article on what Trinidad is trying to do to encourage
youth voting.

http://blp.org.bb/blptv/cartoons This is the site for the Barbados Labor Party. On this
site students can listen to campaign songs using pop culture music.

5. Closing Activity- Create a class government world map. Use an enlarged world
map poster and hang it up in the classroom. Starting with the Caribbean, have
students label countries by their respective government type. Keep the map up
in the class the entire school year and as students learn about more
governments from around the world, they add them to the map.

Assessments:

What follows is a list of assignments that students can do either as class work or
homework:

1. Have students pick a Caribbean country and have them either

a. Create a political cartoon teaching the audience about the country's
government.

b. A campaign poster promoting in the country's next election as well as
important issues in the country.

c. A song/jingle teaching about the country's government.

2. Have students look through Caribbean online news sources for political current
events. For their current event have them:

a. Print out the story.

b. Write from what country the article originates.

c. Summarize the article in one paragraph.

Page I 21


d. Select five new vocabulary words and define them.

e. Does the article have a bias? If so how do you know and what is the bias?

This is an online resource to complete this assignment:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/caribbean/ This is the BBC's website for the latest Caribbean
news/headlines.

http://www.caribbeannetnews.com/index.php This the Caribbean News Net site with
the latest headlines form a variety of Caribbean countries.

3. Use the following primary documents from dLOC:

http://www.dloc.com/ufdc/?a=dloc1&b=UF00096003&v=00029

Title: Trinidad Guardian Reporting on Prime Minister, Dr. Eric Williams
Author: Trinidad Guardian
http://www.dloc. com/ufdc/?a=dloc1 &b=CA01300919&v=00117

Title: Environment should be the hot topic for this year's local election

Author: Olasee Davis

http://www.dloc.com/ufdc/?a=dloc1&td=elections&b=UF00085497&v=00001

Title: Trinidad Guardian Reporting on Prime Minister, Dr. Eric Williams Election Year
1981 Job Opportunity

Have students pick one for the documents. For their selected document have them
rewrite the document from another Caribbean country's perspective. Ask the students
to discuss the differences between the two countries.
Page I 22


Lesson 4: International Economics: The Caribbean in the Global Economy
Social Studies Benchmark (Next Generation Sunshine State Standards):
SS.912.E.1.1: Identify the factors of production and why they are necessary for the
production of goods and services.
SS.912.E.2.1: Identify and explain broad economic goals.
SS.912.E.3.2: Examine absolute and comparative advantage, and explain why most
trade occurs because of comparative advantage.
SS.912.E.3.3: Discuss the effect of barriers to trade and why nations sometimes erect
barriers to trade or establish free trade zones.
SS.912.E.3.5: Compare the current United States economy with other developed and
developing nations.
Objectives:
The student will be able to:
Define comparative and absolute advantage
Explain the costs and benefits of regional trade organizations such as CAFTA
Analyze the economic relationship between the U.S. and the Caribbean
Explain how and why countries trade
Identify the factors that make a nation developed or developing
Define export and import
Use primary and secondary sources to identify a nation's major export, imports
and economic status
Compare and contrast Caribbean countries in terms of their economic activities
Debate the costs and benefits of tourism in the Caribbean
Analyze current events (through newspapers and magazines) to understand the
application of economic goals in the Caribbean.
Materials:
Page I 23


Computer with internet access
LCD projector
Computer paper/poster paper
Crayons/markers/colored pencils
Scissors
Economics textbook
Overhead projector
Calculators
Books on Caribbean countries
Magazines (for students to cut out pictures)
Procedures:
1. Introductory Activity- Ask students to create a list of the items they have with
them at school (pencil, book bag, shoes, shirt, etc) and find out where it was
made. Then each student will compare his/her list with another student. The
teacher holds a class discussion based on the following questions:
a. How many of your items were made in the US?
b. Why do you think that you have items from so many different places in the
world?
c. Ask them if, when in the produce section of the supermarket, they have
ever noticed where the fresh fruits and vegetables were grown. Ask the
students if they can remember what countries they have seen associated
with what fruits and vegetables.
2. The teacher directs a lecture of the following topics:
a. What is trade? Why we trade?
b. Costs and benefits of trade
c. Comparative v. Absolute Advantage
d. Currency exchange/exchange rates
Page I 24


e. Economic regional organizations

f. Trade barriers

g. Developed v. developing nations

h. International assistance

3. Have each student pick one Caribbean country and complete the following:

a. Using online and print resources they must find the following information
for their country:

i. Imports and exports/major economic partners

ii. Currency/exchange rate

iii. Statistics to determine development level: infant mortality rate,
literacy rate, GDP, health conditions, jobs, poverty levels

b. The student must place this information inside their blank map outline of
the country, (http://geoqraphv.about.com/librarv/blank/blxindex.htm ) They
can draw, cut and paste pictures and write facts.

c. Once the maps are completed the student must determine whether their
assigned country is developed or developing.

d. Each student will present his/her information to the class. After the
presentations, the teacher will lead a discussion based on the following
questions:

i. What do the countries have in common?

ii. Which countries seem to be better off? Why do you think that is?

iii. What should countries like the U.S. do to help Caribbean
countries?

These are some online resources to complete the assignment:

http://www.caricomstats.org/caricomw&mpub.htm This is the CARICOM statistics site.
This site offers students valuable information about health and education statistics for
Caribbean countries.

http://www. eclac. orq/cq i-
bin/qetProd.asp?xml=/publicaciones/xml/7/35437/P35437.xml&xsl=/devpe/tpl-
Page I 25


i/p9f.xsl&base=/tpl-i/top-bottom.xslt This is the United Nations Statistical Year for Latin
America and the Caribbean. The statistics are based on economic and social
parameters.

http://www.prb.orq/Datafinder/Geoqraphv/Summarv.aspx?reqion=88&reqion tvpe=2 -
This is the population Reference Bureau site. Students can pick a country and receive
economic and social statistics for the country.

4. The teacher introduces CAFTA and CARICOM (use the concept of the European
Union as a comparative point). Place the students into two groups: One group
explains CAFTA and the other CARICOM. Each group develops a poster (use
banner paper or large presentation paper). The students should use both print
and online resources to complete the poster. On the poster, the following
information must be included:

a. Member countries.

b. Year and reason for establishment.

c. Goals of the organization.

d. 3 current events (make sure to explain in detail).

e. Benefits for membership.

f. Description of the governing body.

g. Official logo.

The following are online resources that can be used to complete this assignment:

http://www.caftaintelligencecenter.com/subpaqes/What is CAFTA.asp This is CAFTA
Intelligence Center's official site. The site offers information on member countries as
well as details of the agreement.

http://www.caricom.org/isp/sinqle market/travel.isp?menu=csme This is CARICOM's
office site. The site offers information about member countries, current events as well
as details of the agreement.

One member of each group will present their poster to the class. Then the teacher will
lead a class discussion based on the following questions:

a. Do you believe these organizations are of benefit to the member
countries?
Page I 26


b. What problems do you see with these regional organizations?
6. Closing activity: Prepare the class for a debate. Divide the class into two teams
and go over the rules of debate. Have students research the topic, using print
and online resources for the debate.
The debate question: Is the tourism Industry beneficial or detrimental to
Caribbean countries?
These are online resources students can use to prepare for the debate:
http://fama2.us.es:8080/turismo/turismonet1/economia%20del%20turismo/turismo%20z
onal/centro%20america/impact%20of%20tourism%20in%20Caribbe.pdf This is a
reading entitled The Impact of Tourism In the Caribbean by the African Forum.
http://www.irf.org/mission/planning/Coastal degradation.pdf This is a reading entitled
Tourism and Coastal Resources Degradation In the Wider Caribbean: A Study for the
United Nations Environment Programme Caribbean Environment Programme Regional
Coordinating Unit: Kingston, Jamaica

Assessments:
What follows is a list of assignments that students can do either as class work or
homework:
1. Have students look through Caribbean online news sources for economic current
events. For their current event have them:
a. Print out the story.
b. Write from what country the article originates.
c. Summarize the article in one paragraph.
d. Select five new vocabulary words and define them.
e. Does the article have a bias? If so how do you know and what is the bias?
f. What economic terms or concepts were used or explained in the article?
These are online resources that students can use to complete this assignment:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/caribbean/ This is the BBC's website for the latest Caribbean
news/headlines.
Page I 27


http://www.caribbeannetnews.com/index.php This the Caribbean News Net site with
the latest headlines from a variety of Caribbean countries.

2. Use the following exercises to practice currency exchange rates (Make sure the
students look online for current exchange rates):

a. Mike buys a suit for 350 Cayman Dollars, how much would that suit cost
in the United States?

b. Mrs. Gonzalez is taking a trip to Trinidad and decided to take $700 US
dollars to spend there. When she converts her money to Trinidad and
Tobago Dollars, how much would she have?

c. Joan has $500 US dollars for souvenirs on her Spring Break trip. She first
goes to the Dominican Republic and buys a souvenir for 25 Dominican
Pesos. Then she went to the Bahamas and bought another souvenir for
15 Bahamian Dollars. Her last stop was Barbados, where she bought one
last souvenir at 30 Barbados Dollars. When she returns to the US, how
much money does she have left?

d. Which is more expensive, a 125 Euro dress in Martinique or a TV for
20,000 Jamaican Dollars?

Student can use the following online resource for current currency exchange rates:

http://monevcentral.msn.com/investor/market/exchangerates.aspx
Page I 28


Lesson 5: The Caribbean in US History
US History Benchmarks (Next Generation Sunshine State Standards):
SS.8.A.4.12: Examine the effects of the 1804 Haitian Revolution on the United States'
acquisition of the Louisiana Territory.
SS.912.A.4.1: Analyze the major factors that drove United States imperialism.
SS.912.A.4.2: Explain the motives of the United States' acquisition of the territories.
SS.912.A.4.3: Examine causes, course, and consequences of the Spanish American
War.
Objectives:
The student will be able to:
Caribbean Piracy and U.S. History
Identify what a pirate is
Locate piracy in the Caribbean during early American History
Compare and contrast myth v. reality concerning pirates in the Caribbean
Use primary and secondary sources to analyze the life and work on Caribbean
pirates
The Haitian Revolution and the U.S.
Identify the major elements associated with the Haitian Revolution
Evaluate the Haitian Revolution's effect on the United States
Use primary and secondary sources to analyze the life and work on Caribbean
pirates
Use primary and secondary sources to understand the motives and events of the
Haitian Revolution
The Spanish American War
Identify the causes of the Spanish American War
Page I 29


Explain the relationship between the U.S. and the Caribbean before and after the
Spanish American War

Map the U.S. influence in the Caribbean after the war

Use primary and secondary sources to analyze U.S.-Caribbean relations related
to the Spanish American War

Materials:

Computer with internet access

LCD projector

Computer paper/poster paper

Crayons/markers/colored pencils

Scissors

American History textbook

Overhead projector

Books on Haitian Revolution, Spanish American War, Caribbean pirates

Procedures:

Caribbean Piracy and U.S. History

1. Introductory Activity- Show students a clip from Disney's Pirates of the
Caribbean. As the students watch the clip, ask them to list all the things they see
in the scene that are typical of a pirate. After the clip, have a class discussion
based on the following questions:

a. Did pirates really exist? Do they exist today?

b. What was the goal of pirates/piracy?

c. What in the movie clip illustrates "Hollywood's" version of pirates?

2. The teacher leads a lecture on the following topics:

a. The history of Caribbean pirates

b. The U.S. reaction to Caribbean pirates

Page I 30


c. President James Monroe and end the of the Golden Age of Piracy
d. Blackbeard the Pirate and his relation to the United States

e. The life of a pirate

3. Discuss with the students the fact that Blackbeard is the inspiration for the
Disney Pirates of the Caribbean movies. Show students the BBC News clip on
Blackbeard and North Carolina.
(http://news.bbc.co.uk/plaver/nol/newsid 5130000/newsid 5139700/5139780.st
m?bw=bb&mp=wm ) As the students watch the clip, ask them to write down the
connections between pirates and the United States. After the clip, have a class
discussion based on the following questions:

a. What is the reality when it comes to pirates and the United States?

4. Place the students in groups of 3-4 and give each group one of the following
news articles:

http://ngm.nationalqeoqraphic.com/2006/07/blackbeard-shipwreck/bourne-text -
Blackbeard Lives by National Geographic Writer Joel K, Bourne Jr.

http://www.ncmaritime.org/Blackbeard/default.htm Blackbeard the Pirate and the
Presumed Wreck of Queen Anne's Revenge by the North Carolina Maritime Museum.

http://www.melfisher.org/reefswrecks/porter.htm Reefs, Wrecks and Scandals:
Commodore Porter & The Mosquito Fleet by the Mel Fischer Maritime Museum.

http://www.melfisher.org/reefswrecks/slave.htm Reefs, Wrecks and Scandals: Piracy
and the Slave Trade by the Mel Fischer Maritime Museum.

http://findarticles.eom/p/articles/mi ga4442/is 200803/ai n24392726/ Porter & The
Pirates: America's Last Pirate War in Sea Classics, Mar 2008 by Coppock, Mike.


For each article, ask the students to answer the following questions:

a. What is the main idea of the article?

b. What is the connection between pirates and the United States based on
the article?

c. How does the article change you view of pirates?

Have one person from each group present their group's findings to the class.

Page I 31


5. Closing activity- After the presentations, have the class create a T-chart
contrasting fact from myth when it comes to pirates.

Assessments:

What follows is a list of assignments that students can do either as class work or
homework:

1. Have students create the front page of a newspaper, which includes one of the
following stories:

a. Blackbeard's death

b. U.S. attempts to curtail piracy in the Caribbean

c. Life of a pirate

The Haitian Revolution and the United States

1. Introductory Activity- The teacher will show a picture of Toussaint L'Ouverture.
(http://chnm.gmu.edU/revolution/d/224/) Ask the students to identify the man
and to list anything they know about him. Have students share their lists.
Explain to students that the Haitian Revolution is a lesson in International
Relations.

2. The teacher lectures on the following topics:

a. The causes, events and effects of the Haitian Revolution

b. The Louisiana Purchase as a result of the revolution

c. U.S. reaction to the revolution.

3. Have each student look at one of the following primary documents:

http://chnm.gmu.edU/revolution/d/347/ Toussaint L'Ouverture in An Historical Account
of the Black Empire of Haytl

http://chnm.gmu.edU/revolution/d/608/ The French Return from An Historical Account
of the Black Empire of Haytl

http://chnm.gmu.edU/revolution/d/567/ The Pennsylvania Gazette: Magnitude of the
Insurrection (12 October 1791)

http://chnm.gmu.edU/revolution/d/573/ The Pennsylvania Gazette: Blame Now Falls
(16 May 1792)
Page I 32


http://chnm.gmu.edU/revolution/d/574/
July 1793)

http://chnm.gmu.edU/revolution/d/575/
Mulattos Flee (4 December 1793)

http://chnm.gmu.edU/revolution/d/576/
(28 September 1796)

http://chnm.gmu.edU/revolution/d/577/
December 1797)

Each student must answer the following questions related to his/her document:

a. What is the title of the document?

b. What is the tone (positive, negative, anger, sadness, etc.) and how do you
know?

c. Based on the document, what affect did the Haitian Revolution have on
the United States?

Next, each student pairs up with another student that has a different document and they
share their findings. Together they create a Venn diagram for their two documents,
highlighting their similarities and differences. Each student then addresses the following
in 2 paragraphs and includes evidence from the documents they read:

Analyze the affect the Haitian Revolution had on the social and political climate of
the United States.

The following is an online resource to help students complete this assignment:

http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/DIASPORA/HAITI.HTM This is the African Diaspora's site on
the Haitian Revolution. The site offers information on L'Ouverture, the Revolution itself
and its effects on the United States.

4. Closing activity- The teacher shows students a list of laws enacted in the United
States shortly after the Haitian Revolution.
(http://www.historvcooperative.Org/iournals/ht/34.1/thomson.html) The teacher
leads a discussion based on the following questions:

a. How do these laws support or refute the documents you read?

b. What do these laws say about the feelings towards slaves in the United
States?
Page I 33
- The Pennsylvania Gazette: White Refugees (17


- The Pennsylvania Gazette: Free Blacks and


- The Pennsylvania Gazette: Unrest Continues


- The Pennsylvania Gazette: U.S. Vigilance (13


c. How do you think these laws reflect the struggle which leads to the Civil
War?
Assessments:
What follows is a list of assignments that students can do either as class work or
homework:
1. Have students write a bio poem as Toussaint L'Ouverture.
This is an online resource for teachers to format a bio poem-
http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/lesson imaqes/lesson398/biopoem.pdf
The Spanish-American War
1. Introductory Activity- The teacher plays a recording of "Guantanamera" for the
students, (http://www.bbc.co.uk/blast/music audio/guantanamera/109670 )
Afterwards, the teacher gives each student the English lyrics. (http://Owww.top-
tour-of-spain.com/Spanish-Lvrics-to-Guantanamera.html) Tell the students that
the song is based on a poem by Jose Marti, a Cuban revolutionary at the time of
the Spanish-American War. The teacher leads a discussion based on the
following questions:
a. How does the song illustrate Marti's patriotism?
b. How does the song illustrate Marti's distrust of foreign involvement in
Cuba?
c. The teacher should point out significant lyrics that allow students to
decode the political tensions in Cuba at the time.
2. The teacher lectures on the following topics:
a. U.S. imperialism in the Caribbean and the motives behind it
b. The cause of the Spanish American War
c. The sinking of the Maine and Yellow Journalism
d. The battles of the Spanish American War
e. The results of the war- Spain and Puerto Rico
Page I 34


The teacher shows a series of political cartoons created during this time period
which depict American perception of Cuba and Puerto Rico.
(http://www.oah.org/pubs/magazine/1898/martinez-lesson.pdf) As each cartoon
is shown, the teacher asks the following questions:

a. How is the U.S., Cuba and Puerto Rico depicted in the cartoon (symbols)?

b. How does this cartoon support the idea of U.S. imperialism in the
Caribbean?

c. What emotions are evoked by the cartoon?

d. Do you see a trend or characteristic that is present in all the cartoons?

e. How are these cartoons examples of Yellow Journalism?

Have students map out the events, battles and acquisitions related to the
Spanish American War on a blank outline map.
(http://qeoqraphv.about.com/librarv/blank/blxindex.htm)

Have students read the biography of Jose Marti. (http://artsedge.kennedv-
center.org/content/2323/2323 guantanamera martibio.pdf) As they read, they
need to highlight what is the opposing view to U.S. Imperialism and the Spanish-
American War. The teacher leads a discussion based on the reading and the
students' highlights.

Assessments:

What follows are a list of assignments that students can do either as class work or
homework:

1. Have students research the current political state of Puerto Rico. Make sure they
look for information that allows them to answer the following questions:

a. What is a commonwealth?

b. What rights/privileges do Puerto Ricans have that are similar to
Americans?

c. Are they considered U.S. citizens?

d. How is their government structured? Do they have representation in the
U.S. government?

Then based on their research, students answer the following question in 2 paragraphs:
Page I 35
4.


Should Puerto Rico be granted their Independence?
These are online resources students can use for this assignment:

https://www.cia.gov/librarv/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html This is the CIA
Factbook. Students can select a country and research its governmental structure.

http://memorv.loc.gov/frd/cs/cxtoc.html This is A Country Study: Commonwealth of
Caribbean Islands site by the Library of Congress. This site offers general information
about Caribbean countries.
Page I 36


Lesson 6: European Exploration, the Colonization of the Caribbean and its long-lasting
effects

World History Benchmarks (Next Generation Sunshine State Standards):

SS.912.W.4.11: Summarize the causes that led to the Age of Exploration, and identify
major voyages and sponsors.

SS.912.W.4.12: Evaluate the scope and impact of the Columbian Exchange on Europe,
Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

SS.912.W.4.13: Examine the various economic and political systems of Portugal, Spain,
the Netherlands, France, and England in the Americas.

SS.912.W.4.14: Recognize the practice of slavery and other forms of forced labor
experienced from the 13th through 17th centuries in East Africa, West Africa, Europe,
Southwest Asia, and the Americas.

SS.912.W.4.15: Explain the origins, developments, and impact of the trans-Atlantic
slave trade between West Africa and the Americas.

SS.912.W.6.4: Describe the 19th and early 20th century social and political reforms and
reform movements and their effects in Africa, Asia, Europe, the United States, the
Caribbean, and Latin America.

Objectives:

The student will be able to:

Explain the motives for the exploration and the colonization of the Caribbean.

Identify the "Big 5" and which Caribbean island(s) they controlled.

Evaluate the positive and negative effects of the Columbian exchange on all
parties involved.

Utilize primary, secondary sources, graphs and charts to trace the development
of Caribbean colonies.

Compare and contrast the governments and economies of various Caribbean
colonies.

Discuss how Caribbean cultural identity is a mixture of European, African and
Native cultures.
Page I 37


Materials:
Computer with internet access

LCD projector

Computer paper/poster paper/construction paper

Yarn/string

Crayons/markers/colored pencils

Scissors

World History textbook

Overhead projector

Atlas

Books on Caribbean colonialism. Age of Exploration

Procedures:

1. Introductory Activity- The teacher gives each student a copy of Christopher
Columbus' letter to Isabella and Ferdinand.
(http://xroads.virginia.edu/~hvper/hns/garden/columbus.html) Have them read
the letter and write down all the things Columbus viewed from the native peoples.
Ask the students to write their list on the board. If their observation is already on
the board, ask the students to place a mark next to it. Ask students to sum up
Columbus' view on the native peoples in one word. Ask each student to draw a
picture of what Columbus saw on the island based on what the letter says. Let
the students compare drawings.

2. The teacher lectures on the following topics:

a. The motives and means of exploration.

b. The "Big 5" and where they settled.

c. Exports/commodities.

d. The difference in Caribbean colonies-government/economics, social
structure.

e. Africa/Slave trade
Page I 38


f. The Columbian Exchange
g. The development of the Creole, Mestizo, Peninsular
h. Caribbean culture-European/African/Native- Music, language, social
classes, dress
3. Have students trace the voyages of important explorers on a blank outline map of
the world, (http://geographv.about.com/librarv/blank/blxindex.htm) Make sure
they include the explorer's name, country for which he sailed, as well as the route
to their final destination.
4. Using documents of opposing viewpoints, have students discuss the following
question: (http://hiqhered.mcqraw-
hill.com/sites/0072424370/student view0/chapter14/quide to documents.html)
What was the Impact of Columbus on the Americas?
This can be done in a large debate-style forum or as small group discussions. Make
sure to tell students to consider the source of the quote and what bias may be held by
that person.
5. The students create a book for one of the Caribbean colonies. (Teachers use
one of the following colonies for the book: Barbados, Jamaica, Bahamas,
Dominica, Antigua, St. Kitts, St. Lucia, British Virgin Islands, Trinidad, Tobago,
Nevis, Montserrat, Grenada) As a group the students will research print and
online resources to complete the book. The book must include the following:
a. Title page- Name of colony
b. Table of contents
c. Information on the following:
i. Date of creation
ii. Mother country
iii. Reasons for creation
iv. Government structure
V. Economic stats-imports, exports, commodities
vi. Cultural aspects- music, food, language, dance, social classes
Page I 39


d. At least 3 charts and/or graphs (the students must explain why the chart or
graph are important to look at)

e. At least 3 pictures that go along with the information presented (each
picture must have a student written caption)

f. Modern day information on the country

This project can be done as an in-class assignment or a home-learning assignment.

These are online resources students can use to complete the assignment:

http://www.hmsf.org/exhibits/visions/visions.htm This is HistoryMiami's Visions of the
Caribbean online exhibit. The site includes pictures and general information on
colonization of the Caribbean as well as the city life and government structures.

http://memorv.loc.gov/frd/cs/cxtoc.html This is the Country Studies' site from the
Library of Congress. The site offers an overview of the colonial period in the Caribbean
from government structures, to economic activities to social developments.

http://caribbean-guide.info/past.and.present/historv/european.colonies/ This is the
Caribbean Guide site. This site offers a chart of colonial powers as well as general
information on the "Big 5".

http://countrvstudies.us/caribbean-islands/ This is the site by Sandra W. Meditz and
Dennis M. Hanratty, editors. Caribbean Islands: A Country Study. Washington: GPO for
the Library of Congress, 1987. In this site students can research general information
about the colonial experience of all the Caribbean countries.

http://www.caribpro.com/Caribbean Property Magazine/chapter/Januarv2009/Januarv
2009 Caribbean culture.pdf This is the Caribbean Property Magazine's website. The
site offers an article on Taino and Carib Indians of the Caribbean.

From Columbus to Castro: The History of the Caribbean by Eric Williams- This book
offers charts, graphs, pictures and general information about the colonization of the
Caribbean as well as political and economic structure of the colonies.

6. Closing Activity- Each group presents their book to the class and all the group's
books are displayed in the classroom for all students to share.

After the presentation, the teacher leads a class discussion based on the following
questions:

a. What are the major differences between the colonies presented?
Page I 40


b. How is the country today influenced by its colonial history?

Assessments:

What follows is a list of assignments that students can do either as class work or
homework:

1. Have students create a visual mind map of the Columbian exchange. The map
can have no words and must show the exchange of goods, ideas and culture
between both the old and new world.

2. Using print and online resources on slavery and the slave trade have students
write a journal entry as a slave on the middle passage. They must include the
slave's feelings, their life before the trip, their experience on the slave ship, and
what they expect to happen when they arrive in the new world.

These are online resources students can use to complete the assignment:

http://slavevovages.orq/tast/index.faces This is The Transatlantic Slave Trade
Voyages site from Emory University. The site contains graphs, maps, informational
essays, African slave database as well specific voyage information.

http://www.nps.gov/historv/ethnoqraphv/aah/AAheritaqe/histContextsC.htm This is the
National Park Service's site on the Transatlantic Slave Trade. The site offers a general
overview of the reason for the slave trade as well as the condition of slaves during
travel.

3. Have students research one of the improvements or innovations in sailing that
came out of the Age of Exploration. Ask students to trace the development of
that innovation in a timeline from the Age of Exploration to modern day.

These are online resources students can use to complete the assignment:

http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/exhibit/interactives/spain/launchWin.htm This is the
Seattle Art Museum's Marine Navigation in the Age of Exploration online exhibit. The
site offers pictures and information on technological innovations of the time.

http://www.uwgb.edu/dutchs/WestTech/explor.htm This is the Europe Reaches Out -
The Age of Exploration site by Steven Dutch, Natural and Applied Sciences, University
of Wisconsin Green Bay. This site gives students a listing of general facts, innovation,
and inventions stemming from the Age of Exploration.
Page I 41


Lesson 7- Diversity in Caribbean Art

Visual Arts Benchmarks (Sunshine State Standards):

VA.A.1.4 The student understands and applies media, techniques, and processes.

VA.C.1.4 The student understands visual arts in relation to history and culture.

VA.B.1.4 The student creates and communicates a range of subject matter, symbols,
and ideas using knowledge of structures and functions of visual arts.

VA.D.1.4 The student assesses, evaluates, and responds to the characteristics of works
of art.

VA.E.1.4The student makes connections between the visual arts, other disciplines, and
the real world.

Objectives:

The student will be able to:

Define art through its various means.

Identify the various purposes of art.

Classify architecture by it influence/style.

Locate, identify and discuss important architectural features.

Evaluate the diversity of Caribbean architecture based on their colonial history.

Identify a variety of painting styles.

Analyze the theme of a piece of art.

Discuss the diversity of Caribbean art through style and topic.

Materials:

Computer with internet access

LCD projector

Sketch pads

Paint/drawing pencils

Page I 42


Overhead projector
Books on Caribbean architecture, Caribbean art
Camera (optional-for one of the assessments)
Procedures:
1. Introductory Activity-Have students define art in their own words. Ask them write
on the board examples of art. The teacher then leads a class discussion based
on the following questions:
a. Why is it important to study art?
b. What can art tells us about the people/culture that created it?
c. What do people create art? (As a class, develop a list)
2. The teacher lectures on the following topics:
a. Architectural styles in the Caribbean-Spanish Colonial (Gothic, Baroque,
Neoclassical), British Colonial (Jacobean, Georgian), French Colonial
(Louis XII, Rococo), Dutch Colonial (Dutch Caribbean), African (Bohio)
b. Architectural features of the Caribbean- antepecho, balcony, barrotes,
courtyards, entresuelo, gables, gingerbread, jalousie, luceta, mamparas,
medipunta, patio, persianas, pineapple, porh, portales, postigos, rejas,
shutters, tiles, verandah, vitrales, wells
The book Architectural Heritage of the Caribbean: An A-Z of Historic Buildings by
Andrew Gravette provides an overview of the architectural styles and features
mentioned in the lecture.
3. The teacher shows students a series of pictures of buildings from a variety of
Caribbean countries (Make sure to tell students what building it is and its
location). For each picture, the students need to answer the following questions:
a. What architectural style is the building? How do you know?
b. What architectural features are evident in the building?
c. Do you see any adaptations to the building that show you that it is in the
Caribbean?
Page I 43


La Fortaleza, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
Courtesy of http://stiohnbeachguide.com/Fortaleza.htm
Cathedral, Havana, Cuba
Courtesy of http://www.sacred-destinations.com/cuba/havana-cathedral.htm


St. Nicholas Abbey, St. Peter, Barbados
Courtesy of http://barbados.org/nicabbev.htm
San Juan Plantation Great House
Courtesy of http://www.themagazineantigues.com/news-opinion/discoverv/2009-11-
17/antigues-bookshelf-caribbean-houses/
Page I 45


SL&Egfsssa/ifL
A government building opposite the Jose Marti Park-Cuba
Courtesy of http://www.lonelvplanetimages.com/images/162113
Nelson's Dockyard, Antigua
Courtesy of http://www.paradise-islands.org/antigua-nelsons-dockvard.htm


Building in Willemstad, Curacao, Netherlands Antilles
Courtesy of http://www.lonelvplanetimages.com/images/46497
Bohio, Cuba
Courtesy of http://travel.webshots.eom/photo/1172391880010499053bevswd


1*11 nil 111! \\\\ mTd\ m l!!i lit! IT!*""VnifTp
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Bucuti Beach Resort, Aruba
Courtesy of http://honevmoons.about.com/od/aruba/ss/bucuti beach 4.htm
Fort Christian, Charlotte Amalie, US Virgin Islands
Courtesy of http://www.nps.gov/historv/nR/travel/prvi/pr29.htm


Home in Hope Town, Bahamas
Courtesy of http://weewillvstine.net/bb/040401Abaco1.shtml

Caribbean Houses: History, Style, and Architecture by Michael Connors offers more
pictures of historic buildings that cover the aforementioned styles and features.

4. The teacher lectures on the following topics:

a. Types of art- paintings, sketches, artifacts

b. Types of paintings- portrait, landscape

c. Symbolism in art

d. Themes of art- colonial history, culture, religion, revolutions, nature

5. The teacher shows students a series of pictures of art from a variety of
Caribbean countries (Tell students the title of the art, its place or origin and its
creator). For each picture, the students need to answer the following questions:

a. What type of art is this? What style do they use?

b. What is the theme of the art?

c. What symbols do you see in the art?

d. What about the art tells you that it is from the Caribbean?
Page I 49


"Koo-Koo or Actor Boy"
by Isaac Mendes Bellisario in Belllsarlo: Sketches of Character
Kingston, 1837
Courtesy of http://facultv.virginia.edu/SlaveSouth/ioncanoe.html


Deity Figure (Zeml), 15th-16th century Dominican Republic; Taino
Ironwood, shell
Courtesy of http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/1979.206.380
Page I 51


Chatoyer, the Chief of the Black Charalbes, In St. Vincent with his
Five Wives c. 1770-80
by Agostino Brunia
Courtesy of http://www.lennoxhonvchurch.com/brunias.cfm


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by Guillermo Collazo

Courtesy of http://pt.wikipedia.0rg/wiki/Ficheir0:Guillerm0 Collazo
La Siesta. 1888.JPG
Page I 53


Palsaje Cuba no, 1933
by Marcelo Pogolotti
Courtesy of http://www. londonmet. ac. uk/research-unlts/cuba/academlc/phd. cfm
Page I 54


i
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Merengue, Dominican Republic, 1937
by Jaime Colson
Courtesy of http://www.peter-giger.de/html/PPamericaNEW.htm
Page I 55


The Great Master



by Hector Hyppolite



Courtesy of http://www.eng.fiu.edu.tw/worldlit/caribbean/carib images2.html
Page I 56


The World Praying For Peace

by Gladwyn K. Bush

Courtesy of
http://www.gov.kv/portal/page? pageid=1142,1664097& dad=portal& schema=PORTA
L
Page I 57


r-^v..
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The Ten Commandments
by Albert Artwell
Courtesy of http://www.harmonvhall.com/Gallerv/artist/artist.php?id=13
Page I 58


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Dessallnes Ripping the White from the Flag


by Madsen Mompremier


Courtesy of http://www.amnh.Org/exhibitions/vodou/about.html#about2
Page I 59


In the Beautiful Caribbean
by Colin Garland
Courtesy of http://www.iamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20070422/arts/arts1.html
Page I 60


The book Caribbean Art by Veerle Poupeye offers an extensive collection of art from
pre-colonial to modern.

6. Closing Activity- Have students answer the following question in 2 paragraphs
(make sure they include at least 4 buildings and/or artwork they studied):

What factors contribute to the diversity of Caribbean art?
Assessments:

What follows is a list of assignments that students can do either as class work or
homework:

1. Ask students to locate modern examples of building that have styles or features
they studied. They can be pictures from the internet or actual pictures from
buildings in their city. They must produce 5 pictures and for each picture they
must point out and identify the style and/or features, (option: They can present
their information in a PowerPoint)

2. Have students pick one of the themes of Caribbean art they studied and create a
piece of art that uses that theme in relation to their lives, community, and/or
family. Have students present their art to the class.
Page I 61


Lesson 8: Caribbean Folkways through Short Stories

Language Arts Benchmarks (Next Generation Sunshine State Standards):

LA.910.1.6.1: Relate new vocabulary to familiar words.

LA.910.1.7.2: The student will analyze the author's purpose and/or perspective in a
variety of texts and understand how they affect meaning;

LA.910.1.7.3: The student will determine the main idea or essential message in grade-
level or higher texts through inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying
relevant details;

LA.910.1.7.6: The student will analyze and evaluate similar themes or topics by different
authors across a variety of fiction and nonfiction selections;

LA.910.1.7.8: The student will use strategies to repair comprehension of grade-
appropriate text when self-monitoring indicates confusion, including but not limited to
rereading, checking context clues, predicting, note-making, summarizing, using graphic
and semantic organizers, questioning, and clarifying by checking other sources.

LA.910.2.1.1: The student will analyze and compare historically and culturally significant
works of literature, identifying the relationships among the major genres (e.g., poetry,
fiction, nonfiction, short story, dramatic literature, essay) and the literary devices unique
to each, and analyze how they support and enhance the theme and main ideas of the
text;

LA.910.2.1.1: The student will analyze and compare historically and culturally significant
works of literature, identifying the relationships among the major genres (e.g., poetry,
fiction, nonfiction, short story, dramatic literature, essay) and the literary devices unique
to each, and analyze how they support and enhance the theme and main ideas of the
text;

LA.910.2.1.5: The student will analyze and develop an interpretation of a literary work
by describing an author's use of literary elements (e.g., theme, point of view,
characterization, setting, plot), and explain and analyze different elements of figurative
language (e.g., simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole, symbolism, allusion,
imagery);

LA.910.2.1.8: The student will explain how ideas, values, and themes of a literary work
often reflect the historical period in which it was written;

Objectives:
Page I 62


The student will be able to:
Define the words acculturation, cultural identity.
Identify the elements of a short story.
Discuss the central themes of short story (author's purpose).
Analyze a character's development in terms of their importance to the theme.
Evaluate the diversity in Caribbean authors in terms of their views of cultural
identity.
Locate and define new vocabulary words.
Identify styles of writing (narrative, 1' person, monologue, diary entry).
Utilize quotes from the story to justify the theme and character development.
Use the author's personal life story to explore the influences in the story.
Materials:
Computer with internet access
LCD projector
Dictionaries
Overhead projector
Books on Caribbean short stories, Caribbean cultural identity

Procedures:
1. Introductory Activity- Have student define culture by creating a list of things/ideas
he/she would use to explain his/her own culture. Then the teacher leads a class
discussion based on the following questions:
a. Does culture change over time? (generations)
b. Does culture change when a group moves to a new area? (immigration)
c. Over time is it harder or easier to preserve culture? Why?
Page I 63


2. The teacher has a couple of options: this lesson requires students to read two
short stories. They can be read as a class, one at a time or you can divide the
class in half and give each group a story and they will teach the other group their
story.
3. The teacher will lecture on the following topics:
a. Caribbean culture- men v. women, houses, family life, religion,
celebrations, customs, food, traditions.
b. Elements of a short story.
c. Culture and acculturation.
4. Have the class read The Two Grandmothers by Olive Senior. (This can be done
silently in class, at home or through read-a-louds or jump-in reading).
5. Have students create 2 T-charts on why the main character loves and hates
visiting her Grandma Elaine and her Grandma Del. On that same chart ask
students to circle those things she likes that represent culture.
6. Have students look for ten words they do not know and have them complete
vocabulary squares for each word.
7. The teacher will lead a class discussion based on the following questions (make
sure students can quote from the story to support their answers):
a. What is the major theme of their story?
b. What is the main character's struggle?
c. How does this story show the concept of cultural identity/acculturation?
d. Does the fact that the main character is a child affect how she views her
grandmothers?
e. How does the writing style (conversation with her mother) help to
understand the character's struggle?
f. Have you experienced something similar in your life?
8. Ask students to read the biography of Olive Senior.
(http://www.answers.com/topic/olive-senior) The teacher will lead a discussion
based on the question:
Page I 64


How does the author's life Impact their writing?
9. Have students read Neil Bissoondath's Insecurity. (This can be done silently in
class, at home or through read-a-louds or jump-in reading).

10. Have students complete a character analysis for Alistar Ramgoolam.

This site gives teachers a format for doing character development-
http://blackboard.volusia.k12.fl.us/webapps/portal/frameset.isp?tab=courses&url=/w
ebapps/blackboard/execute/courseMain?course id= 871 1/WebPage/SSFair/FairH
ome.htm (use the Stick Figure Chart Assessing an Individual's Contribution to
History Activity and adapt to the main character in the story).

11 .The teacher writes the word insecurity on the board and students will come up
and write all the things the main character is insecure about (explicitly or
implicitly).

12. The teacher leads a discussion based on the following question (make sure
students can quote from the story to support their answers):

a. What was the main character's view of his culture?

b. Was the move to Canada for Ramgoolam a good decision?

c. How did the character's culture help or hurt him when he moved to
Canada?

d. Is this statement accurate? "The main character has escaped from the
psychological insecurity caused by political instability, social
marginalization, and interethnic tension at home, yet in Canada the
character has new insecurities caused by urban-industrial alienation, race
and color prejudice, the impersonal secular mores of the new society, and
the pressures of modern city living."

The book Caribbean New Wave: Contemporary Short Stories by Stewart Brown has
both stories as well as other short stories on the issue of culture.

13. Closing Activity- Both stories deal with competing cultures. Have students
present to the class how the characters deal with that situation (As part of their
presentation they must include personal experience or other literary works that
help explain their point). Their presentation can be in one of the following forms:

a. PowerPoint
Page I 65


b. Skit
c. Their own short story
Assessments:
What follows is a list of assignments that students can do either as class work or
homework:
1. Have the student write a five paragraph essay answer the following prompt:
Defend or refute this statement: The struggle for cultural Identity manifests
Itself In different forms In different people, based on where they come from.
Make sure the students complete a pre-writing graphic organizer as well as a rough
draft.
Page I 66


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