History of the male varsity track and field program at Florida

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Title:
History of the male varsity track and field program at Florida
Series Title:
History of the male varsity track and field program at Florida
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Book
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Long, Curtiss M.

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Florida State University
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Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Submission page
        Page i
    Dedication
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Preface
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
    Acknowledgement
        Page viii
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Full Text

Robert Manning Strozier Library
The Florida State University
Tallahassee, Florida 32306-2047
USA








AUTHORIZATION



As the author, copyright owner, or licensee with the authority to grant such permission, I
hereby authorize the Florida State University to digitize A History of the Male Varsity
Track Team and Field Program at Florida State University from 1948-1974 for non-
profit, educational purposes.


This process would make the entire work available in perpetuity to anyone with access to
the World Wide Web or its successors. The digitization process may also involve using
search software and optical character recognition software to provide enhanced access to
the contents of the document.




Sign r

Curtiss M. Long
Printed Signature


Date






























































D27 College of Educaetion

















IL owi
I.


K2e-
















TABLE OF CONTENTS


PREFACE . . . . . . . . . .

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS . . .. .. . . .. .

Chapter
I. THE BEGINNING: 1948-1954 .

1948 . . . . . . . .
1949 . . . . . . . . . 1
S -mmry . . . . . 15
1950 . . . . . . . . 15
Sum ary . . I . . 23
1951 . . . . . . . . 24
S-m ary . . . . . 32
1952 . . . . . . . . 33
Summry ..........I..... ... 43
1953 I . . . . . . . . . . 45
S-m ary . . . . . 51
1954 . . . . . . . . 52
S -miry . . . . . 59

II. TRAN~SIT10NAND GROWTH: 1955-1957 . .. . 62

1955 . . . . . . . . 62
S -Smmry . . . . . 73
1956 . . . . . . . : . . . 74
S -rmry . . . . . . . . . 81
1957 . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Su-aary . . . . . 91

III. THE YEARS AT THETOP: 1958-1965 . . 93

1958 . . . . . 93
S r, : : : '. : : : : 107
1959 '. : : '. . . . . . li
Summ Y . . . . 118
19 60 . . . . 120
S-m ar'y . . . . . 129
1961 . . . . . . . . 131
Sumry .. 141
S1962 .. 4
Summry ........I...... .... 153










1963 . . . . . .. 155
Sum ary . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 164
1964 . . . . I .. 166
S -may . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 176
1965 . . . . . .. 178
S -m ary . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 191

IVi. THELEAN YEARS: 1966-1968 . . .. 193

1966 . . . . . . . . .
S . . . . . .
1967 . . . . . . . . . . .
S -mmry . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 214
1968 . . . . . . . . . .. 215
S -mmry . .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. 228

V. A RESURGENCE: 1969-1974 . .. .. .. .. .. 231

1969 . . I . . I .. 231
S Uar . . . . . . . . .. 249
1970 . . . . . .. 251
S Yar . . I . . . .. . .. 266
1971 . . . . . .. 267
S-mmry .. .. .. .. .. .. 286
1972 . . . . . .. 288
S-m ary . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 300
1973 . . . . . .. 302
Su-m ry . . . . . . . . .
1974 . . . . . . . . . . .
S -m ary . . . . . . . . .

APPENDICES . . . . . .. 349

BIBLIOGRAPHY . . . . . .. 555

VITA . .. . .. . .. . .. .. 568





















iv























twenty-six years as head swimming coach at FSTJ, was packing boxes of

swimming memorabilia gathered during his long coaching career at

Tallahassee, and was lamenting the possible loss of FSU's swimming

heritage due to the lack of an archives in which to preserve invaluable

athletic records. Stults had been Florida State University's first ao

only head swimming coach until his retirement, and it was apparent the

his departure from the university co-muity could deprive posterity of

a rich and irreplaceable source of historical information concerning

the evolution of the athletic program.

Having been a varsity runner at PSU, the realization that the

same situation existed in the men's track and field program was almost

instantaneous. The track program had been started and nourished by Dr

Kenneth Miller. Mike Long had been installed as head coach when Mille:

was assigned departmental administrative duties in 1955, and he has

served continuously as head track coach to the present. Both man were

still employed by the university, but both were approaching retirement









For various reasons, the study was delimited to the male

varsity track and field program at Florida State during the period

1948-1974 and included both indoor and outdoor competition with the

exclusion of cross-country, separate freshman competition, and intra-

squad events. As the investigation proceeded, the twenty-six year

period of track and field history was sub-divided into five eras created

by natural groupings of events due to team success and the one head

coaching change.

The story of the Florida State University track program was

built upon individual and team performance. Emphasis in this study was

placed upon the performances of the superlative athletes who set the

records, but special attention was paid to the men whose second and

third place efforts often made the difference between defeat and victory.

A complete factual record was developed for each year from meet

results, including places of finish, performance standards, location of

the meet, and schools competing. Additional data were included as

appendices-- chronological listing of all school records and outstanding

performances, and a team roster listing name and varsity letter awards.

Difficulties were encountered in attempting to locate summaries

of results for all meets. Office records were found to be incomplete,

and often newspaper accounts were not inclusive, resulting in sketchy

summaries for some meets. To the appendices, meet reports for large

competition contain only a listing of the events in which Florida State

University placed. Whenever meet summaries listed times and performances

for places other than first, the performance was recorded in parentheses

after the athlete's name. It is regrettable that in a large number of









mannces -er recorded for only firs

tion. personal best marks of many a




as of this study, Florida State Uni

da State, FSU, the Seminoles, and t

























physical education program and member of the doctoral committee; and to

Dr. Janet Wells and Dr. James P. Jones, members of the doctoral committees,

for their personal concern and encouragement.

Appreciation of the help extended by the physical education

program, the FSU athletic department, and to innumerable past and present

personnel who have made pertinent data available is gratefully acknow-

ledged. The invaluable assistance and information provided by Mike Long,

head track coach, was essential to the writing of the study. Special

recognition of Mrs. Dee Frye and Mrs. Eleanor Ludwig and the entire

athletic and intramural departmental secretarial staffs is in order.

Sincere and profuse appreciation is extended to the writer's

wife, "Andy," without whose help and inspiration the study would not

have been completed.

























Florida State University's track program had its beginnings

in the fall of 1948. The master plan covering the expansion of the

athletic program did not call for the fielding of a track team for

several years (Annual Report: 1947-1948); however, events unfolded

that forced the time table to be moved forward. The prime factor in

this evolution was the somewhat bungled hiring of a -e staff member

at the newly coeducational Florida State University.

Kenneth Miller was working as head track and assistant foot-

ball coach at Lock Haven (Pennsylvania) State Teachers College when he

heard of a physical education and coaching opening at FSU. He recalled:

I heard of an opening at this new school and, largely out
of curiosity, wrote a letter of inquiry which included my vita.
Somewhat surprisingly, an offer followed almost immediately.
The opening, among other things, included the basketball coaching
job. Don Loucks had been the first basketball coach at FSU,
but he wanted to take over the tennis coaching position, and so
when my letter, indicating considerable experience in basket-
ball was received, the job was offered to me. This opportunity
in my favorite sport was the primary reason I came to Tallahassee.
My job at Lock Haven was a great one, and the salary there was
better than the new offer. Also, as it turned out, I would
have been department chairman the following year if I. had
remained at Lock Haven. But I wanted to be a head coach in
basketball. (Miller, 1975)

In the fall of 1948, Coach Miller arrived on campus believing

he was to be the basketball coach. Coach Miller's ambition to direct




















clay, with the top running surface composed of red clay. The running

surface was fast when properly prepared, but one hard rain would turn

the track into a quagmire, and hot, dry weather resulted in a concrete-

hard running surface (Miller, 1975).

The high jump and vaulting pits were filled with wood shavings

donated by the Elberta Crate and Box Company. Dump trucks from the

factory would stack the shavings as much as four feet high. This pro-

vided a very soft landing area until the pile compacted. The broad

jump pit was filled with white construction send. All pits were lined

with wooden planks (Miller, 1975).

The most prominent recollection of the track by former athletes

was its isolation and lack of protection from the sun. Ken Jarrett

recalled:

The only shade in the place was off the second curve. There
was only one large oak tree. We gathered around that oak tree
between runs as that was the only shade for us. In 1953, Coach
Miller got the shop to come out and they put up a steel frane
and hung a canvas on top of it. That was the only shelter we
had while on the track. It did get hot, the hottest place I've
ever been--just wide open spaces. (Jarrett, 1975)

The track was located about 300 yards from the dressing facil-


















(Athletic Office Budget File, 1948-1949).

Coach Miller remembers that the money was adequate for purchas-

ing equipment, as there were no recruiting costs or athletic scholar-

ships in 1949. Basic policy of the athletic department, under the

direction of Danford, prohibited the practice of awarding scholarships

for athletic ability.

The athlete shall be treated the same as other students.
There shall be no favoritism shown him and no discriminati n
against him be.-:- i- :_ r; i -% r

of the game. 7. ----; II?~.~ -;..r-r ;i;
from taking part in the sport. Any monetary rewards create
a false sense of values and create situations in which it is
useless to expect significant educational results. In brief,
the university dedicates itself to promotion of the amateur
ideal in sports. (Annual Report, 1947-1948)

This idealistic philosophy soon faced extreme pressure from

alumni, town people, and students who wanted to upgrade the football

program (Talahsse Dmocat 23 January 1949). Grudgingly, in 1951,

the ban against athletic scholarships was rescinded for the football

program (Annual Report, 1950-1951). This concession by the athletic

committee and Danford opened the flood gates for an expanding football

budget and sounded the death knell for Danford's idealistic dream of a

truly amateur sports program that would have no distinction between

major and minor sports (Tallahassee Democrat, 18 August 1948).

Danford's hope was that within a broad spectrum of activities stud ents











the field event entries that comprised the majority of the scoring

punch of the 1949 Seminole traeksters.

The Seminoles were woefully weak in the running events and

especially vulnerable in the sprint and longer distance races. Coach

Miller remembered his first team as willing but not possessing out-

standing talent (Miller, 1975). Unfortunately, the results of the 1949

season bore out his pessimistic evaluation.

The first meet for the fledgling Seminoles occurred on April 7

at home against Mercer College of Macon, Georgia (FSU Track Office

Files, 7 April1949). The meet's opening event, the mile run, pro-

vided an indication of the difficulties facing the Seminoles. The

Mercer distance men swept the mile run with a slow winning time of
5:10.0.

Undaunted by the opening setback, Charles pMihoney cruised to a

:54.8 victory in the 440-yard dash. Thus Mahoney became the first

Seminole to score a track and field victory for the garnet and gold.

Norman Eubanks, an All-Dixie Conference football end (Yeller,

1976), followed Mahoney to the winner's circle by copping the 120-yard

high hurdles with a time of :16.8. Jim Pence captured a valuable third

behind Eubanks.

A put of 38' 6-1/8" by James May was the winning effort in the

shot put and his effort moved Florida State to within four points of

Mercer College after the completionn of four events. The Bears quickly

recaptured their commanding lead by sweeping the 100-yard dash and the

high jump.

















Florida State was able to send only three men to the victory

circle. George Grosskopf lowered the school record in the half-mile

to 2:07.8 with his triumph in the two-lap race. He had set the pre-

vious record two weeks earlier against Mercer College.

James ~Lohmeyer's leap of 5' 8" in the high jump garnered the

Tribe its second individual victory and established a new Seminole

record in the process. The broad jump produced the third win of the

day, when John Thomblesou settled into the send 19' 9-1/4" from the

take-off board. Thombleson's school-record setting performance ended

the Seminoles victory efforts for the day.

The Florida State University track team concluded its first

dual meet schedule at home against Mississippi College on May 7 (FSU

Track Office Files, 7 May 1949). The Seminoles engaged the Chootaws on

the west campus red clay track, where Mississippi College's strength

in the running events provided the Choctaws an edge that the Tribe

was never able to overcome.

George Grosskopf was the only Tribe runner able to break the

Chocta's stranglehold on first places in the foot-racimg. Grosskopf

scored his third consecutive dual meet victory in the half-mile, as his

2:05.9 clocking lowered his own school standard for that event.

Sweeps of the top two spots in three field events spearheaded

a Seminole drive that fell just short of victory. Al Bradford c-m

plated the weight double by scoring victories in both the shot put and

discus with school record tosses of 40' 6" and 117' 10-1/2",


































Coach Ken Miller's 1952 edition of Seminole track promised to

be the best of his four-year stint as head coach of the Florida Star.

University track progg.=. With the exception of James Arnold, the

nucleus of the 1951 Seminole track team was returning. The premature

departure of Arnold would hurt the Tribe. In addition to senior Ed

Kucera, first year man Bill Wagoner and Ken Jarrett would be called

upon to fill the void left by the departed school record-holder in the

two-mile run.

Carlos Fraundorfer, the most unlikely weight man ever to com-

pate for Florida State University, made his appearance an the Tribe

track scene. Fraundorfer packed only 175 pounds on his lean 6' 3"

frame. He depended upon exceptional quickness and power to propel the

weight implements. Fraundorfer also used these exceptional talents to

excel in the high jump, broad jump, sprints, and an occasional 440-yard

lap on the mile relay team. Max Watson, the 1951 team captain, had









35

100-yard dash, while Joe Fracassi grabbed off third ". the pole



-t*The Seminoles opened the dual meet schedule against David-o

College on April 5 in D~avidson, North Carolina. FSU built an early

lead and then held on for a 72 1/3 to 58 2/3 triumph over Davadson

College (FSU Track Office Files, 5 April 1952).

Coach Miller received a glimpse of the quality athlete he had

in freshman Carlos Fraundorfer. The slender Tampa freshman bounded

21' 3" in the broad jump for the first of his three wins of the day.

A toss of 1301 2" in the discus, and a school-record tying leap of 5'

10" in the high jump netted him top honors in both events. A second in

the shot put drove his individual point total for the day to a very

creditable 18 points.

John Poston and Bill Wagoner each captured two events that

sparked an opening Seminole spurt as the team grabbed off the first

five running events. Bill Wagoner showed his potential as he success-

fully completed the difficult mile and half-mile double. He was

clocked at 4:41.5 and 2:03.5, respectively. Wagoner's 880-yard run

time ranked him second on the all-time list for Sei..ole half-milers.

John Poston dipped under :10.0 with his winning time of :09.9 in the

100-yard dash. He turned the furlong in a sharp :22.2 and anchored the

victorious Tribe mile relay with a sparkling split time of :50.1.

With their six-dual-meet-winning-streak on the line, the

Seminoles opened at home against Loyola University of New Orleans.

That streak came to a halt as FSU came out on the short end of a 79 to

59 score (FSU Track Office Files, 12 April 1952).






































Likeable senior Ed Kucer4

carved out a 10:43.0 victory in I

first career victory after four:

State University. Teammate Ken

race, -a especially pleased thai

had finally tasted the thrill of

Tom Sebring was nipped b,


















The much heralded and long w

of Florida State and the Miami Hurrici

west campus red clay oval in Tallahas!

1952). The first two encounters had

the fledgling Seminoles, but the Trib,


.ted meeting between the Seminoll

kes took place on May 10 on the

e (Tallahassee Democrat, 11 May

!sulted in crushing defeats for

had perservered and were now


trailing at 85 yards. Then Poston unleashed a furiouE

that carried him to a narrow victory. The watches reV

tacular new track and school record time of :09.6. TI

duel continued in the 220-yard dash. FSU's sprint seT

the way to crush his Miami opponent with a magnificent

In doing so, Poston had established another track and

Coach Ken Miller felt that his sprint star could have

sprinter in the country over 220 yards on that partict










40

the 440-yard dash with a new track record of :50.7. Parker's triumph

kept him undefeated in 1952 dual meet competition.

The Seminoles split the field events down the middle with the

Hurricanes. Carlos Fraundorfer gathered the first Seminole field event

victory by hurling the shot 43' 5-5/8". Baker King threw his body over

the bar resting at 5' 7-3/4" in the high jump for a first place finish.

School record holder Joe Fracassi closed out his successful year in

fitting style. The Brie, Pennsylvania, junior captured his specialty

with a vault of 12' 6", only one inch short of his school mark.

Florida State led Miami 63 2/3 to 62 1/3 going into the mile

relay. The pressure was on the quartet of Jack Koonce, Richard Mize,

Woody Parker, and John Poston. The Hurricanes held a slight lead after

the competitive first leg. Dick Mize trailed his man until the middle

of the final turn when a quick burst propelled him into the lead.

Parker maintained the advantage in the third leg and a sterling :50.2

anchor leg by John Poston sealed the mile relay and meet for the Sem-

incles. The Tribe foursome had hustled through the mile in 3:28.5 to

earn the last five points for a 68 2/3 to 62 1/3 triumph over the Miami

Hurricanes. Coach Miller summed it all up by saying, "they had not

expected to lose to us" (Miller, 1975).

The Seminoles left for the Georgia AAU on May 23 and almost

never made it. Charles Durbin was wheeling the Seminole bus down a

hill on Highway 19-41 between Ellaville and Butler. When the bus

reached the bottom of the hill, the right front axle snapped. Durbin

described the bump as being just "a little up and down--wasn't a rough

bump at all" (Durbin, 1975). The left front wheel flipped around

















aboard from almost certain immolation (Durbin, 1975).

Fortunately, the road had rain gutters on both sides. The

first lurch threw Durbin completely out of the driver's seat. However,

he was able to retain his grasp on the wheel, and when the bus rico-

cheted off the rain gutter, Durbin .-naged to regain his seat (Durbin,

1975). The rain gutters and Durbin's driving skill kept the bus on the

road until most of its velocity had been dissipated. The bus finally

left the road and without turning over, came to rest in a grove of

trees. The bus had traveled 175 yards before coming to rest (Talla-

basses Democrat, 24 May 1952).

Smoke from the pinned tire filled the interior as Durbin hus-

tled people off the bus. A last minute check by Durbin discovered a

distance runner, who had been sleeping, groping around in the smoke

looking for his shoes (Durbin, 1975).

Woody Parker marvelled at Durbin's driving ability. "How that

bus driver was able to keep that bus from completely turning over, I'll

never knew. I tell you one thing--that really shook some people up"

'1115),

Coach e.n Miller chartered a Greyhound bus and continued on to

Atlanta (Miller, 1975). The accident appeared to be an evil =aen a. the

Seminoles finished a distant fourth (Atlanta Constitution, 25 May 1952).













100-yard dash and second in the furlong. Both events were captured b

the Southeastern Conference sprint champion, Jackie Creel of Auburn.

The only bright spot far the Seminoles occurred in the final

event. The Tribe mile relay team of Harvey Heagerty, Dick Mize, John

Poston, and Woody Parker sprinted to a sensational 3:22.4 clocking.

They lopped four and six-tenths seconds off the existing school record


John Poston made the Seminole's

son national competition on June 6 and

competed in the National Intercollegiatl




















the 220-yard dash.

Summary. The completion of every season brings to an end the

collegiate track careers of a portion of the team. The year 1952 was

no exception as it tolled the and of John Poston's distinguished track

career at FSU. His flashing spikes had carried him to two individual

school records and had anchored two school record setting relay efforts.

Coach Miller described him as "a man ahead of his time"

(Miller, 1975). His records stand as proof of the statement. Poston'.

:09.6 clocking in the 100-yard dash against the Miami Hurricanes stood

unbroken for 13 years. The Jacksonville sprinter covered the furlong

in the same Miami meet in :20.8. No Seminole sprinter was to touch

that record until the 1960 season. Both times were run on the same hot

May afternoon, after which Poston was still able to anchor the crucial

mile relay to victory with a superlative :50.2 split. John Poston was

definitely a sprinter ahead of his time at Florida State University.

A quiet and dedicated distance runner was hanging up his spikes

at the conclusion of the 1952 season. Senior Ed Kucera was not a man

blessed with striking talents as a runner; yet, his determination and

willingness to sacrifice made him invaluable to the team (Jarrett,

1975). The endless days of practice paid dividends on April 26 when













da State University's 1952 track team rewrc

s. Poston contributed his 100- and 220-yat

th Harvey Heagerty, Richard Mize, and Wood3

,ool mark in the mile relay by seven and nir

a fine 3:22.4 effort. The foursome of Woot

Harvey Heagerty, and John Poston composed t

established the first school record in that

9 in the University of Georgia-Georgia Tect

26.

edition to his middle leg on the school recc

arlos Fraundorfer set two new school marks

The Tampa freshman blitzed At Bradford's fc

a put of 44' 5-3/4", and eased out To. Set

discus by three and one-quarter inches wit











45

encounters and running their collective dual meet record to 16

and 6.



1953

Coach Ken Miller and his Seminole thinclads faced the 1953

campaign without the services of standout sprinter John Poston. For

two years, the slender Jacksonville jackrabbit had consistently handled

opposing sprinters, and provided the strong anchor leg so necessary for

success in the sprint relay races.

Recruiting was light, hot the Seminoles did land a promising

hurdler in Weston Minton. Despite a dearth of newcomers, Coach Miller

was confidently awaiting the onset of the new season. His optimism was

created by the quality of returning letterman .

Heading the impressive list of returning veterans was sophomore

Carlos Fraundorfer. Fraundorfer -a the 1952 high point getter and

holder of the school record in the shot put and discus. Joe Frocassi,

an Erie, Pennsylvania senior, had one more season to put together the

elusive 13-foot jump in the pole vault.

The Seminoles were loaded in the middle distance events. Woody

Parker, the first Seminole to run order the 50-second mark in the 440-

yard dash was returning for his junior season. The mile and half-mil.

races were in the capable hands of Bill Wagoner. In 1952, Wagoner had

won both events in four of the five meets in which he attempted the

mile/half-mile double. In the final dual meet of the 1952 season, the

talented middle distance runner ran only the half-mile, setting a new

school record with a 2:01.5 clocking. The joys and triumphs of the









46

1952 season were now past and the Seminoles readied themselves for the

upcoming campaign.

Florida State University began the 1953 track season with the

10th Annual Florida R~elays in Gainesville on March 28 (Tallaha-se

Democrat, 27 March 1953). The Seminoles were unable to win many places,

but the quality of performance was excellent.

Carlos Fraundorfer unleashed a school record toss of 140' 9-3/4"

on his first throw in the discus competition. His superlative effort

earned him third place. Joe Fracassi increased his own school record

in the pole vault to 12' S" to capture a tie for second place.

Disaster stalked the Tribe in the sprint medley relay. Woody

Parker ran the lead-off quarter-mile in an awesome :48.4, only to watch

helplessly as a teammate later dropped the batou. The Seminoles were

disqualified, and Parker's courageous effort want for nought; however,

there was little doubt that Parker was ready to run.

Florida State began the 1953 dual meet season in grand style by

crushing Mercer College 85 1/3 to 45 2/3. The meet was staged on the

west campus track in Tallahassee on April 4 (FSU Track Office File,

4 April 1953). The Mercer Bears started the meet by taking the mile

run, yet after that event only the high j ump, evaded the grasp of the

overpowering Seminoles.

Carlos Fraundurfer tightened his grip on the shot put school

record by exploding the iron ball 45' 1", and then added the broad jump

to his school record cache by copping that event with a leap of 22'

3-1/2". He won the j avelin and discus throws with efforts of 165' 1"

and 140' 4-1/2", respectively. Fraundorfer also ran the second leg on










47

the victorious mile relay. He finished the day with five victories,

two school records, and 21 1/4 points.

Joe Fracassi rose to a 12' 10" personal best in the pole vault

to register both a victory and a new school mark. Scoring in his first

meet as a Seminole, Wes Minton made his home debut a success by cap-

turing both hurdle races with times of :15.7 and :25.0. Both times

ranked second on the Florida State all-time best performance list.

Florida State University met their counterparts from the Univer-

sity of Florida in the Florida AAU Championships an April 18 in Gaines-

ville (FSU Track Office Files, 18 April 1953). The Seminoles were

swamped by the Gators in what turned out to be a dual meet between the

two state universities. The Florida Gators dominated the competition

with 165 points while the Seminoles trailed far behind in second with

only 26 markers. Jacksonville Naval Air Station finished third with

12 points and the Pensacola Marine Base rounded out the field in fourth

with 5 points.

Florida State University did not win a single event, compiling

most of their points with second place finishes by Carlos Fraundorfer

in the shot put and broad jump, Woody Parker in the quarter-mile, Wes

Minton in the 220-yard low hurdles, and Bill Wagoner in the 880-yard

run.

The Seminoles shook off the embarrassing memory of the Florida

AAU by their second consecutive triangular meet win over the University

of Georgia and Georgia Tech in Athens on April 25 (FSU Track Office

Files, 25 April 1953). The Seminoles extended their 1953 dual meet

winning streak to three as they rode the swift legs of Woody Parker






















j avelin 159' 0", catapulting the shot 41' 10-1/2", and flinging the

discus 138' 7-1/2". He completed his day's work by finishing second to

reamerst Woody Parker in the broad jump.

The busy day of Woody Parker began with the anchor leg of FSU'a

second-place-finishing 440-yard relay, ending with a 440-yard anchor

leg on the winning mile relay. John Kulzer, Robert Jones, and Jack

Koonce preceded Parker in the mile relay that ran up a sterling 3:28.8

clocking.

On a whim, Parker petitioned Coach Miller to enter him in the

broad jump. With Lbeapproval of the opposing coaches, Miller was able

to make Parker a last minute entry. The event had already begun, when

on his first jump without warm-up, Parker covered 22' 0" for the best

jump of the competition (Parker, 1975).

Woody Parker r ewtote the FSU quarter-mile mark by flashing to

victory with a :49.5 clocking. Parker was pleased with his performance

but had been unaware of the quality of his effort.





have run a good quarter, but are disappointed when you get your
time. On the other hand, there are races where you don't feel
you have really performed your best and the time was out-
standing. (Parker, 1975)

The Loyola Jesuits duplicated their 1952 defeat of FSUI by trim-










49

3 May 1953). Florida State copped five of nine running events, hot

were overpowered in the field events. Joe Fracassi cleared 12' 6"

for the only Seminole victory in the six field events.

The day was not without its Seminole star. Wes Minton bolted

to a quick victory in the 120-yard high hurdles in a school record set-

ting time of :15.2. Minton closed hard in the 220-yard low hurdles to

overcome favorite Baradel of Loyola in another school record shattering

time of :24.0. His clocking in the low hurdles was five-tenths of a

second faster than Tom B-wan's old mark.

Woody Parker captured the 440-yard dash with a time of :50.9,

while Bill Wagoner eased to victory in the half-mile with a rather slow

time of 2:04.0. Wagoner had finished second in the mile behind Chauvin

of Loyola, but turned the tables on the Jesuit distance specialist in

the 880-yard run. Kenneth Jarrett won the first race of his career at

FSU with his personal best time of 10:46.1 in the two-mile.

The Miami Hurricanes were lying in wait for the Seminoles on

May 9 in Coral Gables (FSU Track Files, 9 May 1953). The meet was a

thrilling sequel to the encounter of the previous year, in Tallahassee.

The competition was hard fought, but the second and third place Miami

finishes behind Ken Jarrett's 10:54.4 victory in the two-mile gave the

Hurricanes an insurmountable 66-60 lead. With only the mile relay

remaining, the Seminole foursome of John Kulzer, Robert Jones, Dick

Mize, and Elwood Parker won the last event to narrow Miami's winning

advantage to only one point as the final point standings were 66 to 65.

Woody Parker captured both the 440- and 220-yard runs with

times of :50.3 and :22.2, respectively. John Poston was the only


























The second race was the 120-yard high hurdles. Coach Miller

described Wes Minton as "a talented, but erratic hurdler" (Miller,

1975). Unfortunately the Miami encounter was an off meet for Minton in

the 120l-yard high hurdles. He followed his previous :15.2 performance

against Loyola with a third place finish. The winning time turned in

by a Hurricane hurdler was :15.9. Minton redeemed himself in the 220-

yard low hurdles by blazing to a :24.7 victory. The two races epito-

mized Coach Miller's characterization of Minton.

Florida State University should have entered their final dual

meet of the season with Mississippi Southern College on May 16, in

Hattiesburg, Mississippi, as heavy favorites (FSU Track Office Files,

16 May 1953). However, during the two weeks following the Miami meet,

an altercation broke out between Coach Miller and several of his key

athletes. The dispute led to the voluntary departure of veterans

who had been instrumental in the Tribe's scaring all year (Miller, 1975

Thus, the Seminoles entered the contest weakened, but determined to

succeed (Jarrett, 1975).

This attitude was best illustrated by Bruce Jacob. Jacob was

a field event man, but when the top Mississippi Southern distance run-

net doubled in the 880-yard run; there were only two men left in the












two-mile field. Jacob agreed to run the two-mile for team points. Ken

Jarrett won the event easily, and when the Mississippi Southern runner

developed cramps, Jacob went on to finleh second (Jarrett, 1975).

Carlos Frauadorfer tried to recoup points lost by winning the

broad jump with a leap of 22' 9-1/2", only one-half inch off the school

record; the discus with a throw of 141' 2"; and the shot put with a toss

of 43' 11-3/8". The Tampa sophomore added a second in the 100-yard

dash to ran his individual point total to 18.

Julian Hurst won the 120-yard high hurdles with a sparkling

time of :15.1, yet his school record claim was spoiled by having a

strong tail wind. Joe F-cassi ended his four-year career at Florida

State on a winning note with his vault of 11' 6". Ken Jarrett copped

the mile and two-mile runs as the Seminoles won nine of 15 events, but

succumbed to greater depth by a score of 73 to 58.

The regular season for the Seminoles ended with the dual meet

confrontation with Mississippi Southern, but several Seminoles traveled

to Atlanta on May 23 to compete in the Georgia AAU Championships

(Atlanta Constitution, 24 May, 1953).

Richard Mize garnered the best place for the Tribe with his

third place finish in the 440-yard dash. Florida State wound up with

seven and one-half points, and a sixth place finish overall.

Summary: The 1953 season began on a positive note with three

straight victories, but narrow losses to Loyola University and the

University of Miami, coupled with internal strife caused the Seminoles













The Tribe continued to set new school records at a brisk pace.

Carlos Fraundorfer added the broad jump to his growing list of school

marks by traversing 22' 10" in the Florida Relays. He improved his

shot put mark to 45' 1", while upping his discus record to 141' 2".

In an erratic freshman year, Wes Minton displayed flashes of

brillance. He set school records in both hurdle events by running the

quick times of :15.2 and :24.0 in the 120-yard high hurdles and 220-

yard low hurdles, respectively.

Joe Fracassi continued his upward trend in the pole vault by

establishing a new record when he cleared 12' 10" against Mercer Colleg

on April 4. Fracassi chased the elusive 13-foot vault throughout his

career at Florida State University, but unfortunately, this dream was

never realized by one of the most consistent scorers in the past four

years. Searing the quarter-mile in :49.5, Woody Parker shattered a

school record against the University of Georgia and Georgia Institute

of Technology on April 25.


1954

Prior to the opening of the 1954 season Coach Ken Miller

offered the following statement to the press, "with an outstanding

group of freshmen on this year's squad, the future looks bright for

track and field at Florida State" (Miller, 1954). The immediate future

did not unfold as Coach Miller had predicted as the Seminoles opened

with an impressive thumping of Mercer College but then skidded to six

straight dual meet losses. Ir was the longest losing streak in Florida

State University track history.










53

A combination of factors thwarted Coach Miller's attempt to

rally his team. The fatal weakness in the 1954 Seminoles was the lack

of overall team depth. The unfortunate exodus of quality athletes at

the end of the 1953 season and the graduation of key performers, left

the Tribe void of seasoned veterans. A more demanding schedule soon

exposed the Seminoles' achilles heel.

The Seminoles had the greatest depth ever in its coaching staff.

Mike Long, an assistant coach in football and basketball, donated his

time to help Coach Miller. Walter Grage served as a graduate assistant

for the track program.

Without money to recruit (Athletic Office Budget File, 1953-

1954), Coach Ken Miller was very adept at discovering quality athletes.

He would identify talented athletes by perusing the result sheets from

surrounding state prep track meets (Miller, 1975). A letter would be

sent to selected athletes expressing FSU's interest in having the young

man attending Florida State, and participating in their track and field

program. Within the framework he had to operate, Coach Miller's system

worked very well.

The best example of the effectiveness of Miller's recruiting

system occurred in the spring of 1953. Coach Miller was scanning the

results of the 1953 Georgia State Track Meet, which included a photo-

graph of the finish in the quarter-mile. The picture was an eye-

catcher because the winner, Jim Casteel, had stayed in his lane for

the entire race. These were the days when the 440-yard dash was not

run in lanes. All contestants ran the first curve in lanes, breaking

for the inside down the backstretch. A letter was immediately sent to











54

the young man out of Avondale, Georgia. Coach Miller did not receive

a reply to his missive, yet in the fall of 1953, the greatest quarter-

miler in Seminole track history appeared on the Florida State University

campus as a result of the contact (Miller, 1975).

There were many good freshmen track recruits joining Casteel at

Florida State in the fall of 1953. The need was great; as the names an

the roll of the missing were impressive. Woody Parker, the school

record holder in the 440-yard dash and participant on two school record

setting relay teams had entered military service (Parker, 1975). Bill

Wagoner, the FSU record holder in the 880-yard run and anchorman for

the record setting sprint medley relay had elected to forego his rnmain-

ing two years of track eligibility (Miller, 1975). Wes Minton dropped

out of school to enter military service, while Joe Fracassi, school

standard bearer in the pole vault, To, Sebring, former school record

holder in the discus, and Richard Mize, participant on the school

record setting mile and sprint medley relays, had graduated. Six men

who had held or helped set nine school records were gone.

The Seminoles began the season with some outstanding perfor-

mances from a scrappy bunch of freshmen at the Florida Relays on

March 27 (FSU Track Office Files, 27 March 1954). The sprint medley

team of Jim Casteel, Carlos Fraundorfer, Joe Davis, and Lawrence

Rountha battled for a second place finish. This was the highest place

for a Seminole relay team, ever, in the prestigious relays. Coach

Miller described the Tribe's performance this way:

















ln

l Ir- r,-


A freshman foursome of Joe Davis, Frank Bright, Charlie Watson,

Jim Casteel raced to the second fastest Seminole time ever, fin-

ig fourth in the mile relay. Their individual splits were Davis

,6), Bright (:52.5), Watson (:50.9), and Casteel (:49.5). The

Aggregate gave the Tribe a 3:24.5 cl-cking. Having thought the

relay team was "out of its class" (Miller, 1954), Coach Miller

7cry pleasantly surprised with the outcome.

Carlos Fraundorfer was the only Seminole to place in an indivi-

event, as his throw of 133' 3/4" in the discus earned him fourth




Florida State began their season with a confidence-building

ahing of Mercer College in Macon on April 3. FSU won 10-15 events

breezing to their 84-47 victory (FSU Track Office Files, 3 April



Jim Casteel led the Tribe by capturing the 440-yard dash

.8), 22G-yard dash (:23.0), the broad jump (:20' 9"), and finished

afternoon by anchoring the mile relay to victory,

Lawrence Hountha, in his first open half-mile as a Seminole,

-Bill Wagoner's old school record by striding to victory in

.6. Thus, he became the first Seminole to run under the two-minute













7, 1954, the Seminoles participated in tl

.The Florida Gators captured the team

ribe garnered second with 53 markers (Go.



tha and Jim Casteal set new Florida AAU

topped the 880-yard run field with a arel























third with 53 markers.

The pressure on the Seminc

of Alabana and the University of I

May 1. Florida State wilted under


was the other Seminole to join Casteel in

,nnpa native raised his own school record t

ive in the shot put. There was nothing for

is=n from their experience and gird them,









58

Jim Casteel continued his steady performance, as he tied his

owo school record by winning the 440-yard dash in :49.4. On his next

appearance on the track, Casteel sped to a :21.4 victory in the fur-

long. The versatile freshman finished second in the broad jump behind

teammate Carolos Fraundorfer. For the second week in a row,, captain

Carlos Fraundorfer improved his owti school record ini the broad jump

with a winning leap of 22' 10-1/2".

Lawrence Hounthe returned to form with a 2:00.3 victory in the

880-yard run. Joe Davis and Warren Stricklaod were the only other

Seminoles to snag victories. Davis' a winning time of ten seconds flat

in the 100-yard dash tied him with Tom Bovman for the second fastest

time in Seminole track history. The top spot in the pole vault was

shared by Thomas of Miami and Warren Strickland of FSU at 11' 0".

Despite the combined total of 22 1/4 points scored by Casteel

and Fraundorfer, the Hurricanes rode a balanced team scoring effort to

a 71 to 60 triumph.

Now the Seminoles had only one more dual meet left on the

schedule. With victory on their minds, the Tribe j ourneyed to Hatties-

burg, Mississippi, on May 15. However, Mississippi Southern played

the spoiler role on their home track extending FSU'a losing skien to

six (FSU Track Office Files, 15 May 1954).

The Seminoles received herculean performances from Jim Casteel,

Carlos Fraundorfer, Jerry Jacobs, and Lawrence Hountha. Casteel was

unbeatable as he raced to victory in the 440-yard dash (:50.0), 220-

yard dash (:22.1), and anchored the mile relay consisting of Bright,

Watson, Hountha, Casteel to a 3:30.8 triumph.



























school record board in the shot put. Jacobs, starting left gi

the football team, scored his victory with a put of 46' 3-1/4"

hassee Democrat, 16 May 1954).

Lawrence Hountha dipped under two minutes in the half

the third time during the 1954 campaign with his top spot earn

1:59.8 clocking. The Seminoles again won more events than the

opponents, but still lost the meet by a 69 to 62 margin. This

brought to a close the official 1954 season.

One Seminole unofficially competed in the Georgia AAU

ships on, May 22. The meet was not officially on the schedule c

the date falling during final examination week, and all school

scored athletic events were prohibited (Annual Report, 1947-194E

Weaver competed as an unattached participant, winning fourth p]

the javelin (Atlanta Constitution, 23 May 1954).

Sumrmar Florida State University had endured the wors

son of its six year history of track and field. The Seminoles










60

seniors on the team. Many impressive performances forecasted a

brighter future for the garnet and gold.

Jim Casteel was undefeated in the 440-yard dash in dual meet

competition, twice dipping under the existing school record. He first

broke Woody Parker's record with his blazing :49.4 effort against

Alabama and Loyola on May 1. A week later, Casteel tied that mark in

the meet with Miami. Coach Miller stated that his prize quartermiler

was "one of the outstanding college freshman runners in the entire

country" (Miller, 1954).

Carlos Fraundorfer broke into the 23-foot range in the broad

jump with a leap of 23' 3-1/2" against the Southerners of Missi-sippi

Southern College on May 15. While Fraundorfer was setting his record

in the broad j unp, Jerry Jacobs was besting his shot put re-ord by

putting the shot 46' 3-1/2".

The oldest school record on the board went by the wayside when

Ron Weaver erased Bill Rodger's old mark in the javelin with a heave ol

177' 2-1/2", which Rodger had set in the First Annual Dixie Conference

Championship on May 25, 1949. Florida State set a new record at the

Florida Relays in the sprint medley relay. The foursome of Jim Cas-

teel, Carlos Fraundoxfer, Joe Davis, and Lawrence Hountha finished

only three-tenths of a second behind North Carolina's winning time of

3:25.5. The freshmen foursome of Joe Davis, Frank Bright, Charles

Watson, and Casteel raced to the second fastest mile relay time in

Seminole track hiistory with a time of 3:24.5 at the Florida Rel~ays.

Coach Miller was not to enjoy the bl-oing of his young












Athletics, wanted Coach Miller to assume the position of assistant

director of the men's physical education department. and to chair the

growing graduate program. The chance for professional advancement

could not be denied (Long, 1975).

The Seminole program had evolved from Ken Miller's own hand,

and had prospered under his guidance. John Thombleson, a former-

school record-holder in the broad jump and a member of Coach Miller's

first team described the beginning, "he built a track program from

nothing but his own hard work and I've always admired him for the

effort" (Thombleson, 1975).

Under six years of Dr. Kenneth D. Miller's quiet and concerne,

tutelage, the Seminole track team had won 20 of 35 dual meets and

placed two men high in national competition. His decision to accept

an administrative position in the men's physical education department

at FSU draw to a close the first era in Florida State University's

track and field history. With his tenure as head track coach at an

end, Coach Miller continued to be a supporter and interested follower

of the track fortunes.












copped the Minnesota Inter-collegiate Track Meet, and also placed in

the low hurdles (St. Paul Pioneer Press, 27 May 1934).

After two years at Macalester College, Long transferred to the

University of Minnesota. Concentrating only an track, the versatile

performer won the 1936 Olympic regional pole vault.

In 1937, Mike Long graduated from the University of Minnesota

with a bachelor of science degree in physical education. With the

depression at its height, Long managed to land a teaching position at

Clinton (Minnesota) High School at a salary of $110.00 per month for

nine months. Long remembers there being literally hundreds of applica-

tions for the job (Long, L.S., 1976).

Coach Mike Long had decided to try coaching for five years

before reevaluating his future. With a desire to rise in the coaching

ranks, he decided to change schools every two years. In keeping with

his strategy, Long stayed at Clinton High School for two years before

shifting to Sherburn (Minnesota) High School in 1939. On the athletic

fields, Long's responsibilities included football, basketball, wrest-

ling, and track and field. Two years later, Farmington (Minnesota)

High School was the next stop for Mike Long. He was charged with the

responsibility for the football, basketball, and track programs. His

success was expressed in school superintendent C. J. Wall's statement

concerning Mike Long's resignation in the winter of 1943.
















regional tournament where the Tigers were runners-up. It was





The next coaching stop for Mike Long was Sarasota (Florida)

High School, as the head football, basketball, and track coach. Unresf

in the local community with Long's losing inaugural football season lec

to his replacement as the head football coach and eventually to his

decision to resign. After announcing his plans to leave Sarasota,

Long's basketball charges went to the semi-finals of the state tourna-

ment and his track team won the state title (Long, L.N., 1976).

The announcement of Mike Long's resignation brought surprise

plaudits from Ray Norton, sports columnist for the Tampa Tribune.

Resignation of Mike Long as athletic director at Sarasota


Conference, and in Tampa.
I met Mike for the first time at the South Florida Con-
ference Basketball Tournament in Sarasota where he went out




sure he'd like to live in Florida, and would prove on, asset
to any high school sports staff. (TE a ribne 28 March 1946)

Coach Mike Long entered the Lee County School System as the

Ft. Myers Senior High School head basketball and track coach, and an

assistant in football. The Greenies' basketball and track programs

prospered under his guidance.























he was frustrated at every to-n. Convinced that I was avoid-
ing him, Danford became determined to find me and offer me
the job. When he finally found me, I accepted the job.
(Long, L.S., 1976)

The reflection of a man can be found in the image he leaves

behind. The press release by athletic director "Jock" Southerland

expressed the feelings of the Green Wave athletic staff for Mike Long.







The coaching versatility of Long was a key consideration in his

hiring. Dr. Howard Danford explained:

We believed the appointment of Mike Long on our staff fills
a need of long standing. He has had wide experience in Florida
at the high school level. He is a competent worker, well-
known and respected over the state. (FloidaTims-Uion
I August 1953)

With Mike Long's 1954 coaching schedule including only football

and basketball, the track program again inherited a well qualified

coach who had not been hired directly for the track coaching position.

The new mentor, Mike Long, would have a talented squad with

which to work. Nine returning lettermen headed by the multi-talented











Jerry Jacobs (shot put), and Carlos Fraundorfer (discus and broad

jump). The 1955 track brochure described Carlos Fraundorfer as a man

"who's been setting a series of Seminole track and field records for

the past three years. At one time or another in his career, Carlos has

held FSU school records for the shot put, discus, and broad jump. In

addition be's thrown the javelin, high jumped, run the 100-yard dash,

and sparked three different relay teams" (FSU Track Brochure File,

Spring Sports, 1955).

A wealth of newcomers swelled the ranks of the Seminoles,

eliminating the chronic depth problem that had plagued the 1954 Sem-

inoles. Vernon Does, two time Florida state class "A" prep champion in

the mile ran, and Ken Segner, class middle distance runner, were the

best of the new additions in 1955.

By the beginning of the season, the loss of two valuable me--

bars of the Tribe squad jolted the Seminole hopes for a successful

rebuilding season. Jim Casteel decided to drop out of school to join

the army. The powerful ground covering stride of the premier quarter-

miler would be irreplaceable.

The second loss was Larry Hountha. The personalities of the

half-miler school record-holder and sophomore Ken Segner clashed bit-

terly during the fall of 1955. A rivalry had sprung up between the

two man during Segner's transfer year in 1954. Neither man wanted to

lose to the other in any situation. Practice workouts turned into

fierce competitive battles. The all-consuming competitive attitude was

unhealthy and destructive. It led them to pay little attention to

workout conditions in their desire to achieve dominance.



















a Seminoles flexed their newly found muscles in the Florida

onships on April 16 and came away with the championship (FSU

ze Files, 16 April 1955). The Tribe won five individual

ed for first in another, captured the mile relay, and showed

overall strength in their 51 5/6 to 47 3/4 win over the

Florida Cators. The 1955 Florida AAU meet marked the first

da State University had ever beaten the University of Florida

Dred track and field competition.

a Weaver captured a school record and the j avelin event with

f 1931 6". Although Tenoy Brown failed to win the high jump,

E 6' 1/4" established a new Senionle high jump standard and

.is only Seminole over six feet in the history of the program.

garnered two victories when Charley Watson breezed through


Vernon Duce highlighted the

victory- in the two-mile run. His s,

LO:20.1 provided the Tribe with a a.

Florida going into the mile relay.

Long the dominant track pow

Florida was not interested in losing

apstarts from Tallahassee (Long, L.!


;iaoale effort with his dramatic

iool record setting performance o

Lght 3 1/12 points advantage over



Sin the state, the University of

on their home track to the young

.1 1976). Disregarding Florida's

its University "A!' team ran the
















7ech. April 23 was a very satisfying day for the streaking thinclads

.rom Florida State. The Seminoles won seven of 16 events and placed

.m every event, except the 880-yard run, as they improved their record

:o three wins and no losses (FSU Track Office Files, 23 April 1955).

As often happens in big meet competition, the times were not

spectacular but the Seminoles competed hard. The Tribe fought

'iercely for every available point. Several FSU trackmen delivered

)arsenal best performances in nonwinning efforts.

Jack Terwilliger won the 100-yard dash and then turned in a

personall record :22.5 clocking for third in the 220-yard dash. Charle

Tatson placed a very close second in the quarter-mile behind the win-

Ling performance of teammate Ken Segner (Long, L.S., 1976). Watson's

personall best time of :25.1 in the 220-yard low hurdles only placed hin

:hird. Ron Weaver bested his own school record in the javelin with a

oss of 194' 11-3/4" but had to settle for second.

Vernon Duce was the only double winner for the Seminoles as he

capturedd both the mile and two mile runs. Joe Davis was the remaining

'SO victor with his winning jump of 21' 7" in the broad j mp.

The mile relay team composed of Segner, Terwilliger, Davis,

zd Watson cemented their 67 1/3 to 56 2/3 victory ever the University

,f Georgia by sweeping to a 3:28.8 triumph. Their splits were Segner

:50.7), Terwilliger (:51.0), Davis (:52.3), and Watson (:54.8).

Florida State University conducted their last home track meet

.ver on their West Campus facility on April 30 against the Jesuits














1949, and again played the spoiler in the Tribe's finale in 1955. The

Jesuits parlayed speed and endurance into a 72 1/3 to 58 2/3 defeat of

the Seminoles of Florida State (FSU Track Office Files, 30 April 1955).

The :25.1 effort by Joe Davis in the 220-yard low hurdles was

the lone Seminole victory in the running events. The Seminoles kept

the margin of defeat within respectable bounds by winning three of six

field events and tying for the top spot in another. Jerry Jacobs and

Carlos Fraundorfer won the shot put and discus with throws of 47' 3/4"

and 141" 1/2", respect-ively. The javelin was won by FSU's Ron Weaver

with a toss of 183' 5". Toney Brown tied for first in the high jump

with Di-t of Loyola at 5' 10-1/4".

The Seminoles rolled into Miami on May 5 looking to regain

their winning ways. Catapultad by meo new school record performances

and a sweep of all three places in the 220-yard low hurdles, the Sem-

inoles overcome the Miami Hurricanes by a 73 to 58 margin (FSU Track

Office Files, 5 May 1955).

Ron Weaver became the first Seminole to ever throw the javelin

ever 200 feet as his throw landed just five inches beyond the 200-foot

mark. Carlos Fraundorfer continued his assault against the record boo

by shattering his own school mark in the discus with a throw of 146' 4".

Jack Terwilliger spent less than 33 seconds on the track wffile

winning two events. The Dade City sensation snatched the 100-yard

dash in :10.2 and then used only :22.4 to win the 220-yard sprint.

Terwilliger's time in the furlong was a personal best.










73

Mississippi Southern. With the score resting at 68 to 58, the mile

relay was cancelled by mutual consent.

Summary. The Florida State University thinclads finished

their first season under the tutelage of Mike Long with a 5-1 record

and an, impressive victory over the University of Florida in the 1955

Florida AAU meet. The lack of a true superstar was overcome by strong

individual and team desire to win. The team refused to concede any

place and fought fiercely for every available point. This is corro-

borated by the fact that two school records and numerous personal

records were established in nonwinning efforts.

Team spirit and cooperation were the most important virtue-,

espoused by the coaching staff and those who could not accept these

concepts were invited to run elsewhere. This spirit and cohesion soon

became the trad emsrk of track and field squads fielded by FSU's Mike

Long.

Carlos Fraundorfer closed out his outstanding career at Florida

State University in the style to which his coaches had grown accustomed.

He regained his shot put record, lost to Jerry Jacobs in 1954, with a

monumental throw of 48' 3-1/4" which surpassed the old record by two

full feet. He still held the school mark in the broad jump at 23'

3-1/2", remaining the only Seminole to have ever jumped over 23 feet,

and the discus mark at 146' 5". Fraundorfer established n new career

scoring record by compiling 278 3/4 points during his four year stint

at FSU (FSU Track Brochure File, FSU Spring Sports 1956).

Undoubtedly the most unlikely weightman, to ever throw at

Florida State University, Carlos Fraundorfer stood 6' 4" and weighed









75

schools in the South. The rivalry with the University of Florida Was

expanded by scheduling the first FSU-Florida dual meet in the history

of the two schools (FSU Track Brochure File, Spring Sports 1956).

With only two school record-holders returning for the 1956

campaign, the Seminoles were short of veteran performers. The record

holders were Tenny Brown in the high jump and javelin thrower Ron

Weaver. The multitalented Carlos Fraundorfer had been lost via grad-

uation, and Vernon Duce, the freshman sensation in the two-mile, had

left school abruptly without explanation. These two men had played key

roles in the successful rebuilding efforts of 1955.

Despite the losses in personnel, ISO faced the 1956 season con-

fidently. The Seminoles were again without the legitimate superstar,

yet were strong in every event. The chances for a successful season

had been brightened by the return of two ex-Seminole track men after a

hitch in the military service. Wes Minton, school record-holder in

both hurdle events, bolstered a thin corps of timber-toppers. Depth

was added in the middle distance events with the arrival of Pete

Fraschetti, a former record-holder in the half-mile. Sophomore speed-

ster, Jack Terwilliger, headlined the sprinting corps as his :09.9

clocking in 1955 had made him the second fastest Seminole in FSU track

history.

The 1956 season began with the Atlantic Coast Conference Indoor

Championship in Raleigh, North Carolina, on February 24 (FSU Track

Office File, 24 February 1956). Competing in the nonconference divi-

sion, the Tribe did not fare well. The Seminoles took only two fourth

places--the mile relay, and Joe Davis in the 70-yard low hurdles. The


















The outcome of the meet had not made many people happy; yet it

as not without its humorous aspects. Bruce Jacob described what hap-

oned to him in the mile run.








T 1 i 7 .; ~ r~ ?. i. i~I .r


















With the entire squad competing, the Seminoles flexed their

electivee muscles by thumping Mississippi Southern College 89 to 42

,i Tallah-see on March 28 (FSU Track Office File, 28 March 1955).

iis was the earliest opening dual meet date for the Seminoles, yet the

-ring time air obviously agreed with the Tribe.

Jack Terwilliger displayed May form on this March afternoon.

ie Dade City flyer streaked through the 100-yard dash in :10.0, and

agistered his second victory in the 220-yard dash with a clocking of

Z2.4. Ron Weaver led teammates Jimmy Harrell and Mike Guerra to a

-ese in the iavelin with his throw of 198' 2". The former school










77

record-holder in the shot put, Jerry Jacobs copped his specialty, flip-

ping the iron ball 45' 4-1/4". The mile relay of Terwilliger, Mike

Conley, Charlie Watson, and Doyle Ruff capped off a successful opening

day performance with a victoriou, 3:28.8 clocking.

The Seminoles managed only two fourths in the 13th running of

thle prestigious Florida Relays (FSU Track Office File, 31 March 1956).

Jack Terwilliger garnered one of the Seminole places with a :10.3 per-

formance in the IOG-yard dash, while Ron Weaver captured the other with

a toss of 193' 2-1/2" in the j avelin.

A hot and windswept Georgia afternoon (Tallahassee Democrat,,

8 April 1956) was the setting for the running of the Mercer College-

Davidson College-Florida State University triangular track meet. The

Seminoles did not find themselves particularly sharp, but had enough

firepower to ease out an 83 1/3 to 70 2/3 win over Davidson as Mercer

tallied only two markers (FSU Track Office File, 7 April 1956).

Field event men provided the main thrust of the Seminole vic-

tory. Florida State copped six out of seven field events. Lloyd Las-

sen's school record and event winning leap of 6' 2" in the high jump

highlighted the Seminoles' efforts.

Jerry Jacobs and Joe Davis turned in sterling winning perfor-

mances in the shot put and broad jump with efforts of 45' 9-3/8" and

22' 9-1/2", respectively. Davis' leap in the broad jump was the second

best ever by a Seminole. Competing in his third event of the day, Joe

Davis sped over the barriers in the 220-yard low hurdles in only 25

second..













April 14 marked the beginning of the Florida-Florida State

dual meet series. With Florida possessing the home track advantage,

the Seminoles did not create an auspicious beginning. Florida's track

men completely dominated the meet as the Tribe managed to win only two

events in the lopsided 90 to 41 Garet victory (Tallahassee Democrat,

15 April 1956).

The lone Seminole winners were Ron Weaver and Joe Davis. A

toss of 194' 4-1/4" in the javelin earned Weaver his first place spot.

Davis' broad jump of 23' 6-3/4" topped the field, breaking Carlos

Fraundorfer's FSU record.

Mike Conley was bested in the mile by West of Florida in a neat

dead heat finish. With the two runners matching stride for stride

through the final lap, the winning time of 4:29.9 was awarded to both

men. Thus Conley dropped his personal best in the mile over 12 seconds

also setting a new FSU standard. This race marked the only time durinFg

the 1956 season that West was able to beat the Seminole miler.

The Seminoles brought their damaged track ego back to the

friendly confines of the FSU track. The frustrations generated by the

Tribe's first loss of the 1956 season were vented against the Jesuits

of Loyola University on April 28 (FSU Track Office Files, 28 April

1956). The thinclads of Florida State captured 10 of the 15 events on

their way to a 87 to 44 hearing of Loyola University.

Jack Terwilliger sped to a :50.2 triumph in the quarter-mile

and doubled back in the 220-yard dash for his second win of the day

with a spectacular Lime of :21.3. Terwilliger's time was a track

record for the new Seminole facility.


































the w tch did not work because I was trying hard
:50 .0. (Jacob, 1975)

The Seminoles received superlative performance,

Jacobs, Warren Strickland, and Ken Segner. Jerry Jac,

shot putter, unleashed his second best throw in his t:

heaving the shot 46' 2-1/2". The 12-foot barrier in I

scaled for the second time by a Seminole vaulter as W,

copped the acrobatic event with a jump of 12 feet evei
























best of 21' 9-3/4" for third in the broad jump. Don Ayers became the

third Seminole to vault over 12 feet with his jump of 12' 1" in the

pole vault. His efforts gained him a tie for second place.

The Seminoles responded to their second defeat at the hands ol

the Florida Gators with renewed motivation for victory. On May 8 in

Tallahassee, the Florida State Seminoles turned "Hurricane hunters," i

they defeated the University of Miami by a whopping 92 3/4 to 38 1/4

margin (FSU Track Office Files, 8 May 1956).

Jack Terwilliger had a spectacular day as he whipped through

the quarter-mile with a winning time of :50.06, and returned in the

next event to win the 100-yard dash in :09.9. His day was far from

over. After a short respite, he turned the furlong in :21.6 and

anchored the mile relay for his third and fourth triumphs of the afte:

noon. Lloyd Lassen equalled his own school record by winning the higI

jump with a leap of 6' 2".

Two Seminoles broke into the victory column~ for the first tim

during the 1956 campaign. Pete Fraschatti handled the half-mile fielc

with a respectable time of 2:05.0. Ron Weaver relinquished the top

spot in the j avelin to Jerry Henderson, as the improving sophomore










81

Summary. Coach Mike Long's Seminole track men had completed

the 1956 season with the highest total of dual meet victories in thee

eight year history of track at Florida State University. The Tribe

captured seven wins with only one loss, and finished second in the

Florida AAU. After inheriting talented, yet imrmature, team that had

won only once while losing six in 1954, Coach Long had run up an out-

standing 12-2 record in only two years at the helm. The schedule had

been steadily upgraded to parallel the Seminoles' improvement. The

Tribe was making its way into the big time in a winning fashion.

Three Seminoles had added their names to the record books in

1956. The oldest record on the board tumbled to the smooth rhythm of

Mike Conley's easy strides. No Seminole had been able to surpass Bill

Duncan's 4:32.0 school record set in 1950 until April 14, when Conley

placed second in a near photo finish against the University of Florida

with a time of 4:29.9. Although Mike Conley had won the Florida prep

mile in the 1954 State track and field meet he had decided not to run

track at Florida State during his freshman year. The talented dis-

tance runner returned to the cinders his sophomore year, and rapidly

honed his rusty skills. Coach Long described 1956 as "the year that

marked the emergence of Conley from nowhere to one of the best milers

in the South" (Long, 1976).

Lloyd Lassen erased the high jump record of his good friend and

rival Tenny Brown by clearing 6' 2". The bulky high jumper cleared

this height on two different occasions.

Joe Davis reduced Carlos Fraundorfer's entries in the record

book to two by grabbing the broad jump mark with his new standard

































(220-yard dash on the curve), Joe

ran) and Lloyd Lassen (high j=

L record marks, Terwilliger, Davi

--getters in 1956 with 71 3/4, 56



i Mike Long saw only one major atl

1 1957 (FSU Track Brochure File.





























placed them fourth behind Southeastern Conference powerhouses L,

State University, Auburn University, and the University of Alab.

LSU won the first Annual Coliseum Relays with 44 points.

The only Seminole victory occurred in the 60-yard dash.

Terwilliger topped the dash field with a :06.5 clocking. The D.

native added a fourth in the 300-yard dash to his collection of

Florida State established two new indoor marks in the fj

events with fine nonwinning efforts. Richard Ellwood's mark cat

the pole vault as he tied for second place with a jump of 12' 8'

Tenny Brown andl~loyd Lassen were part of a five-way tie for seci

the high jump at 5' 10".

The mile relay concluded the painful learning experience(

a fourth place finish. The Tribe was made acutely aware of the

ment necessary to insure success during the outdoor season.

Florida State University served notice to its opponents

the Seminoles were a newly emerging power with which to be recki










84

23 February 1957). The ACC Indoor Championship was one of the few

indoor meets the Seminoles had ever attended; therefore, many of their

performances established new school indoor records.

Jack Terwilliger shot to a :06.3 victory in the 60-yard dash,

earning himself a spot in the FSU record books. Joe Davis earned a

similar spot with his :07.9 victory clocking in the 70-yard low hur-

dles. Lloyd Lassen gained the indoor counter-part to his high jump

record with a leap of 5' 10-1/2".

Dick Ellwood bested teammate Warren Strickland with a winning

vault of 12' 0". Strickland cleared 11' 6" for second place.

The Seminole aSsauit on the record book was concluded with a

flourish as the mile relay laid claim to the PSU indoor record with a

victorious clocking of 3:35.3. The relay consisted of Watson, Davis,

Conley, and Terwilliger.

The two indoor meets had readied the Seminole thinclads for

their premier outdoor performance. Mississippi Southern was the

unlucky opponent. By the end of the day, Florida State had amassed

101 points to Mississippi Southern's 35 (FSU Track Office Files, 13

March 1957). The Seminoles swept 15 of 16 events amid many outstanding

perf ormances..

Mike Conley rewrote Vernon Duce's two-mile record with a win-

ning time of 10:15.9. He had previously won the mile run with a good

time of 4:32.2.

Jack Terwilliger came within an eyelash of John Poston's 100-

yard dash record with a race-capturing :09.7. Be returned in the 220-

yard dash to take his second win of the day with a :21.6 clocking.












Terwilliger also anchored both the 440 and mile relay teams to victory.

Richard Ellwood, Doyle Ruff, and Joe Davis teamed with Terwilliger to

equal the school mark of :43.5 in the meet-opening 440-yard relay. A

3:27.5 effort was turned in by the mile relay team composed of Charley

Watson, Doyle Ruff, Pete Elliot, and Jack Terwilliger.

The Seminoles copped both hurdle races in near record times.

Tenny Brown sped to a quick :15.3 clocking that wa. only rne-tenth of

a second off Wes Minton's record. Watson took aim on Minton's 220-

yard low hurdle record, falling only three-tenths of a second shy with

a sparkling :24.3 effort.

The Tribe displayed power in the high jump and pole vault.

Lloyd Lassen led a Seminole sweep in the high jump with a fine winning

leap of 61 1-1/2". Tenny Brown and Bob McDonald tied for second place.

There was a four-way split of first place in the pole vault, of which

three were Seminoles. Don Ayers, Richard Ellwood, and Warren Strick-

land all cleared 12' 6".

The increasing strength of the Florida State University track

team became evident in the fourteenth running of the Florida Relays on

March 30 (FSU Track Office Files, 30 March 1957). Placing in seven

events, the Seminole tracksters had their best showing ever.

The best individual performances were by Richard Ellwood and

Warren Strickland in the pole vault. The two Seminole vaulters claimed

exclusive ownership of second place.

Dave Sins, the Duke University sprint star who had established

an amazing :20.0 220 world record in 1956, copped the 100-yard dash in

:09.6 as FSU's Jack Terwilliger ran a distant third. The Seminole












point gathering performances were concluded by Joe Davis' fourth in the

broad jump and Tenny Brown's fifth in the high jump.

Quality performances in Florida State's first two outdoor meets

had provided the Seminoles with high team morale for the upcoming con-

frontation with the University of Florida (Lung, L.S., 1976). April 13

marked the return engagement in Tallahassee with the Florida Gators.

When the dust had settled, the Gator. owned a hard earned 67 to 64 vic-

tory (FSU Track Office Files, 13 April 1957).

Mike Conley opened the meet on a winning note for the Tribe by

taking the mile run in 4:32.4. The results of the two-mile run

delivered a devastating blow to the Seminole victory chances as Conley

developed a stitch and was forced to back-off the pace (Tall~ahassee

Democrat 14 April 1957). The Tribe's distance sensation finished a

soundly beaten second. Mike Conley explained:

All spring, under my right rib cage, I had pain anytime I
ran over a mile, even on trails. I don't know why, may have
been out of shape, but I never had that problem again.
(Conley, 1976)

Florida State's weaknesses in the shot and discus events were

exploited by the Gators. Florida won the top two spots in both events

gaining a 16 to 2 advantage that eventually proved to be the difference

in the meet.

Richard Ellwood and Warren Strickland continued their friendly

personal dual in the pole vault as both men cleared an FSU record-

setting 13' 2" for first place. A personal best time of 1:58.9 earned

Ken Seener a victory in the 880-vard run.













Adversity Overtook the Seminoles in the javelin throw,

'a Jerry Henderson, the Overwhelming premeet favorite, threw

ee of his preliminary throws out-of-bounds and did not qualil

finals (Long, L.S., 1976). Rising to the occasion, Jimmy 1h

ped the javelin for the Seminoles with a throw of 188' 1/2".

r, critical second place points had slipped away for the Tril

With the Gators possessing an insurmountable 67 to 59 lc

inole mile relay composed of Joe Davis, Doyle Ruff, Ken Seg-t

k Terwilliger expressed the Tribe's refusal to quit by taking

al event with a fast dual meet time of 3:25.6

Team members replayed their loss over and over in their

sewing the tragedies that had befallen them in two events, ir

Tribe had figured to be solid favorites. The loss was hard

ept, and 19 years later Coach Long rated the 1957 Florida def

of the toughest losses in his coaching career (Long, L.S., I

The Seminoles had to live a week with the galling defeat

rida on their mind before the heat of competition could purgc

is. The fifth running of the University of Georgia-Georgia I

angular was the setting Of their redemption. The Seminoles f

it way to a 77 to 53 victory over runner-up Georgia as Georg!

ished third with 42 markers (FSU Track Office Files, 20 April

Mike Conley was in easy control in both the mile and twc

a. He coasted to a 4:40.4 victory in the mile and a 11:08.2
















Segner had ample reason to rum that night. His

from his victory against the Gators on the prece

plus the fact that his fiance had driven up from

watch him run (Segner, 1975).

Doyle Ruff led the race through the firs

The strapping sophomore was still in command of

final curve. Coming out of the last turn, Segne:


opening event with a time of :43.5.

relay, Joe Davis captured two more

to flow over the barriers in the Z5

3-3/4" in the broad junp.

The Seminoles took a week c

to action against the University ol

The Seminoles stormed to an easy 81

Files, 1 May 1957).

Jack Terwilliger attempted

anchor the mile relay. The plucky

herculean task. The 440-yard dash


vents as he took only 25 seconds

-yard low hurdles and leaped 22'



f from competition before returning

Miami in Coral Gables on May 2.

to 49 victory (PSU Track Office



o win three individual events and

Printer almost accomplished this













Terwilliger bounded back to take the 220-yard dash with an outstanding

time of :21.3.

Joe Davis upset Terwilliger for the first of his two victories.

Davis became the third Seminole to run under 10 seconds flat in the

hundred with his blazing ;09.8 clocking. He also took the broad jump

with a jump of 22 feet even.

On this day, Warren Strickland emerged on top in the pole vault

witii a jump of 13' 0". It seemed fitting that the senior should win

the last dual meet of his career.

The mile relay race held a special meaning to the men running

for Florida State. The Seminoles had won the meet easily, but still

-rned desperately to win the relay. With the varsity letter award

being based upon scoring a--e points in competition, Jack Terwilliger

explained why the mile relay was so important:

Bobby Bryson needed only one point for his letter and we
persuadedd Coach Long. to let him lead-off the Tile relay.
11 1-.ri- Ti. E-1l Ii
4 ?- 1 1 Elrll --lr.- I--?r -- ~i



Florida State got its shot at revenge against rival University

of Florida in the Florida AAU championships in Gainesville on May 4

(FSU Track Office Files, 4 May 1957). The Miami Sunday News termed the

meet a "regatta" (5 May 1957), as rain fell continually throughout the

afternoon. However, the atrocious condition of the track did not dam-

pen the heat of competition.

The Seminoles were paced by three school record setting per-

formances, yet again they fell agonizingly short of their intrastate















university ot M1=1i was tthlrd with ib markers.

Mike Conley broke both the one and two

the process of winning both events. He dipped

and gained a 10:08.5 revenge victory in the t

Florida. Morgan's victory over Conley in the

Florida State-Florida dual meet had put that m

Doyle Ruff set a school mark in the he

Segner's final race as a collegian. Segner ex

through the first quarter-mile before a lead g

on the back straightaway, caught him unaware.

unattached runner before he could adjust to th

pace. He hauled both man down and the three u

the final curve. The runners came out of the

The unattached runner was sandwiched between F

and Segner on the outside. It was a primitive

determination down the home stretch. No one g

decision declared Doyle Ruff the winner in a o

own words, Ken Segner "did not take the loss w

was sure he had won. Passions cooled and an h

congratulating his teammate on his school reco

Jerry Henderson became the second Semi

over 200 feet in the j avelin. His second plac

even. Jimrmy Harrell finished third with a thr
















the Seminoles to within seven points of the Florida Gators.

With only the pole vault remaining, the Tribe needed to win

both first and second place to claim their victory. The University of

Miami provided the principal competition. Richard Ellwood and Warren

Strickland had accomplished that feat against the Hurricanes in their

dual meet, but Rosbaught and Banstone of M~iami were not to be denied.

Ellwood's tie for second was the best the Seminole vaulters could

manage and FSU fell three points short of victory. A fine Seminole

team effort had been called and beaten by a similar Gator performance.

Summary. The year 1957 had been highly successful for the

Seminoles. The Seminoles of Florida State captured the independent

division of the Atlantic Coast Conference Indoor Championship and

finished second in the Florida AAU Championship. The Tribe was equally

as tough in head-to-head competition as the Seminoles won four of five

dual meets. The only loss was a very painful decision to the University

of Florida.

The runners were the only Seminoles to mount an offensive on

the school record board. Mike Conley continued his steady improvement,

and lowered his school record in the mile run by 9.1 seconds to 4:18.8.

He added the two-mile run to his record collection with an impressive

10:08.5 clocking.

The mile relay was the setting for a new school record when the

foursome of Joe Davis, Charles Watson, Ken Segner, and Jack Terwilliger

toppled the old mark with a 3:20.5 performance at the Florida Relays.












Doyle Ruff and Ken Segner staged a battle for the 880-yard run

record. Ken Segner first topped Lawrence Hountha's record by touring

the two laps of the oval in only 1:57.6. His record lasted only two

weeks before Doyle Ruff narrowly bested both Segner and his record in

the Florida AAU with a time of 1:57.1.

The 440-yard relay record was tied twice by two different c-m

binations of runners. The team of Richard Ellwood, Doyle Ruff, Joe

Davis, and Jack Terwilliger first turned the trick on March 16. They

beat the Mississippi Southern relay team with a time of :43.5. The

quartet of Ellwood, Bobby Bryson, Davis, and Terwilliger equalled the

record when they won the relay in the Georgia-Georgia Tech triangular

meet on April 20, 1957.

The 1957 season brought to a close three years of work by Coac

Mike Long. His efforts as head coach had resulted in teams that -om

piled a 16 and 3 win-loss record. The Seminoles had completed their

rebuilding task and were ready to assume a position of prominence amonl

the track powers in the South.


























There were many missing faces when the Seminoles began their

fall drills. Among the missing were ten lettermen of the 1957 squad

that had helped run up a 4-1 record. The most prominent departed Sem-

inoles were pole vaulter Warren Strickland, middle distance runner Ken

Segner, and versatile Joe Davis. These three men were involved in set-

ting or sharing five school records. However, the 1958 senior domin-

ated team possessed a powerful appearance.

In giving a preseason prognosis, Coach Mike Long tharacteri-dd

the shot and discus events as areas of "definite weakness," but stated

"our running strength could possibly be enough to even things out"

(FSU Track Brochure File, Spring Sports 1958).

The running strength that Coach Long alluded to was headed by

Jack Terwilliger, the bantam speedster. Terwilliger was the 1957

Florida AAU champion in the 220-yard dash and the second fastest Sem-

inole in FSU track history with a :09.7 100-yard dash clocking. Jim

Casteel, returning after a three-year absence, was the 1957 Florida

AAU quarter-mile champion. Mike Conley, the 1957 Florida AAU mile

champion; and Doyle Ruff, the 1957 Florida AAU half-mile champion,

comprised the remaining components of an awesome lineup in the running































































presence of Dave Sime. To the 1960 Olympic Games, Dave Sime was th

silver medalist in the 100-meter dash.

The Seminoles were in good position after the first two leg

by Jim Caqteel and Gary Butner. The baton passed to Terwilliger on























he South by winning all four relays ent

ual events. The Seminole opponents wer

ye-ratching fashion.

The Seminoles continued their di

oanake Colleze in Tallahassee on Atril












The sprint medley relay team of Jim Casteel, Gary Butner, jack

Terwilliger, and Mike Conley chased Villanova to a sparkling time of

3:22.5. The Seminole quartet finished a very respectable second.

Misfortune struck the Seminole mile relay team as Jack Ter-

williger answered the gun slowly and came out of the first turn dead

last. He swerved to the outside of the pack on the backstretch and

started to move into contention. Terwilliger stayed on the outside as

he entered the last turn and continued to move up. Four teazis, inclu-

ding FSU, passed the baton simultaneously. Disaster struck when Doyle

Ruff was spiked in the confusion and pulled a hamstring muscle. Florida

State was out of the race (Long, L.S., 1976). Coach Mike Long com-

mented on the Seminole performance:

I thought our boys did very good. When you get a boy hurt
it sort of puts a damper on it and give you a let down Up
until that time that Ruff was hurt, FSU was performing very
well. We would have given them a good race in the mile (relay)
if Ruff hadn't gotten hurt. We were in as good a position as
could be expected that early in the race. (Tallhase
Democrat, 27 April 1958)

The Seminoles invited the University of Miami into their lair

on May 1. The Tribe knocked the wind out of the Hurricanes by a 88 to

41 margin (Tallahassee DevocraL, 2 May 1958).

Mike Conley began the meet on an auspicious note by taking the

mile run with a school record time of 4:14.2. Jim Casteel took the

hint and blasted through the quarter-mile in only :48.5. He followed

up that school record performance by eclipsing Wes Minton's low hurdle

mark by four-tenths of a second with a time of :23.6. Casteel added

the broad jump to his credit by traversing 22' 1/4" for this third win

of the day.

















The promise Charley Nye had shown in the Miami meet was ful-

filled in the Florida AAU half-mile. The Orlando runner won the 880-

yard run in a school and AAU record shattering time of 1:56.5 (Talla-

hassee Democrat, 4 May 1958). The old FSU standard bearer in the hall

mile, Doyle Ruff, finished third.

The 220-yard dash was the scene of personal triumph for Jack

Terwilliger. The Dade City senior topped arch rivals Ellis Goodloe of

Florida, ageless Buddy Fcwlkes, and teammate Jim Casteel with a spark-

ling one curve time of :21.8. Buddy Powkles, the former standout

sprinter at Georgia Tech, was used by veteran observers as a standard

of measure for sprinting excellence (Long, L.S., 1976). Terwilliger

had just joined a select circle of dashmen who had bested Buddy Fowlks

The magnitude of the feat was not lost on him:

The on17 time I beat Jim Casteel was in the Florida AAU in
my senior year. Not only did I beat Casteal, but also Ellis
Goodloe of Florida, and Buddy Fowlkes.
There was a very sharp curve at Florida and being short, I
practiced running close to the line. I had a very good curve
and managed to hold on to win.
That was my last individual race of my career at Florida
State. I am probably more proud of the Florida AAU 22G-yard
dash victory than anything else in my senior year.
Everytime we ran a 220, I'd be out in front and then I'd
see a long leg come out in front of me and Casteel would move
by--Casteel first and Terwilliger second.
I've wondered to this day if Jimmy let me win that race
because it was my last race in college. He was that type of
guy. In fact, the guys at Florida State were like that.
They wouldn't just let you win, but were people who cared.
I think that was the success of our track team. (Terwilliger,


















Tom Keeney opened the m,

a strong run in the mile. His ,

Till followed Keeney's winning 4

:49.7. He be-ae the third Sem:

h-i-ie in lP i ----11.l.


!t on the right foot for the Tribe with

_ctory was clocked at 4:21.8. Quentin

:auiple by taking the 440-yard dash in

iole ever to crack the 50-second


Before the start of the 100-yard dash, Ralph Fabian, LSU's pre-

mier sprinter, asked the officials if the finish yard could be lowered

so it would not hit him in the face (Tallahassee Democrat, 25 March

1960). Actually, he had little to worry about as FSU's Ron Harrison

broke th~e tape for him in both the 100- and 220-yard dashes. Harrison's

times were a very fast :09.7 for the hundred and a :21.2 clocking! for












outdistancing Furman University 100 1/5 to 77 3/5 on April 16 In

Greenville, South Carolina ('Iallahassee De~mo~crat, 17 April 1960).

The Seminoles were paced by victories in three relays and

four individual events. The Tribe quart~t of Ted Keen, Bill Davis,

Quentin Till, and Ron Hlarrison copped the 440-yaird relay with a

sparkling time of :42.6. A school record resulted in the half-mile

relay when the men who had comprised the quarter-mile relay returned

to thle track, blasting to a 1:28.1 clocking.

The powerful stride of Ron Harrison carried him to a :09.8

triumph in the 100-yard dash. For his work in three winning relays

and his victory in hundred, Ron Harrison was awarded the outstanding

athlete of the meet trophy.

Three Seminoles earned themselves victory honors I. the field

events. Jim Maroon hurled the javelin 181' B" for his first victory

as a Seminole. The high jump gold medal went to Steve Long as he

cleared 6' 3-1/4". Keith Crawford became the fourth Seminole to broad

jump over 23 feet with his winning leap of 23' 1".

The Tribe brought a successful afternoon to a satisfying con-

clusion with a victory in the mile relay. The team of Quentin Till,

Lloyd Evans, Cl-lde Grizzard, and Ron Harrison sped to a 3:22.5 clocking.

With the series between the two -h-1,,s tied at two .11, Florida

State University returned to Gainesville on April 25 for their annual

confrontation with the University of Florida. Double victories by Toni

Keeney and Ron Harrison keynoted a hard fought 79 1/2 to 56 1/2 Se.-

Inole victory (FSU Track Office Files, 25 April 1960). The Tribe

triumphs in the 440-yard and mile relays were instrumental in FSU's













Ron Harrison won the 220-dash with a school, track, and Florida

AAU record shattering :20.3. Harrison's time fell only three-tentha of

a second off of the world record (Florida Flambeau, 10 May 1960); how-

ever, hi victory did not come easy. Bob Sher, University of Miami

sprinter, grabbed an early lead before giving way to Harrison at the

hundred-yard mark. Harrison established a slight lead and was able to

maintain that lead, even though, both Slier and third place Buddyy

Fowlkies broke the old Florida AAU record with times of :20.4 and :20.9,

respectively (Florida Flambeau, 10 May 1960).

The FSU school record in the 120-yard high hurdles dipped under

the 15-second mark as Bill Welch copped the short hurdle event with a

:14.9 clocking. A third FSU record was tied in the 220-yard low hur-

dles when Claude Grizzard burst from the field and sped to a :23.6

clocking. The put of 50' 5-3/4" by Don Ostergaard set a new Florida

AAU mark and wound up FSU's record-setting exploits.

Tom Keeney was the meet's only two-event winner with victories

in the mile and two-mile runs. Henry Wadsworth of the University of

Florida lost his chance when the rain turned the pole vauolt runway

into a quagmire. lie had to settle for a four-way tie for first in the

pole vault after having won the high jump earlier in the afternoon.

Ed Hays of FSU was one of the four men sharing the pole vault title at

13' 0" (Tallahassee Democrat 8 May 1960). Jeff Clark signaled a

warning for future opponents in the discus with his winning toss of

1451 4".













their intrastate rivals, the Tribe made it three in a row over the

Florida Gators and six over the Miami Hurricanes. Florida State

added the News-piadmont Relays and Florida AAU Championships to their

victory catch.

The year had produced five new school records. Ron Harrison

ended his brilliant career by lowering the FSU standard in the 220-

yard dash to an awesome :20.3. Harrison'. time battered the old mark

set by John Poston in 1952 by one-half second. That differential

equates to ever five full yards on the track.

Ron Harrison became the first track man at FSU to ever b

selected by the Florida Flambeau as the FSU athlete of the year

(FlordaFlmbau 20 May 1960). Coach Mike Long was in total agree-

ment with Harrison's selection:




reproach. He's been a tremendous influence on the squad this
year.
Ron came here from Florida Southern In his sophomore vear,
and came out for track. He was enthusiastic about the sport,







L.S., 1960)

The standards in both hurdls events received either alteration

or addition. bill Welch removed Tom Chivers' name from the board by

becoming the first Seminole to run under 15 seconds in the 120-yard

high hurdles with his time of :14.9 in the Florida AAU Championships.

In the same competition, Claude Grizzard tied Jim Casteel's school

record of :23.6 in the 220-vard low hurdles.










































a and Claude Grizzard's record le

6. At the end of the competitive

d fastest collegiate time run in

440-yard relay contingent of Crai









156

for the new campaign (FSU Track Brochure File, Spring Sports 1963).

Not only were lettermen lost, but five of the missing 13 were school

record holders. One of the five record holders, Terry Long, still had

one season of indoor eligibility remaining.

The 1963 team centered around the six returning lettermen and

a foursome of promising sophomores. Co-captains Craig Johnson and Herb

Kraft led the returnees that included Allen Williams, Dick Roberts, Jim

Lankford, and Hutch Johnson. Among the sophomores heavily counted upon

were hurdler-jumper Floyd Lorenz, sprinters Jerry McDaniel and Al Cato,

and half-miler Ross Winter.

The Seminoles were going to have to off set weak area. J. the

pole vault, javelin, and hurdles by strong performances in the sprint

and weight events. The young Seminoles would have to mature rapidly.

FSU's financial situation brightened considerably in the Fiscal

Year 1962-63. The Tribe's operating budget was raised by over $3,500.

In addition, the scholarship portion of the budget was increased by

$3,000. The Seminoles began the 1963 season in the best financial

shape of their 15-year history (FSU Athletic Office Budget File, 1962-

1963),

Florida State opened their indoor season at Montgomery in the

Coliseum Relays cr February 16. The vouag Tribesmen gathered in at

important 35 to 23 1/2 victory over second place Southwestern Louisi-

ana State University (FSU Track Office Files, 16 February 1963). The

Seminoles set four indoor school marks and tied another.

Allen Williams exploded the shot 54' 6" to obliterate the old

mark of 51' 8" set by Jeff Clark the year before in Memphis. The


































but expected the 1963 meet to be very tough.

FSU received fine performances from sprinters Al Cato and Cra:

Johnson. Sophomore Cato became the fifth Seminole sprinter to run

:09.7 as he ran to victory in the 100-yard dash. He dominated the

furlong as he clocked a swift :22.0. The Tribe's control of the spri

races was made complete by Craig Johnson's :49.4 triumph in the quartE

mile.

The mile run was won by FSU's Dick Roberts in 4:24.0; however,

the Miami distance runnerra were able to take Roberts in the grueling

two-mile as a strong late kick by Bill Payne carried him by Roberts fc

second place. Byron of Miami won the race after having finished

second in the mile run.

The 120-yard high hurdles were a fiasco as the ninth and tentl

hurdles were mis-set causing the stride pattern of the hurdlers to be

thrown off. All three leading men fell with Dankes and Turek of MiamJ

outscrambling FSU's Floyd Lorenz to the finish line (Lorenz, 1975).












The Florida State 440-yard relay team composed of Jerry McDaniel

McDaniel, Hutch Johnson, Al Cato, and Craig Johnson opened the meet

with a blazing :41.7 school record setting performance that powered

them to victory. The Seminoles Were unable to sustain their momentum

in the footracing competition as Furnan, captured seven of the eight

remaining running events. The only Seminole to break Furman's strangle-

hold was Hutch Johnson, using a :09.5 in the 100-yard dash. Johnson's

time was better than the existing school record, but was disallowed due

to a strong favoring wind (Long, L.S., 1976). The Tribe was dealt a

severe blow when Al Cato, leading Hutch Johnson at the 40-yard mark in

the 100-yard dash, tore a hamstring and Was lost for weeks (Long, C. M.,

1076) '

Allen Williams copped the shot put with a throw of 55' 8-1/4"

and outstripped the discus field with a heave of 148' 3-3/4". The

throw in the shot put erased Jeff Clark's old school mark of 55' 3-1/4".

Within the space of one short month, Al Williams had broken both Jeff

Clark's indoor and outdoor shot put records. Bill Giswold established

another school record with a leap of 45' 1/4" in the triple jump.

The score was 68 to 63 in favor of Furman going into the final

two events, but outstanding performances by Furman's Patterson in the

twu-mile and the Paladin mile relay closed the door on the Seminoles'

chances of victory. The final tally showed Furman with 78 and the












members on the traveling squad. The small Tennessee team was competi-

five, but the outcome of the meet was never in doubt. The Seminoles

won 10 of the 14 events, sweeping all three places in four events.

Keeping his school record binge in the shot put alive, Allen

Williams uncorked a 56' 2" -auty. lie became the first Seminole to

hurl the shot over 56 feet. Williams decimated his opposition in the

discus with a toss of 155' 4".

The winning jump of 6' 5-3/4" in the high jump by Bill Ciswold

left him only one-quarter of an inch shy of George Smith's school

record. Giswold entered into a tie with Steve Long for the second best

jump by a Seminole. In the triple jump, Giswold won his second event

of the day with a 44' 2-1/8" effort.

Jerry McDaniel clipped one-tenth of a second off his personal

best in the furlong by sprinting to :21.8 victory. With the meet

safely in hand, the mile relay was cancelled by =fueal consent.

Florida State University bussed to Columbia, South Carolina, on

April 6 for the first running of the Carolina State-Record Relays. The

Tribe was less than auspicious in the relay races with only a second

in the quarter-mile relay and a fourth in the mile relay to show for

their efforts (FSU Track Office Files, 6 April 1963). The remaining

three FSU places were gathered by Allen Williams' second in the shot

put (52' 10-1/2") and a third in the discus (145' 11"), and Bill

Giswold's third in the high jump with a leap of 6' 0"..

April 29 was the day of the annual battle between Florida and

Florida State. The meet was held on the Gator track, but the home

track advantage did little to help the Florida Gators, as the Seminoles











tud gold well with a third in the shot put by Williams and Giswold's

ourth in the triple jump.

Allen Williams was the only Seminole to qualify for the United

:rates Track and Field Championships in Houston on June 7-8 (FSTJ Track

Iffice Files, 7-8 June 1963). Williams uncorked a throw of 57' 3-1/4"

hat earned him fifth place. He followed up his great shot putting

,ith a throw of 157' 5-1/2" in the discus to finish a very respectable



isl*The first Seminole ever to place in the National Collegiate

athleticc Association Track and Field Championship was Allen Williams in

he shot put on June 13-15 (FSU Track Office Files, 13-15 June 1963).

'he hefty Atlanta native hurled the iron ball 57' 7" for fourth.

Summary. The Seminoles began the year with only a few veteran

performers, and injuries weakened their effectiveness. Dick Roberts

acurred a hairline fracture of his right foot. Although he continued

o compete, his practice routine was disrupted (Roberts, 1975). Herb

raft reinjured his hamstring and was lost for the majority of the

eason. Nagging muscle injuries plagued Craig Johnson for much of his

enior year (Long, L.S., 1976).

The injuries did not always select veterans as Al Cato suffered

ne of the most severe hamstring tears seen by Coach Mike Long in his

coaching career (Long, L.S., 1976). The proud sprinting corps of

'lorida State often ran on only one or two cylinders.

The Seminoles opened their season by winning the Coliseum Relays

itle in Montgomery, Alabama. The Tribe slowly gained momentum to run

p a 4-1 dual meet record.














































Johnson (sprints and hurdles) and Herb Kraft (broad jump).

The Tribe looked to the sprint races for their strength. Jerry

McDaniel was the Seminole's most powerful runner and especially tough

in the 440- and 220-yard dashes. He led off the 440-yard relay and ran

the anchor leg on the mile relay. Hutch Johnson and Al Cato handled

the 100-yard dash, with Bob Sable adding relay strength and depth.

The return of both Dick Roberts and Jim Lankford gave the

Seminoles a competitive entry in the distance events. The hopes of the

Tribe in the middle distance races rested on Hank Raehn and Ross












with the Orange Bowl football extravaganza (MaiHead 2 January

1964). Allen Williams and Jerry MlcDaniel had two impressive second

place finishes behind world class performers. The shot put was domin-

ated by Gary Gubner, reigning NCAA champion (PSU Track Brochure File,

Spring Sports 1964), with a throw of 59' 7-1/2". Williams bested all

other challenges for the runner-up position.

The incomparable Robert Hayes was the victor in the 220-yard

dash with an awesome time of :20.4. He was followed by FSU's Jerry

McDaniel who clocked a fine :21.0 for second place.

A humorous incident occurred the night before the meet, as Al

Cato was caught in a minor lapse of good judgment prior to the competi-

tion:

One of the most humorous situations occurred while at the



p.m. that night. Some of us want down to gei something. The
thing that appealed to me was a concoction called a "black
Mow" It' a a hu Be mixt'r e of ice cream, chocolate syrup, nuts,
coke, etc. Just a. I we. about t begin my feast-_Coach Long
walked in. Imagine my face! His only comment, among the
catcalls from everyone with me was "don't lose tomorrow."
Out of the nine entries in the 100-yard dash, I came in



The Seminoles embarked upon their indoor season by entering the

Chattanooga USTFF Championships on February 8 in Chattanooga. The

Tribe met with little success as three seconds and one fourth place

finish accounted for their slim 10-point total (ChttnogaDalyTies












The Seminole quartet of Jerry McDaniel, HIutch Johnson, Bob

Sable, and Al Cato demonstrated the Tribe's determination as they

flashed to a :41.6 victory that earned them school record honors

(Tallahassee Democrat, 7 March 1964).

The Tribe displayed their speed by capturing all of the sprint

events. Bob Sable became the sixth Seminole to run :09.7 as he sped

to victory in the 100-yard dash. Jerry McDaniel added the 440- and

220-yard dashes to his credit with a :48.3 and :21.9, respectively.

There were two school records set in addition to the 440-yard

relay. Doug Ferry snatched Craig Johnson's 330-yard intermediate hur-

dle title from him with a :38.9 clocking that established a new track,

meet, and school record (Tallahassee Democrat, 7 March 1964), and a

jump of 14' 5-1/4" in the pole vault gained Don Pharis both victory and

a school record.

Very creditable winning performances were turned in by Allen

Williams and Floyd Lorenz. Williams won the shot put with a toss of

55' 3", while Floyd Lorenz was taking the high Jump at 6' 4-1/2".

Hank Raehn came up with a personal best time of 1:56.4 to win

the half-mile. After the meet had been safely tucked away, PSU

entered the powerful foursome of Doug Ferry, Tom Houston, Ross Winter,

and Jerry McDaniel in the mile relay. The Tribe was successful in the











became the fourth Seminole to ever run the two-mile under 10 minutes.

The shot put and discus were won by Allen Williams with throws of

55' 10-1/2" and 153' 8-1/2", respectively.

Jerry McDaniel captured the 440-yard dash in :48.4 and the fur-

long in :21.9. McDaniel did not have a chance to run his customary

anchor leg on the mile relay when Ross Winter pulled a hamstring after

taking the baton on the third leg of the relay.

Florida State returned to the winner's circle in the 21st Annual

Florida Relays on March 28 (FSUO Track Office Files, 28 March 1964).

The 440-yard relay team of Jerry McDaniel, Hutch Johnson, Bob Sable,

and Al Cato stormed to victory with a :41.4 clocking that clipped two-

tenths of a second off the school record set by this same foursome

earlier in the season.

Al Williams took top honors in the shot put with a 561 3" effort

and finished second in the discus. Although finishing fifth, the dis-

tance medley relay team of Irv Watson, Tom Houston, Hank Raehn, and

Dick Roberts established a new FSU record with their 10:27.9 clocking.

On April 4 Florida State University embarked upon their =att

difficult weekend of dual meet competition in 16 years. In a three-

day span, the Tribe was facing two of the toughest team. in the South-

eastern Conference with both meets away from home. The weekend began

against the Florida Gators in Gainesville (FSU Track Office Files,

4 April 1964).

The Gators came up with most of the outstanding running times,

but the Tribe hung tough and used twin victories by Al Williams to

close out their rivals by a 74 to 71 tally.












I could place third in the pole vault, we could possibly win.
1 i Ti 1 i.-,_ T ii-;



fiber glass pole strapped to my Corvette. As I remember, we
did win. (Crotty, 1975)

The pole vault unfolded better than Coach Long had hoped. Don

Pharis won the event as expected with Bill Crotty stepping out of his

self-imposed retirement to capture the second position. Thus, very

valuable points were added to the Seminole side of the ledger.

With the Tennessee Volunteers awaiting the Seminoles only two

days hence, Coach Mike Long elected not to run the mile relay after the

meet had been mathematically won. The Seminoles boarded their bus for

home minus their miler, Dick Roberts, who had stayed behind with his

younger brother-- runner for the University of Florida.

Sunday morning found the Tribe meeting at Tully Gymnasium for

a long car ride to Knoxville (Long, L.S., 1976). FSU was due to battle

the University of Tennessee on Monday, April 6 (FSU Track Office Files,

6 April 1964).

Monday morning dawned with thunderclouds darkening the skies

and soon the heavens released its burden on the earth below. By mett

time, the rain had stopped; however, the Tennessee cinder track was

unrunable and the meet was moved to a local high school track (Long,

L.S., 1976). Mud was the order of the day. For the most part, the

recorded performances were not indicative of the competitive effort

expended.

Jerry McDaniel proved to be the beat Tribe mudder as he copped

the 440-yard dash in :49.9 and the furlong in :22.5. Disregarding the









176

relax before the crucial relay. McDaniel's reply to the request was,

"who's going to help me relax?" (McDaniel, 1976). Whatever, McDaniel

told him worked as Raehn and the mile relay team ran well and Florida

State won the meet 75 to 70.

The Tribe had just beaten the University of Florida and the

University of Tennessee, the indoor Southeastern Conference Champions,

in the space of three days. Coach Mike Long was ecstatic with the per-

formance of his team over their difficult weekend. "Probably the

greatest track weekend we've ever had at FSU," exclaimed the happy

mentor. He went on to observe that "strangely enough, PSU participants

in the Tennessee meet appeared fresher than the UT runners" (Talla-

hassee Democrat, 8 April 1964).

The dual meet with the University of Tennessee brought to a

conclusion the team competition for the Seminoles. The varsity squad

was joined by FSU's freshman team and local area athletes to compete

in both the Florida and Georgia AAU Championships as the Tallahassee

Athletic Club.

Jerry McDaniel represented FSU in the Drake Relays special

220-yard event on April 24 in Des Moines. The powerful Seminole

sprinter finished third in a school record shattering :21.2. McDaniel's

time was a school record for the furlong run on the turn. Henry Carr

of Arizona State won the race in :21.0 (New York Times, 25 April 1964).

Summary. The Seminoles had stayed reasonably healthy through-

out the year and it paid dividends with an undefeated dual meet season.

The Tribe victims included the University of Miami, Furman University,












1965

Florida State had the perfect combination of seasoned perfor-

mers and young sophomore. that could continue the Tribe's winning

string which extended back to the loss to Furman University on March 16,

1963. The Seminoles lost two school record holders from the 1964 team

with the graduation of Allen Williams (shot put and discus) and Hank

Raehn (Half-mile). Distance runners Richard Roberts and Jim Lankford

were among the graduating lettermen (FSU Track Brochure File, 1965).

The sprint events were again the area in which the Seminoles'

strength lay. The school record setting quarter-mile relay team

returned three of its members, missing only Hutch Johnson. He was

replaced by Pensacola Junior College speedster Ken White.

Jerry McDaniel controlled the 440- and 220-yard dashes, and

he had suffered only one dual meet loss during the entire previous

season. Al Cato, Ken White, and Bob Sable formed a very strong three-

some in the 100- and 220-yard dashes.

The loss of Al Williams, the South's premier weight man, was

impossible to fill as a man of his calibre is not often found. Foot-

baller Dave Braggins and Ray Hoxit had the task of keeping the Seminoles

competitive in the weight throwing events.

Hank Raehn was gone in the half-mile, and juniors John Brogle

and Ross Winter were called upon to fill the vacancy. Winter had

shown promise with his vital second place finish in the victory over

the Universitv of Tennessee in Knoxville.












promising young Seminoles had to come through while the veterans

needed to maintain their winning desire for the dream of an undefeated

season to materialize.

The season opener in Montgomery on February 13 was a mixture

of excitement and disappointment. The Seminoles fought to a 34 to 34

tie with Northeast Louisiana State in the ninth running of the Colis-u

Relays (FSU Track Office File, 13 February 1965). Florida State had to

come from behind to grab a share of the title with the team that had

defeated them by three points the year before.

Victories were hard earned as three of the four wins called for

school record setting performances. The two-mile relay team composed of

Irv Watson, John Brogle, Bill Nelson, and Ross Winter scampered to

victory in an FSU record time of 8:06.7.

The question concerning the possible vulnerability of FSU in the

broad j ump was answered when Sidney Gainey sailed to a new indoor mark

of 23' 1". This jump gave the slender Georgian the Coliseum Relays

broad jump title.

The high jump was a long-lasting event with the Seminoles strug-

gling hard for points. In a pressure cooker situation, Floyd Lorenz

mustered the best indoor jump of his career to take the event with a

new FSU indoor record of 6' 7".

The mile relay Was the concluding event. The Seminoles had to

win as they trailed by two points. If they were successful in the mile

relay and if Northeast Louisiana State finished third or lower, the

meet would belong to the Seminoles. The Tribe flashed around the oval

in 3:28.1 as they edged out Northeast Louisiana State who finished












intermediate hurdles. Jerry Mcr~aniel won two individual events with a

:48.6 clocking in the quarter-mile and a :21.8 effort in the 220-yard

dash,

With times of :15.0 and :39.5, Steve Landis won the 120-yard

high hurdles and the 330-yard intermediate hurdles. A strong showing

by Landis in practice had prompted Coach Mike Long to take Doug Ferry,

FSU record holder in the 330-yard intermediate hurdles, out of the hur-

dles and return him to the quarter-mile (Long, L.S., 1976).

Led by a school record-setting performance by Don Casteel, the

Seminoles won 35 of the 63 available points in the field events. In

his first varsity outdoor meet, Casteel bounded 46' 2-1/2" in the triple

jump for a new FSU school record.

The home opener for the Tribe took place =n March 13. The

Paladins of Furman University visited Tallahassee without witnessing

the usual southern hospitality. The Tribe dropped the baton in the

440-yard relay, and this was followed by a Furman victory in the mile

run as the Paladin's Curt Hollifield copped the win. The remainder of

the meet, however, belonged to the Seminoles as they captured 12 of

the 14 remaining events (Tallahassee Democrat, 14 March 1965).

Jerry McDaniel turned in a very fast double in the 440- and

220-yard dashes by winning the quarter-mile in :48.1 and the furlong in

a track record setting :21.5. Ken White became the sixth Seminole to

run :09.7 as he blazed to victory in the 100-yard dash. He finished

second in the 220-yard dash with Al Cato in third, making the furlong

a Seminole sweep. The 5' 9" Steve Landis showed high stepping form by

















University of Georgia. Don Casteel moved over the 48-foot mark with

school record setting triple jump of 48' 6". It was his third school

record jump in as many meets. Ken White joined earlier Seminoles Jack

Terwilliger and John Fast-n in the record book with his :09.6 dash to

victory in the 100-yard dash. The Seminoles closed out the day with

Floyd Lorenz copping a second in the high jump, and Steve Landis run-

ning third in the 330-yard intermediate hurdles.

Florida State traveled to Auburn on April 2 to do battle with

Auburn University. The Seminoles came away with a 95 to 50 triumph

(FSU Track Office Files, 2 April 1965). The win marked the first home

meet loss suffered by the Tigers in 21 meets (Tallahassee Democrat,

8 April 1968).

Bill Nelson captured the mile run. with a 4:20.4 clocking, with

Irv Watson finishing third with a time of 4:21.5. The quarter-mile was

won by Jerry McDaniel in :48.1. Ken White led Al Cato to a 1-2 Seminole

finish in the 100-yard dash. White's race was timed in :09.8, while

Cato was one-tenth of a second back at :09.9.

John Brogle and Ross Winter fought to another 1-2 Tribe finish

with outstanding times of 1:55.1 and 1:55.4, respectively in the 880.

A double win was scored by Floyd Lorenz as he capped the 120-yard high

hurdles in :15.0 and the high jump at 6' 5".

An all-Seminole cast, starring Darryl Guthrie, dominated the

javelin. A personal best toss of 190' 6" by Guthrie won the event, as

Gary Oates and David Thompson finished second and third with throws of











tootraces, but managed to win only three of the seven field events

(FSU Track Office Files, 5 April 1965).

PSU's fine quarter-mile relay team opened with a quick :41.8

victory. Showing the mile field his heels, Irv Watson became the

fourth fastest miler in Seminole track history with a 4:19.8 clocking.

These two opening victories were followed by the superlative

efforts of Jerry McDaniel and Ken White. McDaniel won the 440-yard

dash, only one-tenth of a second off the two-curve school record with

a clocking of :47.8. Bursting from the blocks, Ken White sped to vic-

tory in a school record time of :09.5. John Poston's record, set in

1952 and tied by Jack Terwilliger in 1958 and Ken White in 1965, had

finally been broken.

Floyd Lorenz copped the high hurdles in a fast :14.8 and

leaped 6' 4" for victory in the high jump. Although finishing second

in the 880-yard run, Ross Winter established a new FSU record with a

clocking of 1:54.0 (Tallahassee Democrat, 6 April 1965).

In his third race of the day, Jerry McDaniel topped tea mme te

Al Cato in the 220-yard dash with a very quick time of :21.4. The mile

relay marked McDaniel's final appearance in the meet. The powerful

quarter-miler split :46.5 on the anchor leg, but failed by inches to

overcome a seven-yard headstart by the Gamecock anchorman (Tallahassee

Democrat, 6 April 1965).

The final score was 85 to 60 in favor of the Seminoles. It

marked the fourth victory in a row for the Tribe against the University

of South Carolina.








188

and still is a rival and I don't like losing to them, so it was
really a big meet for me.
John Anderson, the Florida sprinter, and I had gone head-
to-head on several occasions during the year with no clear cut
winner on any occasion. I was really keyed up for this meeting
between John and myself. I also was anxious to beat Ken White
and get the school record for myself.
Aa I recall, just prior to the 100, our relay team had
just won the 440-yard relay with me anchoring it and just
beating out John at the wire. I was ready to make it a double
by beating him in the 100-yard dash. As it turned out, I was
the winner and lucky enough to tie the school record and share
it at :09.5 with Ken White. (Cato, 1975)

Many Florida State athletes were turning in career-best per-

formances that night. Steve Landis tied his own school record in the

330-yard intermediate hurdles with a winning time of :37.6.

Florida had two fine shot putters in Leach and Winkler, and the

event figured to be one of critical importance. FSU's Dave Braggins

responded by winning the shot put competition with a throw of 50' 5-1/2".

It was the first time he had thrown over 50 feet.

Sidney Gainey and Don Casteel handled the horizontal jumping

events with performances of 23' 2" and 46' 1-1/2" in the broad jump and

triple jump, respectively. Floyd Lorenz bounded over 6' 4" for victory

in the high jump.

The 220-yard dash was an exciting event for the Seminoles.

Jerry McDaniel bad never lost a dual meet 220-yard dash race during his

three-year career at Florida State University. The announcer stated

this fact to the crowd just prior to the start of the race (Roberts,

1975). With 215 yards of the race covered by flying feet, the leader

was Al Cato. With his streak in jeopardy, Jerry McDaniel was charging

hard in second place. Hampered by a sore hamstring, Ken White was in

third and struggling to hold on after going out extremely fast.










contests. Ina quarter-mile relay team tasted defeat for the first time

in the 1965 season. Th. Tribe fo ...ome finished third with a resp-c

table time of :42.3 (New York Times, 25 April 1965).

Don Casteel had the highest Seminole place as he covered 46'

6-1/4" in the triple jump, earning second place. A :53.6 clocking in

the 440-yard intermediate hurdles garnered a fifth place and a new FSU

record for Steve Landis (New York Times, 24 April 1965).

On the first day, Ken White won his heat in the 100-yard dash

with a time of :09.6. However, he could only muster a fourth place in

the finals on Saturday.

The high jump and broad jump were the only ot her events the

Tribe placed in, as Floyd Lorenz cleared 6' 4" for sixth in the high

jump and Sidney Gainey wound up fifth in the long j ump at 22' 11" (New

York Times, 24 April 1965).

The final competition for the Seminoles occurred on June 11-12

in the Third Annual USTFF Track and Field Championships. Sidney Gainey

and Don Casteel continued to excel for the Seminoles. The two young

sophomores became the second and third Seminoles to place ever in

national competition. Gainey captured fifth in the broad jump with a

leap of 221 6-1/2", while Casteel won fifth in the triple jump with a

leap of 46' 9-1/4" (FSU Track Office Files, 11-12 June 1965). Jerry

McDaniel competed in the 220-yard dash, but was unable to place in the



fnl.The threesome of Jerry Mc~aniel, Sidney Gainey, and Dun Casteel

competed in the NCAA Track and Field Championships on June 17-19 in












Two men broke the school record in the half-mile. Ross Winter

first accomplished the feat with a 1:54.0 clocking in the South Caro-

lina dual meet. John Brogle bested Winter's mark with a 1:52.2 clock-

ing during the dual meet with the University of Florida. Earlier in

the year, these two men had teamed with Bill Nelson and Irv Watson to

set a school record in the two-mile relay at the Florida Relays. They

shaved seven and one-tenth seconds off the old school mark with their

7:42.1 clocking.

The end of the 1965 season brought to a close the most pros-

perous era In Seminole track history. It had begun in 1958 and the

following seven years saw many of the best performances in the Tribe's

track history.

Every school record was broken during this eight-year span of

time. The FSU track team ran up a 34 and 3 dual meet record against

the best teams in the South. Florida State demonstrated their complete

dominance over the Florida Gators by winning all eight of their annual

encounters.

The pride and confidence during this era set these athletes

apart from those who had preceded them. Al Cato's comment on his

successful evening against John Anderson, in the FSU-Florida dual meet

exemplified the attitude of Mike Long's teams during this year. He

remarked, "I ran him four times, and I wanted to beat him four times,

and I only won three" (Roberts, 1975).









194

Florida State University had 13 lettermen on the 29-man varsity

roster (FSU Track Brochure File, Track and Field 1966). Many of the

lettermen were marginal performers. Their improvement, along with a

favorable adjustment of last year's freshmen to varsity competition,

was critical to the success of the team in dual meet encounters. The

outcome of the 1966 season depended on the output of the available

personnel. Injuries or the failure to perform up to expectation would

be devastating to the Seminoles' chances for success.

At a time of growing inflation, the track budget received a

healthy boost. The operating budget gained almost $2,500, while the

scholarship fund was increased $5,500 (Athletic Office Budget File,

1965-1966). These monies were well received as the consumer price

index had risen two and seven-tenths points over the previous year.

This CPI increase was the highest single year raise in over six years

(U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 1975).

The Tribe turned their attentions to competition with a selet-

ted entry in the Senior Bowl Track Meet on December 28 in Mobile.

FSU's Sidney Gainey won the broad jump at 23' 7-3/4" for the only Sem,

inole place in the prestigious invitational meet (Mobile Register,

29 December 1965).

Once again, a triumph by Sidney Gainey was the only Seminole

representative on the victory stand in the Orange Bowl Track and Field

Championship in Miami on January 8. His leap of 231 11" topped a field

of the best jumpers in the South (MiamiHerald 9 January 1966).

The Seminoles swept into Montgomery on February 11 seeking to

defend their Coliseum Relays title. Paced by victories in the two-mile
















Files, 11-12 February 1966).

School records were tallied by the two-mile relay team and

broad jumper Sidney Gainey. The relay team of Bob Hohnadel, John

Brogle, Ross Winter, and Bill Nelson burned to victory in 8:01.8.

Sidney Gainey established himself as a national calibre broad jumper

with his victory leap of 24' 5".

The remaining Seminole triumph occurred in the 60-yard dash.

Ken White did the honors with a quick :06.4 clocking. The Tribe col-

lected three seconds and two third places to raise their final point

total to 33 markers.

Florida State visited Chattanooga on February 19 for the South-

eastern USTFF Indoor Championships. For the third meet of the season,

Sidney Gainey was the lone Seminole to go to the victory stand. The

lean broad jumper copped his specialty with a fine leap of 23' 7-1/4"

(Chattanooga Daily-Times, 12 February 1966).

Florida State University opened the outdoor season with the

Jesuit Invitational Track and Field Championships in Tampa on Feb-u

sty 26. With the state title on the line, the Seminoles walked away

with an 88 to 70 victory over runner-up Florida (FSC Track Office

Files, 26 February 1966).

The Seminoles were led by a classic display of speed by sprin,

ter Kenny White. White's :09.6 and :21.4 performances in the 100- and

220-vard dashes were most impressive considering the earlv date.












Moving into a tie for second place on the all-time Seminole

list of high hurdlers, Charles Vickers clipped over the high hurdles

to a second place finish with a time of :14.8. Battling no old nemesis,

Steve Landis topped an intermediate hurdle field that included

Florida's Scott Hager with a quick time of :53.6.

Sidney Gainey and Don Casteel began the outdoor season with

victories in the long and triple jumps, respectively. Gainey's winning

jump was measured at 23' 10-1/4". The triple jump was won with Cas-

teel's bound of 46' 5". He was followed by Sid Gainey's 45' 3/4"

ef fort..

Jack Flandeau sailed over 14' 4" to win the pole vault. It -ar

the best vault of his career, only two and one-half inches shy of Don

Pharis' a school record.

The mile relay team composed of Wayne Currie, Curtiss Long,

Ross Winter, and John Brogle dashed to victory in the meet finale with

the fast time of 3:16.8. It was the second fastest relay ever run by

FSU in scored meet competition.

Florida State returned home to host the Hurricanes of Miami on

March 5. Ignoring a gusty wind (Tallahassee Democrat, 6 March 1966),

the Seminoles turned in sweeps of first and second places in seven

events as they ran to an easy 99 to 46 win (FSU Track Office Files

5 March 1966).

Both Ken White and Bud Manning won two events, while Curtiss

Long copped the 440-yard dash and ran on two winning relays. White's

times were ;09.8 in the century dash and :22.6 in the furlong. Manning











copped the high jump at 6' 2" and hurled the javelin 1921 1/2". He

became the fourth Seminole to throw over 190 feet in the j elin.

The quarter-mile was won by Long with a time of :49.8. The

440-yard relay team composed of Bill Campbell, Curtiss Long, Don Cas-

teel, and Ken White sped to an easy victory in :43.7. Wayne Currie,

Curtiss Long, Ross Winter, and John Brogle closed out the meet with a

winning time of 3:20.7 In the mile relay.

The powerful Southern Illinois University track team came into

Tallahassee on the first stop of their southern tour on March 19. One

of the Saluki station wagons transporting the team was involved in a

minor traffic accident. No one was seriously hurt, but as a pre-

caution, Coach Lew Hartzog held several of his runners out of competi-

tion (Hartzog, 1976).

With the meet tied at 61 all, the Salukis rar-off victories in

the two-mile run, triple jump, and the mile relay to seal FSU's doom

80 to 65 (FSU Track Office Files, 19 March 1966). The loss was the

first Seminole defeat I. dual meet competition since March 16, 1963.

Ken White blasted to his second :09.6 clocking in three meets

to register a Seminole win in the 100-yard dash. He returned for a

second win of the day in the 220-yard dash as he keyed a Seminole sweep

with a :22.4 clocking.

Sidney Gainey and Steve Landis were the only other individual

Seminole winners. Gainey gained his victory with a jump of 23' 5-1/2"

in the long jump. The grueling 440-yard intermediate hurdles event

was captured by Landis with a track record time of :53.8 (Tallahsse

Democrat, 20 March 1966).




















The final event of the day was the mile relay. The relay team

of Wayne Currie, Curtiss Long, Ross Winter, and John Brogle ran the

third fastest mile relay by a Seninole quartet with a time of 3:15.7.

Their collective efforts earned them fifth.

After the meet, the Seminoles boarded the bus with Charles

Durbin behind the wheel (Long, C. M., 1976). The Tribe had to be

ready for their dual meet with the University of Tennessee on the fol-

lowing Monday. The Volunteers of Tennessee were third in the 1965 NCAA

Cross-country Championship (TalaaseeDeocat 29 March 1966).

Using their distance running advantage, the University of Tennessee

managed to eke out a 79 to 66 triumph (FSU Track Office Files, 28 March

1966). The Volunteers swept the mile and two-mile runs. In the two-

mile run, FSU's Tom Grab=m ran a personal and school record time of

9:29.1 and only finished fourth. He had bettered his old personal mark

by over 20 seconds.

The 100-yard dash provided exciting action as Tennessee's

Webster was out fast and barely managed to hold off FSU's fast closing

Kenny White. The time of :09.6 was awarded to both men. White gained

a measure of revenge with a :22.0 victory in the 220-yard dash with

Wayne Currie finishing a surprise second at :22.3.




Full Text





















Florida State University's track program had its beginnings

in the fall of 1948. The master plan covering the expansion of the

athletic program did not call for the fielding of a track team for

several years (Annual Report: 1947-1948); however, events unfolded

that forced the time table to be moved forward. The prime factor in

this evolution was the somewhat bungled hiring of a -e staff member

at the newly coeducational Florida State University.

Kenneth Miller was working as head track and assistant foot-

ball coach at Lock Haven (Pennsylvania) State Teachers College when he

heard of a physical education and coaching opening at FSU. He recalled:

I heard of an opening at this new school and, largely out
of curiosity, wrote a letter of inquiry which included my vita.
Somewhat surprisingly, an offer followed almost immediately.
The opening, among other things, included the basketball coaching
job. Don Loucks had been the first basketball coach at FSU,
but he wanted to take over the tennis coaching position, and so
when my letter, indicating considerable experience in basket-
ball was received, the job was offered to me. This opportunity
in my favorite sport was the primary reason I came to Tallahassee.
My job at Lock Haven was a great one, and the salary there was
better than the new offer. Also, as it turned out, I would
have been department chairman the following year if I. had
remained at Lock Haven. But I wanted to be a head coach in
basketball. (Miller, 1975)

In the fall of 1948, Coach Miller arrived on campus believing

he was to be the basketball coach. Coach Miller's ambition to direct








































ram was began ahead of schedule with the se

coach. Ken Miller had an extensive career 1

runner and as a coach. His early formal r

alileo High School in San Fraacisco where h

because his basketball coach believed track

eason activity for basketball players. Mil

igh school sprinter, and recalls his "best"













After graduating, Miller entered Marin (California) Junior

College. Basketball and, to a lesser extent, track and field were his

primary athletic interests at Maria. It was during this period that

the junior college track coach moved him from the sprints to the quarter

mile. A third place finish in the state junior college championships

during his sophomore year was the product of this decision.

During the summer following his graduation from junior college,

Miller was invited to Washington State University to try-out for a

basketball scholarship. After a week-long practice session with var-

sity members on campus, he started home without a firm offer. En

route, Prince Callison, the football coach at the University of Oregon,

met the young athlete at the Portland train station and asked him to

visit Eugene where they were looking for a quarter-miler. Miller

accepted the invitation and within the week was offered, and accepted,

an athletic scholarship at Oregon.

Miller was still more interested in basketball, and even though

his scholarship was for track, he had ort given up the idea of playing

basketball for Oregon during track's off-season. Knowing of Miller's

background, the Oregon basketball coach was pleased to have an exper-

ienced junior college player as part of his program without using

basketball scholarship funds. This seemingly ideal arrangement,

however, proved to be ephemeral. Miller recalls that only a few days

after the fall semester began Colonel Bill Hayward, the legendary

Oregon track coach, drove into the parking lot of the fraternity where

Miller was staying, and hooked his horn until someone came out of the













house to see what he wanted. He had Mille, paged, and Coach Miller

recalled the ensuing events:

He just -

you're notanymore!" r?-ri~- l. ; Hayward






Thus began the track career of Ken Miller at the University of

Oregon. Although he anchored the mile relay team throughout his

career at the University of Oregon, Coach Hayward moved him to the

half-mile as his regular event. Once again, the move up in distance

paid dividends. His best mark of 1:53.4 was, at that time, the univer-

sity record. He ran 1:54.0 or better on several occasions during his

two years at the university, and in 1937 was selected by Hayward as a

member of an all-time University of Oregon track squad.

Miller graduated from the University of Oregon in 1937, and

remained as coach of the freshman team during the following year while

working on his master's degree.

His first head coaching position was at Liberty Union High

School, Brentwood, California, beginning in the fall of 1938. He

served as head track coach and assistant football and basketball coach

at Brentwood for three years. During this period, he renewed his

participation as a basketball player as a member of the Delta Market

squad, a Sun Francisco Bay area AAU team. Tn 1941, he left Liberty

High to enter the doctoral program in physical education at the Univer-

sity of Michigan. This plan was interrupted by World War II, and

Miller entered the naval aviation program. During his training period,












he played basketball for the Iowa "Seahawks," and subsequent to receiv-

ing his wings, he played for the Quonset N-1a Air Station and the

Bunker Hill Naval Air Station teams. As a naval aviator, he later had

combat duty in the Aleutian Islands and in the Mariana Islands.

Upon receiving an honorable discharge early in 1946, Miller

returned to the University of Michigan to continue work on his doctor-

ate, and that fall, he accepted the position of head track coach and

assistant football coach at Lock Haven State Teachers College. Coach

Miller returned to Amn Arbor during the summers and completed his doc-

toral work in 1948, the year he accepted the offer extended by Florida

State University.

The premature beginning of the track program left the new coach

with several serious problems. The most pressing was the total lack of

facilities. In the fall of 1948, Florida State University was commit-

ted to having a track team, but had no track. There was no relief in

the local community; as only Leon High School had a track program, but

again, no track.

Because of the initial cost of an adequate track complex, the

university attempted to build the facility using university personnel

(Durbin, 1975). An area on the old west campus was selected as the

site for the new track, The track was completed immediately prior to

the advent of the 1949 season (Clendinen, 1962).

In order to provide drainage, the track was constructed with

one turn higher in elevation than the other. This meant that one-half

of a lap was run slightly uphill; the other a few degrees downhill

(Miller, 1975). The drainage problem was solved, yet obvious problems




















clay, with the top running surface composed of red clay. The running

surface was fast when properly prepared, but one hard rain would turn

the track into a quagmire, and hot, dry weather resulted in a concrete-

hard running surface (Miller, 1975).

The high jump and vaulting pits were filled with wood shavings

donated by the Elberta Crate and Box Company. Dump trucks from the

factory would stack the shavings as much as four feet high. This pro-

vided a very soft landing area until the pile compacted. The broad

jump pit was filled with white construction send. All pits were lined

with wooden planks (Miller, 1975).

The most prominent recollection of the track by former athletes

was its isolation and lack of protection from the sun. Ken Jarrett

recalled:

The only shade in the place was off the second curve. There
was only one large oak tree. We gathered around that oak tree
between runs as that was the only shade for us. In 1953, Coach
Miller got the shop to come out and they put up a steel frane
and hung a canvas on top of it. That was the only shelter we
had while on the track. It did get hot, the hottest place I've
ever been--just wide open spaces. (Jarrett, 1975)

The track was located about 300 yards from the dressing facil-











site with the statement, "it was a long way for water!" (Schmalz,

1975).

The barely adequate first track becomes a marvel of yankee

ingenuity when considered in the light of the expertise and equipment

available to the man burdened with the actual task of building it.

Credit must be given to the maintenance and grounds personnel respen-

sible for the track construction. This facility served the needs of

the track -rogram for seven years.

With the track completed and the first home meet rapidly

approaching, a second problem was brought into sharp focus. The lack

of maintenance personnel with knowledge concerning the preparation of

a track for competition worked a hardship on Coach Miller. He had to

train the maintenance staff in the art of lining and measuring the clay

oval and in marking off the sectors and arcs for the shot put, discus,

and javelin. Coach Miller often found himself performing these tasks

to insure their authenticity (Miller, 1975).

The lack of track enthusiasts in the local area made the task

of obtaining meet officials difficult. Through parserverance and hard

work, Coach Miller slowly began the buildup of dedicated followers of

track and field at Florida State University. This point is best exem-

plified by two faculty members--Greg Phifer and Richard Husband. Dr.

Phifer, a former turner at the University of Pacific, officiated the

broad jump, and later the triple jump when that event was added to the

dual meet order of events, since 1951 (Phifer, 1976). A former dis-

taece runner at Dartmouth University, Dr. Husband has been an official

timer and/or finish judge for 24 years (Husband, 1976).


















(Athletic Office Budget File, 1948-1949).

Coach Miller remembers that the money was adequate for purchas-

ing equipment, as there were no recruiting costs or athletic scholar-

ships in 1949. Basic policy of the athletic department, under the

direction of Danford, prohibited the practice of awarding scholarships

for athletic ability.

The athlete shall be treated the same as other students.
There shall be no favoritism shown him and no discriminati n
against him be.-:- i- :_ r; i -% r

of the game. 7. ----; II?~.~ -;..r-r ;i;
from taking part in the sport. Any monetary rewards create
a false sense of values and create situations in which it is
useless to expect significant educational results. In brief,
the university dedicates itself to promotion of the amateur
ideal in sports. (Annual Report, 1947-1948)

This idealistic philosophy soon faced extreme pressure from

alumni, town people, and students who wanted to upgrade the football

program (Talahsse Dmocat 23 January 1949). Grudgingly, in 1951,

the ban against athletic scholarships was rescinded for the football

program (Annual Report, 1950-1951). This concession by the athletic

committee and Danford opened the flood gates for an expanding football

budget and sounded the death knell for Danford's idealistic dream of a

truly amateur sports program that would have no distinction between

major and minor sports (Tallahassee Democrat, 18 August 1948).

Danford's hope was that within a broad spectrum of activities stud ents
















From 1949 to 1953, track athletes were enticed to Florida St;

diversity on the program's merit and the offer of possible parttime

employment. The advent of scholarships in track and field did not

arminate the belief that the program existed for the students. The

rack program was always open to any FSU student who desired to deve:

,is talents. The reputation of the Florida State University track

rogr=m has repeatedly attracted the unsolicited services of many

quality athletes.

The most valuable recruiting aid to the talent discovering

efforts of the coaching staff has always been the help of active and

ormer members of the team. many prospective track athletes have be

wayed to attend FSU by the enthusiastic endorsement of the FSU progl

y Seminole track man.

After the purchase of equipment, the funds available for tra,

ere limited. The method of transportation was strictly limited to

lus and private cars.

Charles Durbin became the athletic department bus driver in

947 and served continuously through the period of this study (Durbii

975). An old bus was purchased secondhand in the spring of 1948.

ge of the bus necessitated frequent repairs as the vintage vehicle

.ad a propensity for breaking down on trips. FSU athletes on various:

eams had the dubious honor of pushing "Old ironsides"--an affection.

te nickname for the first bus--to get it started or moved for

epairs (Durbin, 1975).























































The field events were the strongest Seminole suit as Al Brad-

ford, a former Florida prep champion in the shot put (Miller, 1975),

joined a football contingent of Ed Fox, James May, and Robert Schmalz

to form a solid nucleus of weight men for the team. Bill Rodger, a











the field event entries that comprised the majority of the scoring

punch of the 1949 Seminole traeksters.

The Seminoles were woefully weak in the running events and

especially vulnerable in the sprint and longer distance races. Coach

Miller remembered his first team as willing but not possessing out-

standing talent (Miller, 1975). Unfortunately, the results of the 1949

season bore out his pessimistic evaluation.

The first meet for the fledgling Seminoles occurred on April 7

at home against Mercer College of Macon, Georgia (FSU Track Office

Files, 7 April1949). The meet's opening event, the mile run, pro-

vided an indication of the difficulties facing the Seminoles. The

Mercer distance men swept the mile run with a slow winning time of
5:10.0.

Undaunted by the opening setback, Charles pMihoney cruised to a

:54.8 victory in the 440-yard dash. Thus Mahoney became the first

Seminole to score a track and field victory for the garnet and gold.

Norman Eubanks, an All-Dixie Conference football end (Yeller,

1976), followed Mahoney to the winner's circle by copping the 120-yard

high hurdles with a time of :16.8. Jim Pence captured a valuable third

behind Eubanks.

A put of 38' 6-1/8" by James May was the winning effort in the

shot put and his effort moved Florida State to within four points of

Mercer College after the completionn of four events. The Bears quickly

recaptured their commanding lead by sweeping the 100-yard dash and the

high jump.










12

The young Seminoles refused to quit as they won both the 880-

yard run with George Grosskopf's 2:08.6 clocking and the javelin on the

strong arm of Bill Rodger. Rodger's winning toss was a pleasing effort

of 157' 4-3/4".

The Tribe's victory in the discus, with Rd Fox's throw of 110'

9-1/2", was the last bright spot for the Seminoles until a 3:40.4 effort

by the mile relay quartet of Joe Wells, George Grosskopf, Dave Harden,

and Charles Mahoney brought victory in the concluding event of the day.

The lack of a Seminole sprinter or distance runner was graphi-

cally illustrated by the 35 to 2 advantage enjoyed by Mercer College

in the 100-yard and 220-yard dashes, mile, and two-mile races. The

Bears eventually won the meet 82 to 49--the exact margin they had

carved out in the sprint and distance events.

Florida State won seven out of fifteen events and these made

up the first school records. In an attempt to guarantee the integrity

of school records, Coach Miller instituted a policy that school record.

had to be winning performances. This rule was enacted primarily

because only first place in the running events are usually timed with

more than one stopwatch. The assumption was that timing on the remain-

ing places was subject to wide error. The policy was made all-inclusive

to provide equality of opportunity between the field events and running

events (Miller, 1975).

The Seminoles journeyed to Coral Gables, Florida, for the

second dual meet in their short history. The University of Miami, at

that time a power in southern track and field circles, outclassed the

young Seminoles by a lopsided score of 92 to 34 (FSV Track Office

















Florida State was able to send only three men to the victory

circle. George Grosskopf lowered the school record in the half-mile

to 2:07.8 with his triumph in the two-lap race. He had set the pre-

vious record two weeks earlier against Mercer College.

James ~Lohmeyer's leap of 5' 8" in the high jump garnered the

Tribe its second individual victory and established a new Seminole

record in the process. The broad jump produced the third win of the

day, when John Thomblesou settled into the send 19' 9-1/4" from the

take-off board. Thombleson's school-record setting performance ended

the Seminoles victory efforts for the day.

The Florida State University track team concluded its first

dual meet schedule at home against Mississippi College on May 7 (FSU

Track Office Files, 7 May 1949). The Seminoles engaged the Chootaws on

the west campus red clay track, where Mississippi College's strength

in the running events provided the Choctaws an edge that the Tribe

was never able to overcome.

George Grosskopf was the only Tribe runner able to break the

Chocta's stranglehold on first places in the foot-racimg. Grosskopf

scored his third consecutive dual meet victory in the half-mile, as his

2:05.9 clocking lowered his own school standard for that event.

Sweeps of the top two spots in three field events spearheaded

a Seminole drive that fell just short of victory. Al Bradford c-m

plated the weight double by scoring victories in both the shot put and

discus with school record tosses of 40' 6" and 117' 10-1/2",














performance of 168' 7", while Bradford completed his afternoon's

efforts by capturing second place in the javelin behind Rodger.

Despite shuttling back and forth between the shot put and the

high jump, James May tied the school record with his winning leap of

5' 8" in the high Jump. May finished second behind Al Bradford's

record setting performance in the shot put. The school record holder

in the high jump, James Lohmeyer, added the second place in that event

to the Seminole total.

John Thoublesmn improved his broad jump school record with a

20' 9-1/16" winning effort. Thombleson remembers this effort as "one

of my better jumps" (1975).

Florida State University's efforts in the field events had

pulled the Tribe to within five points with only the mile relay

remaining to be run. The Seminoles' hope for a tie was quickly

snuffed out as Mississippi College sped to a convincing 3:35.9 victory.

The Seminoles concluded their inaugural season by competing in

the First Annual Dixie Conference Championship on May 21 in Macon

(FSU Track Office Files, 21 May 1949). The Tribe finished a very

respectable fourth. The Seminoles amassed 32 5/6 points and finished

ahead of Oglethorpe College and Florida Southern College.

Florida State University was led by victories by Bill Rodger

in the javelin, and Al Bradford in the shot put. Both men set new

school records in registering their winning marks. Rodger broke the

170O-foot barrier in the javelin with his toss of 171' 9-1/2". This

throw was to be the best of his career and a school record which



























































bing a sound beating at the hands at a

track team. H-wvr, the 1950 versic

-a to prove a small southern p- ur

hurricane loss -a the only blemish on

a the year that settled old scores fre




lack of budgetary funds and the no act









16

to inquiries concerning the program and to the encouragement of FSU

students to come out for the team. Despite such restriction, Coach

Miller shored up glaring weaknesses in the sprint and distance events.

He had discovered a superb athlete in Tom Bowman, an ali-round perfor-

mer who was to turn the program around. Bowman had played football the

previous year at the University of Florida, yet wanted to transfer to

a school where he could concentrate on the decathlon. The emerging

track program at Florida State University afforded him the opportunity

to compete in several events on a regular meet basis. Tom Bowman

talked with Dr. Miller and decided to compete his senior year as a

Seminole (Miller, 1975).

Two athletes from Pennsylvania contacted Dr. Miller an the

possibility of obtaining financial help to attend Florida State Univer-

sity. Joe Fracassi and Peter Fraschetti were Erie city champions in

the pole vault and 880-yard run, respectively. Coach Miller was

delighted at the prospect of obtaining the services of two quality

athletes.













them jobs. I tried to get tbem summer jobs in contstruction,




























MLiami on March 28 held little joy for the Seminoles. The Hurricanes

stretched the Seminole losing streak to four with their 91 to 35 defea

of the Tribe (PSU Track Office Files, 28 March 1950).

Florida State University was able to find some solace in the

performances of Duncan, Bradford, and Bowman. Bill Duncan's copping

of the meet-opening mile run with a Seminole record setting clocking o:

4:43.1, and Al Bradford's winning toss of 411 10-1/4" in the shot put

gave the Seminoles some early momentum. However, the Tribe failed to

win again until Tom Bowman's burning :24.5 victory inthe 220-yard low

hurdles. His triumph was the first ever for a Seminole in the low

hurdles. B-~a wound up being the leading point getter for FSU with


team as they swept to their first dua3

history of the track program (FSU Trac

The friendly west campus oval

as the Seminoles romped to a 89 1/3 tc

the record parade by clipping two-tent


. meet victory in the short

k Office Files, 1 April 1950).

yielded seven new school records

1412/3 win. Tom Bowman began

hes of a second off the old










18

120-yard high hurdle record with a mark of :16.6. Richard Mize con-

tinued the march by slicing a whopping two and two-tenths seconds off

of the 440-yard dash school standard, lowering the record to :52.6

It was now Tom Bowcan's turn again as the speedster returned to

the track in the 100-yard dash. B-wa's victory dash lasted only 10.1

seconds as he became the first Seminole to ever win a sprint race.

Running in only his second race as a Seminole, Peter Fraschetti

garnered the 880-yard run and the school record as he lowered the stan-

dard to 2:05.2. Fraschetti's victory completed a string of four con-

secutive school record setting performances on the track.

The Tribe field eventmen were not without their record break--

.r.. Tom Bowman and J-ms May combined to tie for first place in the

high jump with a new school record height of 5' 10".

The pole vault was the scene of the sixth school record as

William Weigel sailed over 10' 6". The story of Bill Weigel as a pole

vaulter is an interesting one. Dr. Miller reconstructed the circum-

stances surrounding Weigel's normal meet entry:





L.: _11 4e-;I.~-.-.-











scored-and sometimes won. His importance, though, was in his



never a champion pole vaulter or runner, but as an "athlete"
he was a real champion in my mind. (Miller, 1975)

The mile relay foursons, of Fraschetti, Stafford, Weigel, and

Mize closed out the historic afternoon in record setting fashion as

four Seminoles romped to victory in 3:42.3.

Florida State University entered the Southern Relays on

April 8 in Birmingham. A fourth place finish by the 880-yard relay

foursome of David Harde~n, Harry Bringger, Frank Pearson, and Charles

Mahoney was the only Seminole place in the meet (TlahseeDmor

9 April 1950).

The Florida State University tracksters journeyed to Atlanta

on April 15 in search of their second dual meet victory. The Semino

made their sojourn a success by crushing Emory University 100 1/3 to

30 2/3 (PSU Track Office Files, 15 April 1950).

Tom Bowman almost outscored the entire Emory team as he gar-

nered 26 points by capturing four events and finishing second in two

more. He set two school records and tied a third. His record perfo

mances were a :16.1 clocking in the 120-yard high hurdles and a 21'

11-3/4" leap in the broad jump. Bowman equalled his own school

record in the 100-yarci dash by flashing to victory in :10.1. He

added seconds in both the high jump and j avelin.

Bill Duncan scored a distance double, and his 10:42.1 mark i

the two-mile run established a new Seminole record. The shot put an

discus titles fell to kl Bradford, as his all-time personal best

throw of 125' 2-1/2" broke his own existing school discus mark by ov











20

seven feet. Joe Fracassi shattered Willi=m Weigel's pole vault record

by a full foot when he soared 11' 6" on his winning effort. Florida

State University's mile relay, consisting of Mahoney, Stafford, Pear-

son, and Fraschetti, raced to a new school record of 3:39.1 which

ended the competition as it had begun--with a Seminole victory.

April 29 saw the Seminole track team competing away from home

for the second consecutive week. FSU was trying to make Florida

Southern College their third dual meet victim in a raw (ISO Track

Office Files, 29 April 1950).

Bill Duncan and Peter Fraschetti got the momentum flowing the

Seminole way as they copped the two top spots in the mile run. For the

third time in the young season, Duncan lowered the school record for

the mile run with a time of 4:34.2.

Tom Bowman kept the pressure on by copping the first of his

three wins of the day with a blazing, wind-aided :15.1 in the 120-yard

high hurdles. Alternating between the track and the high jump area,

Bowman carved out victories in the 100-yard dash and high jump with

school record tying performances of :10.1 and 5' 10", respectively.

Re finished the day with 19 individual points. Coming off a second

place effort in the mile run, Pete Fraschetti lowered the school record

in the 880-yacd run as he ran to a 2:04.7 triumph.

The Seminoles, led by Al Bradford's weight double, swept five

of six field events and shared the top spot in the other. Bill Rodger

was tops in the i avelin while John Thambleson captured the broad jump

win. Joe Fracassi and Bill Weigel shared the top spot in the pole

vault at 11' 0" with Warner of Florida Southern College. In winning









21

12 of 14 events, the Seminole strength proved too formidable as the

Tribe rolled over Florida Southern College 86 to 40.

The search for victory number four took the Tribe to Clinton,

Mississippi, on May 6. The Seminoles evened their series with Missis-

sippi College at one victory apiece with a convincing 75 1/2 to 55 1/2

triumph (FSU Track Office Files, 6 May 1950).

Florida State University was paced by the school record per-

formances, of Pete Fraschatti and Joe Fracassi. Fraschetti had only

three events int-mveing his third place finish in the mile run and his

school record 2:02.0 winning effort in the 880-yard run. The second

Seminole record of the day was set in the pole vault. With the bar

resting at 11' 9", freshman Joe Fracassi tasted victory for the third

time during the 1950 season.

Tom Bowman and Al Bradford did yeoman duty as they combined to

score 29 points. Bowman registered victories in the 100-yard dash and

the 220-yard low hurdles, and finished second in the shot put, high

jump, and the broad jamp. Al Bradford completed the weightman's

double with victories in the shot put and discus throws. It was the

third time in five meets that the Tallahassee senior had accomplished

that feat.

With the meet safely tucked away, the mile relay of Fr-as-

obetti, Mahoney, Pearson, and Mize added the finishing touches by

winning the event and shattered the school mark in the process. Their

aggregate time of 3:32.8 was three and one-tenth seconds under the

old mark.
















A heavy rain shower just prior to the meet did not dampen the Tribe's

enthusiasm for the fray. The Tribe outscored their adversaries eight

to one in the meet opening mile run and the rout was on. Before the

mile relay was mercifully cancelled, PSU had won every event and run

up a 109 to 17 advantage (Tallahassee Democrat, 14 May 1950).

Tom Bowman outstripped the entire Howard College team with his

combined point total of 28. The decathalete won the 100-yard dash,

:10.0; 22G-yard dash, :22.2 ;220-yard low hurdles, :24.5; high jump,

5' 7"; and finished second in the shot, put. His efforts in the 100-

and 220-yard dashes were new school records and his time in the low

hurdles equalled his own school standard set in the first meet of the

season against the University of Miami.

With only competition from teammates to motivate them, Richard

Mize and Bill Duncan drove to school record performance in the 440-

yard dash and two-mile run, respectively. Mize burned the oval in

:52.3 seconds for the quarter-mile victory. On the other hand, Duncan

seemed to toil effortlessly around eight laps of the track to 1 owe r his

own existing school record by 10.4 seconds to 10:31.7. The Florida

State University Seminoles boarded the bus secure in the knowledge that

they were ready for the challenge awaiting them the following week at

the Dixie Conference Championship (Miller, 1976).

The Seminoles journeyed to Macon, Georgia, on May 20 to coc,

pace in the second running of the Dixie Conference Championship. FSU

combined outstanding individual effort with overall team depth to pull
















Tom Bowman headed the list of individual stars by scoring 20

3/4 points and edged Bob Reeder of Mercer College for high point man of

the meet (Tallahassee Democrat, 21 May 1950). First place winners for

the Seminoles included Joe Fracassi in the pole vault, 11' 6"; Dick

Mize in the 440-yard dash, :52.6; Tom Bowmat, in the 120-yard high hur-

dles, :15.9; Pete Fraschetti in the half-mile, 2:02.7; and Al Bradford's

school record in the shot put of 42' 9-5/8". Only Dick Mize's time of

:52.2 in the quarter-mile was not a new D~ixie Conference record

(Tallahassee Democrat 21 May 1950).

Florida State had accumulated enough points by the mile relay

to be assured of victory. However, the Seminole quartet of Mahoney,

Mize, Pearson, and Bowman was not content to let the season end quietly.

The school record-shattering-performance lasted only 3:31.6 and wound

up the most successful season in Florida State University's two-year

track history.

Tom Bowman added more honors to the school and himself when he

traveled to Tulare, California, on July I for the National Decathlon

Championship. Competing against the best all-round athletes in the

country, he finished seventh scoring 6417 points (FSU Track Office

Files, 1 July 1950).

Summary. The Seminoles had raced to a 6-1 dual meet record

with its only loss coming at the hands of the powerful Miami Hurricanes

in the season's opener. FSU had concluded the season on a very posi-

tive note with a satisfying triumph in the Dixie Conference Championship










24

meet. A fantastic achievement for team winless in 1949 and only in

its second year of track and field competition. School records were

broken 31 times and a new standard was eventually set in every event

except the javelin.

The year 1950 marked the end of Tom Bowcan's track career at

Florida State University. Bowman ran at FSU for only one year, yet he

rewrote the record book in five individual events and anchored the

school record setting mile relay team. He personally accounted for

142 1/4 points in that single season! Despite expanding schedules, his

season point record still stands at this writing, 24 years later.

Bowm~an scored 28 points against Howard College on May 13, 1950, and

that, too, is a single meet scoring record coma ining unbroken in 1974.

Tom Bowman was truly the first great athlete to perform in track and

field at Florida State University.


1951

The young Seminole track squad faced the 1951 campaign confit

dently despite the loss of three men who were instrumental in the

extraordinary success of the 1950 season. Tom Bowman school record

holder in seven events and the single season point leader had exited

via graduation. The unexpected departure from school of freshman dis-

tance running sensation Bill Duncan left a void in the mile and two-

mile runs that just had to be filled. The graduation of weightman Al

Bradford robbed the Seminoles of an inspirational leader and school

record holder in two events.











25

A total track budget of only $3,500 (Athletic Offic Budget

File, 1950-1951), did not allow Coach Miller the opportunity to recruit

except by mail. However, fate took a hand and steered three young men

to Florida State University. John Poston, Elwood Parker, and James

Arnold were newcomers to the track team, and subsequently played a

prominent role in fashioning a successful season.

Elwood Parker's path to Florida State University was typical

of many track athletes attending FSU in the early years.

In high school, while I did perform wall, I was not what










After several weeks of practicing in relative obscurity, Coach

Miller suggested that Parker change his event from the sprints to the

quarter-mile. This was no event that Parker had run only once in high

school (Parker, 1975), yet the change was made and time would show

this decision to be an astute coaching move.

John Poston was a walk-on sprint candidate from Jacksonville,

Florida. He had never run track in high school, although he had

served as the student m-agler for his team (Miller, 1975). Poston's

first competitive running experiences were in military service pro-

grams. Coach Miller could never understand how Poston's talent could

have been overlooked in high school.

He had been a manager of his high school track team.

















I E I I I .-I~







a bay with those characteristics-- whatever his age level--I
couldn't wait to get him out to a level stretch of ground and
time him over 50 yards.


1P. 1-- 1 f. 1. :?lii;;




he knew, and everyone else knew, that he was a pretty good
sprinter. I've often wondered what those lost two or three





Fortune continued to deal Coach Miller good athletes in the

form of two football players. A freshman two-miler by the name of

James Arnold was what the program needed to replace the departed Bil

Duncan, and I=m Sebring improved the outlook in the weight events.

The return of school record holders Peter Fraschetti and

Richard Mize in the 880- and 440-yard runs made the flat races very

strong for the Tribe. Joseph Fracassi and William Rodger headed a

strong field event group that appeared solid and reliable.

The 1951 edition of the Florida State University track team

was characterized by a number of quality athletes ; yet, it had some

events that were manned by personnel not tested in the heat of compE

tion. The maturation of its talented newcomers was a prerequisite f













--- ins m upcoming season opener against Duke University would

provide the Seminoles with a severe test of their mettle.

The Doke Blue Devils, an Atlantic Coast Conference powerhouse,

severed the Tribe's five-dual-meet winning streak by the embarrassing

margin of 103 to 28 (FSU Track Office Files, 28 March 1951).

School record marks by Joe Fracassi in the pole vault and Tom

Sebring in the discus were the only victories that the FSU squad could

manage. Fracassi became the first Seminole to ever clear the 12-foot

barrier in the pole suilt with his winning jump of 12 feet even. In

his first track appearance as a Seminole, I=m Sebring hurled the dis-

cus almost 10 feet further than any previous Tribe discus thrower,

with a throw of 135' 1-3/4".

FSU demonstrated resiliency by bouncing back against Dixie Con-

ference opponent Mercer College. Coach Miller rallied his charges

after only three days rest to pound out a 80 2/3 to 50 1/3 triumph in

Macon, Georgia (FSU Track Files, 31 March 1951). The Seminoles were

not especially sharp, but did manage to capture eight out of nine

running events, losing only the two-mile run.

The Seminole effort on the track was highlighted by John

Poston's :23.7 clocking in the 220-yard dash. The Jacksonville junior

had turned the furlong in the second fastest time in Florida State

University track history.

The best individual effort in the meet for the Seminoles was

Joe Fracassi's jump of 12 feet even in the pole vault. He tied his

own school record set only three days previously in the Duke Univer-

sity meet. The Seminole victory hinged on four events as the Tribe













































John Poston became the first Seminole to ever crack the 10-

second barrier in the 100-yard dash. The Jacksonville speedster

turned-in an impressive :09.8 clocking. He later wron the 220-yard dash

and ran the lead-off leg no the meet concluding mile relay. Freshman

Woody Parker dipped under 52 seconds in the quarter-mile as his fluid

strides carried him to a school and track record setting victory in

:51.6 seconds (Tallahassee Democrat, 22 April 1951).

The victories by Alan Carter in the 220-yard low hurdles, :25.5;

James Seagra in the broad jump, 21' 6-1/2"; and James Arnold in the

two-mile run, 10:29.4; were indicative of the improvement being made by

the young Tribe harriers. James Arnold's twa-mile time improved the

previous school mark bv one and nine-tenths seconds. Thirtv-seven and










29

one-half of the 80 1/3 points totaled by the Seminoles were scored by

freshmen.

The Seminoles trailed Davidson College by 14 1/6 points with

only five events remaining, yet overcome this deficit and led going

into the mile relay by five and one-sixth points (Tallahassee Democrat,

22 April 1951). The Seminole's surge had mathematically assured them

of victory, but the Tribe entered the mile relay with the strongest

quartet they could master, Each man had figured prominently in the

scoring prior to the relay and they were once again being called to the

track. The foursome of Poston, Fraschotti, Parker, and Mize shook off

their fatigue and responded with a 3:40.3 triumph. The Seminoles had

earned a hard fought 80 1/3 to 73 1/6 conquest of Davidson College as

Emory University trailed with a meager 8 1/2 points.

The Seminoles coasted to their fourth straight victory with a

82 1/2 to 48 1/2 pasting of old rival Mississippi College in Tallahas-

see on May 5 (FSU Track Office Files, 5 May 1951). The Seminoles began

slowly as Mississippi College captured the top two spots in the mile

run and came right back in the next event to cop first place in the

high hurdles. However, Florida State University completely dominated

the field events and eventually won all six field events.

Joe Fracassi scaled 12' 7" in the pule vault to finish first,

while raising his own school record. His attempt to become the first

Seminole to clear 13 feet narrowly failed as the bar quivered and

finally fell off on his third and final attempt at that height

(Tallahassee Democrat, 6 May 1951).













A personal best of 21' 6" for John Thombleson earned him the

winner's position in the broad j ump. This was the first win for the

Jacksonville junior since the meet with Florida Southern College on

April 29, 1950. Tom Sebring's creditable toss of 129 feet earned a

victory in the discus.

Overcoming a poor start, John Poston slipped under ten seconds

in the 100-yard dash for the second consecutive week with a quick :09.9.

The Jacksonville flier was off with the gun in the 220-yard dash and

lopped six-tenths of a second off of Tom Bowman's old school mark,

with a :21.6 clocking.

The quarter-mile had been billed in premeet publicity as the

feature race of the day (Tallahassee Democrat, 6 May 1951). The race

matched FSU's veteran Dick Mize against his freshman teammate Woody

Parker. As so often happens in important races, this match developed

into a test of strategy. Parker's stretch drive carried him to a

thrilling one yard victory; however, the winning time was a disappoint-

ing :53.0.

Florida State University closed out its dual meet schedule on

May 12 as it breezed to an easy 85 to 46 triumph over outmanned Howard

College (FSU Track Office Files, 12 May 1951). FSU was never in any

difficulty as they gathered 47 out of a possible 54 points in the

field events.

Coach Miller entered many of his men out of their specialties.

The only noteworthy performance was a school-record-tying :09.8 effort

in the 100-yard dash by John Poston. This was the first meet in 1951

that FSU did not set a track record (Tallahassee Democrat, 13 May 1951).









31

Florida State University traveled to Clinton, Mississippi, on

May 19 determined to successfully defend their Dixie Conference crown.

Nevertheless, Coach Miller had figured the competition to be close

(Miller, 1976). As predicted, the meet was a three-way battle for the

crown that began with the opening mile run and was not ended until the

baton had been carried across the finish line in the mile relay.

FSU prevailed as they eked out a seven-point victory over

runner-up Mercer College (FSU Track Office Files, 19 May 1951). The

Mississippi Southern Choetaws, finished third only 14 1/2 points behind

the Seminoles.

The Florida State Seminoles cracked five conference marks and

tied another (TalaaseeDeocat 20 May 1951) on the way to their

second consecutive Dixie Conference championship. John Poston swept

the 100- and 220-yard dashes with conference record setting perfor-

mances of :10.0 and :22.3, respectively. Woody Parker responded to the

big meet competition with a school and conference record performance of

:50.6 in the one lap event. On the strength of his sterling perfor-

mance in the quarter-mile, Parker was named as the outstanding athlete

of the meet (Tallahassee Democrat, 20 May 1951). Woody Parker recalls

how it felt to win that race.





J


The remaining conference records set by the Seminoles were in

the field events. Tom Sebring tossed the discus 128' 4" and Joe

Fracassi negotiated 11' 6" in the pole vault.









32

Florida State University maintained a fragile lead throughout

most of the competition. With only the mile relay remaining, the

Seminole bulge stood at five points over Mercer College (Tallahassee

Democrat, 20 May 1951.

Competing in his third event of the day, John Poston led off

the mile relay. By the time the baton had passed from Poston to Par-

ker, then to Pearson, and on to anchorman Mize, the Seminoles were

mile relay and Dixie Conference champions. The elapsed time of 3:29.9

lowered the FSU and Dixie Conference mark by one and seven-tenths

seconds (Tallahassee Dem~ocrat, 20 May 1951).

Summary. The year had begum, with high hopes of promising nev-

comers filling the gaps left by the graduation of Tom Bowman and Al

Bradford and the unexpected departure of freshman distance runner Bill

Duncan. The emergence of John Poston into sprinting prominence and the

steady quarter-mile work of Woody Parker provided the drive necessary

for the 1951 Seminoles thinclads to duplicate the previous year's 5-1

dual meet record and repeat as Dixie Conference champions.

The record board ordervent major revision as seven individual

event marks and the mile relay standard fell by the wayside. John

Poston led the charge by erasing the 100- and 220-yard dash marks as

he sped to a :09.8 clocking in the hundred and a quick :21.6 in the

furlong. In addition, Poston ran the lead-off leg on the mile relay

team that reduced the school and Dixie Conference records to 3:29.9.

Woody Parker, Frank Pearson, and Richard Mize teamed up with Poston on

the record shattering mile relay. Parker established a record of his

own in the 440-yard dash with an impressive :50.6 clocking in the Dixie


































Coach Ken Miller's 1952 edition of Seminole track promised to

be the best of his four-year stint as head coach of the Florida Star.

University track progg.=. With the exception of James Arnold, the

nucleus of the 1951 Seminole track team was returning. The premature

departure of Arnold would hurt the Tribe. In addition to senior Ed

Kucera, first year man Bill Wagoner and Ken Jarrett would be called

upon to fill the void left by the departed school record-holder in the

two-mile run.

Carlos Fraundorfer, the most unlikely weight man ever to com-

pate for Florida State University, made his appearance an the Tribe

track scene. Fraundorfer packed only 175 pounds on his lean 6' 3"

frame. He depended upon exceptional quickness and power to propel the

weight implements. Fraundorfer also used these exceptional talents to

excel in the high jump, broad jump, sprints, and an occasional 440-yard

lap on the mile relay team. Max Watson, the 1951 team captain, had









34

exited via graduation leaving his hurdle replacement, Julian Hurst, to

shore up a weakness in the hurdle events.

The Seminoles had all the ingredients for a highly successful

season, covering all of the events well and having talent at the top.

The Dixie Conference had folded during the off-season (Biennial

Report, 1950-1952) and the Seminoles were forced to seek new challen-

ges. The schedule was mixed with old opponents and some new teams .

Coach Miller was slowly introducing his team to stiffer competition.

The recipe was obviously working, as the Tribe had copped 10 of their

last 12 dual meets after going winless in their inaugural season.

The Florida State University Seminoles opened the 1952 campaign

with an indoor excursion to Chapel Hill, North Carolina, on March 1

(FSU Track Office Files, I March 1952). The occasion was the Atlantic

Coast Conference Indoor Championship. FSU landed only two places. The

mile relay team composed of Woody Parker, Dick Slade, Richard Mize, and

John Poston finished second behind the foursome fielded by the Univer-

sity of Alabama. Meanwhile, Carlos Fraundorfer scored the first points

of his athletic career at FSU with his second place finish in the shot

put throwing a respectable 40' 4-1/2".

The Seminoles did not have another meet until the Florida Relays

in Gainesville on March 29 (FSU Track Office Files, 29 March 1952).

The prestigious relays proved tough competition for the Tribe. The

Seminoles managed to place in only three events. The sprint medley

relay composed of Woody Parker, Richard Mize, John Poston, and Bill

Wagoner finished behind powerful D~uke and Loyola Universities and just

ahead of Florida. John Poston captured the fourth place slot in the









35

100-yard dash, while Joe Fracassi grabbed off third ". the pole



-t*The Seminoles opened the dual meet schedule against David-o

College on April 5 in D~avidson, North Carolina. FSU built an early

lead and then held on for a 72 1/3 to 58 2/3 triumph over Davadson

College (FSU Track Office Files, 5 April 1952).

Coach Miller received a glimpse of the quality athlete he had

in freshman Carlos Fraundorfer. The slender Tampa freshman bounded

21' 3" in the broad jump for the first of his three wins of the day.

A toss of 1301 2" in the discus, and a school-record tying leap of 5'

10" in the high jump netted him top honors in both events. A second in

the shot put drove his individual point total for the day to a very

creditable 18 points.

John Poston and Bill Wagoner each captured two events that

sparked an opening Seminole spurt as the team grabbed off the first

five running events. Bill Wagoner showed his potential as he success-

fully completed the difficult mile and half-mile double. He was

clocked at 4:41.5 and 2:03.5, respectively. Wagoner's 880-yard run

time ranked him second on the all-time list for Sei..ole half-milers.

John Poston dipped under :10.0 with his winning time of :09.9 in the

100-yard dash. He turned the furlong in a sharp :22.2 and anchored the

victorious Tribe mile relay with a sparkling split time of :50.1.

With their six-dual-meet-winning-streak on the line, the

Seminoles opened at home against Loyola University of New Orleans.

That streak came to a halt as FSU came out on the short end of a 79 to

59 score (FSU Track Office Files, 12 April 1952).












The Seminoles got double wins from Poston and Wagoner, but the

only other Seminoles to corral a first in any event were Carlos

Fraundorfer and Baker King. Poston gained a measure of revenge over

Leithman, the 1952 Florida Relays sprint champion, when he spun-out

:10.0 and :21.9 victories in the 100- and 220-yard dashes. Bill

Wagoner continued his ironman. role by duplicating his mile/half-mile

twin victories in the Davidson College encounter with times of 4:36.8

and 2:06.5, respectively.

Only two and three-fourths inches separated Carlos Fraundorfer

from the school record when he traversed 21' 9" for his triumph in the

broad jump. Baker King western-rolled over 5' 10" to take first place

in the jump and become the fifth Seminole to clear that height.

The Seminoles returned to the winning path with their third

victory in as many years over Mercer College. The meet -as contested

in Tallahassee on April 19 (FSU Track Office Files, 19 April 1952).

The Seminoles were sparked to their 78 1/2 to 52 1/2 triumph

by twin record-setting victories by Carlos Fraundorfar. The Tampa

weightman wrote his name onto the record books with throws of 44' 1/4"

and 135' 4" in the shot put and discus, respectively.

John Poston dipped under the magic ten-second mark for the

fifth time with his victory snatching time of :09.9 in the 100-yard

dash. The Jacksonville senior blazed to victory down the long 220-

yard clay straightaway before the home crowd with a new school record

mark of :21.5. Poston came back in the final event to team with Jack

Koonce, Peter Nimkoff, and Dick Mize to blitz the school record by

burning through the mile relay in 3:27.0.






































Likeable senior Ed Kucer4

carved out a 10:43.0 victory in I

first career victory after four:

State University. Teammate Ken

race, -a especially pleased thai

had finally tasted the thrill of

Tom Sebring was nipped b,






















( i~ i rI-, 1--.'

' total team performance gained the Florida State University

Seminoles a hard earned 66 1/2 to 59 victory over Georgia Tech as the

University of Georgia finished third with 45 1/2 points.

On May 3, FSU piled lot. the boa bound for Clinton, Mississippi,

to renew an old rivalry with Mississippi College (FSU Track Office

Files, 3 May 1952).

Confident of his tean's strength, Coach Miller shook up his

lineup. He matched sprint sensation John Poston against quarter-mil.

school record-holder Woody Parker in the one lap race. Parker edged

Poston in the stretch for first with a :50.5 to Poston's :50.6

(Tallahassee Democrat, 4 May 1952). However, Poston turned the tables

in the furlong with a :21.7 victory leaving Parker with a creditable

:22.5 second place finish.

Carlos Fraundorfer upped his school mark in the shot put with

his victory toss of 44' 5-3/4". It as a 16-point day for the versatile

performer as he copped the shot put, broad jump, discus, and added a

third in the 100-yard dash to his total. Bill Wagoner was given the

opportunity to run fresh in the half-mile and responded with a 2:01.5

FSU record setting performance.

The Seminoles strolled to a 86 to 45 win over Mississippi

Coll-ge. The Tribe did not have I-n to eniov their victory. however,


















The much heralded and long w

of Florida State and the Miami Hurrici

west campus red clay oval in Tallahas!

1952). The first two encounters had

the fledgling Seminoles, but the Trib,


.ted meeting between the Seminoll

kes took place on May 10 on the

e (Tallahassee Democrat, 11 May

!sulted in crushing defeats for

had perservered and were now


trailing at 85 yards. Then Poston unleashed a furiouE

that carried him to a narrow victory. The watches reV

tacular new track and school record time of :09.6. TI

duel continued in the 220-yard dash. FSU's sprint seT

the way to crush his Miami opponent with a magnificent

In doing so, Poston had established another track and

Coach Ken Miller felt that his sprint star could have

sprinter in the country over 220 yards on that partict










40

the 440-yard dash with a new track record of :50.7. Parker's triumph

kept him undefeated in 1952 dual meet competition.

The Seminoles split the field events down the middle with the

Hurricanes. Carlos Fraundorfer gathered the first Seminole field event

victory by hurling the shot 43' 5-5/8". Baker King threw his body over

the bar resting at 5' 7-3/4" in the high jump for a first place finish.

School record holder Joe Fracassi closed out his successful year in

fitting style. The Brie, Pennsylvania, junior captured his specialty

with a vault of 12' 6", only one inch short of his school mark.

Florida State led Miami 63 2/3 to 62 1/3 going into the mile

relay. The pressure was on the quartet of Jack Koonce, Richard Mize,

Woody Parker, and John Poston. The Hurricanes held a slight lead after

the competitive first leg. Dick Mize trailed his man until the middle

of the final turn when a quick burst propelled him into the lead.

Parker maintained the advantage in the third leg and a sterling :50.2

anchor leg by John Poston sealed the mile relay and meet for the Sem-

incles. The Tribe foursome had hustled through the mile in 3:28.5 to

earn the last five points for a 68 2/3 to 62 1/3 triumph over the Miami

Hurricanes. Coach Miller summed it all up by saying, "they had not

expected to lose to us" (Miller, 1975).

The Seminoles left for the Georgia AAU on May 23 and almost

never made it. Charles Durbin was wheeling the Seminole bus down a

hill on Highway 19-41 between Ellaville and Butler. When the bus

reached the bottom of the hill, the right front axle snapped. Durbin

described the bump as being just "a little up and down--wasn't a rough

bump at all" (Durbin, 1975). The left front wheel flipped around

















aboard from almost certain immolation (Durbin, 1975).

Fortunately, the road had rain gutters on both sides. The

first lurch threw Durbin completely out of the driver's seat. However,

he was able to retain his grasp on the wheel, and when the bus rico-

cheted off the rain gutter, Durbin .-naged to regain his seat (Durbin,

1975). The rain gutters and Durbin's driving skill kept the bus on the

road until most of its velocity had been dissipated. The bus finally

left the road and without turning over, came to rest in a grove of

trees. The bus had traveled 175 yards before coming to rest (Talla-

basses Democrat, 24 May 1952).

Smoke from the pinned tire filled the interior as Durbin hus-

tled people off the bus. A last minute check by Durbin discovered a

distance runner, who had been sleeping, groping around in the smoke

looking for his shoes (Durbin, 1975).

Woody Parker marvelled at Durbin's driving ability. "How that

bus driver was able to keep that bus from completely turning over, I'll

never knew. I tell you one thing--that really shook some people up"

'1115),

Coach e.n Miller chartered a Greyhound bus and continued on to

Atlanta (Miller, 1975). The accident appeared to be an evil =aen a. the

Seminoles finished a distant fourth (Atlanta Constitution, 25 May 1952).













100-yard dash and second in the furlong. Both events were captured b

the Southeastern Conference sprint champion, Jackie Creel of Auburn.

The only bright spot far the Seminoles occurred in the final

event. The Tribe mile relay team of Harvey Heagerty, Dick Mize, John

Poston, and Woody Parker sprinted to a sensational 3:22.4 clocking.

They lopped four and six-tenths seconds off the existing school record


John Poston made the Seminole's

son national competition on June 6 and

competed in the National Intercollegiatl




















the 220-yard dash.

Summary. The completion of every season brings to an end the

collegiate track careers of a portion of the team. The year 1952 was

no exception as it tolled the and of John Poston's distinguished track

career at FSU. His flashing spikes had carried him to two individual

school records and had anchored two school record setting relay efforts.

Coach Miller described him as "a man ahead of his time"

(Miller, 1975). His records stand as proof of the statement. Poston'.

:09.6 clocking in the 100-yard dash against the Miami Hurricanes stood

unbroken for 13 years. The Jacksonville sprinter covered the furlong

in the same Miami meet in :20.8. No Seminole sprinter was to touch

that record until the 1960 season. Both times were run on the same hot

May afternoon, after which Poston was still able to anchor the crucial

mile relay to victory with a superlative :50.2 split. John Poston was

definitely a sprinter ahead of his time at Florida State University.

A quiet and dedicated distance runner was hanging up his spikes

at the conclusion of the 1952 season. Senior Ed Kucera was not a man

blessed with striking talents as a runner; yet, his determination and

willingness to sacrifice made him invaluable to the team (Jarrett,

1975). The endless days of practice paid dividends on April 26 when













da State University's 1952 track team rewrc

s. Poston contributed his 100- and 220-yat

th Harvey Heagerty, Richard Mize, and Wood3

,ool mark in the mile relay by seven and nir

a fine 3:22.4 effort. The foursome of Woot

Harvey Heagerty, and John Poston composed t

established the first school record in that

9 in the University of Georgia-Georgia Tect

26.

edition to his middle leg on the school recc

arlos Fraundorfer set two new school marks

The Tampa freshman blitzed At Bradford's fc

a put of 44' 5-3/4", and eased out To. Set

discus by three and one-quarter inches wit











45

encounters and running their collective dual meet record to 16

and 6.



1953

Coach Ken Miller and his Seminole thinclads faced the 1953

campaign without the services of standout sprinter John Poston. For

two years, the slender Jacksonville jackrabbit had consistently handled

opposing sprinters, and provided the strong anchor leg so necessary for

success in the sprint relay races.

Recruiting was light, hot the Seminoles did land a promising

hurdler in Weston Minton. Despite a dearth of newcomers, Coach Miller

was confidently awaiting the onset of the new season. His optimism was

created by the quality of returning letterman .

Heading the impressive list of returning veterans was sophomore

Carlos Fraundorfer. Fraundorfer -a the 1952 high point getter and

holder of the school record in the shot put and discus. Joe Frocassi,

an Erie, Pennsylvania senior, had one more season to put together the

elusive 13-foot jump in the pole vault.

The Seminoles were loaded in the middle distance events. Woody

Parker, the first Seminole to run order the 50-second mark in the 440-

yard dash was returning for his junior season. The mile and half-mil.

races were in the capable hands of Bill Wagoner. In 1952, Wagoner had

won both events in four of the five meets in which he attempted the

mile/half-mile double. In the final dual meet of the 1952 season, the

talented middle distance runner ran only the half-mile, setting a new

school record with a 2:01.5 clocking. The joys and triumphs of the









46

1952 season were now past and the Seminoles readied themselves for the

upcoming campaign.

Florida State University began the 1953 track season with the

10th Annual Florida R~elays in Gainesville on March 28 (Tallaha-se

Democrat, 27 March 1953). The Seminoles were unable to win many places,

but the quality of performance was excellent.

Carlos Fraundorfer unleashed a school record toss of 140' 9-3/4"

on his first throw in the discus competition. His superlative effort

earned him third place. Joe Fracassi increased his own school record

in the pole vault to 12' S" to capture a tie for second place.

Disaster stalked the Tribe in the sprint medley relay. Woody

Parker ran the lead-off quarter-mile in an awesome :48.4, only to watch

helplessly as a teammate later dropped the batou. The Seminoles were

disqualified, and Parker's courageous effort want for nought; however,

there was little doubt that Parker was ready to run.

Florida State began the 1953 dual meet season in grand style by

crushing Mercer College 85 1/3 to 45 2/3. The meet was staged on the

west campus track in Tallahassee on April 4 (FSU Track Office File,

4 April 1953). The Mercer Bears started the meet by taking the mile

run, yet after that event only the high j ump, evaded the grasp of the

overpowering Seminoles.

Carlos Fraundurfer tightened his grip on the shot put school

record by exploding the iron ball 45' 1", and then added the broad jump

to his school record cache by copping that event with a leap of 22'

3-1/2". He won the j avelin and discus throws with efforts of 165' 1"

and 140' 4-1/2", respectively. Fraundorfer also ran the second leg on










47

the victorious mile relay. He finished the day with five victories,

two school records, and 21 1/4 points.

Joe Fracassi rose to a 12' 10" personal best in the pole vault

to register both a victory and a new school mark. Scoring in his first

meet as a Seminole, Wes Minton made his home debut a success by cap-

turing both hurdle races with times of :15.7 and :25.0. Both times

ranked second on the Florida State all-time best performance list.

Florida State University met their counterparts from the Univer-

sity of Florida in the Florida AAU Championships an April 18 in Gaines-

ville (FSU Track Office Files, 18 April 1953). The Seminoles were

swamped by the Gators in what turned out to be a dual meet between the

two state universities. The Florida Gators dominated the competition

with 165 points while the Seminoles trailed far behind in second with

only 26 markers. Jacksonville Naval Air Station finished third with

12 points and the Pensacola Marine Base rounded out the field in fourth

with 5 points.

Florida State University did not win a single event, compiling

most of their points with second place finishes by Carlos Fraundorfer

in the shot put and broad jump, Woody Parker in the quarter-mile, Wes

Minton in the 220-yard low hurdles, and Bill Wagoner in the 880-yard

run.

The Seminoles shook off the embarrassing memory of the Florida

AAU by their second consecutive triangular meet win over the University

of Georgia and Georgia Tech in Athens on April 25 (FSU Track Office

Files, 25 April 1953). The Seminoles extended their 1953 dual meet

winning streak to three as they rode the swift legs of Woody Parker






















j avelin 159' 0", catapulting the shot 41' 10-1/2", and flinging the

discus 138' 7-1/2". He completed his day's work by finishing second to

reamerst Woody Parker in the broad jump.

The busy day of Woody Parker began with the anchor leg of FSU'a

second-place-finishing 440-yard relay, ending with a 440-yard anchor

leg on the winning mile relay. John Kulzer, Robert Jones, and Jack

Koonce preceded Parker in the mile relay that ran up a sterling 3:28.8

clocking.

On a whim, Parker petitioned Coach Miller to enter him in the

broad jump. With Lbeapproval of the opposing coaches, Miller was able

to make Parker a last minute entry. The event had already begun, when

on his first jump without warm-up, Parker covered 22' 0" for the best

jump of the competition (Parker, 1975).

Woody Parker r ewtote the FSU quarter-mile mark by flashing to

victory with a :49.5 clocking. Parker was pleased with his performance

but had been unaware of the quality of his effort.





have run a good quarter, but are disappointed when you get your
time. On the other hand, there are races where you don't feel
you have really performed your best and the time was out-
standing. (Parker, 1975)

The Loyola Jesuits duplicated their 1952 defeat of FSUI by trim-










49

3 May 1953). Florida State copped five of nine running events, hot

were overpowered in the field events. Joe Fracassi cleared 12' 6"

for the only Seminole victory in the six field events.

The day was not without its Seminole star. Wes Minton bolted

to a quick victory in the 120-yard high hurdles in a school record set-

ting time of :15.2. Minton closed hard in the 220-yard low hurdles to

overcome favorite Baradel of Loyola in another school record shattering

time of :24.0. His clocking in the low hurdles was five-tenths of a

second faster than Tom B-wan's old mark.

Woody Parker captured the 440-yard dash with a time of :50.9,

while Bill Wagoner eased to victory in the half-mile with a rather slow

time of 2:04.0. Wagoner had finished second in the mile behind Chauvin

of Loyola, but turned the tables on the Jesuit distance specialist in

the 880-yard run. Kenneth Jarrett won the first race of his career at

FSU with his personal best time of 10:46.1 in the two-mile.

The Miami Hurricanes were lying in wait for the Seminoles on

May 9 in Coral Gables (FSU Track Files, 9 May 1953). The meet was a

thrilling sequel to the encounter of the previous year, in Tallahassee.

The competition was hard fought, but the second and third place Miami

finishes behind Ken Jarrett's 10:54.4 victory in the two-mile gave the

Hurricanes an insurmountable 66-60 lead. With only the mile relay

remaining, the Seminole foursome of John Kulzer, Robert Jones, Dick

Mize, and Elwood Parker won the last event to narrow Miami's winning

advantage to only one point as the final point standings were 66 to 65.

Woody Parker captured both the 440- and 220-yard runs with

times of :50.3 and :22.2, respectively. John Poston was the only


























The second race was the 120-yard high hurdles. Coach Miller

described Wes Minton as "a talented, but erratic hurdler" (Miller,

1975). Unfortunately the Miami encounter was an off meet for Minton in

the 120l-yard high hurdles. He followed his previous :15.2 performance

against Loyola with a third place finish. The winning time turned in

by a Hurricane hurdler was :15.9. Minton redeemed himself in the 220-

yard low hurdles by blazing to a :24.7 victory. The two races epito-

mized Coach Miller's characterization of Minton.

Florida State University should have entered their final dual

meet of the season with Mississippi Southern College on May 16, in

Hattiesburg, Mississippi, as heavy favorites (FSU Track Office Files,

16 May 1953). However, during the two weeks following the Miami meet,

an altercation broke out between Coach Miller and several of his key

athletes. The dispute led to the voluntary departure of veterans

who had been instrumental in the Tribe's scaring all year (Miller, 1975

Thus, the Seminoles entered the contest weakened, but determined to

succeed (Jarrett, 1975).

This attitude was best illustrated by Bruce Jacob. Jacob was

a field event man, but when the top Mississippi Southern distance run-

net doubled in the 880-yard run; there were only two men left in the












two-mile field. Jacob agreed to run the two-mile for team points. Ken

Jarrett won the event easily, and when the Mississippi Southern runner

developed cramps, Jacob went on to finleh second (Jarrett, 1975).

Carlos Frauadorfer tried to recoup points lost by winning the

broad jump with a leap of 22' 9-1/2", only one-half inch off the school

record; the discus with a throw of 141' 2"; and the shot put with a toss

of 43' 11-3/8". The Tampa sophomore added a second in the 100-yard

dash to ran his individual point total to 18.

Julian Hurst won the 120-yard high hurdles with a sparkling

time of :15.1, yet his school record claim was spoiled by having a

strong tail wind. Joe F-cassi ended his four-year career at Florida

State on a winning note with his vault of 11' 6". Ken Jarrett copped

the mile and two-mile runs as the Seminoles won nine of 15 events, but

succumbed to greater depth by a score of 73 to 58.

The regular season for the Seminoles ended with the dual meet

confrontation with Mississippi Southern, but several Seminoles traveled

to Atlanta on May 23 to compete in the Georgia AAU Championships

(Atlanta Constitution, 24 May, 1953).

Richard Mize garnered the best place for the Tribe with his

third place finish in the 440-yard dash. Florida State wound up with

seven and one-half points, and a sixth place finish overall.

Summary: The 1953 season began on a positive note with three

straight victories, but narrow losses to Loyola University and the

University of Miami, coupled with internal strife caused the Seminoles













The Tribe continued to set new school records at a brisk pace.

Carlos Fraundorfer added the broad jump to his growing list of school

marks by traversing 22' 10" in the Florida Relays. He improved his

shot put mark to 45' 1", while upping his discus record to 141' 2".

In an erratic freshman year, Wes Minton displayed flashes of

brillance. He set school records in both hurdle events by running the

quick times of :15.2 and :24.0 in the 120-yard high hurdles and 220-

yard low hurdles, respectively.

Joe Fracassi continued his upward trend in the pole vault by

establishing a new record when he cleared 12' 10" against Mercer Colleg

on April 4. Fracassi chased the elusive 13-foot vault throughout his

career at Florida State University, but unfortunately, this dream was

never realized by one of the most consistent scorers in the past four

years. Searing the quarter-mile in :49.5, Woody Parker shattered a

school record against the University of Georgia and Georgia Institute

of Technology on April 25.


1954

Prior to the opening of the 1954 season Coach Ken Miller

offered the following statement to the press, "with an outstanding

group of freshmen on this year's squad, the future looks bright for

track and field at Florida State" (Miller, 1954). The immediate future

did not unfold as Coach Miller had predicted as the Seminoles opened

with an impressive thumping of Mercer College but then skidded to six

straight dual meet losses. Ir was the longest losing streak in Florida

State University track history.










53

A combination of factors thwarted Coach Miller's attempt to

rally his team. The fatal weakness in the 1954 Seminoles was the lack

of overall team depth. The unfortunate exodus of quality athletes at

the end of the 1953 season and the graduation of key performers, left

the Tribe void of seasoned veterans. A more demanding schedule soon

exposed the Seminoles' achilles heel.

The Seminoles had the greatest depth ever in its coaching staff.

Mike Long, an assistant coach in football and basketball, donated his

time to help Coach Miller. Walter Grage served as a graduate assistant

for the track program.

Without money to recruit (Athletic Office Budget File, 1953-

1954), Coach Ken Miller was very adept at discovering quality athletes.

He would identify talented athletes by perusing the result sheets from

surrounding state prep track meets (Miller, 1975). A letter would be

sent to selected athletes expressing FSU's interest in having the young

man attending Florida State, and participating in their track and field

program. Within the framework he had to operate, Coach Miller's system

worked very well.

The best example of the effectiveness of Miller's recruiting

system occurred in the spring of 1953. Coach Miller was scanning the

results of the 1953 Georgia State Track Meet, which included a photo-

graph of the finish in the quarter-mile. The picture was an eye-

catcher because the winner, Jim Casteel, had stayed in his lane for

the entire race. These were the days when the 440-yard dash was not

run in lanes. All contestants ran the first curve in lanes, breaking

for the inside down the backstretch. A letter was immediately sent to











54

the young man out of Avondale, Georgia. Coach Miller did not receive

a reply to his missive, yet in the fall of 1953, the greatest quarter-

miler in Seminole track history appeared on the Florida State University

campus as a result of the contact (Miller, 1975).

There were many good freshmen track recruits joining Casteel at

Florida State in the fall of 1953. The need was great; as the names an

the roll of the missing were impressive. Woody Parker, the school

record holder in the 440-yard dash and participant on two school record

setting relay teams had entered military service (Parker, 1975). Bill

Wagoner, the FSU record holder in the 880-yard run and anchorman for

the record setting sprint medley relay had elected to forego his rnmain-

ing two years of track eligibility (Miller, 1975). Wes Minton dropped

out of school to enter military service, while Joe Fracassi, school

standard bearer in the pole vault, To, Sebring, former school record

holder in the discus, and Richard Mize, participant on the school

record setting mile and sprint medley relays, had graduated. Six men

who had held or helped set nine school records were gone.

The Seminoles began the season with some outstanding perfor-

mances from a scrappy bunch of freshmen at the Florida Relays on

March 27 (FSU Track Office Files, 27 March 1954). The sprint medley

team of Jim Casteel, Carlos Fraundorfer, Joe Davis, and Lawrence

Rountha battled for a second place finish. This was the highest place

for a Seminole relay team, ever, in the prestigious relays. Coach

Miller described the Tribe's performance this way:

















ln

l Ir- r,-


A freshman foursome of Joe Davis, Frank Bright, Charlie Watson,

Jim Casteel raced to the second fastest Seminole time ever, fin-

ig fourth in the mile relay. Their individual splits were Davis

,6), Bright (:52.5), Watson (:50.9), and Casteel (:49.5). The

Aggregate gave the Tribe a 3:24.5 cl-cking. Having thought the

relay team was "out of its class" (Miller, 1954), Coach Miller

7cry pleasantly surprised with the outcome.

Carlos Fraundorfer was the only Seminole to place in an indivi-

event, as his throw of 133' 3/4" in the discus earned him fourth




Florida State began their season with a confidence-building

ahing of Mercer College in Macon on April 3. FSU won 10-15 events

breezing to their 84-47 victory (FSU Track Office Files, 3 April



Jim Casteel led the Tribe by capturing the 440-yard dash

.8), 22G-yard dash (:23.0), the broad jump (:20' 9"), and finished

afternoon by anchoring the mile relay to victory,

Lawrence Hountha, in his first open half-mile as a Seminole,

-Bill Wagoner's old school record by striding to victory in

.6. Thus, he became the first Seminole to run under the two-minute













7, 1954, the Seminoles participated in tl

.The Florida Gators captured the team

ribe garnered second with 53 markers (Go.



tha and Jim Casteal set new Florida AAU

topped the 880-yard run field with a arel























third with 53 markers.

The pressure on the Seminc

of Alabana and the University of I

May 1. Florida State wilted under


was the other Seminole to join Casteel in

,nnpa native raised his own school record t

ive in the shot put. There was nothing for

is=n from their experience and gird them,









58

Jim Casteel continued his steady performance, as he tied his

owo school record by winning the 440-yard dash in :49.4. On his next

appearance on the track, Casteel sped to a :21.4 victory in the fur-

long. The versatile freshman finished second in the broad jump behind

teammate Carolos Fraundorfer. For the second week in a row,, captain

Carlos Fraundorfer improved his owti school record ini the broad jump

with a winning leap of 22' 10-1/2".

Lawrence Hounthe returned to form with a 2:00.3 victory in the

880-yard run. Joe Davis and Warren Stricklaod were the only other

Seminoles to snag victories. Davis' a winning time of ten seconds flat

in the 100-yard dash tied him with Tom Bovman for the second fastest

time in Seminole track history. The top spot in the pole vault was

shared by Thomas of Miami and Warren Strickland of FSU at 11' 0".

Despite the combined total of 22 1/4 points scored by Casteel

and Fraundorfer, the Hurricanes rode a balanced team scoring effort to

a 71 to 60 triumph.

Now the Seminoles had only one more dual meet left on the

schedule. With victory on their minds, the Tribe j ourneyed to Hatties-

burg, Mississippi, on May 15. However, Mississippi Southern played

the spoiler role on their home track extending FSU'a losing skien to

six (FSU Track Office Files, 15 May 1954).

The Seminoles received herculean performances from Jim Casteel,

Carlos Fraundorfer, Jerry Jacobs, and Lawrence Hountha. Casteel was

unbeatable as he raced to victory in the 440-yard dash (:50.0), 220-

yard dash (:22.1), and anchored the mile relay consisting of Bright,

Watson, Hountha, Casteel to a 3:30.8 triumph.



























school record board in the shot put. Jacobs, starting left gi

the football team, scored his victory with a put of 46' 3-1/4"

hassee Democrat, 16 May 1954).

Lawrence Hountha dipped under two minutes in the half

the third time during the 1954 campaign with his top spot earn

1:59.8 clocking. The Seminoles again won more events than the

opponents, but still lost the meet by a 69 to 62 margin. This

brought to a close the official 1954 season.

One Seminole unofficially competed in the Georgia AAU

ships on, May 22. The meet was not officially on the schedule c

the date falling during final examination week, and all school

scored athletic events were prohibited (Annual Report, 1947-194E

Weaver competed as an unattached participant, winning fourth p]

the javelin (Atlanta Constitution, 23 May 1954).

Sumrmar Florida State University had endured the wors

son of its six year history of track and field. The Seminoles










60

seniors on the team. Many impressive performances forecasted a

brighter future for the garnet and gold.

Jim Casteel was undefeated in the 440-yard dash in dual meet

competition, twice dipping under the existing school record. He first

broke Woody Parker's record with his blazing :49.4 effort against

Alabama and Loyola on May 1. A week later, Casteel tied that mark in

the meet with Miami. Coach Miller stated that his prize quartermiler

was "one of the outstanding college freshman runners in the entire

country" (Miller, 1954).

Carlos Fraundorfer broke into the 23-foot range in the broad

jump with a leap of 23' 3-1/2" against the Southerners of Missi-sippi

Southern College on May 15. While Fraundorfer was setting his record

in the broad j unp, Jerry Jacobs was besting his shot put re-ord by

putting the shot 46' 3-1/2".

The oldest school record on the board went by the wayside when

Ron Weaver erased Bill Rodger's old mark in the javelin with a heave ol

177' 2-1/2", which Rodger had set in the First Annual Dixie Conference

Championship on May 25, 1949. Florida State set a new record at the

Florida Relays in the sprint medley relay. The foursome of Jim Cas-

teel, Carlos Fraundoxfer, Joe Davis, and Lawrence Hountha finished

only three-tenths of a second behind North Carolina's winning time of

3:25.5. The freshmen foursome of Joe Davis, Frank Bright, Charles

Watson, and Casteel raced to the second fastest mile relay time in

Seminole track hiistory with a time of 3:24.5 at the Florida Rel~ays.

Coach Miller was not to enjoy the bl-oing of his young












Athletics, wanted Coach Miller to assume the position of assistant

director of the men's physical education department. and to chair the

growing graduate program. The chance for professional advancement

could not be denied (Long, 1975).

The Seminole program had evolved from Ken Miller's own hand,

and had prospered under his guidance. John Thombleson, a former-

school record-holder in the broad jump and a member of Coach Miller's

first team described the beginning, "he built a track program from

nothing but his own hard work and I've always admired him for the

effort" (Thombleson, 1975).

Under six years of Dr. Kenneth D. Miller's quiet and concerne,

tutelage, the Seminole track team had won 20 of 35 dual meets and

placed two men high in national competition. His decision to accept

an administrative position in the men's physical education department

at FSU draw to a close the first era in Florida State University's

track and field history. With his tenure as head track coach at an

end, Coach Miller continued to be a supporter and interested follower

of the track fortunes.
















CHAPTER IT


TRANSITION AND GROWTH: 1955-1957


1955

The Seminoles entered into their era of transition and growth

with a new coach at the tiller. Ken Miller had a-smed the position of

assistant director of men's physical education and chairman of the

graduate program; and Mike Long, after a year as assistant track

coach, was appointed to fill the head coaching vacancy.

The athletic career of FSU's new head coach was a collage of

sport experiences. Mike Long was a football, basketball, and track

letter recipient at Luverne (Minnesota) High School in 1933. With

track and field as his primary focus, Long won district championships

in five events. A fire had destroyed all of the district track

records; thereby making his victories in the 100-yard dash, 220-yard

dash, long j mp, high jump, and pole vault all new district records.

His speed and leaping ability made Long a dangerous end in football

and although only 5' 8" in stature, the j umping center on the Cardinal

basketball team (Long, L.S., 1976).

Upon graduation from high school, Mike Long entered Macalester

College in St. Paul, Minnesota. He narrowed his athletic endeavors to

football and track. The talented athlete was the starting right end

on the football team. With a winning vault of 11' 6", Mike Long


62












copped the Minnesota Inter-collegiate Track Meet, and also placed in

the low hurdles (St. Paul Pioneer Press, 27 May 1934).

After two years at Macalester College, Long transferred to the

University of Minnesota. Concentrating only an track, the versatile

performer won the 1936 Olympic regional pole vault.

In 1937, Mike Long graduated from the University of Minnesota

with a bachelor of science degree in physical education. With the

depression at its height, Long managed to land a teaching position at

Clinton (Minnesota) High School at a salary of $110.00 per month for

nine months. Long remembers there being literally hundreds of applica-

tions for the job (Long, L.S., 1976).

Coach Mike Long had decided to try coaching for five years

before reevaluating his future. With a desire to rise in the coaching

ranks, he decided to change schools every two years. In keeping with

his strategy, Long stayed at Clinton High School for two years before

shifting to Sherburn (Minnesota) High School in 1939. On the athletic

fields, Long's responsibilities included football, basketball, wrest-

ling, and track and field. Two years later, Farmington (Minnesota)

High School was the next stop for Mike Long. He was charged with the

responsibility for the football, basketball, and track programs. His

success was expressed in school superintendent C. J. Wall's statement

concerning Mike Long's resignation in the winter of 1943.
















regional tournament where the Tigers were runners-up. It was





The next coaching stop for Mike Long was Sarasota (Florida)

High School, as the head football, basketball, and track coach. Unresf

in the local community with Long's losing inaugural football season lec

to his replacement as the head football coach and eventually to his

decision to resign. After announcing his plans to leave Sarasota,

Long's basketball charges went to the semi-finals of the state tourna-

ment and his track team won the state title (Long, L.N., 1976).

The announcement of Mike Long's resignation brought surprise

plaudits from Ray Norton, sports columnist for the Tampa Tribune.

Resignation of Mike Long as athletic director at Sarasota


Conference, and in Tampa.
I met Mike for the first time at the South Florida Con-
ference Basketball Tournament in Sarasota where he went out




sure he'd like to live in Florida, and would prove on, asset
to any high school sports staff. (TE a ribne 28 March 1946)

Coach Mike Long entered the Lee County School System as the

Ft. Myers Senior High School head basketball and track coach, and an

assistant in football. The Greenies' basketball and track programs

prospered under his guidance.























he was frustrated at every to-n. Convinced that I was avoid-
ing him, Danford became determined to find me and offer me
the job. When he finally found me, I accepted the job.
(Long, L.S., 1976)

The reflection of a man can be found in the image he leaves

behind. The press release by athletic director "Jock" Southerland

expressed the feelings of the Green Wave athletic staff for Mike Long.







The coaching versatility of Long was a key consideration in his

hiring. Dr. Howard Danford explained:

We believed the appointment of Mike Long on our staff fills
a need of long standing. He has had wide experience in Florida
at the high school level. He is a competent worker, well-
known and respected over the state. (FloidaTims-Uion
I August 1953)

With Mike Long's 1954 coaching schedule including only football

and basketball, the track program again inherited a well qualified

coach who had not been hired directly for the track coaching position.

The new mentor, Mike Long, would have a talented squad with

which to work. Nine returning lettermen headed by the multi-talented











Jerry Jacobs (shot put), and Carlos Fraundorfer (discus and broad

jump). The 1955 track brochure described Carlos Fraundorfer as a man

"who's been setting a series of Seminole track and field records for

the past three years. At one time or another in his career, Carlos has

held FSU school records for the shot put, discus, and broad jump. In

addition be's thrown the javelin, high jumped, run the 100-yard dash,

and sparked three different relay teams" (FSU Track Brochure File,

Spring Sports, 1955).

A wealth of newcomers swelled the ranks of the Seminoles,

eliminating the chronic depth problem that had plagued the 1954 Sem-

inoles. Vernon Does, two time Florida state class "A" prep champion in

the mile ran, and Ken Segner, class middle distance runner, were the

best of the new additions in 1955.

By the beginning of the season, the loss of two valuable me--

bars of the Tribe squad jolted the Seminole hopes for a successful

rebuilding season. Jim Casteel decided to drop out of school to join

the army. The powerful ground covering stride of the premier quarter-

miler would be irreplaceable.

The second loss was Larry Hountha. The personalities of the

half-miler school record-holder and sophomore Ken Segner clashed bit-

terly during the fall of 1955. A rivalry had sprung up between the

two man during Segner's transfer year in 1954. Neither man wanted to

lose to the other in any situation. Practice workouts turned into

fierce competitive battles. The all-consuming competitive attitude was

unhealthy and destructive. It led them to pay little attention to

workout conditions in their desire to achieve dominance.















the mile run. Neither man wanted the lead and the result was a very

slow paced run with a strong finishing kick. This race strategy did

not lead to optimum performance. The utter disregard for the workout

was not to be condoned by Coach Long. He called his feuding athletes

together and gave them two options. They could run the workouts as

prescribed as teammates or leave--just that simple. Lawrence Hountha

left; Kenneth Segner stayed (Long, L~.S., 1975).

The first meet of the season was an ideal situation for a teal

on a six-meet losing string. The Seminoles met Mercer College on

April 5 in Tallahassee with the outcome never in doubt. The Tribe

cruised to a 101 to 30 victory over their outclassed opponents from

Macon (FSU Track Office Files, 5 April 1955).

The Seminoles completely dominated the meet by winning every

event except the high jump. Florida State had four men account for

eight individual victories. Vernon Once opened the meet with a win iz

the mile run and then swept through the two-mile in 10:32.5. His win-

ning time in the two-mile was only three-tenths of a second off the

existing school record.

Charles Watson captured the improbable double of the 440-yard

dash and the 220-yard low hurdles. Freshman sprinter Jack Terwillige:

copped the century dash in :10.2 and the furlong in :23.2. Although

well off his school record form, Froundorfer captured the broad jump



















a Seminoles flexed their newly found muscles in the Florida

onships on April 16 and came away with the championship (FSU

ze Files, 16 April 1955). The Tribe won five individual

ed for first in another, captured the mile relay, and showed

overall strength in their 51 5/6 to 47 3/4 win over the

Florida Cators. The 1955 Florida AAU meet marked the first

da State University had ever beaten the University of Florida

Dred track and field competition.

a Weaver captured a school record and the j avelin event with

f 1931 6". Although Tenoy Brown failed to win the high jump,

E 6' 1/4" established a new Senionle high jump standard and

.is only Seminole over six feet in the history of the program.

garnered two victories when Charley Watson breezed through


Vernon Duce highlighted the

victory- in the two-mile run. His s,

LO:20.1 provided the Tribe with a a.

Florida going into the mile relay.

Long the dominant track pow

Florida was not interested in losing

apstarts from Tallahassee (Long, L.!


;iaoale effort with his dramatic

iool record setting performance o

Lght 3 1/12 points advantage over



Sin the state, the University of

on their home track to the young

.1 1976). Disregarding Florida's

its University "A!' team ran the













of 3:27.0, eliminating any chance of a University of Florida victory.

The lead-off leg by Ken Segner almost never materialized.

Segner had not run well in the half-mile and was standing talking to a

friend prior to the race:


Coach Long came over and grabbed me rather forcefully.
He asked if I was ready to do this job or not--if not, he

would get someone else. I said I was ready. (Segner, 1975)
Coach Long remembers the "bad race" of which Segner spoke. Ken

Segnler was the class of the half-mile field and had a commanding lead

in the race when he stopped on the backstretch and walked off the

track. The half-miler could not be found for about 45 minute.. "I

know that he disappeared, because I was looking for him," stated Coach

Long (Long, L.S., 1976). "Segner was slated to lead-off the mile

relay, but I wanted anyone on the squad but Segner to run. Several

team members approached me and asked for Segner to have another chance

to run" (Long, L.S., 1976). The second chance was granted.

Bumper Watson was the lead-off runner for Florida. The 1954

Southeastern Conference sprint champion grabbed an early commanding

lead. Segner remembers Watson hitting the proverbial "stonewall" in

the final turn (Segner, 1975). He passed the faltering Gator and gave

the Seminoles a big lead.

Coach Long qualified their spectacular win by stating that

Coach Percy Beard did not pull out all of the stops in an all-out

effort to win points. The Gators had not entered their quality people

in more than one event in the early going. Coach Beard had under-

estimated the strength of the Seminoles until too late (Long, L. S. ,1976).
















7ech. April 23 was a very satisfying day for the streaking thinclads

.rom Florida State. The Seminoles won seven of 16 events and placed

.m every event, except the 880-yard run, as they improved their record

:o three wins and no losses (FSU Track Office Files, 23 April 1955).

As often happens in big meet competition, the times were not

spectacular but the Seminoles competed hard. The Tribe fought

'iercely for every available point. Several FSU trackmen delivered

)arsenal best performances in nonwinning efforts.

Jack Terwilliger won the 100-yard dash and then turned in a

personall record :22.5 clocking for third in the 220-yard dash. Charle

Tatson placed a very close second in the quarter-mile behind the win-

Ling performance of teammate Ken Segner (Long, L.S., 1976). Watson's

personall best time of :25.1 in the 220-yard low hurdles only placed hin

:hird. Ron Weaver bested his own school record in the javelin with a

oss of 194' 11-3/4" but had to settle for second.

Vernon Duce was the only double winner for the Seminoles as he

capturedd both the mile and two mile runs. Joe Davis was the remaining

'SO victor with his winning jump of 21' 7" in the broad j mp.

The mile relay team composed of Segner, Terwilliger, Davis,

zd Watson cemented their 67 1/3 to 56 2/3 victory ever the University

,f Georgia by sweeping to a 3:28.8 triumph. Their splits were Segner

:50.7), Terwilliger (:51.0), Davis (:52.3), and Watson (:54.8).

Florida State University conducted their last home track meet

.ver on their West Campus facility on April 30 against the Jesuits














1949, and again played the spoiler in the Tribe's finale in 1955. The

Jesuits parlayed speed and endurance into a 72 1/3 to 58 2/3 defeat of

the Seminoles of Florida State (FSU Track Office Files, 30 April 1955).

The :25.1 effort by Joe Davis in the 220-yard low hurdles was

the lone Seminole victory in the running events. The Seminoles kept

the margin of defeat within respectable bounds by winning three of six

field events and tying for the top spot in another. Jerry Jacobs and

Carlos Fraundorfer won the shot put and discus with throws of 47' 3/4"

and 141" 1/2", respect-ively. The javelin was won by FSU's Ron Weaver

with a toss of 183' 5". Toney Brown tied for first in the high jump

with Di-t of Loyola at 5' 10-1/4".

The Seminoles rolled into Miami on May 5 looking to regain

their winning ways. Catapultad by meo new school record performances

and a sweep of all three places in the 220-yard low hurdles, the Sem-

inoles overcome the Miami Hurricanes by a 73 to 58 margin (FSU Track

Office Files, 5 May 1955).

Ron Weaver became the first Seminole to ever throw the javelin

ever 200 feet as his throw landed just five inches beyond the 200-foot

mark. Carlos Fraundorfer continued his assault against the record boo

by shattering his own school mark in the discus with a throw of 146' 4".

Jack Terwilliger spent less than 33 seconds on the track wffile

winning two events. The Dade City sensation snatched the 100-yard

dash in :10.2 and then used only :22.4 to win the 220-yard sprint.

Terwilliger's time in the furlong was a personal best.
























The Seminole thincluds wound up their 1955 season in Hatties-

burg, Mississippi, with a dual meet against Mississippi Southern Col-

lege on May 14 (Tallahassee Dlemocrat, 15 May 1955).

The Tribe used its field event strength to good advantage and

ran up a 38 1/2 to 15 1/2 edge in the off-track events. Ron Weaver

led the Seminole charge with a school record shattering throw of 205'

1-1/2" in the javelin. Jerry Jacobs and Carlos Fraundorfer split the

weight events. Jacobs copped the shot put with a 45' 2" effort as

Fraundorfer hurled the discos 138' 1" to register his victory. Carl

Grenn used a personal best vault of 12' 0" to win the pole vault.

Florida State employed its depth superiority in the running

events to off-set a determined effort by four Southerners. Mississippi

Southern's Axelson, Faggard, Franzen, and Ellis captured five of seven

contested running events.

Jack Terwilliger gained a measure of revenge in the 220-yard

dash over Franzer, and Faggard of Mississippi Southern with a personal

best time of :21.3. It was the first loss of the day for both South-










73

Mississippi Southern. With the score resting at 68 to 58, the mile

relay was cancelled by mutual consent.

Summary. The Florida State University thinclads finished

their first season under the tutelage of Mike Long with a 5-1 record

and an, impressive victory over the University of Florida in the 1955

Florida AAU meet. The lack of a true superstar was overcome by strong

individual and team desire to win. The team refused to concede any

place and fought fiercely for every available point. This is corro-

borated by the fact that two school records and numerous personal

records were established in nonwinning efforts.

Team spirit and cooperation were the most important virtue-,

espoused by the coaching staff and those who could not accept these

concepts were invited to run elsewhere. This spirit and cohesion soon

became the trad emsrk of track and field squads fielded by FSU's Mike

Long.

Carlos Fraundorfer closed out his outstanding career at Florida

State University in the style to which his coaches had grown accustomed.

He regained his shot put record, lost to Jerry Jacobs in 1954, with a

monumental throw of 48' 3-1/4" which surpassed the old record by two

full feet. He still held the school mark in the broad jump at 23'

3-1/2", remaining the only Seminole to have ever jumped over 23 feet,

and the discus mark at 146' 5". Fraundorfer established n new career

scoring record by compiling 278 3/4 points during his four year stint

at FSU (FSU Track Brochure File, FSU Spring Sports 1956).

Undoubtedly the most unlikely weightman, to ever throw at

Florida State University, Carlos Fraundorfer stood 6' 4" and weighed












only 165 pound,4 He had the ability to run a :10.0 hundred and was a

valuable runner on the sprint medley and 440-yard school record setting

relays. There was no doubt that he was, as the 1955 FSU track brochure

described, "FSU's best all-round performer in history" (FSU Track

Brochure File, Spring Sports 1955).

Ron Weaver was an FSU footballer who turned to the javelin in

the off-season and found a latent faculty. He was the product of

talent, good coaching, and hard work. Weaver won his first meet an

April 3 against Mercer College with a throw of 159' 1". lie eventually

parlayed a strong throwing arm into a school record of 205' 1-112".

Vernon Duce was a high school champion before coming to

Florida State (Long, L.S., 1976). Living up to his reputation, Duce

strode through a 10:20.1 clocking to win the Florida AAU two-mile run

and establish a new Seminole standard for that distance.

Tenny Brown stood only 51 11" tall. Although short for a high

jumper, be hecame the first man in seven years of track at Florida

State to clear six feet. The rule requiring victory as a prerequisite

for establishing a school record had been rescinded (Long, L.S., 1976).

Therefore, Brown's second place j ump of 6' 1/4" in the Florida AAU









75

schools in the South. The rivalry with the University of Florida Was

expanded by scheduling the first FSU-Florida dual meet in the history

of the two schools (FSU Track Brochure File, Spring Sports 1956).

With only two school record-holders returning for the 1956

campaign, the Seminoles were short of veteran performers. The record

holders were Tenny Brown in the high jump and javelin thrower Ron

Weaver. The multitalented Carlos Fraundorfer had been lost via grad-

uation, and Vernon Duce, the freshman sensation in the two-mile, had

left school abruptly without explanation. These two men had played key

roles in the successful rebuilding efforts of 1955.

Despite the losses in personnel, ISO faced the 1956 season con-

fidently. The Seminoles were again without the legitimate superstar,

yet were strong in every event. The chances for a successful season

had been brightened by the return of two ex-Seminole track men after a

hitch in the military service. Wes Minton, school record-holder in

both hurdle events, bolstered a thin corps of timber-toppers. Depth

was added in the middle distance events with the arrival of Pete

Fraschetti, a former record-holder in the half-mile. Sophomore speed-

ster, Jack Terwilliger, headlined the sprinting corps as his :09.9

clocking in 1955 had made him the second fastest Seminole in FSU track

history.

The 1956 season began with the Atlantic Coast Conference Indoor

Championship in Raleigh, North Carolina, on February 24 (FSU Track

Office File, 24 February 1956). Competing in the nonconference divi-

sion, the Tribe did not fare well. The Seminoles took only two fourth

places--the mile relay, and Joe Davis in the 70-yard low hurdles. The


















The outcome of the meet had not made many people happy; yet it

as not without its humorous aspects. Bruce Jacob described what hap-

oned to him in the mile run.








T 1 i 7 .; ~ r~ ?. i. i~I .r


















With the entire squad competing, the Seminoles flexed their

electivee muscles by thumping Mississippi Southern College 89 to 42

,i Tallah-see on March 28 (FSU Track Office File, 28 March 1955).

iis was the earliest opening dual meet date for the Seminoles, yet the

-ring time air obviously agreed with the Tribe.

Jack Terwilliger displayed May form on this March afternoon.

ie Dade City flyer streaked through the 100-yard dash in :10.0, and

agistered his second victory in the 220-yard dash with a clocking of

Z2.4. Ron Weaver led teammates Jimmy Harrell and Mike Guerra to a

-ese in the iavelin with his throw of 198' 2". The former school










77

record-holder in the shot put, Jerry Jacobs copped his specialty, flip-

ping the iron ball 45' 4-1/4". The mile relay of Terwilliger, Mike

Conley, Charlie Watson, and Doyle Ruff capped off a successful opening

day performance with a victoriou, 3:28.8 clocking.

The Seminoles managed only two fourths in the 13th running of

thle prestigious Florida Relays (FSU Track Office File, 31 March 1956).

Jack Terwilliger garnered one of the Seminole places with a :10.3 per-

formance in the IOG-yard dash, while Ron Weaver captured the other with

a toss of 193' 2-1/2" in the j avelin.

A hot and windswept Georgia afternoon (Tallahassee Democrat,,

8 April 1956) was the setting for the running of the Mercer College-

Davidson College-Florida State University triangular track meet. The

Seminoles did not find themselves particularly sharp, but had enough

firepower to ease out an 83 1/3 to 70 2/3 win over Davidson as Mercer

tallied only two markers (FSU Track Office File, 7 April 1956).

Field event men provided the main thrust of the Seminole vic-

tory. Florida State copped six out of seven field events. Lloyd Las-

sen's school record and event winning leap of 6' 2" in the high jump

highlighted the Seminoles' efforts.

Jerry Jacobs and Joe Davis turned in sterling winning perfor-

mances in the shot put and broad jump with efforts of 45' 9-3/8" and

22' 9-1/2", respectively. Davis' leap in the broad jump was the second

best ever by a Seminole. Competing in his third event of the day, Joe

Davis sped over the barriers in the 220-yard low hurdles in only 25

second..













April 14 marked the beginning of the Florida-Florida State

dual meet series. With Florida possessing the home track advantage,

the Seminoles did not create an auspicious beginning. Florida's track

men completely dominated the meet as the Tribe managed to win only two

events in the lopsided 90 to 41 Garet victory (Tallahassee Democrat,

15 April 1956).

The lone Seminole winners were Ron Weaver and Joe Davis. A

toss of 194' 4-1/4" in the javelin earned Weaver his first place spot.

Davis' broad jump of 23' 6-3/4" topped the field, breaking Carlos

Fraundorfer's FSU record.

Mike Conley was bested in the mile by West of Florida in a neat

dead heat finish. With the two runners matching stride for stride

through the final lap, the winning time of 4:29.9 was awarded to both

men. Thus Conley dropped his personal best in the mile over 12 seconds

also setting a new FSU standard. This race marked the only time durinFg

the 1956 season that West was able to beat the Seminole miler.

The Seminoles brought their damaged track ego back to the

friendly confines of the FSU track. The frustrations generated by the

Tribe's first loss of the 1956 season were vented against the Jesuits

of Loyola University on April 28 (FSU Track Office Files, 28 April

1956). The thinclads of Florida State captured 10 of the 15 events on

their way to a 87 to 44 hearing of Loyola University.

Jack Terwilliger sped to a :50.2 triumph in the quarter-mile

and doubled back in the 220-yard dash for his second win of the day

with a spectacular Lime of :21.3. Terwilliger's time was a track

record for the new Seminole facility.


































the w tch did not work because I was trying hard
:50 .0. (Jacob, 1975)

The Seminoles received superlative performance,

Jacobs, Warren Strickland, and Ken Segner. Jerry Jac,

shot putter, unleashed his second best throw in his t:

heaving the shot 46' 2-1/2". The 12-foot barrier in I

scaled for the second time by a Seminole vaulter as W,

copped the acrobatic event with a jump of 12 feet evei
























best of 21' 9-3/4" for third in the broad jump. Don Ayers became the

third Seminole to vault over 12 feet with his jump of 12' 1" in the

pole vault. His efforts gained him a tie for second place.

The Seminoles responded to their second defeat at the hands ol

the Florida Gators with renewed motivation for victory. On May 8 in

Tallahassee, the Florida State Seminoles turned "Hurricane hunters," i

they defeated the University of Miami by a whopping 92 3/4 to 38 1/4

margin (FSU Track Office Files, 8 May 1956).

Jack Terwilliger had a spectacular day as he whipped through

the quarter-mile with a winning time of :50.06, and returned in the

next event to win the 100-yard dash in :09.9. His day was far from

over. After a short respite, he turned the furlong in :21.6 and

anchored the mile relay for his third and fourth triumphs of the afte:

noon. Lloyd Lassen equalled his own school record by winning the higI

jump with a leap of 6' 2".

Two Seminoles broke into the victory column~ for the first tim

during the 1956 campaign. Pete Fraschatti handled the half-mile fielc

with a respectable time of 2:05.0. Ron Weaver relinquished the top

spot in the j avelin to Jerry Henderson, as the improving sophomore










81

Summary. Coach Mike Long's Seminole track men had completed

the 1956 season with the highest total of dual meet victories in thee

eight year history of track at Florida State University. The Tribe

captured seven wins with only one loss, and finished second in the

Florida AAU. After inheriting talented, yet imrmature, team that had

won only once while losing six in 1954, Coach Long had run up an out-

standing 12-2 record in only two years at the helm. The schedule had

been steadily upgraded to parallel the Seminoles' improvement. The

Tribe was making its way into the big time in a winning fashion.

Three Seminoles had added their names to the record books in

1956. The oldest record on the board tumbled to the smooth rhythm of

Mike Conley's easy strides. No Seminole had been able to surpass Bill

Duncan's 4:32.0 school record set in 1950 until April 14, when Conley

placed second in a near photo finish against the University of Florida

with a time of 4:29.9. Although Mike Conley had won the Florida prep

mile in the 1954 State track and field meet he had decided not to run

track at Florida State during his freshman year. The talented dis-

tance runner returned to the cinders his sophomore year, and rapidly

honed his rusty skills. Coach Long described 1956 as "the year that

marked the emergence of Conley from nowhere to one of the best milers

in the South" (Long, 1976).

Lloyd Lassen erased the high jump record of his good friend and

rival Tenny Brown by clearing 6' 2". The bulky high jumper cleared

this height on two different occasions.

Joe Davis reduced Carlos Fraundorfer's entries in the record

book to two by grabbing the broad jump mark with his new standard

































(220-yard dash on the curve), Joe

ran) and Lloyd Lassen (high j=

L record marks, Terwilliger, Davi

--getters in 1956 with 71 3/4, 56



i Mike Long saw only one major atl

1 1957 (FSU Track Brochure File.





























placed them fourth behind Southeastern Conference powerhouses L,

State University, Auburn University, and the University of Alab.

LSU won the first Annual Coliseum Relays with 44 points.

The only Seminole victory occurred in the 60-yard dash.

Terwilliger topped the dash field with a :06.5 clocking. The D.

native added a fourth in the 300-yard dash to his collection of

Florida State established two new indoor marks in the fj

events with fine nonwinning efforts. Richard Ellwood's mark cat

the pole vault as he tied for second place with a jump of 12' 8'

Tenny Brown andl~loyd Lassen were part of a five-way tie for seci

the high jump at 5' 10".

The mile relay concluded the painful learning experience(

a fourth place finish. The Tribe was made acutely aware of the

ment necessary to insure success during the outdoor season.

Florida State University served notice to its opponents

the Seminoles were a newly emerging power with which to be recki










84

23 February 1957). The ACC Indoor Championship was one of the few

indoor meets the Seminoles had ever attended; therefore, many of their

performances established new school indoor records.

Jack Terwilliger shot to a :06.3 victory in the 60-yard dash,

earning himself a spot in the FSU record books. Joe Davis earned a

similar spot with his :07.9 victory clocking in the 70-yard low hur-

dles. Lloyd Lassen gained the indoor counter-part to his high jump

record with a leap of 5' 10-1/2".

Dick Ellwood bested teammate Warren Strickland with a winning

vault of 12' 0". Strickland cleared 11' 6" for second place.

The Seminole aSsauit on the record book was concluded with a

flourish as the mile relay laid claim to the PSU indoor record with a

victorious clocking of 3:35.3. The relay consisted of Watson, Davis,

Conley, and Terwilliger.

The two indoor meets had readied the Seminole thinclads for

their premier outdoor performance. Mississippi Southern was the

unlucky opponent. By the end of the day, Florida State had amassed

101 points to Mississippi Southern's 35 (FSU Track Office Files, 13

March 1957). The Seminoles swept 15 of 16 events amid many outstanding

perf ormances..

Mike Conley rewrote Vernon Duce's two-mile record with a win-

ning time of 10:15.9. He had previously won the mile run with a good

time of 4:32.2.

Jack Terwilliger came within an eyelash of John Poston's 100-

yard dash record with a race-capturing :09.7. Be returned in the 220-

yard dash to take his second win of the day with a :21.6 clocking.












Terwilliger also anchored both the 440 and mile relay teams to victory.

Richard Ellwood, Doyle Ruff, and Joe Davis teamed with Terwilliger to

equal the school mark of :43.5 in the meet-opening 440-yard relay. A

3:27.5 effort was turned in by the mile relay team composed of Charley

Watson, Doyle Ruff, Pete Elliot, and Jack Terwilliger.

The Seminoles copped both hurdle races in near record times.

Tenny Brown sped to a quick :15.3 clocking that wa. only rne-tenth of

a second off Wes Minton's record. Watson took aim on Minton's 220-

yard low hurdle record, falling only three-tenths of a second shy with

a sparkling :24.3 effort.

The Tribe displayed power in the high jump and pole vault.

Lloyd Lassen led a Seminole sweep in the high jump with a fine winning

leap of 61 1-1/2". Tenny Brown and Bob McDonald tied for second place.

There was a four-way split of first place in the pole vault, of which

three were Seminoles. Don Ayers, Richard Ellwood, and Warren Strick-

land all cleared 12' 6".

The increasing strength of the Florida State University track

team became evident in the fourteenth running of the Florida Relays on

March 30 (FSU Track Office Files, 30 March 1957). Placing in seven

events, the Seminole tracksters had their best showing ever.

The best individual performances were by Richard Ellwood and

Warren Strickland in the pole vault. The two Seminole vaulters claimed

exclusive ownership of second place.

Dave Sins, the Duke University sprint star who had established

an amazing :20.0 220 world record in 1956, copped the 100-yard dash in

:09.6 as FSU's Jack Terwilliger ran a distant third. The Seminole












point gathering performances were concluded by Joe Davis' fourth in the

broad jump and Tenny Brown's fifth in the high jump.

Quality performances in Florida State's first two outdoor meets

had provided the Seminoles with high team morale for the upcoming con-

frontation with the University of Florida (Lung, L.S., 1976). April 13

marked the return engagement in Tallahassee with the Florida Gators.

When the dust had settled, the Gator. owned a hard earned 67 to 64 vic-

tory (FSU Track Office Files, 13 April 1957).

Mike Conley opened the meet on a winning note for the Tribe by

taking the mile run in 4:32.4. The results of the two-mile run

delivered a devastating blow to the Seminole victory chances as Conley

developed a stitch and was forced to back-off the pace (Tall~ahassee

Democrat 14 April 1957). The Tribe's distance sensation finished a

soundly beaten second. Mike Conley explained:

All spring, under my right rib cage, I had pain anytime I
ran over a mile, even on trails. I don't know why, may have
been out of shape, but I never had that problem again.
(Conley, 1976)

Florida State's weaknesses in the shot and discus events were

exploited by the Gators. Florida won the top two spots in both events

gaining a 16 to 2 advantage that eventually proved to be the difference

in the meet.

Richard Ellwood and Warren Strickland continued their friendly

personal dual in the pole vault as both men cleared an FSU record-

setting 13' 2" for first place. A personal best time of 1:58.9 earned

Ken Seener a victory in the 880-vard run.













Adversity Overtook the Seminoles in the javelin throw,

'a Jerry Henderson, the Overwhelming premeet favorite, threw

ee of his preliminary throws out-of-bounds and did not qualil

finals (Long, L.S., 1976). Rising to the occasion, Jimmy 1h

ped the javelin for the Seminoles with a throw of 188' 1/2".

r, critical second place points had slipped away for the Tril

With the Gators possessing an insurmountable 67 to 59 lc

inole mile relay composed of Joe Davis, Doyle Ruff, Ken Seg-t

k Terwilliger expressed the Tribe's refusal to quit by taking

al event with a fast dual meet time of 3:25.6

Team members replayed their loss over and over in their

sewing the tragedies that had befallen them in two events, ir

Tribe had figured to be solid favorites. The loss was hard

ept, and 19 years later Coach Long rated the 1957 Florida def

of the toughest losses in his coaching career (Long, L.S., I

The Seminoles had to live a week with the galling defeat

rida on their mind before the heat of competition could purgc

is. The fifth running of the University of Georgia-Georgia I

angular was the setting Of their redemption. The Seminoles f

it way to a 77 to 53 victory over runner-up Georgia as Georg!

ished third with 42 markers (FSU Track Office Files, 20 April

Mike Conley was in easy control in both the mile and twc

a. He coasted to a 4:40.4 victory in the mile and a 11:08.2
















Segner had ample reason to rum that night. His

from his victory against the Gators on the prece

plus the fact that his fiance had driven up from

watch him run (Segner, 1975).

Doyle Ruff led the race through the firs

The strapping sophomore was still in command of

final curve. Coming out of the last turn, Segne:


opening event with a time of :43.5.

relay, Joe Davis captured two more

to flow over the barriers in the Z5

3-3/4" in the broad junp.

The Seminoles took a week c

to action against the University ol

The Seminoles stormed to an easy 81

Files, 1 May 1957).

Jack Terwilliger attempted

anchor the mile relay. The plucky

herculean task. The 440-yard dash


vents as he took only 25 seconds

-yard low hurdles and leaped 22'



f from competition before returning

Miami in Coral Gables on May 2.

to 49 victory (PSU Track Office



o win three individual events and

Printer almost accomplished this













Terwilliger bounded back to take the 220-yard dash with an outstanding

time of :21.3.

Joe Davis upset Terwilliger for the first of his two victories.

Davis became the third Seminole to run under 10 seconds flat in the

hundred with his blazing ;09.8 clocking. He also took the broad jump

with a jump of 22 feet even.

On this day, Warren Strickland emerged on top in the pole vault

witii a jump of 13' 0". It seemed fitting that the senior should win

the last dual meet of his career.

The mile relay race held a special meaning to the men running

for Florida State. The Seminoles had won the meet easily, but still

-rned desperately to win the relay. With the varsity letter award

being based upon scoring a--e points in competition, Jack Terwilliger

explained why the mile relay was so important:

Bobby Bryson needed only one point for his letter and we
persuadedd Coach Long. to let him lead-off the Tile relay.
11 1-.ri- Ti. E-1l Ii
4 ?- 1 1 Elrll --lr.- I--?r -- ~i



Florida State got its shot at revenge against rival University

of Florida in the Florida AAU championships in Gainesville on May 4

(FSU Track Office Files, 4 May 1957). The Miami Sunday News termed the

meet a "regatta" (5 May 1957), as rain fell continually throughout the

afternoon. However, the atrocious condition of the track did not dam-

pen the heat of competition.

The Seminoles were paced by three school record setting per-

formances, yet again they fell agonizingly short of their intrastate















university ot M1=1i was tthlrd with ib markers.

Mike Conley broke both the one and two

the process of winning both events. He dipped

and gained a 10:08.5 revenge victory in the t

Florida. Morgan's victory over Conley in the

Florida State-Florida dual meet had put that m

Doyle Ruff set a school mark in the he

Segner's final race as a collegian. Segner ex

through the first quarter-mile before a lead g

on the back straightaway, caught him unaware.

unattached runner before he could adjust to th

pace. He hauled both man down and the three u

the final curve. The runners came out of the

The unattached runner was sandwiched between F

and Segner on the outside. It was a primitive

determination down the home stretch. No one g

decision declared Doyle Ruff the winner in a o

own words, Ken Segner "did not take the loss w

was sure he had won. Passions cooled and an h

congratulating his teammate on his school reco

Jerry Henderson became the second Semi

over 200 feet in the j avelin. His second plac

even. Jimrmy Harrell finished third with a thr
















the Seminoles to within seven points of the Florida Gators.

With only the pole vault remaining, the Tribe needed to win

both first and second place to claim their victory. The University of

Miami provided the principal competition. Richard Ellwood and Warren

Strickland had accomplished that feat against the Hurricanes in their

dual meet, but Rosbaught and Banstone of M~iami were not to be denied.

Ellwood's tie for second was the best the Seminole vaulters could

manage and FSU fell three points short of victory. A fine Seminole

team effort had been called and beaten by a similar Gator performance.

Summary. The year 1957 had been highly successful for the

Seminoles. The Seminoles of Florida State captured the independent

division of the Atlantic Coast Conference Indoor Championship and

finished second in the Florida AAU Championship. The Tribe was equally

as tough in head-to-head competition as the Seminoles won four of five

dual meets. The only loss was a very painful decision to the University

of Florida.

The runners were the only Seminoles to mount an offensive on

the school record board. Mike Conley continued his steady improvement,

and lowered his school record in the mile run by 9.1 seconds to 4:18.8.

He added the two-mile run to his record collection with an impressive

10:08.5 clocking.

The mile relay was the setting for a new school record when the

foursome of Joe Davis, Charles Watson, Ken Segner, and Jack Terwilliger

toppled the old mark with a 3:20.5 performance at the Florida Relays.












Doyle Ruff and Ken Segner staged a battle for the 880-yard run

record. Ken Segner first topped Lawrence Hountha's record by touring

the two laps of the oval in only 1:57.6. His record lasted only two

weeks before Doyle Ruff narrowly bested both Segner and his record in

the Florida AAU with a time of 1:57.1.

The 440-yard relay record was tied twice by two different c-m

binations of runners. The team of Richard Ellwood, Doyle Ruff, Joe

Davis, and Jack Terwilliger first turned the trick on March 16. They

beat the Mississippi Southern relay team with a time of :43.5. The

quartet of Ellwood, Bobby Bryson, Davis, and Terwilliger equalled the

record when they won the relay in the Georgia-Georgia Tech triangular

meet on April 20, 1957.

The 1957 season brought to a close three years of work by Coac

Mike Long. His efforts as head coach had resulted in teams that -om

piled a 16 and 3 win-loss record. The Seminoles had completed their

rebuilding task and were ready to assume a position of prominence amonl

the track powers in the South.


























There were many missing faces when the Seminoles began their

fall drills. Among the missing were ten lettermen of the 1957 squad

that had helped run up a 4-1 record. The most prominent departed Sem-

inoles were pole vaulter Warren Strickland, middle distance runner Ken

Segner, and versatile Joe Davis. These three men were involved in set-

ting or sharing five school records. However, the 1958 senior domin-

ated team possessed a powerful appearance.

In giving a preseason prognosis, Coach Mike Long tharacteri-dd

the shot and discus events as areas of "definite weakness," but stated

"our running strength could possibly be enough to even things out"

(FSU Track Brochure File, Spring Sports 1958).

The running strength that Coach Long alluded to was headed by

Jack Terwilliger, the bantam speedster. Terwilliger was the 1957

Florida AAU champion in the 220-yard dash and the second fastest Sem-

inole in FSU track history with a :09.7 100-yard dash clocking. Jim

Casteel, returning after a three-year absence, was the 1957 Florida

AAU quarter-mile champion. Mike Conley, the 1957 Florida AAU mile

champion; and Doyle Ruff, the 1957 Florida AAU half-mile champion,

comprised the remaining components of an awesome lineup in the running













The presence of school record holders Jerry Henderson and

Richard Ellwood in the javelin and pole vault, respectively, aided in

making the 1958 Seminole dual meet squad the most powerful in the 10

years of track and field at Florida State University.

Finding itself halfway up the mountain of success, the Tribe

band worked hard during the off-season. Jack Terwilliger described on

of Coach Long's practice drills:

We did what was called the 50-second killer. You would
start on the whistle and run like crazy as far as you could
in 50 seconds. Where you were at the end of 50 seconds, he








With the long arduous hours of practice behind them, a small

group of Seminoles drove by car to the Atlantic Coast Conference Indoo

Championship on March I in Chapel Hill, North Carolina (FSU Track Offi

Files, I March 1958). The Seminoles were led by Mike Conley's 4:27.5









95

inexperienced in these matters, the knowledgeable mentor grinned his

approval. The inevitable happened very quickly and the FSU parade

stopped quickly to let the pale green athlete out of the car. A much

wiser young man subsequently returned to his seat (Long, L.S., 1976).

The Seminoles traveled in full strength to participate in the

Coliseum Relays on February 13 in Mlontgomery (FRO Track Office Files,

13 February 1958). The Tribe's 28 points bested Alab-m's 23 1/2 and

the rest of an outstanding field which included seven Southeastern

Conference schools.

Mike Conley led the charge with school and meet records in both

the mile and two mile runs. He ran away from a talented field with a

very fast 4:18.1 mile time and blitzed the two-mile contingent with a

fantastic 9:50.3. The short dirt track was renowned for its reluctance

to release fast times. Conley tells of the price he had to pay for

his records.





1976)

Mike Conley demonstrated his sprint speed by running the third

leg on the victorious and school record setting mile relay. The team

of Terwilliger, Doyle Ruff, Conley, and Jim Casteel flashed to a

3:27.3 clocking. Richard Ellwood tied his owt, FSU record in the pole

vault with a jump of 13' 2" that earned him third place in the

competition.

A successful indoor season had primed the Seminoles for their

first outdoor meet against the Paladans of Furman in Tallahassee on













!7 (FSU Track Office Files, 27 March 1958). The Tribe s

101 1/3 to 34 2/3, in their home opener.

The Seminole jerseys were prominent at the victory sta

State won 13 of 16 events. Jim Casteel won three indi

and ran on two winning relays. Be was the quarter-mile

-hool record time of :49.5; zipped over the low hurdles

and broad jumped 21' 2" for his three individual triumph

anchored the winning 440-yard relay team of Jack Terwi

,tner, and Ted Keen, which set a new FSU school and trac

time of :42.2. He ran the third leg of the mile relay

-d of Charley Nye at lead-off, Doyle Ruff second, and Ja

r at the anchor position. The foursome earned the vict

:s with an outstanding track record time of 3:21.6 (Tall

t, 28 March 1958).

Jack Terwilliger burned the 100-yard dash in :09.7. H

me tied his own personal best and was only one-tenth of

school record.

Doyle Ruff edged teammate Charley Nye with a track rec

clocking in the 880-yard run (Tallahassee Democrat, 28

He missed his own school standard by only one-tenth of



At the mile and one-half pole, Tom Keeney started a dr

A, Furican's Rodney Davis and carried him to victory in t

ig two-mile run (TallahasseDmca, 28 March 1958).

mile run, Keeney had placed second to running mate Mike












The Seminoles had only two days rest before the fifteenth run-

ning of the Florida Relays in Gainesville (FSU Track Office Files, 29

March 1958). The Tribe went on a rampage against the best in the

South. The Seminoles finished the day with 39 unofficial points and

the team title (Tallahassee Democrat, 30 March 1958). However, the

points were considered unofficial as the meet was not technically

scored.

The typical response to the Seminole outburst was summarized

by Jack Terwilliger:

We went down there and surprised some folks by winning the





The Seminole quartet of Terwilliger, Gary Butner, Richard

Ellwood, and Jim Casteel set the order of the meet by capturing the

440-yard relay in a time of :42.7. Florida State edged Louisiana

Technical Institute, Louisiana State University, and the University of

Florida *

Florida State University was just getting started. The two-

mile relay team of Ben George, Charley Nye, Doyle Ruff, and Mike Conle:

whipped the likes of North Carolina, Clemson, and North Carolina State

with a clocking of 7:50.8. Doyle Ruff relived the greatest 880 he ever

ran:

The 1958 Florida Relays were the last run on the old black
cinder track. FSU had a team spirit that year that I've never
seen matched. We were truly a "team" team. This was a price-
less factor in any relay event, and this was a relay meet.
I was assigned to run third leg of the two~mile relay,

F i .1 ~ ;? "'"1 ' i .' i































































presence of Dave Sime. To the 1960 Olympic Games, Dave Sime was th

silver medalist in the 100-meter dash.

The Seminoles were in good position after the first two leg

by Jim Caqteel and Gary Butner. The baton passed to Terwilliger on












the third leg and the spunky sprinter matched strides with the great

runner from Duke. At the end of Terwilliger's 220-yard leg, the

Seminoles were in the hunt. Mike Conley took control of the stick ant

strangled the field with his strong anchor leg. The Tribe had flashe

to a new school and Relays' record with a time of 3:24.6 (Tallaha -e~

Democrat, 30 March 1958). This mark stood as a school record for

16 years.

In addition to running on three victorious relay te-m, Jim

Casteel captured the broad i ump with a leap of 221 10". Jerry Mender

son topped the javelin field with a throw of 200' 7-1/2". Jack Ter-

williger finished fourth in a strong 100-yard dash field with a :10.1

ef fort '

The mile relay team of Terwilliger, Conley, Ruff, arnd Casteel

blew the final event apart with their Florida Relays and school record~

run of 3:14.4 (Tallahassee Democrat, 30 March 1958). The quartet had

lowered the school record by 6.4 seconds; a mark that would hold unti:

1969,

Jack Terwilliger remembers his lead-off leg that split :48.6

(Talhse Democrat, 30 March 1958) and which gove the Seminoles a























he South by winning all four relays ent

ual events. The Seminole opponents wer

ye-ratching fashion.

The Seminoles continued their di

oanake Colleze in Tallahassee on Atril










101

The Florida State University Seminoles made their biennual

sojourn to Gainesville in search of their first dual meet victory

over the Florida Gators. April 14 was the date of Florida State's

72 11/15 to 53 4/15 triumph over the fighting Gators of the University

of Florida (Florida Times-Union, 15 April 1958). The Tribe won every

flat race and held their own in the field events to deal bitter defeat

to their intrastate rival.

Mike Conley won the meet opening mile run in a smooth 4:21.4

clocking. The fluid striding distance runner slipped under the 10-

minute mark as he flowed to victory in the two-mile run in 9:57.0.

The Seminoles were accustomed to his 10 points in the distance events

(Ruff, 1975).

The quarter-mile title fell to Jim Casteel's impressive :48.7

effort. The Seminoles lost the next event, the 120 yard high hurdles,

but Terwilliger put the Seminoles back in the groove with his :10.0

race in the 100-yard dash.

Doyle Ruff led a Tribe sweep in the 880-yard run with a fine

clocking of 1:58.8. Charlie Nye finished second and likeable Ben

George was third.

The Gators clipped the top two spots in the 220-yard low hur-

dles. However, the Seminoles turned the tables in the very next event.

Jack Terwilliger bested Jim Casteal with a fine one-turn furlong time

of :21.9.

A school record was toppled by Jerry Henderson's strong arm in

the javelin. Henderson hurled the spear 215' 6-1/2" to up his school










102

mark by over 12 feet. Richard Ellwood copped the pole vault with a

fire vault of 13' 1-1/2".

After holding a lead at the end of the second leg, the Sam-

inoles closed out the meet by running away with the mile relay. Ellis

Goodloo, an outstanding sprinter for the University of Florida, took

the baton on the third leg and set dead aim on FSU's Mike Conley, as

the smooth striding Seminole was about 10 to 12 yards in front of him.

By the 220-yard mark, Conley's lead had dwindled to only four or five

yards. However, Goodloe had given the first 220 yards his best shot

and had not only not caught the "distance runner," but was now losing

ground. For all practical purposes, the race between the twio men was

over. Conley continued to flow through his quarter-mile toward a

split in the high 47s, while Ellis Goodloe struggled the remaining

yards on wooden legs (Long, L.S., 1976). The anchor leg by Jim Casteel

was merely a matter of form and at the conclusion of his run, the

Seminoles owned a 3:22.4 victory.

The Tribe traveled by car to Philadelphia on April 23 for the

Pennsylvania Relays. The Seminoles won one event and finished second

in another in this most prestigious of all relay carnivals (New York

Times, 27 April 1958).

When Jerry Henderson unleashed his winning throw in the j avelin,

Coach Mike Long turned to a companion in the bleachers and said, "that

looks to be about 217' 1" (Long, L. S., 1976). The throw was officially

measured at 217' 4"-- new FSU record.












The sprint medley relay team of Jim Casteel, Gary Butner, jack

Terwilliger, and Mike Conley chased Villanova to a sparkling time of

3:22.5. The Seminole quartet finished a very respectable second.

Misfortune struck the Seminole mile relay team as Jack Ter-

williger answered the gun slowly and came out of the first turn dead

last. He swerved to the outside of the pack on the backstretch and

started to move into contention. Terwilliger stayed on the outside as

he entered the last turn and continued to move up. Four teazis, inclu-

ding FSU, passed the baton simultaneously. Disaster struck when Doyle

Ruff was spiked in the confusion and pulled a hamstring muscle. Florida

State was out of the race (Long, L.S., 1976). Coach Mike Long com-

mented on the Seminole performance:

I thought our boys did very good. When you get a boy hurt
it sort of puts a damper on it and give you a let down Up
until that time that Ruff was hurt, FSU was performing very
well. We would have given them a good race in the mile (relay)
if Ruff hadn't gotten hurt. We were in as good a position as
could be expected that early in the race. (Tallhase
Democrat, 27 April 1958)

The Seminoles invited the University of Miami into their lair

on May 1. The Tribe knocked the wind out of the Hurricanes by a 88 to

41 margin (Tallahassee DevocraL, 2 May 1958).

Mike Conley began the meet on an auspicious note by taking the

mile run with a school record time of 4:14.2. Jim Casteel took the

hint and blasted through the quarter-mile in only :48.5. He followed

up that school record performance by eclipsing Wes Minton's low hurdle

mark by four-tenths of a second with a time of :23.6. Casteel added

the broad jump to his credit by traversing 22' 1/4" for this third win

of the day.











104

Jack Terwilliger joined John Poston as one of the two fastest

Seminoles afoot by hurrying to a :09.6 clocking in the 100-yard dash.

Terwilliger explained his record tying performance as:

.4 ere






The winning side of Terwilliger's ledger received an additional carry

when the speedster captured the 220-yard dash with his personal best

time of :21.1.

A couple of sophomore runners called attention to their presence

by winning the 880-yard run and the two-mile run. Charley Nye sailed

to a 2:01.0 romp in the half-mile and Tom Keeney became the second

fastest two-miler in Seminole track history with his 10:16.2 victory.

Jerry Henderson unleashed a prodigious throw of 227' 5" in

winning the javelin. He had improved his own school record by over

too full feet.

The Florida State squad received only two days rest before

turning their attention to the Florida AAU Championships. The Tribe

found the Gainesville track to their liking and defeated the University

of Florida for the second time by a 41 2/3 to 37 margin (FSTJ Track

Office Files, 3 May 1958).

Mike Conley controlled the mile with a winning time of 4:25.6.

The senior distance running ace poured on the coal in the two-mile run,

steaming to victory in an FSU and FLorida AAU record setting time of

9:55.6 (Tallahassee Democrat, 4 May 1958). That race marked the first

















The promise Charley Nye had shown in the Miami meet was ful-

filled in the Florida AAU half-mile. The Orlando runner won the 880-

yard run in a school and AAU record shattering time of 1:56.5 (Talla-

hassee Democrat, 4 May 1958). The old FSU standard bearer in the hall

mile, Doyle Ruff, finished third.

The 220-yard dash was the scene of personal triumph for Jack

Terwilliger. The Dade City senior topped arch rivals Ellis Goodloe of

Florida, ageless Buddy Fcwlkes, and teammate Jim Casteel with a spark-

ling one curve time of :21.8. Buddy Powkles, the former standout

sprinter at Georgia Tech, was used by veteran observers as a standard

of measure for sprinting excellence (Long, L.S., 1976). Terwilliger

had just joined a select circle of dashmen who had bested Buddy Fowlks

The magnitude of the feat was not lost on him:

The on17 time I beat Jim Casteel was in the Florida AAU in
my senior year. Not only did I beat Casteal, but also Ellis
Goodloe of Florida, and Buddy Fowlkes.
There was a very sharp curve at Florida and being short, I
practiced running close to the line. I had a very good curve
and managed to hold on to win.
That was my last individual race of my career at Florida
State. I am probably more proud of the Florida AAU 22G-yard
dash victory than anything else in my senior year.
Everytime we ran a 220, I'd be out in front and then I'd
see a long leg come out in front of me and Casteel would move
by--Casteel first and Terwilliger second.
I've wondered to this day if Jimmy let me win that race
because it was my last race in college. He was that type of
guy. In fact, the guys at Florida State were like that.
They wouldn't just let you win, but were people who cared.
I think that was the success of our track team. (Terwilliger,


















three days (Tallahassee Democrat, 4 May 1958). He ran the anchor leg

on the victorious mile relay that clinched the 1958 Florida AAU cham-

pionship for the Seminoles with a fast time of 3:21.0.

A two-man Seminole contingent traveled to Houston for the Meet

of Champions on June 7. Coach Long took Mike Conley and Jim Casteel

in his own private car (Long, L.S., 1976).

The mile run developed into one of the best races of the meet.

The top runners, including Conley, remained tightly bunched throughout

the race. The competition did not really begin until there were only

220 yards left to run. Five different men took their turn at leading

the race during those final yards. Coming off the last curve, Coach

Long felt that his athlete would win (Long, L.S., 1976). Conley was

timed at 4:05.7, only three-tenths of a second behind Oklahoma's

Hodgeson's winning time of 4:05.4 (FSU Track Office Files, 7 June

1958). Mike Conley described his race:

E i 1 .- 1 i i i.i -- ;





Although advancing to the semi-finals in the quarter-mile, Jim Casteel

failed to place in the 440-yard dash.

The Seminoles traveled to Berkeley for the NCAA Outdoor Track












Summary. The Tribe had concluded the most impressive stint

in their ten-year history of track and field. The Seminoles were

undefeated in dual meet competition and battered arch rival Florida

for the first time in their third encounter. The Tribe won the

Coliseum Relays Championship, the unofficial Florida Relays title, and

the Florida AAU crown.

Individual and relay school records fell like rain as the

onslaught by talented performers bettered 12 university marks. Many of

these records would last for years.

Mike Conley was considered by many of his contemporaries to be

the most impressive runner on the talented 1958 squad. Charley Nye,

school record holder in the half-mile, explained why:





ego was recovering, he would return and do it to you all over
again. (Nye, 1975)

Mike Conley set two pairs of distance records in 1958. On

February 13 in Montgomery, Conley spun-out two races that were simply

incredible. He turned the slow indoor dirt track in an astonishing

4:18.8 for the mile. Later that same night, Conley dropped the FSU

indoor two-mile record to 9:50.3.

Coach Long observed that, "Conley ran only as fast as necessary

to win" (Long, L.S., 1976). Since Conley was better than his competi-

tion, no one was ever sure how fast he would have run if exposed to

more national level competition (L~ong, L.S., 1976).

The outdoor equivalents to Mike Conley's indoor mile aond two-

mile school records were also set in 1958. On May 3 in the Florida























Jim Casteel set two individual school records in his first -s

sity year back at Florida State University after a three-year lay-of]

He lowered the quarter-mile school record to :47.0 in the Georgia AAI

This mark remained unbroken for eighteen years. Casteel broke his a]

school record of :49.4 four times during the 1958 campaign. He also

captured the 220-yard low hurdle standard with a sparkling time of

:23,6,

Jerry Henderson became the first Seminole to win an event in

the Pennsylvania Relays. His toss of 217' 4" topped a quality field

of spear-throwers. One short week after the Pennsylvania Relays,

Henderson uncorked a prodigious school record setting throw against t

University of Miami. Hlis javelin traveled 227' 5" before the tip bit

thle ground. An injury during practice cut his throwing career short:

11' -I I El .1 r- ;r - .r i.~I

L;. I .I ~!~ reinjured the elbow and that


Richard Ellwood finally snagged the pole vault record with a

vault of 13' 4" (FSU Track Brochure File, Spring Sports 1959). He h

previously shared the record with Warren Strickland at 13T 2".
















clocking against the University of Miami on May 1.

The Seminoles rewrote four relay entries in the school record

books. The Tribe set three of them on that memorable at the 1958

Florida Relays. The Seminole foursome of Ben George, Charley Nye,

Doyle Ruff, and Mike Conley raced to victory in the two-mile relay with

a time of 7:50.8.

The sprint medley quartet of Jim Casteel, Gary Butner, Jack

Terwilliger, and Mike Conley overcame the efforts of a great Duke

University team and sped to a sterling school and Florida Relays record

time of 3:24.6. Their school record withstood the test of time for

fifteen years.

The miie relay was the final e ...t is the 15th Annual Florida

Relays. Seminoles Terwilliger, Conley, Ruff, and Casteel were ready.

This foursome raced ?o victory and established a school record that

resisted the attempts of the next 10 generations of Tribe mile relays

to better that mark until yielding in 1969. The fast four covered the

mile in 3:14.4.

The lone relay mark that was not set in the Florida Relays

occurred in the Furman University dual meet on March 27. Jack Ter-

williger, Gary Butner, Ted Keen, and Jim Casteel signaled their readi-

ness to run in the 440-yard relay with a record shattering time of













"team." Jack Terwilliger felt that their team spirit was the reason

for their extraordinary success:

We had a fantastic amount of team spirit. People under-










Jack Terwilliger was not alone in his judgment that team spirit

was the cornerstone of the FSU success story. Jerry Henderson related

how team spirit contributed to the overall effort:

I've never seen a team with greater spirit. The members
are always helping each other, even after they have run their
events and would have normally be expected to rest. (Talla-
hassee Democrat, 9 May 1958)


1959

Coach Mike Long was embarking on his fifth year at the helm of

the Seminole track juggernaut. Long's tracksters had compiled a 20-3

win-loss record for an amazing .870 winning percentage. The Tribe

track program had reached a zenith in 1958 when they captured thee

Coliseum Relays, Florida Relays, Florida AAU, and performed well in

the Pennsylvania Relays. For the first time since the conception of

the program in 1949, Florida State rang up an otudefeated dual meet

record as they emerged victorious over four quality opponents.

The lockers of sprint star Jack Terwilliger, distance standout

Mike Conley, and ace javelin thrower Jerry Henderson would stand empty

in 1959. However, the Seminoles confid-itly awaited the opening of

the new season. This confidence sprang from the presence of Jim











Casteel, holder of two individual school records, and school standard

bearers Charley Nye in the half-mile and Richard Ellwood in the pole

vault. The coaching staff was expecting strong performances from

juniors Ted Keen in the sprints, Claude Grizzard in the low hurdles,

and Tom Keeney in the distance events (Long, L.S., 1975). The matur-

ation of sophomores Kent Mils in the distance races ad Charles Drago

in the weights, into solid point contributors was a key factor in the

aspirations of the 1959 Seminoles.

The only weak event on paper was the javelin, a. area tradi-

tionally strong for the Tribe. The lack of an adequate replacement for

the departed Jerry Henderson left the Seminoles vulnerable in the spear

throwing event.

With an increase of $1,700, the track budget moved over the

$10,000 mark. The total operating budget for track and field for 1959

was set at $10,200 (FSU Athletic Office Budget File, 1958-1959).

The Florida State track men put the athletic department's money

to good use by successfully defending their Coliseum Relays champion-

ship in Montgomery on February 14 (FSU Track Office Files, 14 February

1959). The Tribe outpointed runner-up Georgia Tech and a host of

strong contenders. The final tabulation showed Florida State with a

10 1/2 point bulge in the31 /2 to 21 victory over Georgia Tech.

Jim Casteel led the Seminoles with victories in the 60-yard

dash and broad jump with efforts of :06.4 and 22' 2", respectively.

Casteel's effort in the 60-yard dash tied the meet record (Tallahassee

Democrat, 15 February 1959). The talented Avondale, Georgia, senior

ran the anchor leg on FSU's winning mile relay. Charley Nye, Ron












Harrison, and Doyle Ruff joined Casteel in the relay that recorded a

3:30.7 clocking. Despite not winning another event, the Seminoles

used their strong depth to accrue their remaining 16 1/2 points.

The Seminoles put their show no the road outdoors as they

invaded Coral Gables on March 7 to do battle with the University of

Miami (FSU Track Office Files, 7 March 1959). The Seminoles were led

on the warpath by Jim Casteel's twin victories in the 440- and 220-yard

dashes. He was timed :50.5 in the quarter-mile and sped through the

furlong in :21.3.

Fulfilling the promise of greatness, Ted Keen grabbed the

third slot on the all-time Seminole sprint list with his :09.7 victory

in the 100-yard dash. The FSU high hurdle mark, set by Wes Minton in

1953, was broken by the flashing feet of a young man returning to his

high school track. Tom Chivers related his feelings about that race:

The :15.1 record was my most enjoyable race. I had many of
my high school friends there, as I had practiced in high school
on that track. I can even remember my old scoutmaster obser-
ving the meet. Also, FSU really walked over Miami that meet.
(Chivers, 1975)

Kent Mills continued the runners'assault on the school record

book by taking the two-mile run with a fine time of 9:52.5. Doyle Ruff

and Ron Harrison closed out the outstanding individual running perfor-

mances with a 1:59.1 clocking in the half-mile and a :24.2 effort in

the 220-yard low hurdles, respectively.

The field event mer, showed that they were equally adept at

record smashing by destroying the old FSU marks in the shot put and

discus. Don Ostergaard flipped the ironball 49 feet even to whip

Schroeder of Miami and FSU's Charles Drago. The Florida State
























mile relay. The Tribe had run up a 90 1/3 to 41 2/3 winning margin.

March 14 in Baton Rouge was a long, miserable afternoon for t

Seminoles. Louisiana State University, early season favorites to win

the Southeastern Conference, brought Florida State's seven-meet-winni

streak to a screeching halt. Led by all-American football halfback

Billy Cannot, and Ralph Fabian (Tallahassee Democrat, 15 March 1959),

the Tigers won 11 -of 16 events on their way to an 86 to 50 triumph

(FSU Track Office Files, 14 March 1959).

Tom Keeney became the second fastest miler in Seminole track

history by the virtue of his 4:21.5 win in the mile run. The remain

four Tribe victories were achieved by Jim Casteel in the 440-yard des

(:48.3), Kent Mills in the two-mile ron (10:01.5), and with Steve Lon

and Richard Ellwood sharing the top spots with LSU track men in the

high jump and pole vault. Steve Long, the eldest son of FSU mentor

Mike Long, gained his position with a leap of 5' 10", and Ellwood

cleared 13' 1" in the pole vault for his share of first place.

The Seminoles journeyed to Hollywood, Florida, for the Holly-

wood Invitational on March 17. The Seminole foursome of Charles Nye,

Ron Harrison, Doyle Ruff, and Jim Casteel captured the invitational

mile relay with a time of 3:19.4 (Miami Heald 18 March 1959). The

team entry had been limited by the meet selection committee.














on the 26th of March. The Tribe pounded to an overwhelming 108 to 28

defeat of the Paladians (FSU Track Office Files, 26 March 1959).

Doyle Ruff regained his school record by beating Charley Nye

with a 1:56.0 victory in the 880-yard run. Tom Chivers tied his ownn

school mark in the 120-yard high hurdles when only :15.1 elapsed

between the firing of the gun and his breaking of the finish yam..

The second fastest 220-yard dash by a Seminole was run by Jim

Casteel as he captured the furlong with a brilliant :21.0. Richard

Ellwood upped his school standard in the pole vault by one-half inch

with his winning jump of 13' 4-1/2".

The fourth school record was broken when Kent Mills took a

mere 9:54.6 to complete the two-mile circuit. The sophomore outdis-

tanced all of his competition.

Coach Mike Long removed two of his stars from the mile relay

and gave two reserves an opportunity to run. The foursome of Towes,

Taylor, Ruff, and Nye copped the final event with a time of 3:28.9.

The Seminoles returned to the scene of their greatest day in

track and field on March 28 to compete in the 16th Annual Florida

Relays (FSU Track Office Files, 28 March 1959). On a cold and windy

day (Tallhase Deocat 29 March 1959), the Tribe was only able to

duplicate one of their four 1958 relay victories.

The foursome of Roy Jones, Charles N~ye, Doyle Ruff, and Tom

Keeney successfully defended their two-mile relay crown. Running on

new grasstex surface (Long, L.S., 1976), this fast stepping Seminole

team raced to a 7:49.1 school-record setting victory.













Florida State University was in the thlick of the battle for th

title in the hotly contested mile aild sprint medley relays, but the

Seminoles emerged with only a third place finish in the mile relay and

a fourth in the sprint medley to show for their efforts-

Tying for first place, Richard Ellwood was one of three men to

clear 12' 11" in the pole vault. Kent Mills ran the fastest race of

his life in the two-mile run, establishing a new school record, only to

find his clocking of 9:31.4 fast enough for fourth place.

The Seminole entertained the University of Florida on April 11

in Tallahassee (FSU Track Office Files, 11 Ap il 1959). The fans were

treated to a parade of Seminole winners as Florida State stormed to an

82 1/6 to 48 5/6 dismantling of~ the Gators.

The meet was opened on a winning note for the Tribe as Tom

Keeney captured the mile run with a time of 4:25.6. His second win

came in the t-rmile, overtaking teammate Kent Mills in the late stages

of the race (TlahseeDmort 12 April 1959), to become the third

Seminole ever to run under 10 minutes with a strong 9:53.6 triumph.

Jim Casteel was another Seminole double winner as he loped to

a :49.2 victory in the quarter-mile and devastated the 220-yard dash

field in :21.2. Ted Keen performed well despite running a 100 degree

temperature before the meet. The Atlanta native sped to victory In the

100-yard dash (:09.8), finished a close second to Casteel in the 220-

yard dash, and placed second in the pole vault (Tallaha- Demrrit













awarded the time of 1:54.9, a new record for both schools (Tallahassee

Democrat, 12 April 1959).

The shot put event was the scene of intense competition as

FSU's Charles Drago and Don Ostergaard both broke the existing school

mark and failed to win. Drago's throw was measured at 49' 8" and Ostec-

gaard's heave at 49' 5-1/2", but Beaver of Florida won the event at

50' 4",

Co-tinuiog his steady progress, Steve Long became the third

Seminole in FSU history to clear six feet in thebigh jump by winning

the event at 6' 1/2". Competing in his fourth and final Florida-Florida

State dual meet, Richard Ellwood found the winning combination in the

pole vault. His jump of 13' 7" established a new school mark. The

team of Roy Jones, Charley Nye, Doyle Ruff, and Jim Casteel ended the

meet happily for the hame town crowd by taking the mile relay with a

time of 3:23.3.

The Seminole caravan traveled to Greenville, South Carolina,

for the second annual News-Piedmont Relays on April 18 (FSU Track

Office Files, 18 April 1959).

Inclement weather inhibited performances (Long, L.S., 1976),

but did not prevent the Seminoles from entering the winning five relays.

First, the Seminoles captured the 440-yard relay with a slow time of

:43.01. Then Florida State bested Furman University, Citadel, and

the University of Tennessee in the sprint medley relay with a time of

3:11,111*

... it was Lhe distance men's turn, as they continued the

winning parade by adding the distance medley to the Seminole collection















stanuara tor the infrequently run event. The sprinters return

fore and established a new school mark in the 880-yard relay w

quick time of 1:30.5.

Field event men Charles Drago and Richard Ellwood were

things happen on the field. Drago threw the platter 1531 3-1/

victory in the discus. His throw was a new school record as

became the first Seminole to propel the discus more than 150 f

Richard Ellwood coordinated the use of muscle and pole in vaul

13' 4". This was the best performance of the day in the pole

The action reverted to the track for the mile relay.

inoles made it five for five in the relay events with a fine 3

winning effort. The Seminoles had run up a 74 1/2 point total

register a 25-point triumph over Furman University. Jim Caste

selected as the most outstanding athlete of the 1959 News-Pied

Relays (Talahsse emcrt 19 April 1959).

The Tribe returned to the track on April 24-25, in the

vania Relays (FSU Track Office Files, 24-25 April 1959). The

placed third in the college two-mile relay behind the Universi

Michigan and Pennsylvania State. The Tribe mile relay grabbed

the Big 50-Mile Relay Series as North Carolina College won the

3:14.7 and Georgetown University was second.

Florida State University's next competition was on May

the Florida AAU Championships held in Tallahassee. The Semino

















Files, 2 May 1959).

Jim Casteel took his specialty, the quarter-mile, in :49.0.

Doyle Ruff was only one and five-tenth seconds off his school mark

with a new Florida AA\U record setting 1:56.4 triumph in the 880-yard

run (Lallahassee Democrat, 3 May 1959).

FSU's only double winner Charles Drago unleashed a school and

Florida AAU record shattering throw of 154' 10-1/2" in the discus. He

also gained a measure of revenge over Beaver of Florida with a shot

put victory of 49' 1". A new Florida AAU record in the two-ile run of

9:43.5 by Kent Mills (TalaaseeDeocat 3 May 1959) rounded out the

Seminole contingent in the winner's circle.

The Seminoles closed out their season in Atlanta on May 23 for

the Georgia AAU Championships. Florida State's sole win came in the

mile relay, but FSU used their overall depth to great advantage in

accumulating 52 points, well over Georgia Tech's second place total of

32 1/2 markers (Tallahassee Democrat, 24 May 1959).

The Seminoles captured seven seconds nnd three thirds before

the team of Claude Grizzard, Charley Nye, Doyle Ruff, and Jim Caaqteel

won the last event of the meet. The Tribe foursome moved the baton

through the mile in 3:23.8.

Sumrmary. The 1959 squad had been faced with the unenviable












Conference champions (University of Georgia, 1976) Louisiana State

University. The Tribe captured the Coliseum and News-Piedmont Relays

titles and added the Florida and Georgia AAU championships to their

victory ledger.

The 1959 edition of Tribe track found the solution to the nag-

ging absence of a weightman which had plagued the team since the grad-

uation of Jerry Jacobs in 1956. Charles Drago and Don Ostergaard

shared a new FSU mark in the shot put at 49' 8". Drago grabbed the

discus record for himself with a throw of 154' 10-1/2".

Four Seminole standouts closed out their careers at Florida

State University in record breaking fashion. Richard Ellwood complete

his four-year stint at FSU with a new school mark of 13' 7-3/4" against

the Florida Gators. Doyle Ruff finished his career in comparable styl

with a new FSU record-setting performance of 1:54.9 in the 880-yard

run against the University of Florida on April 11.

I=m Chivers set a school record in the 120-yard high hurdles

against the University of Miami on March 7 witha time of :15.1. He

tied his record on March 26 against the Furman Paladans.

On four different occasions, Kent Hills ran under Mike Conley'

two-mile standard. It was ironic that his school record time of 9:31.

gained him only fourth place in the Florida Relays.

The Seminoles rewrote the record book entry in mne relay and

made two new relay postings. The Tribe ran the 88D-yard and distance

medley relays for the first time in the New-piedmont Relays on

April 18. Florida State was successful in both attempts with victory













clockings of 1:30.5 in the 880-yard relay and 10:38.05 in the distance

medley relay.

The team of Roy Jones, Charles Nye, Doyle Ruff, and Tom Keeney

raced to first place in the tw.-mil. relay, establishing a new record

time of 7:49.1, in the Florida Relays.


1960

The Seminole track program had reached a plateau of prominence

during the 1957-58 and 1958-59 seasons. The difficult task of main-

taining this position of leadership stared the 1960 Seminoles squarelv

in the face. The task was made more demanding by the loss of five

school record-bolders after the 1959 season. Doyle Ruff (880-yard run),

Tom Chivers (high hurdles), Richard Ellwood (pole vault), Jim Casteel

(440-yard dash and low hurdles), and Charles Drago (discus).

The Tribe's losses had been great; h owe ver, the Seminoles'

chances for success were bolstered by the return of sprinter-vaulter

Ted Keen; Ron Harrison, 440-yard dash man; Tom Keeney, miler/two-miler;

Kent M~ills, school record holder in the two-mile run; and Don Oster-

gaard, co-holder of the shot put school record. Moving up from the

freshman squad were promising point earners Bill Davis, Jack Brock~smith,

Dave Ellis, Ed flays, Terry Long, Quentin Till, and Bill Welch.

The only weakness appeared, once again, to 1,, in the javelin,

as the responsibility rested solely on the young shoulders of sophomore

Jim Maroon. The 1960 Seminoles possessed outstanding talent. If the

















Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 1975). Every spring

sport absorbed a setback with track being slashed $2,100 (Athletic

Office Budget File, 1959-1960). The austerity program spelled hardshi

for a sport already operating on a financial shoestring.

Florida State University began and ended their abbreviated

indoor schedule by competing in the Third Annual Celiac=m Relays on

February 20 in Montgomery (Montgomery Advertiser, 21 February 1960).

The Coliseum Relays record leap of 6' 2-1/2" by FSU's Steve Long pro-

vided the lone Seminole victory. The mile relay provided a classic

example of racing strategy overcoming superior talent.

The 1960 FSU track brochure listed Claude Grizzard as 6' 2" aT

190 pounds (FSU Track Brochure File, Spring Sports 1960), attribultes

he used to his advantage in the mile relay. Every time the Northeast

Louisiana lead-off man gave Grizzard a glimpse of daylight on the

inside on the turn, he would drive into the opening, forcing his

lighter opponent to the outside. Claude Grizzard described the result



Between the two twins, they had won practically every event.



Till in first place. (Grizzard, 1975)

Using good racing strategy and his physical tools, Claude Grizzardl hac

overpowered a more talented opponent. However, the Tribe eventually

finished second in this event.





























































nit put with his school record setting

iool record occurred in the high jump

.- at 6' 5-3/4". Long's mark also set

imp (Tallahassee. Democrat, 13 March

,moosed of Don RKoberts. Terrv Lone.


The Tribe struggled for points but Northeast Louisiana State

rsity, led by the Styron twins, dominated the meet with 43 points.

University of Kentucky was second with 20 point. and the Tribe

to the show slot with 16 markers after having won the championship

)58 and 1959.

The outdoor season began with an encounter against the Univer-

of Miami on the Seminole's home track on March 12. The Tribe rode

schooll record performances of Ron Harrison, Don Ostergaard, and

Long to a resounding 95 to 41 smashing of the Hurricanes (FSU

SOffice Files, 12 March 1960).

Through the efforts of Claude Grizzard, Quentin Till, Ron

son, and Bill Davis, the Seminoles opened the meet with a swift

0 victory in the 880-yard relay. The Seminoles went on to capture

16 events.

In addition to appearing in the 880-yard relay, Ron Harrison

,d three victories by taking the 100-yard dash in :09.8, the 220-

dash with a time of :20.7, and the low hurdles at :24.0. Although

soan's time in the furlong of :20.7 heated John Poston's school


record, a strong following wind

Democrat, 13 March 1960).

Don Ostergaard took the

throw of 52' 4-1/4". A second st

as Steve Long bounded over the bi

a new track record for the high

1960) A ,nhtitnfe mile relav


Harri


















The Seminoles chalked up their second dual meet win in as many

starts against Furman University in Tallahassee on March 21. The Tribe

employed power and depth In acc umn lating an 87 2/3 to 52 1/3 winning

margin (FSU Track Office Files, 21 March 1960). Ron Harrison and Tom

Keeney keyed the victory effort with two victories apiece. Keeney cap-

ped both the one and two-mile runs with times of 4:28.5 and 10:01.0,

respectively. Competing in four events, Harrison won two finished

second once, and ran the second lea an the triumphant 440-yardl relay

team. The tall sprinter's only defeat came when teammate Ted Keen ran

:10.0 in the 100-yard dash. Harrison galloped through the 22G-yard

low hurdles in :23.8, only two-tenths of a second off the school record.

He finished the day with a :21,0 performance in the 220-yard dash.

Running in only his second varsity meet, Bill Welch broke Tom

Chivers' school record in the 120-yard high hurdles with a winning time

of :15.0. Don Ostergaard raised the school record in the shot put for

the second consecutive meet. He heaved the shot 52' 8-1/2" only to

finish second behind Furman's Ken Garrett. For the second week in a

raw, Steve Long captured the high jump with a fine j ump of 6' 2-3/4".

With two dual meet victories under their belts, the Seminole

tilfnclads geared up for their rematch with Louisiana State University.

The lone Tribe loss of the 1959 season had came at the hands of the

Tiger,. The meet was held on March 24 in Tallahassee. The Seminoles

parlayed strong running and clutch field event performances into a


















Tom Keeney opened the m,

a strong run in the mile. His ,

Till followed Keeney's winning 4

:49.7. He be-ae the third Sem:

h-i-ie in lP i ----11.l.


!t on the right foot for the Tribe with

_ctory was clocked at 4:21.8. Quentin

:auiple by taking the 440-yard dash in

iole ever to crack the 50-second


Before the start of the 100-yard dash, Ralph Fabian, LSU's pre-

mier sprinter, asked the officials if the finish yard could be lowered

so it would not hit him in the face (Tallahassee Democrat, 25 March

1960). Actually, he had little to worry about as FSU's Ron Harrison

broke th~e tape for him in both the 100- and 220-yard dashes. Harrison's

times were a very fast :09.7 for the hundred and a :21.2 clocking! for











125

A school record shattering throw of 53' 7-3/4" by Dan Oster-

gnard netted him only a fourth place finish. Steve Long jumped 6'

2-1/4" in the high j mp and found himself in an identical position.

Ken Mills toured the two miles in 9:48.8, receiving another fourth

place result.

In relay races, the Seminoles continued to meet frustration.

The mile relay of Grizzard, Davis, Till, and Harrison obtained ther

highest finish when their 3:16.5 clocking placed them second. It was

the second fastest mile relay ever run by a Seminole teas; yet, North-

east Louisiana State won easily in 3:12.5.

The 440-yard relay and the sprint medley relay both finished

fifth. Ted Keen, Bill Davis, Quentin Till, and Ron Harrison be-ame

the second fastest Seminole 440-yard relay contingent with a quick

:42.7 clocking. The sprint medley relay foursome of Till, Harrison,

Keen, and Tom Keeney registered the second fastest Florida State time

ever with a 3:30.0 effort.

A small number of Seminoles traveled to Austin for the 33rd

Annual Texas Relays on April 1-2 (FED Track Office Files, 1-2 April

19610). The 880-yard relay team of Ted Keen, Bill Davis, Quentin Till,

and Ron Harrison lowered the school record of this rarely run event to

1:29.1. The Seminoles placed third; however, only three tea- managedd

to finish the race. Steve Long was the only other Seminole placer,

tying for third in the high jump with a leap of 6' 0".

Entering their third consecutive rely carnival, Florida State

University successfully defended their News-Piedmont title by












outdistancing Furman University 100 1/5 to 77 3/5 on April 16 In

Greenville, South Carolina ('Iallahassee De~mo~crat, 17 April 1960).

The Seminoles were paced by victories in three relays and

four individual events. The Tribe quart~t of Ted Keen, Bill Davis,

Quentin Till, and Ron Hlarrison copped the 440-yaird relay with a

sparkling time of :42.6. A school record resulted in the half-mile

relay when the men who had comprised the quarter-mile relay returned

to thle track, blasting to a 1:28.1 clocking.

The powerful stride of Ron Harrison carried him to a :09.8

triumph in the 100-yard dash. For his work in three winning relays

and his victory in hundred, Ron Harrison was awarded the outstanding

athlete of the meet trophy.

Three Seminoles earned themselves victory honors I. the field

events. Jim Maroon hurled the javelin 181' B" for his first victory

as a Seminole. The high jump gold medal went to Steve Long as he

cleared 6' 3-1/4". Keith Crawford became the fourth Seminole to broad

jump over 23 feet with his winning leap of 23' 1".

The Tribe brought a successful afternoon to a satisfying con-

clusion with a victory in the mile relay. The team of Quentin Till,

Lloyd Evans, Cl-lde Grizzard, and Ron Harrison sped to a 3:22.5 clocking.

With the series between the two -h-1,,s tied at two .11, Florida

State University returned to Gainesville on April 25 for their annual

confrontation with the University of Florida. Double victories by Toni

Keeney and Ron Harrison keynoted a hard fought 79 1/2 to 56 1/2 Se.-

Inole victory (FSU Track Office Files, 25 April 1960). The Tribe

triumphs in the 440-yard and mile relays were instrumental in FSU's















a :42.9 win in the quarter-mile relay. Tom Keene,

2onmaud performance in the mile run of 4:25.3 and

tery in the two-mile race with a 10:08.2 clocking.

Bill Welch took the high hurdles in :15.3!













Ron Harrison won the 220-dash with a school, track, and Florida

AAU record shattering :20.3. Harrison's time fell only three-tentha of

a second off of the world record (Florida Flambeau, 10 May 1960); how-

ever, hi victory did not come easy. Bob Sher, University of Miami

sprinter, grabbed an early lead before giving way to Harrison at the

hundred-yard mark. Harrison established a slight lead and was able to

maintain that lead, even though, both Slier and third place Buddyy

Fowlkies broke the old Florida AAU record with times of :20.4 and :20.9,

respectively (Florida Flambeau, 10 May 1960).

The FSU school record in the 120-yard high hurdles dipped under

the 15-second mark as Bill Welch copped the short hurdle event with a

:14.9 clocking. A third FSU record was tied in the 220-yard low hur-

dles when Claude Grizzard burst from the field and sped to a :23.6

clocking. The put of 50' 5-3/4" by Don Ostergaard set a new Florida

AAU mark and wound up FSU's record-setting exploits.

Tom Keeney was the meet's only two-event winner with victories

in the mile and two-mile runs. Henry Wadsworth of the University of

Florida lost his chance when the rain turned the pole vauolt runway

into a quagmire. lie had to settle for a four-way tie for first in the

pole vault after having won the high jump earlier in the afternoon.

Ed Hays of FSU was one of the four men sharing the pole vault title at

13' 0" (Tallahassee Democrat 8 May 1960). Jeff Clark signaled a

warning for future opponents in the discus with his winning toss of

1451 4".













Florida State University was forced to rompet, their track teaml on all

unattached basis.

The official attitude against athletic competition during

final examination week did little to deter a small, determined hand of

Seminoles. Ron Harrison and Tom Keeney combined to win four events

and score a combined total of 21 1/4 points (Atlanta Constitution, 30

May 1960).

The quarter-mile and 220-yard dash titles were captured by the

pounding feet of Ron Harrison. Harrison recorded a :48.0 in the 440-

yard dash before speeding to a new Georgia AAU record time of :20.7

in tile furlong,

An all-time personal best of 4:18.4 by Tom Keeney in the mile

run resulted in a win for FSU's number one distance runner. Elated by

his mile triumph, Keeney outdistanced his competitors in the two-mile

with another personal record performance of 9:42.3.

Ten Seminoles entered into the scoring for tile Tribe as Florida

State University fell two points shy of the Georgia AAU title. The

official record shows Georgia Tech winning the meet with 44 points and

the Atlanta Striders Track Club second with 33 markers, as the Sen,-

inoles were not officially entered as a team.

Sumrmary. Facing a rough schedule with a rebuilding team, the

1960 Seminoles became only the second team in the 12-year history of

track and field at Florida State University to go undefeated in dual













their intrastate rivals, the Tribe made it three in a row over the

Florida Gators and six over the Miami Hurricanes. Florida State

added the News-piadmont Relays and Florida AAU Championships to their

victory catch.

The year had produced five new school records. Ron Harrison

ended his brilliant career by lowering the FSU standard in the 220-

yard dash to an awesome :20.3. Harrison'. time battered the old mark

set by John Poston in 1952 by one-half second. That differential

equates to ever five full yards on the track.

Ron Harrison became the first track man at FSU to ever b

selected by the Florida Flambeau as the FSU athlete of the year

(FlordaFlmbau 20 May 1960). Coach Mike Long was in total agree-

ment with Harrison's selection:




reproach. He's been a tremendous influence on the squad this
year.
Ron came here from Florida Southern In his sophomore vear,
and came out for track. He was enthusiastic about the sport,







L.S., 1960)

The standards in both hurdls events received either alteration

or addition. bill Welch removed Tom Chivers' name from the board by

becoming the first Seminole to run under 15 seconds in the 120-yard

high hurdles with his time of :14.9 in the Florida AAU Championships.

In the same competition, Claude Grizzard tied Jim Casteel's school

record of :23.6 in the 220-vard low hurdles.











Mike Long's eldest son made coaching a little easier for him

by winning the high jump in three of four dual meets and placing in

both the Texas and Florida Relays. Steve Long bettered Lloyd Lassen's

old school mrk of 6' 2" on four different occasions, eventually

raising the record to 6' 5-3/4"


1961

The 1961 season loomed very prosperous for the Seminoles as 13

of 18 lettermen returned from the undefeated team of 1960. However,

the top point getters, Ron Harrison and Ted Keen, along with hurdler

Claude Grizzard and miler Tom Keeney were among those who had completed

their eligibility.

The weight events were solid with the school record-holder in

the shot put, Don Ostergaard, returning. He was joined by Jeff Clark

in the discus. Steve Long, school standard bearer in the high jump,

was back for his final season. Sophomore Herb Kraft and junior Ed

Hays were called upon to deliver in the broad jump and pole vault,

respectively.

The Seminoles were light in the Javelin yet running events

appeared to be strong enough to compensate for the deficiency. Craig

Johnson and Quentin Till held down the sprint events. The high hurdle

event boasted the presence of school record-holder Bill Welch. The

wisdom of moving Terry Long from the middle distance events to the 220-

yard low hurdles was a major question to be answered early in the

season. he Seminoles were not deep in the distance events, but

expected Kent Mills, FSU's record-holder at two miles, and Don Roberts

to represent the Tribe well.











The financial situation was moderately eased for the track team

with the infusion of $2,400 into the operating budget (Athletic Office

Budget File, 1960-1961). However, the Tribe possessed only $3,950 in

the scholarship fund. The cost of a full scholarship at Florida State

University was rated at $984 in 1961 (FSU Bulletin, 1961). In appli-

cation, the Seminoles had only four full scholarships at their disposal.

With 16 events to cover, the Seminole mentor gave only partial scholar-

ships (Long, L.S., 1976). Therefore, the identification. and develop-

ment of latent talent was the cornerstone of rSU's track program. The

Tribe's successes on-the-track were a great tribute to Mike Long's on-

the-field coaching ability.

The Seminoles, under the direction of Mike Long, had won 27 and

lost only four for a winning percentage of .871. The mentor was

heading into his seventh year at the track helm.

The 1961 indoor season had a very depressing beginning in the

Fifth Annual Coliseum Relays in Montgomery on February 4. The Seminoles

finished a distant sixth with only eight and one-half points (Mont-

gomery Advertiser, 5 February 1961).

The Tribe collected their meager winnings with Steve Long's

fourway tie for second place in the high jump at 6' 1", Bill Davis'

ru..rup placing in the 880-yard run, and a second by the mile relay

team.













The Seminoles garnered their only victory in the high jump

where Steve Long and George Smith shared first place with identical

jumps of 6' 1-1/2". The Tribe used third place finishes by Terry Long

in the 60-yard low hurdles, Herb Kraft in the broad jump, and the 20-

lap relay team to run up the remaining bulk of their 30 1/2 point

total. Although the Seminoles finished fourth in the meet, the gap

between the Tribe and their leading competitors had lessened.

With the indoor season over, the Seminoles ran under the

bright Miami sunshine on March 11 against the University of Miami.

Former Miami high school athletes running for the Tribe returned home

to hamnt the Hurricanes. When the day had ended, Florida State had won

14 of 15 events and compiled the third large victory margin in their

13 years of track at the university (MimiHerld 12 March 1961).

The 102 to 29 defeat was spearheaded by Quentin Till, whose

family resided in Coral Gables. Till scored 11 1/4 poir-ts for the

Seminoles by winning the 440-yard dash (:49.6), 220-yard dash (:22.8),

and anchoring the mile relay.

Quentin Till was joined by two other Miami athletes competfii

for Florida State. Bill Davis copped the 880-yard run in 1:58.0, while

Jeff Clark spun the platter 153' 9-1/2' for victory in the discus.

Miami broad jumper Frank Lloyd suffered his first intercol-

legiate defeat when F'SU's Herb Kraft leaped 22' 11-3/4" for victory.

The sale FIU record performance was in the 120-vard hich hurdles as











134

mercifully brought the meet to its end with a victory snatching

clocking of 3:22.5.

The Seminoles met the University of Alabama for the first dual

meet ever between the two schools on March 23 in Tallahassee. The

Tribe won five of six field events and used depth in the running

events to ease out a 71 1/2 to 59 1/2 victory (FSU Track Office Files,

24 March 1961).

Don Ostergaard copped his sp-cialty with a put of 53' 3". With

the bar resting at 6' 5" and his competitors eliminated from further

competition, Steve Long catapulted his lean 6' 1" frame over the cross-

bar to win the event.

The 100- and 220-yard dashes were the only running events won

by the Seminoles. Both sprint races were captured by Craig Johnson

with times of :10.0 odd :21.7, respectively.

With only the discus and mile relay remaining, and the Seminoles

holding a fragile seven-point lead, the young foursome of Tom Houston,

Craig Johnson, Bill Davis, and Quentin Till salted away the Tribe

triumph with the fastest dual meet mile relay ever run by a Seminole

quartet. The 3:17.5 clocking also established a new track record

(Tallahassee Democrat, 25 March 1961). The victory over the University

of Alabama illustrated the progress the young Seminoles were making as

the Crimson Tide had finished ahead of the Tribe in both the Coliseum

Relays and the Memphis Relay Carnival.

The 18th Annual Florida Relays were not very productive for

the Florida State Seminoles. The Tribe managed only one second, one


















The Sprint medley team composed of Quentin Till, Bill Davis,

Terry Long, and Craig Johnson sped to a 3:26.8 clocking that earned

them only third place in the Florida Relays, yet was the second fastest

sprint medley ever run by a FSTJ team. George Smith cleared 6' 1-3/4"

in the high jump to tie for fo-rth. A put of 51' 7-1/2" landed Don

Ostergaard a fifth in the shot put.

FSU's mile relay clocking of 3:16.0 was the Second f.Stest time

ever for a Seminole team, but still fell far short of Princeton's win-

ning time of 3:13.1. Florida State nosed out the University of Ala-

bama, Citadel, and Auburn University for second place as only nine-

tenths of a second separated second place from fifth.

The Seminoles sailed to their third dual meet victory of the

young season by overpowering Furman University on March 27, in Tall--

hassee (FSU Track Office Files, 27 March 1961). Using their Strength

in the field events, the Tribe rolled up an 86 to 45 advantage over

the 1961 indoor Southern Conference champions (Tallahassee emocrat

28 March 1961).

The Seminoles swept all six field events with the high jumpers

leading the charge. Steve Long and George Smith tied for first with

jumps of 6' 4-1/2". Mike O'Brien finished third with a leap of 6' 2".

It was the first time that three Seminoles had jumped over six feet

in the Same meet.

Herb Kraft bec-ie t he third FSU jumper to cover more than 23

feet in the broad jump with his winning jump of 23' 3-1/2". A personal













record jump of 13' 1" gave Franklin Ford the top spot in the pole



va 'The Tribe managed to win only three of the foot-races. Both

hurdle races came to the Seminoles through the efforts of Bill Welch

and Terry Long. The high hurdles were captured by Welch in :15.0 wi

Long second. Long reversed the order of find,,!, with Welch in the 22

yard low hurdles with a personal best clocking of :23.9. Quentin Ti

raced to the remaining victory in the quarter-mile in :49.7.

The Seminoles and Louisiana, State Ulniversity conducted their

annual meeting on April 8 in Baton Rlouge (FSU Track Office Files, 8

April 1961). The confrontation was a typical struggle between the

schools that was not decided until the final event.

The Senminoles won only three running events from the defiendi

Southeastern Conterence champions (Tallahassee Democrat, 9 April 196

Quentin Till captured the 440-yard dash with the tremendous time of

:47.7. His clocking was the fastest quarter-mile ever run by a Se--

inale around two curves. The school record :47.0 set by Jim Casteel

in the 1958 Georgia AAU meet was run around only one curve.

A personal best time of 1:55.1 was required from Bill Davis

order to win the 880-yard run. A p-rsonal achievement of the same

magnitude was demanded of Terry Long in the 220-yard low hurdles. 7

second son of Coach Mike Long responded with a winning effort of :23

Kent Mills came up with his best time of the 1961 campaign with his

winning clocking of 9:45.5 in the two-mile run.

The Seminoles split the field events with the Tigers as Stev

Long captured the high jump at 6' 4-1/4"; Herb Kraft won the broad
























































ark in the shot put to 54' 1/2". A

i was set with Steve Long's winning

Democrat, 15 April 1961). The fie]

inning efforts in individual events

I" in the discus and Herb Kraft's













Florida State University chalked up their seventh straight

winning dual meet season as they exterminated the University of Florida

in Tallahassee on April 21. The Seminoles extended their winning

streak over the Gators to four with a 104 1/3 to 30 2/3 defeat of their

archrivals (FSU Track Office Files, 21 April 1961). The Tribe cap-

tured 14 of 16 events which included Terry Long's school record per-

formance in the 220-yard low hurdles.

Junior Terry Long capped his long slow struggle for athletic

success with a school record blast in the 22G-yard low hurdles. He

cut four-tentbs of a second off the record held jointly by Jim Casteel

and Claude Grizzard with his time of :23.2.

Craig Johnson scored two sprint victories by taking the 100-

and 220-yard dashes. His winning times were a sparkling :09.8 and

:21.5, respectively. Johnson also led off the winning 440-yard relay

and ran second leg on the victorious mile relay. The other members of

th, :42.9 440-yard relay team were Keith Crawford, Terry Long, and

Quentin Till.

Dave Ellis produced the first win of his track career at

Florida State with a :15.1 clocking in the 120-yard high hurdles. The

development of the talented hurdler had been slowed by periodic ham-

string tears. Ed Rays became the second Seminole in 1961 to clear 13

feet in the pole vault with his winning jump of 13' 1".

The mile relay of Dave Ellis, Craig Johnson, Bill Davis, and











139

victory enjoyedl by either team in the history of the series (Talla-

hassee Democrat, 22 April 1961).

Selected Seminole entries competed in the Pennsylvania Relays

on April 28-29 in Philadelphia (New York Times, 30 April 1961). The

consolation division of the high jump was the most productive for the

Seminoles as George Smith was second at 6' 4" and Steve Long tied for

third with a jump of 6' 2".

Don Ostergaard placed second in the consolation division shot

put with a throw of 51' 1/4". The sprint medley relay team completed

the Seminoles' success by finishing third in the nonchampionship

division.

Florida State University captured their fourth Florida AAU

Championship in a raw on May 6 in Gainesville (Florida Times-Union,

7 May 1961). FSU won five individual events before icing their victory

by winning the mile relay.

Quentin Till had a superlative day by winning the 440-yard

dash in :48.1, tying the ageless Buddy Fowlkes in the 220-yard dash

with a :21.4 clocking, and anchoring FSU's Florida AAU record setting

mile relay team.

The Seminoles reigned over the hurdle events as Dave Ellis

skimmed over the 42-inch barriers to register a :15.0 victory and

Terry Long dominated the 220-yard low hurdles in :23.8. The field

events provided additional firepower for the Tribe. A throw of 51'

7-3/4" by FSU's Don Ostergaard was the best toss of the day in the shot

par. Herb Kraft continued bis steady progress in the broad jump with

a winning leap of 23' 1/4".












The Seminole mile relay team composed of Tom Houston, Craig

Johnson, Bill Davis, and Quentin Till grabbed the five first place

points with a Florida AAU record clocking of 3:19.8, driving the Sem

inoles aggregate total to 55 markers. The University of Miami trailed

with 42 voint..

The Seminoles completed their season by competing in the

Georgia AAU meet on May 20 in Atlanta (Atlata Cnstittion 21 May

1961). Despite winning only one event, the Seminoles collected 42

points by grabbing five seconds and utilizing numerous fourth and fifth

place finishes. This placed the Tribe second, only four points shy of

Auburn University's winning total of 46. Quentin Till contributed the

Seminoles' lone victory as he copped the quarter-mile in :48.1.

Two Seminoles tasted defeat in their specialties for the first

time during the 1961 campaign. In a dual of short hurdlers, Terry long

finished second to Ron Ablowich of Georgia Tech in both the 220-yard

low hurdles and the 440-yard intermediate hurdles. Herb Kraft dropped

the broad jump as he finished second to Carr of the University of

Georgia.

Summary. With the season at an end, the Seminoles could pause

and reflect back upon their year with satisfaction. The Tribe had

returned 13 of 18 lettermen from the 1960 squad and had begun the sea-

son with high hopes. The 1961 team lived up to their advanced billings

by capturing the News-Piedmont and Florida AAU Championships. The only


















their mastery over the Florida Caters with a decisive 104 1/3 to 30 2/2

win.

The FIorida State track men rearranged the record board by sct-

ting six new school records. Don Ostergaardi improved his shot put

record to 54' 1/2". However, his close friend, Steve Long lost hiis

high jump mark to junior George Smith's leap of 6' 6" in the Florid,

AAU meet.

Juniors Terry Long and Bill Welch lowered the school marks in

both hurdle events. Choosing a =ast opportune time, Terry Long whip-

ped through a :23.2 record setting run in the 220)-yard low hurdl-s

against the Univ-rsity of Florida. Bill Welch set his record of :14.8

in the 120-yard high hurdles in the first meet of the outdoor season

against the Miami Hurri-anes.

The 88G-yard relay team composed of Q~uentin Till, Terry Long,

Bill Davis, and Craig Johnson streaked to a 1:28.5 school record in the

News-Fiedmont Relays. Quentin Till ran to a :47.7 victory in thee

quarter-mile against Louisiana State University, thereby becoming thee

fastest Seminole for a quarter-mile run around two curves.


1962

The 1962 FSU track team had inherited an impressive legacy.

Under the tutelage of Mike Long, no Seminole track team had ever suf-

























































improving performer, was a figure to watch in

overall strength of the Seminoles was the key

field events appeared to be the best in years.

The Seminoles opened their season wit]

Coliseum Relays on February 3 in moutgomery.

and finished a disappointing fifth (FSU Track

1962).











143

Tom Bourne was the only Seminole to win an event. Ile cleeired

6' 2" on his winning jump, falling only one-half inch short of Steve

Long's indoor school record. The only other noteworthy Seminole per-

formance came in the shot put when Jeff Clark established a new Tribe

standard with a throw of 50' 3". Clark finished third in the final

shot put standings.

The Seminoles quickly bounced back in the Second Annual Memphis

Junior Chamber of Commerce Indoor Track Carnival an February 23-24.

Florida State had traveled to the meet in station wagons. When the

team arose the following morning to go to the meet, they had to scrape

the snow off of their vehicles. Over an inch of snow had fallen during

the night (Long, T. N., 1976).

The track meet was held in a converted cattle arena where the

sides of the buidling did not touch the ground. This gap allowed the

wind to whip across the arena. Terry Long related that he was dis-

tracted at the start of the 60-yard low hurdle preliminary by the snow

drifting across the straightaway (Long, T. N., 1975).

The heat for the building was provided by four huge blowers

stationed in each corner. The only warm spots in the house were

directly in front of the heaters. The overall inside temperature

during the morning preliminaries was a chilly 33 degrees.

The temperature did not cool the Seminoles as Florida State

captured two relays and one individual event on the way to a 59 1/2 to

51 victory over runner-up Alabama (FSU Track Office Files, 23-24

February 1962).











144

The team of Craig Johnson, Terry Long, Bill Davi,, and Quentin

Till raced to victory in the eight-lap relay. Quentin Till overcome an

almost insurmountable deficit .. the anchor leg to give the Seminoles

a spin-tingling victory.

Quentin was so far behind that he could look across the
track and see the l e r -~.i i i
to give it a shot.
thought that he had to tie up, but asQuentin got closer, he







Davis Ellis joined Johnson, Davis, and Till in the 12-lap relay

as this contingent grabbed another win in meet record time. The

irregular size of the track and the odd number of laps run made the

relay times virtually meaningless for comparative purposes.

Decked out in a pair of white thermal underwear under his track

uniform, George Smith tied for first in the high jump at six feet even

(Long, I. N., 1975). Jeff Clark upped his school record in the shot-

put to 51' 4-4/5". It was the second meet in a row that an outstanding

throw failed to net Clark a victory as he had to settle for the runner-



usptA ..all land of Seminoles journeyed to Louisville, Kentucky, on

February 17 for the Mason-Dixon Games. The 600-yard run produced the

only Seminole place in the meet. In a three-way blanket finish, FSU's

Quentin Till was picked second with the top thr-e runners being give.

the same time. Till's clocking of 1:11.2 established a new Seminole

standard for the 600-yard run (Louisville Courier-Journal, 18 February

1962).










145

The Seminoles began the 1962 outdoor season with a traditional

opener against the Miami Hurricanes. The meet was run in Tallahassee

on March 10 (Talaase Dmcrt 11 March 1962).

Dick Roberts finished between a pair of Hurricane milers with a

fine time of 4:22.5 in the first event. It was the first outdoor meet

for Roberts in a Seminole uniform. His time placed him third on the

all-time list of Seminole milers.

As the fourth Tribe sprinter to run :09.7, Craig Johnson raced

to victory in the 100-yard dash. Quentin Till capped the remaining two

sprint races with fine times of :48.8 and :22.3 in the 440- and 220-

yard dashes, respectively.

The 880-yard run was a Seminole show as sophomore Jack Brock-

smith won in 1:56.0, closely followed by Bill Davis in 1:56.7. It was

the first time two Seminoles had run under 1:57.0 in the same race.

Seminoles Mike O'Brien and George Smith tied for first in the high

jump at 6' 1-1/2". Tom Bourne made the vertical jumping event an all

Seminole affair by taking the third spot.

Jeff Clark broke into the win column with a throw of 53' 10-1/2"

in the shot put. Herb Kraft fell just short of the school record in

the broad jump as he broke sand at 23' 5-1/4". Although Kraft missed

the school record, he did win the event. The pole vault went to Ed

Hays with a jump of 13' 5-3/4".

The background preceding Terry Long's school record setting

dash in the 220-yard law hurdles merits mentioning. The stocky hurdler

had neglected his training over the Christmas holidays. Consequently,

the indoor season turned into a struggle for the senior. A week prior










146

to the Miami meet, he had made the mistake of wondering out loud to

Coach Long, his father, on why his performances had not been coming

around. Mike Long had never mentioned his disapproval of his son's

training habits over the holidays, yet once Terry had broached the

subject, a frank, 45-minute discussion followed on how he should be

running after that type of holiday training (Long, I. N., 1975).

Motivated to run well, Terry Long skimmed over the 10 low hur-

dles in a meet, track, and school record time of :22.9, After hearing

of his time, he came running back down the track shouting, ":22.9!

:22.9!" The first man to speak was Coach Mike Long who brought his

son back to earth with, "It was good, but it wasn't that good" (Long,

I. N., 1975). Despite the value of this psychology, the time was

"that good." It was the leading collegiate time in the nation to that

date! (Long, I. N., 1975).

Seminoles Craig Johnson, Jack Brocksmith, Bill Davis, and

Quentin Till finalized the score at 76 1/2 to 53 1/2 with their 3:22.9

victory in the mile relay. The Tribe had opened the season on a vic-

torious note.

FSU went after their second win of the season against the Pal-

adins of Furman University. The Seminoles hosted their visitors on

March 16. With hospitality displayed only off the track, the Tribe

onslaught overpowered the Paladins by a 82 to 54 margin (FBI) Track

Office Files, 16 March 1962).

The Seminole runners were unable to perform up to their normal

standards, but the field event meet took up the slack. Terry Long was











the only footracer to turn in a fast time as he sped to a :23.5 victory

in the 220-yard low hurdles.

Jeff Clark scored twin victories in the weight events. The

255-pound giant exploded the iron ball 52' 6" and tossed the discus

154' 8-1/4". Herb Kraft uncorked another 23-foot jump in the broad

jump when he traversed 23' 3-1/8" down the pit to victory.

The top spot in the pole vault was shared by Ed Hays of Florida

State and Keel of Furman at 13' 7". The only man to clear 6' 3" in the

high jump was George Smith of FSU.

The mile relay team of Craig Johnson, Terry Long, Bill Davis,

and Quentin Till raced to victory in 3:19.4, bringing the meet to a
close.

The Seminoles met the University of South Carolina in the first

dual meet competition between the two schools, on March 24 in Columbia,

South Carolina. Florida State finished on the long end of an 81 to 50

score (FSU Track Office Files, 24 March 1962).

Quentin Till led teammate Terry Long to a Seminole weep of the

top two places in the quarter-mile with a time of :48.5. Long ran a

personal best of :49.4 (Long, T. N., 1975). The 880-yard run winner

was Bill Davis of FSU with an excellent time of 1:55.4.

The Seminoles captured five of six field events as the Tribe

grabbed 40 of the 54 available points. The big blows were struck by

Jeff Clark in the shot put and discus as he won both events with

efforts measuring 49' 10-3/4" and 151' 9", respectively.

The school record set by Richard Ellwood in 1959 was broken by

the 13' 11" vault of Ed Hays. Herb Kraft jumped 23' 4-1/2" for his










148

third straight victory in the broad jump. The Seminoles received a

relatively easy victory in the javelin as Barry Topper hurled the spear

177' 3-1/2".

An interesting subplot unfolded in the South Carolina meet.

Terry Long and Spike Olsen were very close friends and extremely compe-

titive on the track. On the bus trip to Columbia, Olsen declared that

he was going to beat Long in the 220-yard low hurdles (Olsen, 1976).

Olsen had never beaten the school record bolder in the low hurdles.

Spike Olsen remembered the race:







--------i r1^~~ --' fFr- T A--l




The story differs only slightly when told by Terry Long:

I had a personal record in the 440-yard dash of :49.4.
Unfortunately, I got really sick and the dry heaves continued
6''iI

to run.
I moved into the set position and my stomach contracted





Florida State University and Louisiana State University renewed

their annual battle on March 29 in Tallahassee. The teams had swapped

victories for three years with each winning on their home track. Now

it was Florida State's turn to have the home track advantage. The

resulting FSU 85 to 50 victory was keyed by their ability to win both

relays (FSU Track Office Files, 29 March 1962).












Spike Olsen, Hutch Johnson, Terry Long, and Quentin Till

flashed to a sparkling ;42.4 victory in the 440-yard relay. After run-

ning against the LSU hurdler on the third leg of the 440-yard relay,

Terry Long topped the low hurdlers with a superb :22.6 clocking.

Jeff Clark set a new school record in the first of his twin

victories with a throw of 55' 3-1/4" in the shot put. His throw of

150' 3-1/8" was the best toss in the discus. The school record that

had eluded Herb Kraft for so long became his with the winning jump of

23' 7-3/4" in the broad jump.

The second fastest high hurdle time in Seminole track history

snared the top spot in the 120-yard high hurdles for Dave Ellis who

won with a sparkling :14.9 mark. Craig Johnson of Florida State

shared first place in the 100-yard dash with Fornaris of LSD as both

men were timed in :09.7.

A superb time of 1:56.2 brought Bill Davis top honors in the

880-yard run. The mile relay team of Dave Ellis, Lemn Smith, Jack

Brocksmith, and Craig Johnson closed out the meet with a winning effort

of 3:24.5.

The 19th Annual Florida Relays was the second meet in three

days for the Seminoles. March 31 was a difficult day for the Tribe.

The effort was there but the victories were not (FSU Track Office Files,

31 March 1962).











































53' 2-3/4" earned FSU's Jeff Cla

ays vaulted 13' 6" to tie for fou



Loaded into private cars on April

in the Texas Relays. The Tribe c;

,i the pole vault and a sixth placl

for their efforts (New York Time:

3' 6" by Ed Hays gave Florida Sta-














The times and pertomances were not outstanding, but the garnet and

gold took home their share of victories. The Tribe won the distance

medley and mile relays, while finishing second in the sprint medley,

two-mile, and 440-yard relays (FSU Track Office Files, 12-13 April

1962).

Jeff Clark captured both the shot put and discus. He hurled

the ball 51' 9-1/2" and the platter 146' 4-1/2" for his two triumphs.

B Hays turned in the outstanding Seminole performance of the meet with

his school record shattering jump of 14' 2". He became the first

Seminole vaulter to scale the 14-foot barrier in the pole vault.

The News-Piedmont Relays had changed their fomat and for the

first time there was no team title. The Seminoles had to be content

with their individual performances after having won the title in 1960

and 1961.

During the period of April 24 through 29, the FSU track team

did not accomplish much more thn covering over 2,00 miles in two

university station wagons. The primary Seminole objective was to make

a good showing in the Pennsylvania Relays, but the meet results showed

the Tribe collecting only two thirds, one of which was a tie.

Jeff Clark tossed the iron ball 50' 9-1/2" for third in the

shot put (New York Times, 29 April 1962). A jump of 13' 6" by Ed Hays

gave the Tribe their tie for third in the pole vault (Nw York Times,

29 April 1962).

The Seminole bus headed for Gainesville on April 21 for the

Tribe's seventh dual meet encounter with the University of Florida










152

(PSU Track Office Files, 22 April 1962). Before the afternoon was over,

the Seminoles owned a 83 to 53 victory over the Caters.

The Tribe was led by Terry Long as the senior hurdler competed

in four events in which either a meet or school record was set. The

fleet hurdler ran on both Seminole relays and competed In the two

hurdle events.

The 440-yard relay foursome of Quentin Till, Hutch Johnson,

Terry Long, and Craig Johnson began the competition with a Seminole

victory, establishing a new FSU record of :42.0.

On the Wednesday preceding the meet, Dave Ellis pulled a hou,

string and was lost for the Florida meet (Long, T. N., 1975). With

only two days of practice on the high hurdles, Long topped the 120-

yard high hurdle field with an FSU record setting :14.7. Long came

back in his specialty, the 220-yard law hurdles, to zip to victory in

a school record breaking ran around one turn of :23.4. He ended the

day by running the lead-off leg on the mile relay team that set a meet

record of 3:18.8. Long was joined by Jack Brocksmith, Bill Davis,

and Craig Johnson.

The Seminoles received twin victories by Dick Roberts and Jeff

Clark. Competing in his first Florida dual meet, Dick Roberts domin-

ated the mile and two-mile tons with times of 4:28.7 and 10:06.8,

respectively. Jeff Clark was equally intimidating in the weight

events as he captured the shot put and discus. The imposing Clark tos-

sed the shot 52' 11" and heaved the discus 143' 4". The Tribe's Allen

Williams was second in both events.
















sweep in the pole vault with a jump of 13' 6". In the second slot was

Bill Crotty, with Franklin Ford finishing third.

The Tribe entered the Florida AAU meet in search of their fifth

straight victory, but encountered the consolidated forces of the

greater Miami region. The University of Miami joined their variety and

freshman squads to form the Miami Athletic Club. The combination proved

too strong for the Seminoles as the Tribe fell by three and one-half

points to the Miami Athletic Club (FSU Track Office Files, 4 May 1962).

Jack Brocksmith won the 880-yard run with a school record set-

ting 1:54.5. The low hurdles belong to Terry Long for the second year

in a row. The shot put was captured by Jeff Clark with a fine throw

of 53' 7-1/3". The final FSU victory in an individual event was by

Ed Hays in the pole vault with a jump of 13' 6". The mile relay team

consisting of Craig Johnson, Jack Brocksmith, Bill Davis, and Quentin

Till won the mile relay in 3:19.2.

The loss of Herb Kraft in the broad jump with a pulled hamstring

proved to be the difference in the meet (Long, L.S., 1976). He was a

consistent 23-foot jumper and his specialty was won at only 22' 7".

His five points could have won the meet. However, a team =ast compete

with the people ready to participate on a given day. The Miami Athletic

Club gained a hard fought 50 to 46 1/2 victory over the Seminoles of










































a and Claude Grizzard's record le

6. At the end of the competitive

d fastest collegiate time run in

440-yard relay contingent of Crai









155

Captain Jeff Clark concluded his track career at FSU with a

very productive senior year. It was highlighted by his school record

throw in the shot put of 551 3-1/4" against LSU. He -as a strong com-

petitor all year and it seemed inevitable that the record would fall

to his efforts.

Junior Herb Kraft finally tagged the broad jump record after

many jumps over the 23-foot barrier. He unleashed his record jump of

23' 7-3/4" against the Tigers of LSU. He did not suffer a dual meet

loss in his specialty all year.

Four years of dedicated work culminated in a school record

vault of 14' 2-1/2" for Ed Hays at the News-Piedmont Relays. Ed Hays

made steady progress from a jumper at struggling to clear 12 feet to a

school record holder.

The spring of 1962 brought to a close the track career of

Quentin Till. The bantam battler did not better his school record for

the quarter-mile run around two curves, but he did establish an indoor

standard for the 600-yard run of 1:11.2 in the Mason-Dixon Comes. His

mark remained intact for 12 years. Till had a lightning split on the

anchor leg of the mile relay of :47.3 in the Florida Relays. The man

was aptly described by freshman teammate Floyd Lorenz, "as a skinny

little guy whose running style was all wrong, but he always ran to win.

He seemed to have an awfully big heart" (Lorenz, 1975).









156

for the new campaign (FSU Track Brochure File, Spring Sports 1963).

Not only were lettermen lost, but five of the missing 13 were school

record holders. One of the five record holders, Terry Long, still had

one season of indoor eligibility remaining.

The 1963 team centered around the six returning lettermen and

a foursome of promising sophomores. Co-captains Craig Johnson and Herb

Kraft led the returnees that included Allen Williams, Dick Roberts, Jim

Lankford, and Hutch Johnson. Among the sophomores heavily counted upon

were hurdler-jumper Floyd Lorenz, sprinters Jerry McDaniel and Al Cato,

and half-miler Ross Winter.

The Seminoles were going to have to off set weak area. J. the

pole vault, javelin, and hurdles by strong performances in the sprint

and weight events. The young Seminoles would have to mature rapidly.

FSU's financial situation brightened considerably in the Fiscal

Year 1962-63. The Tribe's operating budget was raised by over $3,500.

In addition, the scholarship portion of the budget was increased by

$3,000. The Seminoles began the 1963 season in the best financial

shape of their 15-year history (FSU Athletic Office Budget File, 1962-

1963),

Florida State opened their indoor season at Montgomery in the

Coliseum Relays cr February 16. The vouag Tribesmen gathered in at

important 35 to 23 1/2 victory over second place Southwestern Louisi-

ana State University (FSU Track Office Files, 16 February 1963). The

Seminoles set four indoor school marks and tied another.

Allen Williams exploded the shot 54' 6" to obliterate the old

mark of 51' 8" set by Jeff Clark the year before in Memphis. The











60-yard low hurdles standard was lowered by Terry Long as he raced to

a quick :07.0 victory. Herb Kraft set the Indoor equivalent to his

outdoor broad jump record with a winning leap of 22' 5-3/4".

Dick Roberts became the first Seminole to break the two-minute

barrier indoors in the 880-yard run with his 1:59.5 victory. In cop

ping the 60-yard dash, Craig Johnson paired his name with Jack Ter-

williger's in FSU's school record book at :06.3.

For the first time, the Coliseum Relays had split the competi-

tion into a Southeastern Conference division and .a nonconference divi-

sion. This division had aided the Seminoles in their quest for the
title.

Florida State returned to Memphis on ebruary 23 in hopes of

repeating their 1962 victory. The hope for a consecutive Memphis

Junior Chamber of Commerce Relays Carnival triumph faded slowly as the

Seminoles finished third with 35 points (FSU Track Office Files, 23

February 1963). The championship was won by Clemson University with

53 points, as the University of Georgia grabbed second with 43 markets.

Several Seminoles turned I. outstanding performances. Allen

Williams continued his upward trend in the shot put with a long throw

of 55' 4-1/2". His winning throw also set a new Seminole record for

the indoor shot put. Only one-tenth of a second off his school record,

Terry Long captured the 601-yard low hurdles in :07.1.

The Tribe won two other events as Dick Roberts copped the mile

run (4:37.5) and the twelve-lap relay team of Al Cato, Tom Houston,

Doug Ferry, and Jerry McDaniel duplicated FSU's 1962 relay victory.


































but expected the 1963 meet to be very tough.

FSU received fine performances from sprinters Al Cato and Cra:

Johnson. Sophomore Cato became the fifth Seminole sprinter to run

:09.7 as he ran to victory in the 100-yard dash. He dominated the

furlong as he clocked a swift :22.0. The Tribe's control of the spri

races was made complete by Craig Johnson's :49.4 triumph in the quartE

mile.

The mile run was won by FSU's Dick Roberts in 4:24.0; however,

the Miami distance runnerra were able to take Roberts in the grueling

two-mile as a strong late kick by Bill Payne carried him by Roberts fc

second place. Byron of Miami won the race after having finished

second in the mile run.

The 120-yard high hurdles were a fiasco as the ninth and tentl

hurdles were mis-set causing the stride pattern of the hurdlers to be

thrown off. All three leading men fell with Dankes and Turek of MiamJ

outscrambling FSU's Floyd Lorenz to the finish line (Lorenz, 1975).









159

The field events produced double victories for two Seminoles.

Bill Giswold copped the high jump at 6' 3/4" and established a school

record in the triple jump, a new event, of 42' 1/2". Allen Williams

won both the shot put and discus with throws of 55' 2-3/4" and 157'

8", respectively. Williams' heave in the discus was a new school

record.

The mile relay team of A1 Cato, Tom Houston, Craig Johnson, and

Jerry McDaniel brought the Tribe from four points back to an apparent

one point win with their 3:21.1 triumph. Subsequently, the coaches

were eating supper when they received word to the effect that the Miami

team was claiming the victory. A phone call to the Miami coach veri-

fied this story (Long, 1976. Later, Coach Bob Downes was quoted in

the Miami Herald as saying:

FSU was credited with three points for being second in the
pole vault. That was wrong. Gene McCleary of our squad
actually was second and Bill Giswold was third. That means
two points have to be subtracted from FSU's total and two
points added to our score. So we win, 70 1/2 to 69 1/2.
(Miami Herald, 10 March 1963)

Coach Mike Long contended that the confusion occurred over

third place in the shot put Long refused to accept the results, and

the meet was scored as a victory by both teams. As described by Miami

Herald sports writer, Luther Evans, "it was an interesting, but weird

meet from start to finish" (Miami Herald, 10 March 1963).

Florida State's next competition was on their home track on

March 16 against Furman University. The Paladins reversed the tables

on the Seminoles for the first time in four meetings (FSU Track Office

Files, 16 March 1963).












The Florida State 440-yard relay team composed of Jerry McDaniel

McDaniel, Hutch Johnson, Al Cato, and Craig Johnson opened the meet

with a blazing :41.7 school record setting performance that powered

them to victory. The Seminoles Were unable to sustain their momentum

in the footracing competition as Furnan, captured seven of the eight

remaining running events. The only Seminole to break Furman's strangle-

hold was Hutch Johnson, using a :09.5 in the 100-yard dash. Johnson's

time was better than the existing school record, but was disallowed due

to a strong favoring wind (Long, L.S., 1976). The Tribe was dealt a

severe blow when Al Cato, leading Hutch Johnson at the 40-yard mark in

the 100-yard dash, tore a hamstring and Was lost for weeks (Long, C. M.,

1076) '

Allen Williams copped the shot put with a throw of 55' 8-1/4"

and outstripped the discus field with a heave of 148' 3-3/4". The

throw in the shot put erased Jeff Clark's old school mark of 55' 3-1/4".

Within the space of one short month, Al Williams had broken both Jeff

Clark's indoor and outdoor shot put records. Bill Giswold established

another school record with a leap of 45' 1/4" in the triple jump.

The score was 68 to 63 in favor of Furman going into the final

two events, but outstanding performances by Furman's Patterson in the

twu-mile and the Paladin mile relay closed the door on the Seminoles'

chances of victory. The final tally showed Furman with 78 and the









161

27 March 1963). It was the largest dual meet victory margin since the

Seminoles mauled Howard College 109 to 17 in 1950.

The Seminoles won 12 of the 15 events and were not pressed in

many of the races. Together, Bill Giswold and Allen Williams won five

of the Tribe victories. Giswold won three jumping events by leaping

6' 4-1/4" in the high jump, 42' 3/4" in the triple jump, and 21' 2-3/4"

in the long jump. Upping his school record in the shot put for the

second time in as many meets, Allen Williams flipped the ball 55' 11".

He threw the discus 152' 5-1/2" for his second win of the day.

In the third meet in which the 330-yard intermediate hurdles

were run, Craig Johnson gained a school record when he topped the field

with a time of :39.8. The hurdle victory was his second win of the day

as he had previously captured the 440-yard dash in :50.0.

All 195 pounds of -xfootballer Jerry McDaniel wheeled around

one curve for a quick :21.9 clocking in the furlong. The quality of

the promising sophomore's first varsity victory in the 220-yard dash

tabbed him as one to watch in future races.

The Florida Relays of 1963 was not a good meet for the Seminoles.

Allen Williams' victory in the discus and his second place finish in the

shot put were the only places accrued by the garnet and gold (FSU Track

Office Files, 30 March 1963). When the tape was pulled taut, Williams'

throw in the discus measured 154' 4".

The University of Tennessee rode into Tallahassee on April 1.

After taking over the Volunteer's track program, Coach Chuck Rohe had

introduced a disciplined regime that would ultimately yield tremendous

results. The immediate outcome, however, was a team with only eight












members on the traveling squad. The small Tennessee team was competi-

five, but the outcome of the meet was never in doubt. The Seminoles

won 10 of the 14 events, sweeping all three places in four events.

Keeping his school record binge in the shot put alive, Allen

Williams uncorked a 56' 2" -auty. lie became the first Seminole to

hurl the shot over 56 feet. Williams decimated his opposition in the

discus with a toss of 155' 4".

The winning jump of 6' 5-3/4" in the high jump by Bill Ciswold

left him only one-quarter of an inch shy of George Smith's school

record. Giswold entered into a tie with Steve Long for the second best

jump by a Seminole. In the triple jump, Giswold won his second event

of the day with a 44' 2-1/8" effort.

Jerry McDaniel clipped one-tenth of a second off his personal

best in the furlong by sprinting to :21.8 victory. With the meet

safely in hand, the mile relay was cancelled by =fueal consent.

Florida State University bussed to Columbia, South Carolina, on

April 6 for the first running of the Carolina State-Record Relays. The

Tribe was less than auspicious in the relay races with only a second

in the quarter-mile relay and a fourth in the mile relay to show for

their efforts (FSU Track Office Files, 6 April 1963). The remaining

three FSU places were gathered by Allen Williams' second in the shot

put (52' 10-1/2") and a third in the discus (145' 11"), and Bill

Giswold's third in the high jump with a leap of 6' 0"..

April 29 was the day of the annual battle between Florida and

Florida State. The meet was held on the Gator track, but the home

track advantage did little to help the Florida Gators, as the Seminoles


































glided across the circle and released an impres-

the shot put. His victory led Clark Robinson

eminole sweep of the shot put. The same three-

with Williams winning at 144' 10" and Jaeger and

ces. Bill Giswold copped the high jump with a


)etition for the 1963 season. The var

trea athletes and former Seminlole ru=n

;ee Athletic Club (TAG). TAG entered

LkU Championships (Long, L.S., 1976).

Florida State University enter

)n April 27 in Des Moines, Iowa (FSU

L963). The school paid for Al William

)ed off in Des Moines on his way home

)reak (Long, L.S., 1976). The two Sem


ity team combined with local

rs to form a powerful Tallahas

oth the Florida and Georgia



d two men in the Drake Relays

rack Office Files, 27 April

trip, but Bill Giswold stop-

SMadison, Wisconsin, for spril











tud gold well with a third in the shot put by Williams and Giswold's

ourth in the triple jump.

Allen Williams was the only Seminole to qualify for the United

:rates Track and Field Championships in Houston on June 7-8 (FSTJ Track

Iffice Files, 7-8 June 1963). Williams uncorked a throw of 57' 3-1/4"

hat earned him fifth place. He followed up his great shot putting

,ith a throw of 157' 5-1/2" in the discus to finish a very respectable



isl*The first Seminole ever to place in the National Collegiate

athleticc Association Track and Field Championship was Allen Williams in

he shot put on June 13-15 (FSU Track Office Files, 13-15 June 1963).

'he hefty Atlanta native hurled the iron ball 57' 7" for fourth.

Summary. The Seminoles began the year with only a few veteran

performers, and injuries weakened their effectiveness. Dick Roberts

acurred a hairline fracture of his right foot. Although he continued

o compete, his practice routine was disrupted (Roberts, 1975). Herb

raft reinjured his hamstring and was lost for the majority of the

eason. Nagging muscle injuries plagued Craig Johnson for much of his

enior year (Long, L.S., 1976).

The injuries did not always select veterans as Al Cato suffered

ne of the most severe hamstring tears seen by Coach Mike Long in his

coaching career (Long, L.S., 1976). The proud sprinting corps of

'lorida State often ran on only one or two cylinders.

The Seminoles opened their season by winning the Coliseum Relays

itle in Montgomery, Alabama. The Tribe slowly gained momentum to run

p a 4-1 dual meet record.












rrlaa tare Un-tesity track men rewrote five school record

Lt mark was bested five times by junior Al Williams before

top mark of the season at 591 10" at the Georgia AAU Cham

His throw was the fourth best collegiate throw in the court,


mediate hurdles were added to provide a transition distance before

moving to the longer event (Long, L.S., 1976). Craig Johnson was abl

to take advantage of this situation and carve out a nitch in the Sem,

inole record books with a :39.8 clocking against Roanoke College.

The triple jump was the second change in the order of events,

This event was also added because of its inclusion in international

competition (Long, L.S., 1976). Bill Giswold hopped, stepped, and














































Johnson (sprints and hurdles) and Herb Kraft (broad jump).

The Tribe looked to the sprint races for their strength. Jerry

McDaniel was the Seminole's most powerful runner and especially tough

in the 440- and 220-yard dashes. He led off the 440-yard relay and ran

the anchor leg on the mile relay. Hutch Johnson and Al Cato handled

the 100-yard dash, with Bob Sable adding relay strength and depth.

The return of both Dick Roberts and Jim Lankford gave the

Seminoles a competitive entry in the distance events. The hopes of the

Tribe in the middle distance races rested on Hank Raehn and Ross











330-yard intermediate hurdles, while Floyd Lorenz shuttled between the

high jump and the high hurdles.

The specter of Allen Williams loomed over the weight events in

the South. His shot put of 59' 10" in 1963 was the best toss ever in

the South and placed him fourth in the 1963 NCAA Track and Field Chas,

pionship (FSU Track Brochure File, Spring Sports, 1964). Williams was

not as strong in the discus, yet he did throw over 160 feet in 1963.

The Seminoles faced the new season, without experienced per-

formers in the broad jump, triple jump, and javelin. Don Pharis was

the sole Tribe entry in the pole vault.

Florida State had to develop its talent in some field events

and keep their sprint strength healthy to achieve their goals in 1964.

The Seminoles possessed talent, but did not have great overall depth,

thus compounding the need to avoid injuries to key personnel.

As the Seminoles geared up for the indoor season, Al Cato sum-

marized the traveling style dictated by financial restriction and how

the track man responded to the situation:

As you well know, we never traveled in luxury. Those sta
tion wagons carried us for many miles; to the Penn Relays, and
to Miami for the Orange Bowl track meet. We didn't have a
great deal of money and the conditions weren't plush, but we
always had a great time. We always traveled and spent the
bare minimum of time necessary in order to get to the track
meet, do our best, and return to campus. The track program
was never really funded as were other sports so Coach Long
got along on what he had. We never lacked for anything we
needed. Oh, we could have always used a lot more, but we
were provided with what we needed to get the job done.
(Cato, 1975)

Florida State University had several of its quality performers

invited to participate in the Orange Bowl Track Meet run in conjunction












with the Orange Bowl football extravaganza (MaiHead 2 January

1964). Allen Williams and Jerry MlcDaniel had two impressive second

place finishes behind world class performers. The shot put was domin-

ated by Gary Gubner, reigning NCAA champion (PSU Track Brochure File,

Spring Sports 1964), with a throw of 59' 7-1/2". Williams bested all

other challenges for the runner-up position.

The incomparable Robert Hayes was the victor in the 220-yard

dash with an awesome time of :20.4. He was followed by FSU's Jerry

McDaniel who clocked a fine :21.0 for second place.

A humorous incident occurred the night before the meet, as Al

Cato was caught in a minor lapse of good judgment prior to the competi-

tion:

One of the most humorous situations occurred while at the



p.m. that night. Some of us want down to gei something. The
thing that appealed to me was a concoction called a "black
Mow" It' a a hu Be mixt'r e of ice cream, chocolate syrup, nuts,
coke, etc. Just a. I we. about t begin my feast-_Coach Long
walked in. Imagine my face! His only comment, among the
catcalls from everyone with me was "don't lose tomorrow."
Out of the nine entries in the 100-yard dash, I came in



The Seminoles embarked upon their indoor season by entering the

Chattanooga USTFF Championships on February 8 in Chattanooga. The

Tribe met with little success as three seconds and one fourth place

finish accounted for their slim 10-point total (ChttnogaDalyTies











The mile relay slipped into the number four slot in the final event

to move the Tribe into seventh place in the meet.

The Seminoles completed their 1964 indoor season at the Coliseum

Relays in Montgomery on February 15. The Tribe fell just short of

duplicating their 1963 victory. Northeast Louisiana State University

eased ahead of the Seminoles by a 42 to 39 score (FSU Track Office

Files, 15 February 1964).

The Florida State track men set two new indoor school records

and tied a third. Al Williams exploded the iron ball 56' 1" to raise

his own school standard in the shot put.

As the only pole vaulter on the traveling squad, D=n Pharis

was off to a very good start. He vaulted 13' 6" to establish a new

indoor school record, yet finished second in the meet. On his own

volition, Pharis did not practice his event much during the fall as he

competed full time on the cross-country team (Long, L.S., 1976).

Floyd Lorenz won the high jump with a leap of 6' 2". He was

only one-half inch off the indoor school record held by Steve Long.

With a 1:15.3 600-yard run, Jerry McDaniel copped the final win

for the Florida State team. Northeast Louisiana State University had

a one point lead over the Seminoles prior to the mile relay, and by

losing this crucial event to Northeast, ESU dropped the meet champion-

ship by three points.

The Seminoles hosted the Miami Hurricanes on March 6. FSU

copped 11 of the 16 events on the way to a very satisfying and

undeniable 89 1/2 to 55 1/2 victory (FSU Track Office Files, 6 March












The Seminole quartet of Jerry McDaniel, HIutch Johnson, Bob

Sable, and Al Cato demonstrated the Tribe's determination as they

flashed to a :41.6 victory that earned them school record honors

(Tallahassee Democrat, 7 March 1964).

The Tribe displayed their speed by capturing all of the sprint

events. Bob Sable became the sixth Seminole to run :09.7 as he sped

to victory in the 100-yard dash. Jerry McDaniel added the 440- and

220-yard dashes to his credit with a :48.3 and :21.9, respectively.

There were two school records set in addition to the 440-yard

relay. Doug Ferry snatched Craig Johnson's 330-yard intermediate hur-

dle title from him with a :38.9 clocking that established a new track,

meet, and school record (Tallahassee Democrat, 7 March 1964), and a

jump of 14' 5-1/4" in the pole vault gained Don Pharis both victory and

a school record.

Very creditable winning performances were turned in by Allen

Williams and Floyd Lorenz. Williams won the shot put with a toss of

55' 3", while Floyd Lorenz was taking the high Jump at 6' 4-1/2".

Hank Raehn came up with a personal best time of 1:56.4 to win

the half-mile. After the meet had been safely tucked away, PSU

entered the powerful foursome of Doug Ferry, Tom Houston, Ross Winter,

and Jerry McDaniel in the mile relay. The Tribe was successful in the












Democrat, 15 March 1964). Florida State fell one point shy of the

century mark as they jolted the Paladins 99 to 45.

The sprint relay team continued to perform well as they won the

opening event with a very quick :41.7 clocking. Al Cato used a tail-

wind to his advantage in notching a :09.5 victory in the 100-yard dash.

A 15-mile per hour favoring wind was over the allowable limit and kept

the time out of the record book.

Al Williams won both the shot put and discus throws. It wasa

feat he was to repeat often during the year. His throw in the shot

measured 56' 5-1/2". After leaving his hand, the discus first cut the

earth six and one-half inches past the 150-foot mark.

The Seminoles gained control of the meet early and took many of

the better performers out of later events. This maneuver gave the

younger Seminoles a chance to display their talents, consequently

reducing the number of outstanding performances.

Florida State University hosted the second meeting with the

University of South Carolina on March 26. The Tribe was paced by

Dick Roberts, Allen Williams, and Jerry McDaniel as each man accounted











became the fourth Seminole to ever run the two-mile under 10 minutes.

The shot put and discus were won by Allen Williams with throws of

55' 10-1/2" and 153' 8-1/2", respectively.

Jerry McDaniel captured the 440-yard dash in :48.4 and the fur-

long in :21.9. McDaniel did not have a chance to run his customary

anchor leg on the mile relay when Ross Winter pulled a hamstring after

taking the baton on the third leg of the relay.

Florida State returned to the winner's circle in the 21st Annual

Florida Relays on March 28 (FSUO Track Office Files, 28 March 1964).

The 440-yard relay team of Jerry McDaniel, Hutch Johnson, Bob Sable,

and Al Cato stormed to victory with a :41.4 clocking that clipped two-

tenths of a second off the school record set by this same foursome

earlier in the season.

Al Williams took top honors in the shot put with a 561 3" effort

and finished second in the discus. Although finishing fifth, the dis-

tance medley relay team of Irv Watson, Tom Houston, Hank Raehn, and

Dick Roberts established a new FSU record with their 10:27.9 clocking.

On April 4 Florida State University embarked upon their =att

difficult weekend of dual meet competition in 16 years. In a three-

day span, the Tribe was facing two of the toughest team. in the South-

eastern Conference with both meets away from home. The weekend began

against the Florida Gators in Gainesville (FSU Track Office Files,

4 April 1964).

The Gators came up with most of the outstanding running times,

but the Tribe hung tough and used twin victories by Al Williams to

close out their rivals by a 74 to 71 tally.












Al Williams won the shot put with a fine throw of 56' 4-1/2"

and then threw the discus 151' 11-1/2" for his second triumph of the

day. Jerry McDaniel lost the quarter-mile for the first time in the

1964 season to a :47.5 clocking by Florida's Pete Rowe McDaniel came

back in the 220-yard dash with a vengeance and redeemed himself with a

very fast :21.5.

With one of his best days as a Seminole, Darryl Guthrie led

Floyd Lorenz to a Tribe sweep of the first two places in the 120-yard

high hurdles with a time of :15.4. Guthrie had finished second in the

javelin competition, while Lorenz had topped the high jump field with

a leap of 6' 2-1/4".

A very unfortunate injury struck the Seminoles, costing the

Tribe the services of Dick Roberts. Having severely blistered the

bottoms of his feet in the mile run, Roberts was unable to run in the

two-mile and would be lost to the Seminoles for their dual meet with

Tennessee on the following Monday.

The premeet figuring by Coach Long had predicted the Florida

meet to be extremely close. The pole vault competition appeared to be

wide open after conceding the top spot to FSU's Don Pharis. Unfor-

tunately, the Tribe had only one pole vaulter. Bill Crotty had vaulted

for the Seminoles before leaving the program after his sophomore year

for personal reason.. He told What transpired during the week prior

to the Florida meet:


J!r? ;r cr-. -E r E-J c:_.

down to three points, that we had a chance of .losing, but if












I could place third in the pole vault, we could possibly win.
1 i Ti 1 i.-,_ T ii-;



fiber glass pole strapped to my Corvette. As I remember, we
did win. (Crotty, 1975)

The pole vault unfolded better than Coach Long had hoped. Don

Pharis won the event as expected with Bill Crotty stepping out of his

self-imposed retirement to capture the second position. Thus, very

valuable points were added to the Seminole side of the ledger.

With the Tennessee Volunteers awaiting the Seminoles only two

days hence, Coach Mike Long elected not to run the mile relay after the

meet had been mathematically won. The Seminoles boarded their bus for

home minus their miler, Dick Roberts, who had stayed behind with his

younger brother-- runner for the University of Florida.

Sunday morning found the Tribe meeting at Tully Gymnasium for

a long car ride to Knoxville (Long, L.S., 1976). FSU was due to battle

the University of Tennessee on Monday, April 6 (FSU Track Office Files,

6 April 1964).

Monday morning dawned with thunderclouds darkening the skies

and soon the heavens released its burden on the earth below. By mett

time, the rain had stopped; however, the Tennessee cinder track was

unrunable and the meet was moved to a local high school track (Long,

L.S., 1976). Mud was the order of the day. For the most part, the

recorded performances were not indicative of the competitive effort

expended.

Jerry McDaniel proved to be the beat Tribe mudder as he copped

the 440-yard dash in :49.9 and the furlong in :22.5. Disregarding the











conditions, Allen Williams topped the shot put and discus fields with

a 56' 1-1/2" throw in the shot and a 156' 3" effort in the discus.

Floyd Lorenz jumped 6' 3" for top honors in the high jump despite

treacherous conditions.

The strange high school surroundings confused the meet offi-

cials in the hundred-yard dash. After a phenomenal time of :09.5 was

recorded by FSU's Hutch Johnson, the officials checked the track mark-

ings and found that they had run only 91 yards (Talahsse Dmocat

8 April 1964).

There were two effort. that did ort win, but held the keys to

the Seminole victory. Ross Winter hung tough in the half-mile and

split two outstanding Tennessee runners. Doug Ferry plowed through the

mud for a second between two fine Tennessee hurdlers in the 330-yard

intermediate hurdles. His time was a remarkable :39.5.

When interviewed concerning the Tennessee meet, Darryl Guthrie

gave a laugh and related this story:

The Tennessee meet was my most embarrassing meet in track.
After the javelin was over, I went over to ask Coach Long if
could run thfe intermediatethurdles. He, of course, said,
"es. had frgotten how the mud would affect the stride
pat tern. The fir at two hurdles went alright, but the mud
and fat igue a on took ho Id. hi t the next hurdle--boom--
down I went. The guys went past me or were already past me .
Not being too smart and just walking off the track, I got
up and, boom, hit another hurdle and went down. Finally,
covered with mud from head to toe, I finished, long after
everyone else. The crowd gave me a standing ovation.
(Guthrie, 1976)

The meet was tied at 70 points apiece with only the mile relay

remaining when Coach Mike Long called Jerry McDaniel aside. He wanted

his star to talk to Bank Raehn, the lead off runner, and help him









176

relax before the crucial relay. McDaniel's reply to the request was,

"who's going to help me relax?" (McDaniel, 1976). Whatever, McDaniel

told him worked as Raehn and the mile relay team ran well and Florida

State won the meet 75 to 70.

The Tribe had just beaten the University of Florida and the

University of Tennessee, the indoor Southeastern Conference Champions,

in the space of three days. Coach Mike Long was ecstatic with the per-

formance of his team over their difficult weekend. "Probably the

greatest track weekend we've ever had at FSU," exclaimed the happy

mentor. He went on to observe that "strangely enough, PSU participants

in the Tennessee meet appeared fresher than the UT runners" (Talla-

hassee Democrat, 8 April 1964).

The dual meet with the University of Tennessee brought to a

conclusion the team competition for the Seminoles. The varsity squad

was joined by FSU's freshman team and local area athletes to compete

in both the Florida and Georgia AAU Championships as the Tallahassee

Athletic Club.

Jerry McDaniel represented FSU in the Drake Relays special

220-yard event on April 24 in Des Moines. The powerful Seminole

sprinter finished third in a school record shattering :21.2. McDaniel's

time was a school record for the furlong run on the turn. Henry Carr

of Arizona State won the race in :21.0 (New York Times, 25 April 1964).

Summary. The Seminoles had stayed reasonably healthy through-

out the year and it paid dividends with an undefeated dual meet season.

The Tribe victims included the University of Miami, Furman University,








177

the University of South Carolina, the University of Tennessee, 1964

SEC Champions (University of Georgia, 1976), and for the seventh year

in a row, the University of Florida.

The Seminoles reset two indoor and five outdoor school stan-

dards. Don Pharis and Allen Williams both set their school records in

the Coliseum Relays. A vault of 13' 6" wrote Don Pharis'. name into

the record book, while Williams blasted the shot 56' 1" to establish

his new indoor standard.

The 440-yard relay team was undefeated all season and blistered

the track in :41.3. The fourso. n of Jerry McDaniel, Hutch Johnson,

Bob Sable, and Al Cato were the men to handle the baton for the Tribe.

Jerry McDaniel reset the one curve furlong school mark with a

fast :21.2 clocking. The powerful junior was undefeated in dual meet

competition in his specialty.

Using his cross-country conditioning to good advantage, Don

Pharis added the outdoor pole vault record alongside his indoor title.

He sailed over 14' 7-1/2" to better the old mark held by Ed Hays by

over seven inches.

In his first year as an intermediate hurdler, Doug Ferry cap-

tured the school record with a fine :38.0 effort. He had been a cd

sistent runner all season. Hank Raehn closed out his senior year by

lowering the school record in the 880 to 1:54.2, and thus joining

a very distinguished league of PSU half-milers.












1965

Florida State had the perfect combination of seasoned perfor-

mers and young sophomore. that could continue the Tribe's winning

string which extended back to the loss to Furman University on March 16,

1963. The Seminoles lost two school record holders from the 1964 team

with the graduation of Allen Williams (shot put and discus) and Hank

Raehn (Half-mile). Distance runners Richard Roberts and Jim Lankford

were among the graduating lettermen (FSU Track Brochure File, 1965).

The sprint events were again the area in which the Seminoles'

strength lay. The school record setting quarter-mile relay team

returned three of its members, missing only Hutch Johnson. He was

replaced by Pensacola Junior College speedster Ken White.

Jerry McDaniel controlled the 440- and 220-yard dashes, and

he had suffered only one dual meet loss during the entire previous

season. Al Cato, Ken White, and Bob Sable formed a very strong three-

some in the 100- and 220-yard dashes.

The loss of Al Williams, the South's premier weight man, was

impossible to fill as a man of his calibre is not often found. Foot-

baller Dave Braggins and Ray Hoxit had the task of keeping the Seminoles

competitive in the weight throwing events.

Hank Raehn was gone in the half-mile, and juniors John Brogle

and Ross Winter were called upon to fill the vacancy. Winter had

shown promise with his vital second place finish in the victory over

the Universitv of Tennessee in Knoxville.
















Roberts and Jim Lankford left the Tribe without an experienced per-

former in the distance races.

The graduation of Don Pharis left Hull Carr, a freshman sensa-

tion in the pole vault, as the lone Seminole vaulter. Carr showed

extraordinary promise, but the seconds and thirds would be hard to

come by *

The Tribe's fortunes in the horizontal jumping events rested

on youngsters Sid Gainey and Don Casteel, younger brother of the former

school record holder in the 440-yard dash, Jim Casteel. The two tal-

ented sophomores were expected to shore up events that had been weak

for the past two year..

Floyd Lorenz returned in the high jump and high hurdles. The

senior from Muscata, Illinois, had steadily improved throughout his

career at Florida State. His steadying influence in the field events

was desperately needed as five of seven field events were manned by

sophomores.

The intermediate hurdles had the ideal blend of a school record

holder and a young talented sophomore. Doug Ferry was embarking on.

his final season as a Seminole and would receive help from sophomore

Steve Landis.

The schedule was obviously tougher than in the past, but the

Tribe had the manpower to duplicate their 1964 undefeated season FSU

had three SEC opponents in Tennessee, Auburn, and Florida on their

schedule, plus tough encounters with Furman and South Carolina. The












promising young Seminoles had to come through while the veterans

needed to maintain their winning desire for the dream of an undefeated

season to materialize.

The season opener in Montgomery on February 13 was a mixture

of excitement and disappointment. The Seminoles fought to a 34 to 34

tie with Northeast Louisiana State in the ninth running of the Colis-u

Relays (FSU Track Office File, 13 February 1965). Florida State had to

come from behind to grab a share of the title with the team that had

defeated them by three points the year before.

Victories were hard earned as three of the four wins called for

school record setting performances. The two-mile relay team composed of

Irv Watson, John Brogle, Bill Nelson, and Ross Winter scampered to

victory in an FSU record time of 8:06.7.

The question concerning the possible vulnerability of FSU in the

broad j ump was answered when Sidney Gainey sailed to a new indoor mark

of 23' 1". This jump gave the slender Georgian the Coliseum Relays

broad jump title.

The high jump was a long-lasting event with the Seminoles strug-

gling hard for points. In a pressure cooker situation, Floyd Lorenz

mustered the best indoor jump of his career to take the event with a

new FSU indoor record of 6' 7".

The mile relay Was the concluding event. The Seminoles had to

win as they trailed by two points. If they were successful in the mile

relay and if Northeast Louisiana State finished third or lower, the

meet would belong to the Seminoles. The Tribe flashed around the oval

in 3:28.1 as they edged out Northeast Louisiana State who finished






























The Seminoles took a small squad to the Southeastern VSTFF

Championships in Chattanooga on February 19-20. There were fine per-

formances by several Seminoles in the unscored competition (FSU Track

Office Files, 19-20 February 1965).

Sidney Gainey upped his indoor broad jump record to 23' 6-1/4'

earning third place for his efforts. The broad j ump had ceased being

a questionable event for the Tribe.

Continuing to j mp well, Floyd Lorenz cleared 61 6" to finish

second in the high jump competition. Hull Carr tied Don Pharis's indc

mark in the pole vault with his third place vault of 13' 6".

The Seminoles gathered at Tully Gymnasium on March 5 to load

into four university station wagons for the long journey to Coral

Gables. On the following day, the Seminoles unloaded on the Miami

Hurricanes by a tune of 104 to 41 (Miami Hral, 7 March 1965).

With a stiff cold wind wreaking havoc with the quality of per-

formances, the Seminoles captured seven of nine running events and

swept all three places in the 220-yard dash and the 330-yard












intermediate hurdles. Jerry Mcr~aniel won two individual events with a

:48.6 clocking in the quarter-mile and a :21.8 effort in the 220-yard

dash,

With times of :15.0 and :39.5, Steve Landis won the 120-yard

high hurdles and the 330-yard intermediate hurdles. A strong showing

by Landis in practice had prompted Coach Mike Long to take Doug Ferry,

FSU record holder in the 330-yard intermediate hurdles, out of the hur-

dles and return him to the quarter-mile (Long, L.S., 1976).

Led by a school record-setting performance by Don Casteel, the

Seminoles won 35 of the 63 available points in the field events. In

his first varsity outdoor meet, Casteel bounded 46' 2-1/2" in the triple

jump for a new FSU school record.

The home opener for the Tribe took place =n March 13. The

Paladins of Furman University visited Tallahassee without witnessing

the usual southern hospitality. The Tribe dropped the baton in the

440-yard relay, and this was followed by a Furman victory in the mile

run as the Paladin's Curt Hollifield copped the win. The remainder of

the meet, however, belonged to the Seminoles as they captured 12 of

the 14 remaining events (Tallahassee Democrat, 14 March 1965).

Jerry McDaniel turned in a very fast double in the 440- and

220-yard dashes by winning the quarter-mile in :48.1 and the furlong in

a track record setting :21.5. Ken White became the sixth Seminole to

run :09.7 as he blazed to victory in the 100-yard dash. He finished

second in the 220-yard dash with Al Cato in third, making the furlong

a Seminole sweep. The 5' 9" Steve Landis showed high stepping form by











taking the 120-yard high hurdles in :14,9 and the 330-yard intermediate

hurdles in a school record time of :37.6.

Don Casteel and Sidney Gainey dominated the horizontal j umping

events. Casteal bettered the school record in the triple jump by

bounding 47' 3". Displaying his high flying form, Sidney Gainey sailed

23' 3" on his winning jump in the broad jump.

Darryl Guthrie became the fourth best javelin thrower in Florida

State's track history with his winning heave of 188' 1/4". The mile

relay team of John Brogle, Bill Nelson, Doug Ferry, and Jerry McDaniel

held onto the stick to record a 3:21.3 victory. The overcast skies

and muddy track had depressed superior marks, but did little to inhibit

the Seminoles' scoring ability as they overwhelmed Furman 96 to 49.

The victory drove FSU's winning string to 10. The last team to defeat

the Tribe had been Furman on March 16, 1963.

The Seminoles of Florida State made their presence felt in the

Twenty-second Annual Florida Relays. The 440-yard sprint relay team of

Jerry McDaniel, Bob Sable, Ken White, and Al Cato successfully defended

their 1964 relay crown The Seminoles also gathered a second, third,

and fifth in the one mile, two-mile, and sprint medley relays, respec-

tively (FSU Track Office Files, 27 March 1965).

Irv Watson led off the two-mile relay that turned in a school

record clocking of 7:42.1, almost seven full seconds below the previous

record. John Brogle, Bill Nelson, and Ross Winter completed the team.

Despite their record setting efforts, they had to settle for third.

Sidney Gainey, Don Casteel, and Ken White all swept to victory

in school record setting or tying performance. Improving with each

















University of Georgia. Don Casteel moved over the 48-foot mark with

school record setting triple jump of 48' 6". It was his third school

record jump in as many meets. Ken White joined earlier Seminoles Jack

Terwilliger and John Fast-n in the record book with his :09.6 dash to

victory in the 100-yard dash. The Seminoles closed out the day with

Floyd Lorenz copping a second in the high jump, and Steve Landis run-

ning third in the 330-yard intermediate hurdles.

Florida State traveled to Auburn on April 2 to do battle with

Auburn University. The Seminoles came away with a 95 to 50 triumph

(FSU Track Office Files, 2 April 1965). The win marked the first home

meet loss suffered by the Tigers in 21 meets (Tallahassee Democrat,

8 April 1968).

Bill Nelson captured the mile run. with a 4:20.4 clocking, with

Irv Watson finishing third with a time of 4:21.5. The quarter-mile was

won by Jerry McDaniel in :48.1. Ken White led Al Cato to a 1-2 Seminole

finish in the 100-yard dash. White's race was timed in :09.8, while

Cato was one-tenth of a second back at :09.9.

John Brogle and Ross Winter fought to another 1-2 Tribe finish

with outstanding times of 1:55.1 and 1:55.4, respectively in the 880.

A double win was scored by Floyd Lorenz as he capped the 120-yard high

hurdles in :15.0 and the high jump at 6' 5".

An all-Seminole cast, starring Darryl Guthrie, dominated the

javelin. A personal best toss of 190' 6" by Guthrie won the event, as

Gary Oates and David Thompson finished second and third with throws of


















j 1 3 j 1 1- .r_ .- ? ..i-J
you know psychology--I thought it was lighter. All three FSU
throwers used the wooden j avelin and finished first, second,
and third. (Guthrie, 1976)

The two Georgians, Don Casteel and Sidney Gainey, continued to

perform well. Casteel upped his school mark for the fourth consecutive

meet with a winning jump of 48' 9-1/2". Falling only mne-half inch

short of his school record, Sidney Gainey bested all the broad jumpers

with a leap of 24' V.

A fumny thing happened on the way to the finish line in the

330-yard intermediate hurdles. A first-hand account is given by Curti

Long:

The track at Auburn ran behind the stands in Cliff Hare
stadium. The 330-yard intermediate hurdles started on the
backstretch, so none of the contestants could see the north
curve. Steve Landis was in lane two, Smith of Auburn in lane
three, and I was in the fourth lane. Running well and making
stride easily for a change, I came off the fourth hurdle and
disappeared behind the stands. Much to my dismay, the fifth
flight of hurdles had not been placed on the track. I did the
only thing I could think of--othing! Just kept on r-nning,
hoping that my stride would be right for the fifth hurdle.
It wasn't and I chopped wildly and almost climbed over the
sixth hurdle. Later I learned that Landis had run around his
hurdle, but I never did know what Smith of Auburn had done.
Landis won the race with Smith catching me late for second.
My third place time of :39.4 was the second best of my career.
I just wish that I could have run a clean race. (Long, C. M.,
1976)

The officials validated the race which had produced the fourth and fif

fastest 330-yard intermediate hurdles races in Seminole history.

Florida State met the Gamecockss of South Carolina on April 5.

The Seminoles ran extremely well as the Tribe captured eight of the 10











tootraces, but managed to win only three of the seven field events

(FSU Track Office Files, 5 April 1965).

PSU's fine quarter-mile relay team opened with a quick :41.8

victory. Showing the mile field his heels, Irv Watson became the

fourth fastest miler in Seminole track history with a 4:19.8 clocking.

These two opening victories were followed by the superlative

efforts of Jerry McDaniel and Ken White. McDaniel won the 440-yard

dash, only one-tenth of a second off the two-curve school record with

a clocking of :47.8. Bursting from the blocks, Ken White sped to vic-

tory in a school record time of :09.5. John Poston's record, set in

1952 and tied by Jack Terwilliger in 1958 and Ken White in 1965, had

finally been broken.

Floyd Lorenz copped the high hurdles in a fast :14.8 and

leaped 6' 4" for victory in the high jump. Although finishing second

in the 880-yard run, Ross Winter established a new FSU record with a

clocking of 1:54.0 (Tallahassee Democrat, 6 April 1965).

In his third race of the day, Jerry McDaniel topped tea mme te

Al Cato in the 220-yard dash with a very quick time of :21.4. The mile

relay marked McDaniel's final appearance in the meet. The powerful

quarter-miler split :46.5 on the anchor leg, but failed by inches to

overcome a seven-yard headstart by the Gamecock anchorman (Tallahassee

Democrat, 6 April 1965).

The final score was 85 to 60 in favor of the Seminoles. It

marked the fourth victory in a row for the Tribe against the University

of South Carolina.























The match-up between John Anderson, a standout sprinter for the

University of Florida, and FSU's sprinting corps held the keys to vic-

tory. The 440-yard relay team opened up the meet with a "come from

behind" (Roberts, 1976) victory in :41.8. The Gators had an outstanding

team and led through the first three men. John Anderson was anchoring

for Florida against Al Cato of Florida State. Coming out of the turn

extremely fast, Cato overcame Anderson's early advantage, taking a one-

half step lead. The two men raced to the tape with Cato holding on

for the victory (Roberts, 1975).

Bill Nelson and Irv Watson registered a sweep of first and

second places in the mile run, with Nelson turning in a sparkling

4:16.5 for first place. Nelson's time moved him into the number two

slot on the Tribe's all-time list.

FSU's Jerry McDaniel and Doug Ferry dominated the one lap race

as McDaniel's winning time of :47.7 tied the school record for the

quarter-mile run around two turns set by Quentin Till in 1961.

The stage was set for Al Cato's match race with John Anderson

in the 100-yard dash. Cato described his feelings before the big race:





bly the last time I would ever run competitively. Florida was








188

and still is a rival and I don't like losing to them, so it was
really a big meet for me.
John Anderson, the Florida sprinter, and I had gone head-
to-head on several occasions during the year with no clear cut
winner on any occasion. I was really keyed up for this meeting
between John and myself. I also was anxious to beat Ken White
and get the school record for myself.
Aa I recall, just prior to the 100, our relay team had
just won the 440-yard relay with me anchoring it and just
beating out John at the wire. I was ready to make it a double
by beating him in the 100-yard dash. As it turned out, I was
the winner and lucky enough to tie the school record and share
it at :09.5 with Ken White. (Cato, 1975)

Many Florida State athletes were turning in career-best per-

formances that night. Steve Landis tied his own school record in the

330-yard intermediate hurdles with a winning time of :37.6.

Florida had two fine shot putters in Leach and Winkler, and the

event figured to be one of critical importance. FSU's Dave Braggins

responded by winning the shot put competition with a throw of 50' 5-1/2".

It was the first time he had thrown over 50 feet.

Sidney Gainey and Don Casteel handled the horizontal jumping

events with performances of 23' 2" and 46' 1-1/2" in the broad jump and

triple jump, respectively. Floyd Lorenz bounded over 6' 4" for victory

in the high jump.

The 220-yard dash was an exciting event for the Seminoles.

Jerry McDaniel bad never lost a dual meet 220-yard dash race during his

three-year career at Florida State University. The announcer stated

this fact to the crowd just prior to the start of the race (Roberts,

1975). With 215 yards of the race covered by flying feet, the leader

was Al Cato. With his streak in jeopardy, Jerry McDaniel was charging

hard in second place. Hampered by a sore hamstring, Ken White was in

third and struggling to hold on after going out extremely fast.
























-, -ony event remaining was ine m-le reiay and despite navi

ieet closed out, the 3,000-plus crowd wanted another Seminole

try. Running on the third leg of the relay, Al Cato remembered

he race unfolded:

One of the =ast memorable performances by Jerry McDadiel





was the mile relay. Jerry was the anchor man Unfortunately








E C- 1 1 1 1 L j I'? j i"1' -:~il~ I~r Il







The 85 1/2 to 58 1/2 shellshocking of the Florida Gators bro

inclusion, the dual meet season. The Seminoles competed in the

da and Georgia AAU Championships as the Tallahassee Athletic

Although the Seminoles had finished their dual meet season,

rs of the squad continued to compete in selected meets. The

traveled to the Pennsylvania Relays on April 23-24. The

oles were not able to win an event, but placed high in several










contests. Ina quarter-mile relay team tasted defeat for the first time

in the 1965 season. Th. Tribe fo ...ome finished third with a resp-c

table time of :42.3 (New York Times, 25 April 1965).

Don Casteel had the highest Seminole place as he covered 46'

6-1/4" in the triple jump, earning second place. A :53.6 clocking in

the 440-yard intermediate hurdles garnered a fifth place and a new FSU

record for Steve Landis (New York Times, 24 April 1965).

On the first day, Ken White won his heat in the 100-yard dash

with a time of :09.6. However, he could only muster a fourth place in

the finals on Saturday.

The high jump and broad jump were the only ot her events the

Tribe placed in, as Floyd Lorenz cleared 6' 4" for sixth in the high

jump and Sidney Gainey wound up fifth in the long j ump at 22' 11" (New

York Times, 24 April 1965).

The final competition for the Seminoles occurred on June 11-12

in the Third Annual USTFF Track and Field Championships. Sidney Gainey

and Don Casteel continued to excel for the Seminoles. The two young

sophomores became the second and third Seminoles to place ever in

national competition. Gainey captured fifth in the broad jump with a

leap of 221 6-1/2", while Casteel won fifth in the triple jump with a

leap of 46' 9-1/4" (FSU Track Office Files, 11-12 June 1965). Jerry

McDaniel competed in the 220-yard dash, but was unable to place in the



fnl.The threesome of Jerry Mc~aniel, Sidney Gainey, and Dun Casteel

competed in the NCAA Track and Field Championships on June 17-19 in















Summary. The 1965 Seminoles completed their second undefeated

dual meet season in as many years. Florida State had new defeated

their last 13 opponents in head-to-head competition. The Seminoles

rewrote seven school records and tied two more in the process.

Seniors Al Cato and Jerry McDaniel provided leadership on and

off the track. McDaniel, the man called "Horse" by his teammates,

remained undefeated in dual meet competition during his career in the

220-yard dash. He tied his own curve 220-yard dash school record as he

drove to a :21.2 clocking.

Al Cato overcame a tendency towards hamstring trouble to blast

to a :09.5 clocking in the Florida dual meet. His time tied him with

Ken White for the school record. Earlier in the season, White had

become the first Seminole to run :09.5 in the 100-yard dash.

Three sophomores began their Seminole track careers in a big

way. Sidney Gainey became the first Seminole to crack the 24-foot

barrier in the broad jump as he floated to a 24' 1-1/2" victory in the

Florida Relays. Don Casteel broke the school standard in the triple

j ump in four consecutive meets before finally letting the record rest

at 48' 9-1/2". New school records were set in the 330- and 440-yard

intermediate hurdles by Steve Landis. Landis lowered Doug Ferry's 330-

yard intermediate hurdle mark with a :37.6 clocking. His fifth place

finish in the Pennsylvania Relays earned him the 440-yard intermediate

hurdle record at :53.6.












Two men broke the school record in the half-mile. Ross Winter

first accomplished the feat with a 1:54.0 clocking in the South Caro-

lina dual meet. John Brogle bested Winter's mark with a 1:52.2 clock-

ing during the dual meet with the University of Florida. Earlier in

the year, these two men had teamed with Bill Nelson and Irv Watson to

set a school record in the two-mile relay at the Florida Relays. They

shaved seven and one-tenth seconds off the old school mark with their

7:42.1 clocking.

The end of the 1965 season brought to a close the most pros-

perous era In Seminole track history. It had begun in 1958 and the

following seven years saw many of the best performances in the Tribe's

track history.

Every school record was broken during this eight-year span of

time. The FSU track team ran up a 34 and 3 dual meet record against

the best teams in the South. Florida State demonstrated their complete

dominance over the Florida Gators by winning all eight of their annual

encounters.

The pride and confidence during this era set these athletes

apart from those who had preceded them. Al Cato's comment on his

successful evening against John Anderson, in the FSU-Florida dual meet

exemplified the attitude of Mike Long's teams during this year. He

remarked, "I ran him four times, and I wanted to beat him four times,

and I only won three" (Roberts, 1975).

















CHAPTER IV


THE LEAN YEARS: 1966-1968


1966

The 1966 squad had talented performers, but a lack of overall

depth hindered the Seminoles in dual meet competition. Key injuries

exposed this fatal flew, before the season was half completed.

The graduation of Jerry McDaniel, Al Cato, and Bob Sable left

the sprints in a vulnerable condition. Ken White was the only veteran

performer in the 100, 220-, and 440-yard dashes. In 1965, White had

run a :09.5 100-yard dash, but if back-up help could not be found, the

sprint events might pose problems.

The 440-yard dash chores were in the hands of Wayne Currie,

Steve Landis, and Curtiss Long. One of these three had to develop if

the Tribe was to avoid being hurt in the quarter-mile. The half-mile

was the strongest event for the Seminoles as returning school record

holder John Brogle joined with the talented Ross Winter to form a

competitive entry.

A key for the Tribe was the performances of Dave Braggins and

I=m Gardner inl the weight events. School record holders Sidney Gainey

and Don Casteel gave the Seminoles a strong entry in the horizontal

jumping events. However, the javelin, high jump, and pole vault

appeared weak. Hopefully, young talented performers could change the

outlook in those events.









194

Florida State University had 13 lettermen on the 29-man varsity

roster (FSU Track Brochure File, Track and Field 1966). Many of the

lettermen were marginal performers. Their improvement, along with a

favorable adjustment of last year's freshmen to varsity competition,

was critical to the success of the team in dual meet encounters. The

outcome of the 1966 season depended on the output of the available

personnel. Injuries or the failure to perform up to expectation would

be devastating to the Seminoles' chances for success.

At a time of growing inflation, the track budget received a

healthy boost. The operating budget gained almost $2,500, while the

scholarship fund was increased $5,500 (Athletic Office Budget File,

1965-1966). These monies were well received as the consumer price

index had risen two and seven-tenths points over the previous year.

This CPI increase was the highest single year raise in over six years

(U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 1975).

The Tribe turned their attentions to competition with a selet-

ted entry in the Senior Bowl Track Meet on December 28 in Mobile.

FSU's Sidney Gainey won the broad jump at 23' 7-3/4" for the only Sem,

inole place in the prestigious invitational meet (Mobile Register,

29 December 1965).

Once again, a triumph by Sidney Gainey was the only Seminole

representative on the victory stand in the Orange Bowl Track and Field

Championship in Miami on January 8. His leap of 231 11" topped a field

of the best jumpers in the South (MiamiHerald 9 January 1966).

The Seminoles swept into Montgomery on February 11 seeking to

defend their Coliseum Relays title. Paced by victories in the two-mile
















Files, 11-12 February 1966).

School records were tallied by the two-mile relay team and

broad jumper Sidney Gainey. The relay team of Bob Hohnadel, John

Brogle, Ross Winter, and Bill Nelson burned to victory in 8:01.8.

Sidney Gainey established himself as a national calibre broad jumper

with his victory leap of 24' 5".

The remaining Seminole triumph occurred in the 60-yard dash.

Ken White did the honors with a quick :06.4 clocking. The Tribe col-

lected three seconds and two third places to raise their final point

total to 33 markers.

Florida State visited Chattanooga on February 19 for the South-

eastern USTFF Indoor Championships. For the third meet of the season,

Sidney Gainey was the lone Seminole to go to the victory stand. The

lean broad jumper copped his specialty with a fine leap of 23' 7-1/4"

(Chattanooga Daily-Times, 12 February 1966).

Florida State University opened the outdoor season with the

Jesuit Invitational Track and Field Championships in Tampa on Feb-u

sty 26. With the state title on the line, the Seminoles walked away

with an 88 to 70 victory over runner-up Florida (FSC Track Office

Files, 26 February 1966).

The Seminoles were led by a classic display of speed by sprin,

ter Kenny White. White's :09.6 and :21.4 performances in the 100- and

220-vard dashes were most impressive considering the earlv date.












Moving into a tie for second place on the all-time Seminole

list of high hurdlers, Charles Vickers clipped over the high hurdles

to a second place finish with a time of :14.8. Battling no old nemesis,

Steve Landis topped an intermediate hurdle field that included

Florida's Scott Hager with a quick time of :53.6.

Sidney Gainey and Don Casteel began the outdoor season with

victories in the long and triple jumps, respectively. Gainey's winning

jump was measured at 23' 10-1/4". The triple jump was won with Cas-

teel's bound of 46' 5". He was followed by Sid Gainey's 45' 3/4"

ef fort..

Jack Flandeau sailed over 14' 4" to win the pole vault. It -ar

the best vault of his career, only two and one-half inches shy of Don

Pharis' a school record.

The mile relay team composed of Wayne Currie, Curtiss Long,

Ross Winter, and John Brogle dashed to victory in the meet finale with

the fast time of 3:16.8. It was the second fastest relay ever run by

FSU in scored meet competition.

Florida State returned home to host the Hurricanes of Miami on

March 5. Ignoring a gusty wind (Tallahassee Democrat, 6 March 1966),

the Seminoles turned in sweeps of first and second places in seven

events as they ran to an easy 99 to 46 win (FSU Track Office Files

5 March 1966).

Both Ken White and Bud Manning won two events, while Curtiss

Long copped the 440-yard dash and ran on two winning relays. White's

times were ;09.8 in the century dash and :22.6 in the furlong. Manning











copped the high jump at 6' 2" and hurled the javelin 1921 1/2". He

became the fourth Seminole to throw over 190 feet in the j elin.

The quarter-mile was won by Long with a time of :49.8. The

440-yard relay team composed of Bill Campbell, Curtiss Long, Don Cas-

teel, and Ken White sped to an easy victory in :43.7. Wayne Currie,

Curtiss Long, Ross Winter, and John Brogle closed out the meet with a

winning time of 3:20.7 In the mile relay.

The powerful Southern Illinois University track team came into

Tallahassee on the first stop of their southern tour on March 19. One

of the Saluki station wagons transporting the team was involved in a

minor traffic accident. No one was seriously hurt, but as a pre-

caution, Coach Lew Hartzog held several of his runners out of competi-

tion (Hartzog, 1976).

With the meet tied at 61 all, the Salukis rar-off victories in

the two-mile run, triple jump, and the mile relay to seal FSU's doom

80 to 65 (FSU Track Office Files, 19 March 1966). The loss was the

first Seminole defeat I. dual meet competition since March 16, 1963.

Ken White blasted to his second :09.6 clocking in three meets

to register a Seminole win in the 100-yard dash. He returned for a

second win of the day in the 220-yard dash as he keyed a Seminole sweep

with a :22.4 clocking.

Sidney Gainey and Steve Landis were the only other individual

Seminole winners. Gainey gained his victory with a jump of 23' 5-1/2"

in the long jump. The grueling 440-yard intermediate hurdles event

was captured by Landis with a track record time of :53.8 (Tallahsse

Democrat, 20 March 1966).











The outcome of the meet hinged on three events in which the

Salukis managed to edge the Seminoles in hotly contested competition.

With a toss of 200' 5", Bud Manning joined a very select group of Sem-

inoles to break the 200-foot mark in the javelin. However, Manning

finished second by a shade over two feet. It was a frustrating day for

the muscular utility man as he jumped a personal record 6' 4" in the

high jump and finished third, over three inches behind second place.

SIU's Jeff Duxbury trailed John Brogle in two races before

striking him down in the homestretch in both the half-mile and mile

relay. Charles Vickers suffered a heart-breaking fall as he hit the

last hurdle in the 44G-yard intermediate hurdles, while battling hard

for second place (TalhsseDmort 20 March 1966).

The 23rd Annual Florida Relays was a good meet for the Seminoles.

The Tribe captured two individual events, established a school record in

one relay, and turned in fast time. in two other relays (FSlJ Track

Office Files, 26 March 1966).

Ken White ran his third :09.6 of the season, beating a quality

field in the 100-yard dash that included Webster of Tennessee, the

1966 SEC sprint champion. Repeating his 1965 victory in the long jump,

Sidney Gainey bested the Florida Relays broad jump field with a leap

of 23' 9".

The two-mile relay team composed of Bill Nelson, Don Hohnadel,

Ross Winter, and John Brogle fought Princeton all the way to the wire,

finishing in second place. The Seminoles lopped a whopping nine and

nine-tenths seconds off of the old school mark with a time of 7:32.2.




















The final event of the day was the mile relay. The relay team

of Wayne Currie, Curtiss Long, Ross Winter, and John Brogle ran the

third fastest mile relay by a Seninole quartet with a time of 3:15.7.

Their collective efforts earned them fifth.

After the meet, the Seminoles boarded the bus with Charles

Durbin behind the wheel (Long, C. M., 1976). The Tribe had to be

ready for their dual meet with the University of Tennessee on the fol-

lowing Monday. The Volunteers of Tennessee were third in the 1965 NCAA

Cross-country Championship (TalaaseeDeocat 29 March 1966).

Using their distance running advantage, the University of Tennessee

managed to eke out a 79 to 66 triumph (FSU Track Office Files, 28 March

1966). The Volunteers swept the mile and two-mile runs. In the two-

mile run, FSU's Tom Grab=m ran a personal and school record time of

9:29.1 and only finished fourth. He had bettered his old personal mark

by over 20 seconds.

The 100-yard dash provided exciting action as Tennessee's

Webster was out fast and barely managed to hold off FSU's fast closing

Kenny White. The time of :09.6 was awarded to both men. White gained

a measure of revenge with a :22.0 victory in the 220-yard dash with

Wayne Currie finishing a surprise second at :22.3.









200

In the homestretch of the half-mile, Ross Winter and John

Brogle swept by the faltering Rose of Tennessee with Brogle taking the

tape in 1:54.4. Winter finished in the second spot with a time of

1:54*1,

Steve ..ndis was the remaining Seminole runner to find the

victory circle. He stepped off a fast :53.5 in the 440-yard inter-

mediate hurdles. His time was only one-tenth of a second off his own

school record.

In the field events, Sidney Gainey copped both the long and

triple jumps with marks of 23' 3-3/4" and 46' 8", respectively. Con-

tinuing to throw wall, Bud Meanning hurled the spear 192' 2" to place

second in the j avelin.

Although mathematically eliminated from the meet, the mile

relay team of Wayne Currie, Curtiss Long, Ross Winter, and John Brogle

ran on pride and was just edged at the tape by the Tennessee quartet

which had bested them in the Florida Relays, by one and two-tenths

seconds -

Florida State's overall record had fallen to I and 2 with two

narrow losses to Southern Illinois University and the University of

Tennessee. The Seminoles expected to even their record when the Tigers

of Auburn came to town on April 2. Instead, the Tigers ran to a

narrow 75 to 70 upset of the Tribe (FSU Track Office Files, 2 April

1966).











Ken White copped the 100-yard dash in :09.7, but managed only

a shocking third in the 220-yard dash with a time of :22.5. Steve

Landis won the 440-yard intermediate hurdles with a new meet record

:54.1 (Tlaase eort 3 April 1966).

Sidney Gainey lifted to a school record in the long j ump. He

covered a prodigious 24' 11" on his record jump. Gainey also finished

second in the triple jump at 46' 4". The mile relay team of Wayne

Currie, Curt Long, John Brogle, and Ross Winter won in meet record

time of 3:18.0 (Tallahassee Democrat, 3 April 1966).

The Seminoles limped into their renewal of the annual shoot out

with the Gators of Florida. Florida State entered the Gator lair on

April 6 missing the services of their brilliant long jumper, Sidney

Gainey. He had torn the medial meniscus cartilage in his left knee

trying to throw the discus earlier that week in a track and field

theory class (Long, L. S., 1976).

The Florida Cators used an unexpected sweep of the long jump

and a narrow victory in the 440-yard relay to register a 76 to 69

triumph (FSU Track Office Files, 6 April 1966). In the opening running

event, Florida had a substantial lead after three legs of the 440-yard

relay. FSU's anchor man, stellar sprinter Ken White, closed hard, but,

unfortunately for the Seminoles, ran out of ground as Florida held on

for this all-important victory. Following this set-back, however, a

spectator watching the running events was subjected to a parade of

Seminole victories. Ken White copped the hundred-yard dash in :09.8

and led teammate Curtiss Long to a sweep of first and second places in
























John Brogle, Ross Winter, and Bill Nelson emerged victorious

in the 880-yard run. Brogle and Winter turned in spectacular times of

1:53.2 and 1:53.8, respectively. The 1:55.6 clocking by Bill Nelson

gains stature when one realizes that it came after his 4:19.3 second

place run in the mile.

The Seminoles needed a victory in the 440-yard intermediate

hurdles to retain a chance to win the meet. The race was a dog fight

in which Scott Hager of Florida just eased by Steve Landis to win in

:52.8. Landis's :52.9 was his second best time ever.

The same fighting spirit was exhibited by Sidney Merchant and

Richard Carrico in the two-mile run. Both mon, had labored hard through-

out their running careers with little tangible return. Merchant ran

an inspired race and won the event in 9:50.3. It was a personal best

and marked the first time he had run under ten minutes for the two-

mile. Richard Carrico battled hard for second and fell back only in

the very late stages of the race to finish third in 10:02.8.

Regardless of the outcome of a meet, the mile relay is run on

pride. The Seminoles had been mathematically defeated, yet were very

determined to win this event (Long, C. M., 1976). Wayne Currie led

off and gained a small advantage. The baton passed to Curtiss Long











who was running against Florida's Charles Mahoney for the third time

in the meet:

I was competing insmy fifth event of the day and was not





Wint er and John Brogle put the race away. (Long, C. M.,
1976)

The time of 3:16.8 was the second fastest dual meet mile relay

ever run by a Seminole foursome. The fastest had been run against the

Florida Gators in 1965.

The Seminoles competed in the Pennsylvania Relays on April 30

and May 1 in Philadelphia. The rainy weather and chilly temperatures

put a damper on performances. The cinder track was quickly churned

into mud (Long, C. M., 1976). The Tribe garnered a fifth in the long

jump with Sidney Gainey's leap of 23' 1-1/2", a tie for fifth in the

intermediate hurdles as Steve Landis spun-out a :53.6 clocking (New

York Times, 30 April 1966), and a sixth in the two-mile relay with a

time of 7:50.7 (New York Times, 1 May 1966).

Sidney Gainey, Ken White, and Steve Landis participated in the

45th Annual NCAA Championships in Bloomington on June 16-18. Although

Gainey failed to make the final six, his leap of 23' 3-3/4" placed

ninth overall (FSU Track Office Files, 16-18 June 1966).

Ken White failed to move out of the preliminaries in both the

100- and 220-yard dashes. His times were :09.8 and :22.0, respectively.

Steve Landis was disqualified for dragging his trail leg around the

hurdle in the 440-yard intermediate hurdle preliminary.












Sumrmary. The 1966 season had started well with victories in

the Coliseum Relays and the Jesuit Invitational. The Seminoles exten-

ded their winning streak to 14 with a triumph over the Hurricanes of

Miami. At this point, inherent problems began to catch up with the

Tribe. One problem had its origin in the gradual erosion of talented

personnel. Only two men remained on the squad from the freshman class

of 1962. In the winter of 1966, promising sophomore pole vaulter Hull

Carr dropped out of school. Lack of depth became acute when sprinter

Bill Campbell departed from the team of his own volition and a knee

injury temporarily sidelined Sidney Gainey.

The handwriting had been on the wall for several years. Coach

Mike Long had built a track dynasty on a financial shoestring. With

the increasing emphasis on track and field in the South, Mike Long

had prophesized the FSU demise in 1962;

In order to keep pace with other schools in track and
field, we're going to have to make greater strides in our
athletic scholarship progra-r-especially in this area.
(Tallahassee Democrat, 8 May 1962)

With only $14,000 in the scholarship budget, Florida State

University had never in its 18-year history of track and field

recruited a track man on a full scholarship (Long, I. S., 1976). The

days of recruiting top quality track athletes on partial scholarships

were rapidly coming to an end.

Despite setbacks, the 1966 Seminoles did have some bright

moments. The Tribe rewrote entries in the school record book for the

long jump, 440-yard intermediate hurdles, and the two-mile relay.












Upping both his indoor and outdoor long jump records, Sidne:

Gainey traversed 24' 5" indoors and 24' 11" outdoors. finishing ninr

outdoors in the NCAA long jump.

Steve Landis placed in the Pennsylvania Relays in the 440-y.

intermediates with a clocking of :53.6. He ultimately ran :52.2 for

new school record for the demanding hurdle race.

The foursome of Bob Hohnedel, John Brogle, Bill Nelson, and

Ross Winter put it all together in the two-mile relay at the 23rd

Annual Florida Relays. They lowered the existing school record by i

and nine-tenths second to 7:32.2.

Ken White did not equal his :09.5 clocking of 1965, but he c

display outstanding consistency. While never running slower than

:09.8, White registered :09.6 clockings on four different occasions

captured the sprint century at the Florida Relays.


1967

The Semineles were faced with a massive rebuilding task in

1967. The squad numbered only 28 of which 16 were sophomores with r

varsity experience. These underclassmen were soon to be tested in t

crucible of competition. The murderous schedule included the follow

challenges: the University of Alabama, Auburn University, the Unive

sity of Tennessee, and traditional foes, the University of Miami an

the University of Florida. Outside of dual meets, FSU would also cc

pete in the prestigious Florida and Pennsylvania Relays (FSU Track

Brochure File, Track and Field 1967). During this rebuilding season











The budget response to the losing season in 1966 was not

encouraging for the highly competitive coach. The scholarship line

item was frozen at the 1966 level and the operating budget was reduced

by over $6,500 (Athletic Office Budget File, 1966-1967).

The Tribe's hopes for the 1967 season were dimmed by the loss

of 17 men from the 29 man squad from the previous year. The =att

notable losses occurred through the graduation of John Brogle, school

record holder in the half-mile; fellow middle distance runner Ross

Winter; Ken White, co-holder of the 100-yard dash school record; and

distancemen Tom Graham and Bob Hohnadel.

The loss of prominent personnel did not stop with runners, as

pole vaulters Jack Flandeau and Fletcher Sims both made personal

decisions to leave school, leaving the Seminoles vulnerable in this

event. A similar decision by Don Casteel, the school record holder in

the triple jump, placed an added burden on Sidney Gainey.

The hurdles loomed as one of the stronger events for the Tribe

with sophomore Mike Kelly joining Steve Landis, the school 440-yard

intermediate hurdle standard bearer, and junior letterman, Charlie

Vickers. The high jumping and javelin chores fell once again on the

shoulders of Bud Nalming. He had surpassed the 220-foot mark in the

javelin the year before, but had to improve to be a consistent winner

in 1967 *

The Seminoles were without veteran performers in the sprints,

the middle distances, the distance races, and the pole vault. The

success of the 1967 season was dependent upon two major factors:











(1) staying injury free and (2) rapid development of key sophomore

personnel.

Florida State's first venture into competition occurred on

February 11 at the Southeastern USTFF Championship in Chattanooga.

The Tribe scrapped for every available point before falling short of

the eventual winners, the University of Tennessee Freshman team, by

one and ono-half points (Chattanooga Daily-Times, 12 February 1967).

The only Seminole victory came in the 60-yard high hurdles as

Mike Kelly turned in a school record performance in his first varsity

race. The yearling timber topper sped over the five barriers in :07.5.

Charles Vickers finished third in the same race.

The remaining points were obtained through Bob Thomas's second

place in the 1,000-yard run, a fourth by Bud Manning in the high Jump,

a second in the long jump by Sidney Gainey, and Joe Rooney's fourth in

the 600-yard ran.

Many of the major schools had passed up Chattanooga's red clay

track or had entered only on a limited basis (Long, C. M., 1976). The

Seminoles would receive a more accurate evaluation of their strength in

the upcoming Coliseum Relays.

Florida State University entered Montgomery on February 18 bent

on defending their 1966 Coliseum Relays crown. The best Seminole

finish was a tie for first by Bud Manning in the high jump as the Tribe

slipped to third place in the 1967 standings (Montgoery Advrtiser

19 February 1967).

Sidney Gainey suffered his second straight loss as Gaff of

Tulane jumped 24' 6-1/4" in the long jump. Gainey finished second at











23' 11-1/2". Having accrued only 19 points, the Tribe narrowly held

off the University of South Carolina and Southeastern Louisiana State

University for the show slot.

The Seminoles opened their outdoor season with the Second Annual

Jesuit Invitational Championship on February 25 in Tampa. The Tribe

had won the inaugural running of the meet which symbolized the state

championship and had hoped to do well in 1967. These hopes were quickly

dashed as the Seminoles finished a very discouraging third behind the

University of Florida and Florida A & M University (FSU Track Office

Files, 25 February 1967).

The Tribe's effort was headed by Sidney Gainey and Mike Kelly.

A jump of 24' 1" by Gainey was one of the two Seminole victories. The

other win came when Mike Kelly took the 120-yard high hurdles in :14.2.

Finishing in the show slot, Charlie Vickers clocked a :14.6. The time.

by Kelly and Vickers were both under the existing school record of

:14.7 set by Terry Long in 1962.

Florida State opened their dual meet season in the traditional

fashion with a dual meet against the University of Miami in Coral

Gables on March 4. The competition proved very uneven as only ons-

tenth of a second defeat in the mile relay kept the Seminoles from

scoring over 100 points. The final score was 99 to 45 in favor of the

Tribe (FSU Track Office Files, 4 March 1967).

Twin victories by Sidney Gainey, Andy Guy, and Marc Williamson

were instrumental in the Seminole victory. A track record leap of 23'

11-7/8" (Tllhase emcrt 5 March 1967) in the broad Jump by









209

Sidney Gainey earned him his first win of the day. The slender Cairo,

Georgia senior also copped the triple j ump at 46' 5".

Andy Guy added his name to the list of Seminole sprinters

who had run under :10.0 in the 100-yard dash by winning the century

sprint with a time of :09.8. He added the 220-yard dash with a :21.7

clocking.

Becoming the first Semiinole sophomore to run under ten minutes

in the two-mile, Marc Williamson took both the mile and two-mile ran.

with times of 4:19.8 and 9:43.0.

Despite throwing over 200 feet in the Javelin, Fsu's throwers

David Thompson and Bud Meanning had to settle for second and third

places, respectively. Thompson's 201' 3" edged Meanning by three

inches. The event was captured by Wymond of Miami at 211' 9".

Dave Braggins won the shot put with a toss of 49' 11-3/4".

Uncorking his career best in the discus Braggins became the fourth

best Seminole discus thrower with a toss of 151' 10-1/2"; however, he

finished second.

Only one-tenth of a second off his school record, Mike Kelly

bested the high hurdle field with his :14.3 clocking. FSU's leading

440-yard dashman from 1966, Curtiss Longwas lost for the majority of

the season due to a torn left hamstring and never ran the quarter-mile

again. This was only the beginning of a series of problems that were

to plague the Seminoles throughout the season.

Florida State was faced with the toughest task in town when

the surging Volunteers of Tennessee came to Seminole territory on

March 18. Quality performances were the order of the day as three











track records were set. The defending Southeastern Conference Ch-n

pions (Tallahassee Democrat, 19 March 1967) possessed too much overall

strength and prevailed 85 to 55 over the Seminoles of Florida State

(FSU Track Office Files, 18 March 1967).

Marc Williamson ran the third best mile time in Seminole track

history only to finish second. His 4:13.5 clocking had been bettered

only twice by Mike Conley in 1958. Tennessee's Storey established a

new track record with a 4:10.9 clocking.

The Tribe was defeated in three running events by a margin of

one-tenth of a second. The first came when Andy Guy ran :09.8 in the

100-yard dash and was edged by Wagner of Tennessee. Guy was clipped

by two Tennessee runners by one click of the clock in the 220-yard

dash,

Mike Kelly tied a school record in the 120-yard high hurdles

and finished a blink of an eye behind nationally renown, Richmond

Flowers of Tennessee. Kelly had run :14.2 as Flowers was clocked in a

new meet and track record :14.1.

The Seminoles swept the 440-yard intermediate hurdles with

Steve Landis and Charley Vickers tying at :53.5 and Kelly finishing

a stride back in :53.7. Sidney Gainey scored routine victories in the

long and triple jumps with efforts of 23' 3" and 45' 1/2", respectively.

Bud Manning became the second leading Seminole javelin thrower ever

with his toss of 220' 8", only to finish second.

The Crimson Tide of Alabama rolled into Tallahassee on March 27.

The difference in the two teams lay in the sprint events as Alabama

outscored the Seminoles 33 to four in the 100-, 220-, and 440-yard










dashes, and the quarter-mile and mile relays (FSU Track Office Files,

27 March 1967). The breakdown in the Seminole sprinting corps paved

the way to an 85 to 60 Alabama verdict.

Dave Braggins was forced to give up track and field at FSU

when he signed a professional football contract with the Canadian

Football League (Long, C. M., 1976). His presence was missed immedi-

ately as Charlie Fuchs was able to capture second place in the shot

put, but Alabama swept the top two spots in the discus with a win-

ning throw of 144' 6".

Marc Williamson continued his steady running by taking the mile

in 4:14.3 and coming back in the two-mile to register the third fastest

Seminole time with a clocking of 9:33.5. Turning in a career best per-

formance, Bob Thomas won the 880-yard run in 1:53.5. Thomas's clocking

was the second best half-mile time by a Seminole.

The Tribe's best finish occurred in the 120-yard high hurdles

as Mike Kelly and Charlie Vickers captured the top two spots with

Kelly's winning performance clocked at :14.5. Vickers came back to

take the 440-yard intermediate hurdles for his first varsity victory

in the fast time of :53.5.

Despite a very sore hamstring (Gainey, 1976), Sidney Gainey

managed to win the long and triple jumps. Bud Manning was the only

other Seminole to win a field event when he cleared 6' 3" in the high



j m' The Seminoles hosted the Auburn Tigers on April 1. The after-

noon was definitely an April Fool's Day for the Tribe (FSU Track Office

Files, 1 April 1967). The lack of Seminole sprinting power once again












proved fatal. A hamstring injury suffered by Andy Guy depleted the

Seminole sprint corps.

Auburn speedsters placed first and second in both the 10G- and

440-yard dashes, while sweeping the furlong. Auburn also opened the

meet with a swift :41.4 victory clocking in the quarter-mile relay.

Marc Williamson delivered personal best performances in the

mile and two~-mile runs, coming away with one win and one second.

Williamson took the mile run in 4:12.5 and ran a school record setting

9:24.3 in the two-mile run. It was a great effort by Williamson as he

was beaten by only nine-tenths of a second by Kelley of Auburn who was

running the event fresh.

Registering his second career victory, Charlie Vickers led

teammates Mike Kelly and Steve Landis to a sweep in the 440-yard inter-

mediate hurdles with a time of :53.1. Earlier, Kelly had captured the

120-yard high hurdles in :14.4.

Sidney Gainey shook off the effects of a sore hamstring to

record impressive victories in the long and triple jumps. Gainey

leaped 24' 7-1/4" on his final jump to take the long jump (Long, C. M.,

1976). His career best of 47' 9-1/2" won the triple j ump.

Moving up to fourth position on the FSU all time high j ump

list, Bud Manning copped the vertical jumping event with a leap of

















8 April 1967).

Two of the four Seminole victories were won by Sidney Gainey.

He took the long jump with a leap of 23' 9" and triumphed in the triple

jump at 451 1/2". Charlie Fuchs became the fifth Seminole to throw

over 50 feet in the shot put with his winning toss of 50' 10". The

final Tribe victory came in the 120-yard high hurdles as Mike Kelly

zipped to a :14.3 clocking.

A seven-foot jump by Frank Saier of the University of Florida

overshadowed a new school record leap of 6' 7-1/2" by FSU's Bud M-n

ning in the high jump. Bob Thomas ran the best half-mile race of his

career and still finished third in 1:53.2.

With a :52.9 clocking, Mike Kelly ran the intermediate hurdles

under 53 seconds for the first time and still finished third as

Florida's Scott Hager established a new meet and track record of :52.2.

Richard McLean became the Ilth Seminole to break the 10-second barrier

in the 100-yard dash by flashing to a :09.9 second place finish.

The Seminoles brought their team meet portion of their schedule

to a conclusion with the Gulf Coast Five-Way Meet in Auburn, Alabama,

on April 22. Hampered by the loss of Sidney Gainey to a hamstring pull,

Florida State did not win an event and captured only three seconds,

four thirds, and two fourth place finishes for a total of 20 points.

The Tribe managed to beat only one team in a field of five (PSU Track

Office Files, 22 April 1967).













The Tribe did produce a few quality performances. Charlie

Fuchs hurled the iron ball a personal record 52' 9-1/4" for second

place in the shot put. Bud Manning jumped 6' 6-1/2" in the high jump

and tossed the j avelin 2101 5-1/2" for third and fourth place, respee-

tively -

The Gulf Coast Five-Way Meet was the worst performance by one

of Mike Long's teams. Fortunately for the majority of the squad, the

season was over. The Seminoles carried a limited number of athletes

to the Pennsylvania Relays on, April 28-29. The Seminoles were able to

garner places in the long jump and intermediate hurdles (New York

Times, 29 April 1967). Sidney Gainey grabbed fourth in the long jump

with a leap of 23' 9". Charlie Vickers and Mike Kelly battled each

other for third place in the 440-yard intermediate hurdles. Vickers

bested his teammate by one one-tenth of a second in :52.3 as both men

bettered the old school mark of :52.5 held by Steve Landis.

Mike Kelly performed at the NCAA Championships in Provo, Utah,

on June 15-17. Kelly did not advance out of the preliminaries in

either the high or intermediate hurdles. He ran :14.5 in the high

hurdles and :53.5 in the intermediate hurdles (FSU Track Office Files,

15-17 June 1967).

Summary. The success of the season had depended on the rapid

development of a large number of young athletes. Their progress had

been good, but could not compensate for the loss of essential veterans.

Marc Williamson had an extraordinary year for a sophomore in

the distance events. He set a new school record of 9:24.3 at two miles

and ran the fastest mile in Seminole track history.












Fulfilling the promise he bad exhibited in his freshman year,

Mike Kelly grabbed the school record in the 120-yard high hurdles with

a :41.2 clocking. Junior Charlie Vickers nudged Steve Landis out of

his PSU record in the 440-yard intermediate hurdles with a :52.3

clocking in the Pennsylvania Relays. Bud Manning set a new standard

in the high Jump with a leap of 6' 7-1/2"; 9-1/2 inches over his

standing height!


1968

The 1968 season looked brighter for the Seminoles. The encour-

aging picture was aided by the enactment of the freshman eligibility

rule by the NCAA (Long, L. S., 1976). The ruling allowed FSU's talen-

ted freshmen to compete on the varsity squad. The smaller budget

schools no longer had to support two separate track programs, freshman

and varsity, which made it financially easier to field a dual meet

team.

The Seminoles had the potential to become one of the better

teams in Florida State's track history. Coach Mike Long explained the

basis for this prediction:


We have one of the most promising teams I have seen at
Florida S tate. The biggest problem lies in the fact that 35
percent of our team will be freshmen and although they are
the best we have ever had at Florida State, I =m not sure
that they will be up to varsity competition this year.
Tf I could put this team on a scale ranging from bad to
axe ellent I think it would fall somewhere between good and
very good, but I am not sure we will be up to the level of
our competition. The South has been undergoing a general
upgrading in track and field in recent years, and although we
bave improved, I don't know if it has been enough. (FSU
Track Brochure File, Track and Field 1968)













The Tribe was looking to school record holders Mike Kelly

Charlie Vickers, Bud Manning, and Marc Williamson for leadership.

hurdles looked to be the toughest entry for Florida State. In 19

Charlie Vickers set the school record in the intermediate hurdles

ran under the old school record in the high hurdles only to finish

behind teammte, Mike Kelly. The friendly rivalry between the twi

athletes provided the motivation necessary for continued improvemi

Bud Manning was the top returning j avelin thrower. Standing only

10", he was also the school record holder in the high jump at 61

The distance corps was led by Marc Williamson and supplemented by

man Sidney Merchant and freshman Ken Misner.

The Seminoles' weak areas were the sprint races and the pi

vault. Sprinter Andy Guy was injured in the 1967 indoor season al

was hampered throughout most of the remaining season. Guy's retu:

top form was critical to FSU's drive for success in 1968.

The 440-yard dash strength r ema ined a question mark as Mil

Link and untested freshman Randy Stow were the leading candidates

the Tribe. The pole vault was questionable, yet promising, as it

manned by two freshmen. Phil Edmonds was the first high school ,

in the State of Tennessee to vault over 14 feet. The Georgia cla

prep champion, Bill Jackson, was the second entry for Florida Stal

(FSU Track Brochure File, Track and Field 1968).

Although the loss of Sidney Gainey in the long and triple

j umps could not be ignored, the talent of junior college transfer

Steve Lewis and freshman Phil Parker minimized the effect of his












graduation. The Seminole squad was a talented team, but whether they

could match the abilities of their 1968 competition was a question soon

answered.

The 1968 version of the fighting Seminoles enjoyed a productive,

yet brief indoor season. Entered in only three meets, the Tribe broke

existing school standards 12 times in nine different events.

The Seminoles opened their season in Knoxville on February 17.

The Tennessee Relays was not a scored meet; therefore, no team champion

was crowned. The Tribe captured three first places and finished

second in three other events (FSU Track Office Files, 17 February 1968).

The two-mile relay team of George Griffin, Tom Rickards, Joe

Law, and Bob Thomas sped to victory in 8:05.6. The fine team effort

was sparked by outstanding individual performances by Joe Law and Bob

Thomas. Law's third leg brought FSU from 12 yards back to take the

lead and Thomas fought off a late challenge by Georgia Tech to win by

five yards. A new indoor school record was set by Bob Thomas in the

1,000-yard run with a winning time of 2:15.4. The other Seminole vic-

tory was obtained when Joe Law controlled the 880-yard run from the

opening gun to win in the school record time of 1:57.4.

Both Mike Kelly and Ken Misner bested FSU records only to fall

a bit shy and finish second in the 60-yard high hurdles and the two-

mile run, respectively. Kelly was edged by nationally renown Leon

Coleman. Kelly was clocked in :07.2 while the winner broke the tape

in :07.1. Misner scampered to a brilliant 9:27.5 time in the two-mile.

He was just two and five-tenths seconds behind the winner.











218

The Seminoles unleashed their firepower in the Ilth Annual

Coliseum Relays in Montgomery on March 1-2. Florida State captured

nine of 15 events as they amassed 65 1/2 points to overwhelm runner-

up Georgia Tech who finished second with 33 1/2 markers. The Tribe

track men set seven new FSU indoor records in their runaway victory

(FSU Track Office Files, 1-2 March 1968).

Joe Law nipped teammate George Griffin for first place in the

half-mile as both FSU runners dipped under the school standard. Law

was timed at 1:55.8. His teammate was a click of the clock back at

li55* 9*

Lowering his school record in the 1,000-yard run, Bob Thomas

zipped to victory in 2:15.1. Thomas had set the old record just two

weeks earlier in the Tennessee Relays.

Freshman Phil Edmunds boomed over 14' 7" in the pole vault to

become the highest flying Seminole in FSU indoor track history. His

vault also established a new Coliseumo Relays record. Fellow freshman

Phillip Parker copped the triple jump with a school record performance

of 45' 9-1/2".

Greg Kaufman set a school record in a n-ninning effort in the

quarter-mile. Kaufman's :51.5 clocking earned him second place honors.

Both the mile and two-mile relays were victorious in school

and Coliseum Relays record times. Joe Law, Bob Thomas, Mike Link, and

George Griffin outstripped their competition with a swift time of

7:48.9. The two-mile relay foursome bettered the old standard, also

set in the Coliseum Relays in 1966, by 12.9 seconds.











219

The mile relay quartet of Greg Kaufman, Charlie Vickers, Andy

Guy, and Mike Link cruised to a 3:23.8 clocking. The new school record

bettered the existing mark, set in the 1957 Coliseum Relays by four

full seconds.

Mike Link sandwiched a 600-yard dash in between two legs on

record setting relays. His time of 1:13.4 was the second fastest

600-yard run in Seminole track history. Link tied with Roger. of

Tulare, running in another heat, for first place.

A second place finishing jump of 23' 1" made Steve Lewis the

second Seminole to long jump over 23 feet indoors. Teammnate Phil Par-

ker followed in third with a Jump of 22' 10". Mike Kelly flashed over

five hurdles in :07.4 to win the 60-yard high hurdles in meet record

time.

The Seminoles had returned to the winner's circle in the indepen-

dent division of the Coliseum Relays with a spectacular display of

power. The Tribe's attentions were quickly focused on the impending

outdoor season.

The first Seminole outdoor endeavor was at Furman University on

March 23. The Tribe performed well in the llth Annual News-Piedmont

Relays (FSU Track Office Files, 23 March 1968).

Bud Manning came away with the top spot in the javelin by

hurling the spear 203' 0". Mike Kelly set a new Seminole record in

the high hurdles with a time of :14.0 while running second behind the

:13.7 of Duke's Jeff Howser.

A strong effort by Ken Misner in the two-mile run fell just

short of victory. Miner had to settle for the runner-up spot with a












time of 9:28.8. Doug Brown became the fourteenth FSTJ sprinter to crack

the 10-second barrier in the 100-yard dash. Brown's time of :09.9

placed him in fourth.

Florida State University entered the Jesuit Invitational on

March in Tampa. The Seminole pride suffered as the powerful Florida

Gators chalked up 83 points. The Tribe barely edged Florida A & M

51 to 46 for second place (Tampa Tribune, 10 March 1968).

Displaying fine early season form, Andy Guy garnered the only

footrace win of the day for the Seminoles with a :21.6 effort in the

220-yard dash. FSU fared only slightly better in the field events when

Bud Meanning topped the javelin field with a toss of 210' 8", and Steve

Lewis outleaped the long jumpers with a 22' 7-3/4" mark.

The Tribe managed to finish second in the mile relay behind

Florida to hold off the FAMU Rattlers by a meager five points for the

second position.

Florida State did not find many answers in the twenty-fifth

running of the Florida Relays. Although FSU did not produce any win-

-es, the Tribe did have a scattering of good performances (FSU Track

Office Files, 30 March 1968).

The shuttle hurdle quartet of Charlie Vickers, Charlie Galloway,

John Fuss, and Mike Kelly finished fifth with a very respectable time

of :59.2. It was the first shuttle hurdle race for a Tribe foursome ,

thereby setting a new FSU record.

Greg Kaufman, Doug Brown, Steve Lewis, and Andy Guy burned to

a :41.4 clocking in the 440-yard relay. The relay's time was only













two-tenths of a second off the school record. Their fine time only

earned them fourth as two teams ran under :41.0.

The two-mile relay received four steady performances from Bob

Thomas, Mike Link, Joe Law, and George Griffin. The total elapsed

time of 7:33.4 was the second fastest by a FSU team and fast enough for

fifth place.

The Seminoles ran wall in the 440-yard intermediate hurdles as

both Mike Kelly and Charlie Vickers ran under 53 seconds. Kelly was

second in the race at :52.6 and Vickers came in fourth with a time of

:52.9.

Andy Guy placed third in the 100-yard dash with a time of :09.8.

Uncorking his best long juup as a Seminole, Steve Lewis flew 23' 6" to

finish third.

For the second year in a row, the Seminoles met a team from

Alabama on April Fools' Day; however, in 1968, the joke was on the

Crimson Tide of Alabama. The Tribe had remembered their 25-point

licking at the hands of Alabama in 1967 and had been ready for the

r,,,tch.

C'...h Mike Long characterized the Tribe's effort as its "best

performance in two years" (Tallahassee Democrat, 2 April 1968). Florid.

State set eight meet, two school, and two track records on their way

to an overwhelming 96 to 49 defeat of the University of Alabama (FSU

Track Office Files, 1 April 1968).

The FSU 440-yard relay team of Greg Kaufman, Doug Brown, Steve

Lewis, and Andy Guy started the day with a victory that established a












new school, track, and meet record. Their combined effort produced a

:41.2 clocking.

The mile run produced another meet record shattering perfor-

mance as Ken Misner turned in a personal best of 4:13.1. Mike Link

continued the assault by copping the quarter-mile in a meet standard

setting :48.6. The Z48.6 marked the first time that Link had run under

49 seconds in the open quarter-mile. The next event, the 120-yard high

hurdles, was won by Mike Kelly in another meet record time of ;144.

For the second consecutive meet, Andy Guy ran :09.8 in the 100-yard

dash. The victory by Guy set still another meet mark.

Florida State University dominated the 880-yard run as all

three Seminole half-milers ran under Bob Thomas's weet record. George

Griffin fought to a new school record by winning in 1:51.9. Thomas

and Joe Law finished second and third with the identical time of

li,52*8,

Mike Kelly beat Charlie Vickers and his weet record when he

won the 440-yard intermediate hurdles in :52.4. Alabama's David Adkins,

the 1968 Florida Relays most outstanding athlete award recipient,

trailed Kelly in second place, while Vickers finished third with a fine

time of :53.2. The versatile Mike Kelly won his third event of the

day by taking the high jump at 6' 6".

Phil Edmonds won the pole vault with a jump of 14' 6" only to

miss Don Pharis's school record by one-half inch. The cocky freshman

narrowly missed clearing 15 feet (Tallahassee Democrat, 2 April 1968).

With a leap of 23' 1/2", Steve Lewis captured the long jump,

and then watched teammate Phil Parker take the triple jump at 46'













3-1/2". Bud Mamning hurled his spear 210' 0" only to have it fall

seven inches short of the winning throw by Phillips of Alabama.

The Seminoles were fresh off mne win over an Alabama school

and were looking for another when the Tribe met the Auburn Tigers on

April 6 in Auburn. The Seminoles could not generate as much fire as

the week before; however, the Tribe competed hard and came away with

an impressive 80 to 65 victory (FSU Track Office Files, 6 April 1968).

The win broke Auburn's eleven home meet win streak that had stretched

over three years. The last home loss was in 1965 and that, too, had

been at the hands of the Seminoles (Tallahassee Democrat, 8 April

1968).

The Tribe managed to win only eight of 17 events, but used

strong back-up performances and two three-place sweeps to overcome

Auburn's front line strength. Mike Kelly whipped over the ten timber.

to tie his own school high hurdle record of :14.2. Charlie Vickers

made the hurdles an all Seminole affair when he copped the 440-yard

intermediate hurdles in a meet record time of :52.5.

Running the three miles fresh, Ken Misner strode to a 14:45.6

victory. His time established a new school, track, and meet record.

Bud Manning was the only Semsinole double winner as he captured the

javelin with a throw of 205' 11" and the high jump at 6' 4". Phil

Parker was second in the triple jump, but his hop, step, and jump

added up to a personal best of 46' 9-3/4".

The Seminoles hosted the Gulf Coast Five-Way Meet on April 20.

Although the Seminoles finished second behind the University of Florida,













the Tribe captured four events, setting one school and track record

and two meet marks (FSU Track Office Files, 20 April 1968).

Mike Link blazed through the one lap event in a school record

tying time of :47.4. Although he finished second behind David Adkins's

meet and track time of :46.6, it was apparent that PSG had found a

stopper in the quarter-mile.

Mike Kelly and Charlie Vickers traded victories in the hurdle

races. Kelly flowed over the timers in the high hurdles to register a

:14.35 victory. Vickers edged his teammate by five-bundredths of a

second after 440 yards of hurdle racing to capture the top spot in this

grueling event with a time of :52.4. Vickers and Kelly both ran under

the fo rmsr meet record.

With the first of his two wins of the day, Phillip Parker

became the sixth Seminole long jumper to leap 23 feet as the tape

measure read 23 feet eveo. Parker then completed the horizontal jump-

ing double by defeating two Auburn jumpers in the triple jump with a

fine effort of 46' 7". Ken Misner finished second in the three-mile

run despite covering the distance in the school record setting time of

14:28.8.

Florida State concluded a good team performance with a very

pleasing victory in the mile relay. The foursome of George Griffin,

Randy Stow, Greg Kaufman, and Mike Link raced to the fastest mile relay

ever run by a Seminole quartet in a scored meet, Their winning time of

3:14.8 Was a meet and track record, yet they fell four-tenths of a

second short of the Seminole school record.











After the completion of the first leg, Randy Stw received the

baton five yards in back of the leaders. When his stint on the relay

was over, the Seminoles were on top by five full yards (Tallahassee

Democrat, 21 April 1968). The third and fourth runners, Greg Kaufman

and Mike Link, were never headed.

The University of Florida used their strength in the field

events to roll over the Seminoles at Percy Beard Field on May 4. The

Gtors did not lose a single field event while winning six of the 10

events on the track to handle the Seminoles 84 to 61 (FSU Track Office

Piles, 4 May 1968).

The Tribe was not without their superstars as Mike Kelly rose

to the occasion and broke one school record and tied another in his

two hurdle victories. Kelly flashed over the ten barriers in the high

hurdles to tie his own school mark of :14.0. The strapping junior was

invincible in the 440-yard intermediate hurdles as he smashed the field

with a new FSU record of :51.5. Kelly became the first Seminole in the

history of track and field at Florida State to run under 52 seconds in

the intermediate hurdles.

The Tribe had several athletes record personal record perfor-

mances in nonwinning efforts. Charlie Vickers finished second in the

12>0-yard high hurdles with his best clocking ever of :14.4. Phil

Parker improved his personal record in the triple jump to 46' 9".

Teammate Charley Galloway became the fourth Seminole to cover more than

46 feet in the triple jump with his personal recori.d of 46' 2". Parker

and Galloway finished second and third, respectively. Bud Manning













uncorked his second best throw ever in the javelin, yet as often had

happened in his throwing career, his 216' 0" throw was topped by a

heave of 230' 6" by Florida's Mike Burton.

The 220-yard dash was a great race as only one-tenth of a

second separated first and third place. Bill Carson of Florida won the

event in :21.8. ISO's Andy Guy and Denson Pepper finished second and

third, respectively, with the identical time of :21.9.

Florida State University concluded their head-to-head competi-

tion in a triangular meet with the University of Tennessee and the

Quantico Marines on May 11 in Knoxville. The powerful Volunteers, 1968

Southeastern Conference Indoor Champions, won the meet easily with 95

points (FSU Track Office Files, 11 May 1968). FSU squeaked out a nar-

row decision over Quantico for second place. The Seminoles' tally of

44 markers gave the Tribe a five-point advantage over the Marines.

Tennessee won 12 of 16 events dropping only the 440-yard intermediate

hurdles, 880-yard run, mile and two-mile runs. The three distance

events were scooped up by the Marines.

Mike Kelly grabbed the only Seminole victory with his second

sub-52-second intermediate hurdle performance in as many meets. The

watches, snapped to a stop at :51.7. Kelly was followed by Charlie

Vickers in second at :53.0 and John Fuss finished in fourth with a

personal best of :54.9. Mike Kelly also finished second in the high

hurdles to the NCAA indoor champion, Richard Flowers of Tennessee.

Kelly's time was recorded as :14.2.













For the second time during the 1968 season, George Griffin

slipped under 1:52.0 in the half-mile with his fifth place clocking of

1:51.5. It was ironic to break the school record and still finish

fifth'

A fresh.-n Tribe weightman picked this stormy day to exhibit

the talent that was to carry him to the top of the Seminole list for

weight men. However, let George Frank describe his performances:

These were my best freshman marks and were accomplished at
the same meet against the University of Tennessee-Quantico
Marines in Knoxville. To this day, I consider this t. be the
most competitive effort I ever made. The meet took place in
a terrible downpour and yet I set PR's in both events--
finishing second in the shot and fourth in the discus. The
amazing thing was that the shot mark (48' V") exceeded my
previous best by about three and one-half feet. (Frank,
1975)

Is=m competition for the season ended with the Tennessee-Quantic(

Marines triangular meet. 0. a selective basis, the Tribe entered the

Southeastern Track and Field Championships at Jefferson, Georgia. The

May 25th date made it a perfect tons up meet for the upcoming national

event,.

Mike Kelly demonstrated top form in winning both hurdle race$

(FSU Track Office Files, 25 May 1968). Kelly scampered to a :14.2

clocking in the 120-yard high hurdles and then blew to a :51.7 in the

intermediate hurdles.

The 440-yard relay team placed third with an FSU record setting

time of :41.2. Greg Kaufman, Doug Brown, Denson Pepper, and Andy Guy

were the men responsible for the record.

The scoring for the Tribe was completed when the mile relay

team composed of George Griffin, Greg Kaufman, Randy Stow, and Mike













Link came in fourth with the relatively slow time of 3:18.2. The 15

points garnered by the Seminoles lodged them in third place behind

the Florida Track Club and the University of Florida.

Mike Kelly was the lone Florida State University entry in the

Sixth Annual United States Track and Field Federation Outdoor Champion-

ships held in Houston, on June 7-8. Kelly recorded twin sixth place

finishes, matching his all time best in the high hurdles with a swift

:14.0 clocking. Kelly was only an eyelash away from biz school record

in the intermediate hurdles with a time of :51.6 (FSU Track Office

File, 7-8 June 1968).

Two weeks later, Mike Kelly entered the NCAA Outdoor Track and

Field Championships in Berkeley on June 18-20. Mike Kelly describes

how the meet unfolded:







were in meters.















RUOTC summer camp commitment kept me from attending the 1968
Olympic trials. (Kelly, 1976)

Summary. The rebuilding program of Coach Mike Long had pro-

ceeded steadily. The sophomore and freshmen laden Seminoles had












experienced surprising success during the 1968 campaign. FSU had run

up an impressive 32-point victory margin over Georgia Tech in the

independent division of the Coliseum Relays. Team efforts found the

Tribe finishing second in the Gulf Coast Five-Way Meet and the Jesuit

Invitational meet. The Seminoles established a three and two dual

meet records against the beat track powers in the South with wins over

the University of Alabama (96 to 49), Auburn University (80 to 65),

and the Quantico Marines (44 to 39). The losses occurred at the hands

of the University of Tennessee, who were the SEC indoor and outdoor

champions, and the University of Florida.

Mike Kelly led the parade of impressive individual Seminole

performers. His prolific record setting year was highlighted by sixth

place finishes in both hurdle races at the Sixth Annual USTFF Champion-

ships. Kelly ran faster than his old record of :14.2, in the high

hurdles, on four separate occasions and tied the record in two addi-

tional meets.

The old school standard in the 440-yard intermediate hurdles,

formerly held by Charlie Vickers, also fell to the flying feet of the

strong junior. Kelly lowered the FSU record to a spectacular :51.5.

A walk-on with no scholarship (Long, L. S., 1976), George

Griffin snapped John Br-ogle's half-mile mark by covering the two laps

in 1:51.5. Griffin's record setting performance occurred in the

Tennessee-Quantico Marines triangular meet, in which, he finished fifth.

Mike Link began to tap his tremendous potential for running the

quarter-mile. Link sped to a school record tying performance of :47.4













in the Gulf Coast Five-Way Meet 440-yard dash. Link's time was only

fast enough for second place.

Freshman Ken Misner finished between two marines in the

Tennessee-Quantico Marines three-mile run. His time of 14:06.8 better

his own school record by 21.7 seconds. Misner added the two-mile run

to his school record collection by popping out a 9:09.1 effort.

The 440-yard relay team of Greg Kaufman, Doug Brown, Denson

Pepper, and Andy Guy set their school record of :41.2 with a third

place finish in the Southeastern Championships.

The dual meet record run up by the Tribe was their best in two

years. The predominance of youth on their squad foreshadowed continued

improvement.
















CHAPTER 1V


A RESURGENCE: 1969-1974


1969

Three years of rebuilding culminated in 1969. The Seminoles

possessed talented personnel in most of the 17 events on the dual seet

program. The most obvious cloud on the horizon of prosperity was the

lack of depth. A team =ast have more than just one quality performer

for each event, if they are to succeed over a long competitive season.

"Our depth is the crucial factor, there is no questioning

that," said Coach Mike Long. "We don't have the numbers some of the

larger schools in the South new have and that makes it tough in dual

meet competition" (FSU Track Brochure File, Track and Field 1969).

With money having been historically in short supply for track

and field, the increase of $3,000 in the operating budget and a $6,000

boost in scholarship funds were welcome additions (Athletic Office

Budget File, 1968-1969). The additional funding came at au opportune

time as the consumer price index had risen five and six-tcnths points

over the previous year (U.S. Department of Health, Education, and

Welfare, 1975).

Mike Kelly led a talented contingent of Seminole runners. Back

for his senior year, the hard working hurdler was expected to be better

than ever. During the 1968 season, Kelly had broken both hurdle school













records with clockings of :13.8 and :51.5. In the Sixth Annual United

States Track and Field Federation Outdoor Championships, Kelly had

placed sixth in both the 120-yard high hurdles and the 440-yard inter-

mediate hurdles.

The talented hurdler was characterized by teammate Sandy Gar-

land as "the type of man every great track coach needs" (Garland, 1975).

The description was very apropos as Kelly was dedicated to his sport.

He possessed the self-discipline n- ... ary to condition himself for

competition and the ability to use his talents at meet time. Mike

Kelly was at his best in tough competition (Long, L.. S., 1976).

Ken Misner was a rising sophomore who had established himself

in 1968 as the distance runner to watch on the Seminole squad. He

handled the Tribe's two- and three-mile chores and competed, on

occasion, in the mile run.

The field events did not appear on paper to have the number of

quality athletes found in the running events, yet they were stronger

than in recent years. The long and triple jumps appeared to have the

greatest potential for scoring with Phil Parker and Steve Lewis carrying

the garnet and gold into competition. Parker had been slowed by

injuries during much of 1968 (Long, L.. S., 1976), but the opportunity

of developing into the best Seminole triple jumper was open to him if

he could remain injury free. The javelin was the only weak event for

the Tribe. If that event was strengthened, or compensated for, 1969

would again be the year of the Seminoles.

The Tribe opened their indoor season with a limited entry in

the Astrodome Federation Championships on January 24-25 in Houston.












FSU utilized university station wagons to convey their small contingent

to Texas (Long, L.S., 1976).

Mike Kelly captured the only Seminole points with a very respec-

table showing in the 60-yard high hurdles. The muscular senior placed

fourth in a very swift race that was won by Southern California's

Franklin in :06.9 (New York Times, 26 January 1969).

Florida State traveled to Lexington, Virginia, for the first

team competition of the young indoor season. The Seminole entries in

the VMI Winter Relays on February 1 established a school record in a

new event and came close to the school standard in two other events

(FSU Track Office Files, I February 1969).

The shuttle hurdle team of Roger Peterson, John Fuss, Phil

Parker, and Mike Kelly finished fourth with a time of :30.6. The race

marked the first time the shuttle hurdle event had been run by a S-m

inole quartet indoors.

A second place finish by Ken Hisner in the two-mile was timed

at 9:28.1. Misner's time was only six-tenths of a second off his own

record set in 1968.

The mile relay team of Greg Kaufman, Andy Guy, Randy Stow, and

Mike Link turned in a fine 3:23.7 performance. The Tribe finished

fourth and only four-tenths of a second over the school mark. The

effort was highlighted by Link's :49.4 anchor leg. He became the first
















'rack Office Files, 22 February 1969).

FAMUl's sprint program had gained national renown for the tracl

Exploits of 1964 Olympian Robert Hayes, Bob Parramore, Eugene Milton,

ames Ashcroft, and many other fine dashmen. Mike Long had always hac












The Seminoles returned to Montgomery on March 1 to defend

their Coliseum Relays title. The Tribe had dominated the independent

division by 32 points in 1968. FSU had little trouble repeating as

the Tribe more than doubled the score of their nearest competitor.

Florida State set five new indoor school records and tied two other

while amassing their 54 1/2 point total (Montgomery Adverti- r, 2

March 1969).

Bob Thomas led the Seminole record setters with a victorious

clocking of 2:14.6 in the 1,000-yard run. Phil Parker joined Thomas

in the winners' circle with a triple jump of 47' 1-1/2". Parker had

bettered his old indoor school mark by over one and one-half feet.

The mile relay was the other victorious record producing per-

formance. The foursome of Greg Kaufman, Randy Stow, Mike Kelly, and

Mike Link moved the baton through the ten-lap, mile in 3:20.8.

Ken Miser and Joe Law both bettered the school standard in

non-winning performances. Misner whipped through the mile in 4:13.6,

only to finish behind Russell of David Lipscomb. Law did not fare as

well, as his record setting performance of 1:55.7 in the half-mile only

brought him fourth place.

Doug Brown joined Jack Terwilliger and Craig Johnson at :06.3

in the 60-yard dash with his second place effort. Brown was nosed out

at the wire by Pleasant of Alabama State. Pleasant and Brown were both

given the same time.

Strong performances were also turned in by Steve Colman and

John Snyder. Freshman Steve Oulman displayed his rawboned strength in

the 600-yard dash. The young man finished third in a very good field













with a time of 1:13.6. Snyder became the first Seminole shot putter

to throw over 50 feet indoors since Al Williams tossed the shot 56' V"

in the 1964 Coliseumn Relays. Snyder's throw of 51' 11-1/4" placed him

second behind the 52' 4-3/4" effort by Brown of Georgia Tech.

Mike Kelly won his second event of the meet by taking the 60-

yard high hurdles in :07.5. The high j ump record of 6' 7" held by

Floyd Lorenz was tied when Mike Kelly scaled the identical height to

win the vertical jumping contest. The most valuable performer selec-

tion was made easy by Kelly's victories in the high jump, high hurdles,

and a strong middle leg on FSU's winning mile relay (Tallahasse

D emo crat, 2 March 1969).

The Jesuit Invitational State Championship in Tampa on March 8

was the second stop on Florida State's outdoor schedule. A hard

driving rain during the competition (Tallahassee Democrat, 9 March

1969) put a constraint on the quality of performances. With Florida

A & M capturing only 14 points, the Jesuit Invitational turned into a

two team meet. The University of Florida prevailed over the Seminoles

by a commanding 94 to 67 score (FSU Track Office Files, 8 March 1969).

FSU's 440-yard relay of Doug Brown Greg Kaufman, Steve Lewis,

and Andy Guy registered the first of four Seminole triumphs with a fine

:41.4 clocking. Continuing to run well in the short sprint races,

Florida State copped the 120-yard high hurdles with a :14.7 performance

by Mike Kelly. Andy Guy showed a flash of brilliance by winning the

220-yard dash in :21.5. If muscle pulls could be avoided, the Tribe

sprinting corps would receive a valuable boost from the oft injured

Andv G-v













.is lone Seminole victory in the field events

,a of Phillip Parker. The slender Atlanta a(

'in the triple jump.

is next Seminole home dual meet was against I

I on March 12. The Tribe was devastating as

and set one school record while tying anoth(

Ull to 34 was the largest Tribe victory total

:ory (FSU Track office Files, 12 March 1969).

Lll Jackson, a sophomore pole vaulter, clear

id an FSU record. The pressure had really bc

Phil Edmunds had left school in the early sr

iville, Georgia, native as the lone Seminole

tckson shared his memory of the pole vault cc

vaulting had been improving through the fal









238

was a feast day for sprinters, Doug Brown pounced out of the blocks

and sped to a personal best of :09.7 in the 100-yard dash. His sprint

victory was duplicated by Andy Guy's :21.5 clocking in the furlong.

Mike Kelly was the king in both hurdle events. Kelly clocked

a quick :14.2 in the 120-yard high hurdles and returned to cover the

quarter-mile intermediate hurdles in :52.7.

The FSU half-milers had it all to themselves in the 880-yard

too. Steve Oulman finished first with a time of 1:53.7, closely fol-

lowed by Joe Law in 1:53.8. Sandy Garland, a junior college walk-on,

scored his first Seminole point with a fine 1:54.8 effort. Ken Misner

rounded out the footracing action with a superlative 14:09.0 perfor-

mance in the three-mile run.

The Seminole performances in the field events were not out-

standing; however, the Tribe won all but six of the 56 contested field

event points. George Frank highlighted the field event effort by

powering the discus 158' 2-3/4".

Florida State competed in four relay carnivals in a rno. The

first was the Florida A & M Relays on March 15 in Tallahassee. The

Tribe entry in the FAMIT Relays was on an individual interest basis

(Long, L. S., 1976). The Rattler clay track gave up times and perfor-

mances grudgingly. FSU did manage to capture five events including the

sprint medley relay (FSU Track Office Files, 15 March 1969).

The most noteworthy effort by a Seminole was a 47' 5" winning

triple jump by Charlie Galloway. This was the first 47-foot jump for

the sophomore from Atlanta. After having won the high hurdles in

:14.5, Mike Kelly suffered his second straight defeat at the hands of











239

FAMU'as Kent Schoolfield in the 440-yard intermediate hurdles. School-

field's time was a sterling :52.7. John Snyder copped the shot put

with a throw of 51' 1" and Ken Misner dominated the mile in 4:20.2.

The traveling Tribe made the long trip to Greenville, South

Carolina for the 12th Annual Nevs-Piedmont Relay. As a team, the

Seminoles were not sharp. Coach Mike Long could find a little solace

in the fact that no team title was at stake (FSU Track Office Files,

22 March 1969).

Mike Kelly was his reliable self. He took the 440-yard inter-

mediate hurdles with a meet record time of :52.3 and won the high jump

at 6' 6". Kelly suffered his only defeat of the day in the 120-yard

high hurdles, as he finished second behind Jeff Howser of Duke with a

time of :14.2.

Ken Misner set a new Seminole standard for two miles with a

9:01.0 clocking. However, his third place clocking was almost ten

seconds behind the winning time. John Snyder copped the shot put with

a toss of 52' 5", his best toss of the season.

The sprint medley team was involved in a tight battle with

Yale and South Carolina for the relay trophy. Andy Guy led off in :22.4

and Paul Sepulveda turned his half-lap in :21.3. The 440-yard leg was

run by Randy Stow in :48.3. Joe Law brought the baton home on the

88G-yard anchor leg in 1:55.5. The Seminoles' overall time placed them

second on the FSU all-time list with a 3:27.5 clocking. However,

FSU's time was not fast enough as Yale burned a 3:27.0 and the Game-

cocks of South Carolina edged the Tribe by one-tenth of a second in













The next stop on the Florida State's relay swing was Gaines-

ville for the 26th Annual Florida Relays. The competition was fierce

as the Tribe broke three school records and did not win an event

(FSU Track Office Files, 28-29 March 1969).

The 440-yard relay team of Doug Brown Greg Kaufman, Steve

Lewis, and Andy Guy blazed to the first sub-41-second time in the

history of track and field at Florida State. FSU's :40.9 clocking wai

topped only by Florida A & M's :40.5 performance.

Phillip Parker, John Fuss, Roger Peterson, and Mike Kelly

joined their hurdling talents to lower FSU's shuttle hurdle record to

:58.6. Their joint efforts netted FSU a third place. In spite of a

school record race in the two-mile, Ken Misner's 9:00.7 was only suf-

ficient for fourth place, as Russell of David Lipscomb turned in a

winning time of 8:54.5.

Mike Kelly garnered two seconds in the hurdle races. Old

nemesis Jeff Howser of Duke nipped the FSU hurdler by a scant two-

tenths of a second in the 120-yard high hurdles. Klelly's time was a

nifty :14.1. He was again second in the 440-yard intermediate hurdle!

with a time of :52.3. In the triple jump, Phil Parker and Charles

Galloway jumped 48' 4" and 47' 6-1/2" for third and fifth places,

respectively.

The Seminoles completed their four relay carnival tour in

Chapel Hill, North Carolina, on April 16 (FSU Track Office Files, 16

April 1969). The 10th Annual Carolina Relays format did not call for

a scored team title. Without a team championship on the line, the

competitive spirit blew hot and cold among the Seminole performers.









241

The first 15-foot vault in FSU's track program came at the

Carolina Relays. Bill Jackson tried to convey his feeling of exhilar-

ation when he wrote:

There's not much to recall from this meet except the
feeling I experienced clearing 15' 1/2". In my entire career
this vault is the one I remember because it felt like every-
thing came together. I felt relaxed as I came down the runway,
my pole plant was smooth, but after that I don't remember much
until I pushed off the pole. On top, I remember looking down
and seeing the top of the pole in the box. As I pushed away
I saw the cork in the top of the pole and the bar and I knew
that I had just made the best vault of my life. The feeling
was and still is, indescribable. (Jackson, 1975)

FSU's shuttle hurdle team of Charles Galloway, John Fuss, Roger

Peterson, and Mike Kelly won that event in a meet record time of

:59.1. The shuttle hurdles victory was the only Tribe triumph of the

afternoon.

FSU's Mike Kelly and Carl Wood, a nationally ranked intermediate

hurdler from the University of Richmond, hit the tape together in a

relays record :52.1. Wood was judged the winner with both men receiving

the same time.

With a throw of 160' 4". George Frank became the first Seminole

since Al Williams in 1964 to throw over 160 feet in the discus. Frank's

toss of 160' 4" was a second place earning effort.

Florida State track men received only three days rest before

competing in the Gulf Coast Five-Way Meet in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, on

April 19. The Seminoles' performances reflected the strain of travel,

yet they battled hard before dropping a nine and mne-half point

decision to the University of Florida. The Tribe came in second with

















Ken Misner placed second in the mile run with a career best of

4:11.9. With a vengeful effort, he took the three miles in 14:23.8.

Finishing third, Steve Oulman broke George Griffin's school mark in the

880-yard run with a 1:51.4.

Mike Kelly's long day began with a :14.2 victory in the 120-yar,

high hurdles. Following his win in the high hurdles, Kelly romped to

victory in the 440-yard intermediate hurdles with a :52.7. The mile

relay provided the setting for Kelly's final race of the afternoon.

Greg Kaufman opened the relay with a :50.0 split out of the blocks.

Randy Stow followed in :48.9 and Kelly ran :48.5 on the third leg.

Mike Link brought the stick home in second place with a :48.7 split.

The Seminole team time was 3:16.0.

The Florida State track team made the long trek to Philadelphia

on April 25-26 for the Pennsylvania Relays. The effort was rewarded

only by a fourth place finish by Mike Kelly in the 440-yard inter-

mediate hurdles. Kelly's time was recorded at :53.0 (Ne Yok Tmes

26 April 1969).

Florida State University hosted their intrastate rival, the

University of Florida, on May 3. The Seminoles had not defeated the

Gators since 1965.

The competition broke down into two smaller meets. In the

field events, the Florida Gators blitzed the Tribe 42 to 21 while the

Seminoles edged the Gators 42 to 40 in the running events (FSU Track

Office Files, 3 May 1969). Florida was able to grab their points in









243

large clusters. The Gators swept all three places in the half-mile and

took both first and second places in the long jump, high jump, j avelin

and quarter-mile, leaving only the single third place point for the

Tribe -

Th. 440-yard relay foursome of Doug Brown Greg Kaufman, Denson

Pepper, and Andy Guy opened the meet with a :41.1 meet record setting

conquest. In addition to his lead off leg on the quarter-mile relay,

Brown prevailed in the 100-yard dash in :09.7 and in the furlong at

:21.6. Brown's time in the 220-yard dash was a career best, while his

effort in the century matched his personal record.

A meet and track record of :13.9 Was set by Mike Kelly in the

120-yard high hurdles. Kelly also captured the 440-yard intermediate

hurdles in :51.9 and anchored FSU's winning mile relay. The Winter

Park senior had never run on an FSU team that had beaten the University

of Florida; however, the Gators had managed only once in three years of

running the high and intermediate hurdles in FSU-Florida dual meet

competition to beat the man himself.

The Seminoles had a fine performance turned in by Ken Misner as

he captured the three-mile run for the second consecutive year with a

meet record 14:29.9. Equally outstanding performances were Charles

Gall-wy's win in the triple jump with a personal best of 47' 8" and

George Frank's second place throw of 160' 3" in the discus. Frank

related the circumstances surrounding the disculs event:





had been having a terrible year. Here was some unknown
thrower who he saw cons istent ly throw 130 feet the year


















orida went on to register an 82 to 63

17 events. Depth, as Coach Long had

rognosis, was a crucial factor.

meet season against the Crimson Tide of

ae. The outcome was never in doubt as

7 events (FSU Track Office Files, 10


victory despite losing nine of

pointed out in his preseason p:

FSU completed its dual

Alabama on May 10 in Tallahassl

the Seminoles captured 14 of I.

May 1969). The final score -a


jump was won by Kelly with a meet record

triumph came in the 44G-yard interm~edia

set a new meet and track record. A ver-

his calibre to close out his last meet

Doug Brown turned in his career

dash. Brown7 recounted his :09.6 race:



















explained his attitude toward throwing during his sophomore year:




throws before my last several meets Ti 1_ i. ri- :-r:






1975)

An incident occurred in the thre.-mile that showed .uit FSU's

team spirit was all about. To, Rickards was a senior distance runner

who had played a role in setting a distance medley school record when

he was a sophomore. He had toiled during his junior and senior years

without much tangible return. Rickards needed to win the three-mile

in the Alabama meet in order to have enough points to win his varsity

letter. There appeared to be little hope as teammate Ken Migner was

vastly superior.

Tom Rickards was giving the race a good effort. Without ever

having talked to any of the coaches, Ken Misner decided to try to win

only if the Alabama runner challenged for the lead. Rickards beat the

Alabama runner and won his senior year award (Roberts. 1976).

















All-American honors were won by Mike Kelly in both the 120-

yard high hurdles and the 440-yard intermediate hurdles. Kelly fin-

ished third in the intermediate hurdles behind Carl Wood of the Univer-

sity of Richmond and Ralph Mann from Brigham Young University, with a

time of :51.5. The strapping senior hurdler had made an early season

decision to try to run the first six hurdles in 13 strides rather than

the usual 15. This technique requires great strength; however, Kelly

was convinced that he could not generate enough speed using the normal

150 step approach (Long, L. S., 1976). The soundness of his reasoning

was corroborated by his high national finish. Kelly also earned All-

America honors with his fourth place finish in thehigh hurdles. His

official time was an impressive :13.9.

Sixth place finishes were collected by Phillip Parker in the

triple jump with a 47' 6-1/2" effort, and by Doug Brown in the 100-

yard dash with a :10.0 clocking. Brown offered the following des-

cription of his success:



any better. I surprised myself as I placed second in my pre-
liminary and semifinal heats. (Brown, 1975)

Florida State tied for 19th in the national meet with 12 points.

The Seminole entries in the National Collegiate Athletic

Association Championships in Knoxville on June 19-21 did not fare very













,erience of being disqualified in both hurdle events. Mike Kell

Ad of his experience at the NCAA Championships:










college track career. I felt good and as usual my times



to be a good running surface for me. I feel effortless on
it. We had just received new double-knit uniforms which
really looked sharp.

i t

their marks, and I remember my left leg and arms visibly
quivering as I readied myself. The gun sounded and the race
began. I was smooth over the hurdles, and my balance was
g od for me. I usually swing wildly with my arms to main-
tain balance and my hips are usually turned counterclockwise.
To my surprise, I maintained contact with the leaders and

(I- Fi












hurdler and Adidas salesman, came by to see if my shoes were in
good shape.
Physically my right hamstring was a little sore, and I had
a heart flutter after the race which lasted for about 30
minutes. The next day, in the semifinals, my leg was still
sore, but I took off like the day before. Carl Wood of Rich-
mond was in my heat and trailed me throughout the race. At
the tenth hurdle I thought about my hamstring and decided
not to push to the finish line. I eased up and Wood passed
me. Wood finished in :50.8 and I was second in :51.2.
The finals were run on the third day. I was in lane one.
Th. hu dles used for this meet were narrow compared to the
lane width and made it difficult for a large right-footed
hord I a to keep his whole body over it. I had great hopes
of winning this final, since my :50.2 was the fastest quali-
fying time and I eased through the semifinal race. My right
leg was still sore and half-way through the race my leg pop-
ped. Apparently the pull wasn't too bad, because I was able
to finish the race in :50.3 with a fourth place. My finish
and time were disappointing but at least fourth place was
All-American. It sounded great, but some minutes later it
was announced that I had been disqualified for trailing my
I eg over the side of a hurdle.





"Mike hung in there well," said FSU track coach Mike Long.

"This is the most disappointing thing that has happened to me in 30

years of coaching. It Is too bad a really nice kid like Mike had to

end his college career like this" (Tallahassee Democrat, 22 June 1969.

Ken Misner was never able to stay with the pace in the three-

mile and was eventually lapped in the race. Doug Brown remembered the

moments before his 100-yard dash preliminary:

I remember John Carlos was in my preliminary heat: We were


people jumped to their feet. Carlos aae rtting out with a
yell w wi d breaker with big red ",.h ny" ww'tt a, on t he
bc The r at afu knew be was the men. ae pranced around
the track, and then came to the start of the 100-yard dash.









249

He gave a few nods to pals from the West Coast--took off his




Summary. Indeed, 1969 had been the year of the Seminole. The

Tribe had captured the Coliseum Relays title, and was second in both

the Jesuit Invitational and the Gulf Coast Five-Way Meet. The Seminol(

rolled up a 3-1 dual meet record with victories over Florida A & M

(106 1/2 to 38 1/2), East Carolina (111 to 33), and Alabama (93 to 52).

The only blemish was a defeat to the University of Florida (82 to 63).

During the regular season, ten school records were overturned.

Mike Kelly was the outstanding Seminole performer for 1969.

The senior hurdler revised both of his hurdle records. He covered the

120-yard high hurdles in :13.7 and toured around intermediate hurdle

littered oval in :50.2.

Many top honors were earned by Mike Kelly during the 1969 sea-

son. He was named outstanding performer in the Coliseum Relays, fin-

ished third in the National USTFF Track and Field Championship inter-

mediate hurdles and fourth in the high hurdles, while close judgment

calls separated him from All-America honors in the NCAA Track and

Field Championships. In spite of his many physical contributions,

Coach Mike Long described Kelly's greatest contribution as being in

the spiritual domain. Long Identified his unique talent as dedicationr

the desire to make the sacrifices needed to win" (FSU Track Brochure

File, Track and Field 1968).

Coach Mike Long's belief was corroborated by a statement by



















was in every sense the finest competitor I have ever seen,
and watching him compete was an experience that I wi 11 ne er
for get Te .e 'a and perff.-. es in whi h he set school



inspiration t o those of us who were fortunate enough to have
compsted with him. (Jackson, 1976)

Doug Brown and Phil Parker also did well in national competi-

tion. Brown finished sixth in the National USTFF 100-yard dash with a

:10.0 clocking. Parker snagged a sixth place in the triple jump with

a 471 6-1/2" effort. He had been beset by nagging injuries to his ham,

strings and knees during the entire 1969 season (Long, L. S., 1976).

He was able to shake his ailments long enough to unleash a 49' 1/4"

school record setting jump in the FSU-FAMU dual meet.

A pair of school records were lowered to new levels by Keo,

Misner. lie covered the tw.-milc event in 9:00.7 and ran through three

miles in 13:54.5. Misner's time marked the first three-mile race ever

run by a Seminole under 14 minutes.

Steve Oulman erased George Griffin's school record in the 880-

yard run by whipping to a 1:51.4 clocking. Both records had been set

in the Gulf Coast Five-Way Meet, only one year apart.

Two Seminole sophomores set new school standards in the field

events. George Frank became the best discos thrower in FSU track












pressure of being the only Seminole entry in the pole vault by brea

Don Pharis's record with a leap of 15' 1/2".

The Seminoles reset both dual meet relay marks. The 440-ya:

relay team of Doug Brown, Greg Kaufman, Steve Lewis, and Andy Guy

became the first Seminole quartet to run under 41 seconds. Their

official time of :40.9 was recorded in the Florida Relays.

The mile relay team composed of Greg Kaufman, Randy Sto, Sc

Oulman, and Mike Kelly erased one of the most prestigious records oi

the board. The former record was established by Jack Terwilliger,

Doyle Ruff, Mike Conley, and Jim Casteel during the golden year of

1958. The new record holders bettered the old record by nine-tenthi

a second with a 3:13.5 clocking. The record was made more remarkab

by the fact that the regular anchorman, Mike Link, was sick and cou.

not ran (Kaufman, 1975).


1970

The 1970 squad appeared to be very strong. Coach Mike Long.

aided by assistant coaches Darryl Guthrie and James Long, had enjoy(

tremendous success in 1969 with an experienced, yet tenderaged team.

The 1969 campaign was to have been a rebuilding year; instead, the

Seminoles developed very rapidly and became a power in southern tra,

circle, '

Ninet-e lettermen, including five school record holders, w

returning for the 1970 season (FSU Track Brochure File, Track 1970)

The record-holderq were Ken Misner (two- and three-mile runs), Mike

Link (quarter-mile), Bill Jackson (pole vault), Steve Oulman













(ha~f mile), and George Frank (discus). The 1970 team possl

ance and if each man performed up to his capabilities, the:

would be without a weak event.

Ken Misner and Doug Brown headed a strong array of

Misner had already earned all-America honors in cross-countl

the fall of 1969. After a strong sixth place finish in the

Annual USTFF Championships, Brown was recognized as one of i

best sprinters.

The field events boasted the most powerful contingei

assembled at Florida State University. School record holder

Jackson and George Frank were the most prominent. With his

15' 1/2", Jackson had become the first Seminole to vault -v

The hard working junior was rapidly improving and his prosp(

future were excellent.

The home-grown George Frank had been a very pleasant

in 1969. The talents of the Tallahasseean coupled with tho2

Snyder, Dave Barton, and Chuck Crowder gave the Seminoles ui

depth in the weight events.

The schedule loomed as strong a. the Tribe, with th(

of Tennessee, the University of Florida, Florida A & M Univi

University of Alabama Auburn University, and Southern Illii

sity appearing on the schedule. Big meet competition came

of the Coliseum, Florida, and Carolina Relays. and the Fedei

pionships in Houston, Texas (FSU Track Brochure File, Track

One problem facing the Tribe was shared by many Amei

Runaway inflation was wreaking havoc with the financial und(













of FSU's track program. Moderate increases in the budget (Athletic

Office Budget File, 1969-1970) could not keep pace with the rapidly

inflating cost of living. The cost of living index rose six and five-

tenths points during the fiscal year 1969-1970 (U.S. Department of

Health, Education, and Welfare, 1975).

The Seminoles opened their indoor season with a triangular meet

in Knoxville against the University of Tennessee and Western Kentucky

University on February 7. The Tribe did not fare well as Tennessee won

the competition handily with 73 points while Western Kentucky edged

FSU by one point 39 to 38 (Tallahassee emcrt, 8 February 1970).

The flat 176-yard tartan track of Stokely Fieldhouse (Long,

L.S., 1976) did not reward the maroon and gold efforts as Ken Misner

was the lone Seminole to capture an event. Forced by fieldhouse regula-

tions to run without spikes (Long, L. S., 1976), Misner defeated the

best runners of two distance-oriented schools with a fine time of 9:15.4

for two miles.

Misfortune befell the Tribe when Mike Link pulled a hamstring

in the 440-yard run. The fourth position in the quarter-mile went

vacant and that single point could have moved the Seminoles into a tie

for second place. Disaster struck again in the 600-yard run when Steve

Colman was jostled to the point of not being able to finish the race.

The Seminoles traveled to the Federation National Indoor Cham-

pionships by station wagon (Jacksou, 1975) on February 11. The Tribe

was unable to place a man in the prestigious meet (Houston Chronicle,










254

The Coliseum Relays on February 27-28 in Montgomery was the

third stop on the Seminoles indoor tour. Over the past two years, the

Tribe had dominated the relays which had traditionally drawn together

the best independent track powers in the South. FSU's 61 total points

far-outstripped runner-up Georgia Tech and the other 16 competing

schools (Montgomary Advertiser, 29 February 1970).

The field event personnel led the way with three victories of

which two were school record performances. Charles Galloway was excep-

tionally tough as his 49' 1-1/2" effort in the triple jump earned him

first place and a new indoor school record. He had bettered the old

record by two feet. Competing earlier in the long jump, Calloway

bounded a1 personal best of 23' 11-3/4". Unfortunately, Galloway touched

the sand one and one-half inches closer to the board than the winning

jump, thereby settling for second place.

Bill Jackson accomplished a Seminole track first with his win-

ning vault of 15' 1". Erasing Phil Edmund's indoor school record,

Jackson became the first Seminole to ever vault over 15 feet indoors.

The third Seminole field event man to enter the winner's circle

was John Snyder. His winning toss of 52' 5-1/4" was a personal best

for the Daytona Beach weightman. Al Williams was the only Seminole to

hurl the iron ball further in indoor competition.

Ken Miseer and Doug Brown ran very fast but not quite fast

enough. Misner became the first Tribe two-miler to break nine minutes

in the two-mile. His FSU record setting time of 8:55.9 rendered him

no better than second as Grav of Arkansas State ran 8:54.2. Although












bolting to a school record tying :06.3, Doug Brown finished third in

the 60-yard dash.

The Seminoles slipped outside for the fifth running of the

Jesuit Invitation in Tampa on March 7. Th. weather made the partici-

pants and coaches wish that they were back indoors. The cold winds,

storm clouds, and finally driving rain forced the cancellation of the

pole vault and held down performances in many events (Tallahassee

Democrat, 9 March 1970). However, the Seminoles most have found the

weather palatable as the Tribe posted their first victory in the Jesul

classic since the inaugural running of 1966 (FSU Track Office Files,

7 March 1970).

Ken Misner was the standout runner for the Seminoles as he

fought the winds for two personal bests. He turned in a tremendous

performance in the two-mile by outlasting three Florida runners with a.

FSU record time of 8:55.5. Misner's victory revenged an earlier defea

to Florida's Joel Parker in the mile run in which Parker had won in

4:10.0 while Misner finished second with a personal record 4:10.8.

Misnor shared the outstanding athlete of the meet award with his dis-

tance running adversary, Joel Parker of the University of Florida.

The Seminoles scored 10 points in the 120-yard high hurdles

when football standout, Barry Smith copped the high hurdles in :14.8.

He was closely followed by FSU's Roger Peterson and Jimmy Broun,

Charles Galloway led a strong field event performance by takin

the long and triple jumps. Galloway mowed down Phil Parker's school

record in the triple jump with a 49' 4-1/2" effort. The tall blonde

jumper from Atlanta had earlier taken the long iump in 23' 7-1/2".





















nered the Tribe eight important points. Snyder hurled the shot a per-

sonal record distance of 541 3-1/2" for first place in the competition.

Immediately following his shot put victory, Snyder threw the discus

154' 4", which was far enough for second place.

The final tally showed the Seminoles on top with 102 points as

opposed to the University of Florida's 88 markers. Florida A & M was

third with 37 points and Edward Waters College trailed in fourth with

18.

The Seminoles won the Florida A & M Relays on March 13-14 in

Tallahassee. The NCAA Indoor Track and Field Championships were held

on the same weekend; however, the Seminoles had no entries in the

national meet. The Tribe was unable to generate outstanding perfor-

mances, but did manage to win five individual events and the distance

medley relay. FSU rang up 67 points to top the Florida A & M Rattlers

who finished second with 56 points (FSU Track Office Files, 13-14

March 1970).

The Tribe geared up for their confrontation with the Southern

Illinois Salukis on March 21 in Tallahassee. Florida State scratched

out their first victory ever over their northern rivals. The Tribe

exploited an SIU lack of depth in several events to claim a 70 to 66












Florida State used the strength of a sweep in the pole vault

and first and second place finishes in the 120-yard high hurdles,

quarter-mile, and shot put to fashion their win. Bill Jackson topped

the pole vault field with a jump of 14' 0", followed by Seminoles Don

Fuchs and Pat Barrett. In the high hurdles, Roger Peterson and Barry

Smith finished first and second with times of :15.5 and :15.7,

respectively.

The quarter-mile was won by Randy Stow in :49.4, chasing him

home for second was FSU's Mike Link at :49.5. The best performance of

the day was turned in by John Snyder with a victory earning heave of

521 10" in the shot put as Chuck Crowder finished second at 51' 11-1/2".

The best effort of the meet was a remarkable double by Robinson

of SID. The Saluki runner ignored the nasty weather conditions to

force his way to a 4:09.7 track and meet record in the mile run. Robin-

son doubled back in the three-mile to set a meet record 14:14.2. Ken

Misner finished second in both races with times of 4:11.2 and 14:33.3.

Florida State University had two victories in the 27th Annual

Florida Relays on March 27 in Gainesville (FSU Track Office Files,

27 March 1970). The Seminoles made up for the scarcity of their vic-

tories by the quality of their triumphs. The shuttle hurdle contingent

of Barry Smith, John Fuss, Charles Galloway, and Roger Peterson won it

all with a school record clocking of :58.1. Ken Mi-ner beat an out-

standing field in the two-mile, using a fine effort of 8:56.4 to aocon,

plish the task.















ck Office Files, 4 April 1970). FSU won 14 of the 17 events,

g all of the field events.

Charles Galloway won the long and triple jumps with distances

" and 47' 1/2", respectively. John Snyder unleashed his second

throw of his career to win the shot put at 54' 2-1/2". A per-

at of 6' 6" by Jim Sauers was sufficient to win the high j omp.

ndis had a similar experience when his personal record throw of

/2" was the best in the javelin.

The 100-yard dash was an exciting race. All three top finishers

ed in :09.9. Florida State's Eddie McMillan and Doug Brown

ked first and second with Fuller of Auburn finishing in the




Randy Stow broke under the 48-second mark for the first time

uarter-mile with a winning effort of :47.9. Roger Peterson ran

best in the 120-yard high hurdles, but lost to a man the Sem

ad tried hard to recruit (Long, L.S., 1976). Peterson's time

was only one click of the clock behind Paul Richard's winning

:14.2.

The Volunteers of Tennessee came to Tallahassee on April 13.

ime they had departed, the Seminoles had suffered their first

dual meet defeat of the 1970 season (FSU Track Office Files,

1970). The Volunteers had seven men rated In the top four

ly in their specialties (Tallahassee Democrat, 12 April 1970).

e set five meet and two track records in the running events,












yet the table was turned in the field competition. FSU managed to

capture only one field event out of seven as the Tennessee victory was

rooted in their field event supremacy.

Ken Misner established a new track and meet record with a time

of 4:09.2 in the mile run. The distance ace was still strong in the

three-mile as he dispatched the field with a meet record 14:31.2. Del

Ramers became the first Seminole freshman to run under 15 minutes for

three miles with his third place clocking of 14:54.5.

The 440-yard relay team composed of Greg K~aufman, Bernie Wax-

man, Randy Stow, and Eddie MlcMillan opened the meet with a victory in

a track and meet record :41.1. Randy Stow captured the next sprint

event, the quarter-mile, in a meet record :48.1. Doug Brown continued

the Seminole sprint success with a :09.8 win in the 100-yard dash.

Tennessee broke the meet open with a sweep of all three places

in the half-mile with a relatively slow winning time of 1:53.1. The

Volunteers duplicated their 880-yard seep in the 220-yard dash. Three

Tennessee sprinters captured all nine points in the 220-yard dash with

a winning time of :22.0.

The Florida State losses in the field events were not due to

poor performanc-Tennessee was just superior. John Snyder lost first

place in the shot put when the shot came to earth 53' 3-3/4" from the

toeboard. Snyder's throw was just one-quarter inch shorter than Baron

of Tennessee's winning throw. Bill Jackson vaulted 15 feet for the

second time outdoors and lost. A personal record tying performance of

6' 6" in the high jump by Jim Sau~ers was two inches under the winning










260

height. Tennessee had performed well, snaring a 87 to 58 victory over

the Seminoles.

The next meet for the Seminoles was the Gulf Coat Five-Way

Meet in Gainesville on April 18. The major story for the Tribe was Ken

Misner's twin victories in the one- and three-mile runs (FSU Track

Office Files, 18 April 1970). Fighting off the determined efforts of

four Florida runners, Misnor won the mile with a meet record time of

4:06.5. The slender distance runner had just run the second fastest

mile in Seminole track history. He proved his stamina by winning the

three-mile with a strong time of 14:24.2.

Charles Galloway was the only other FSU man to win an event.

The triple jumper topped the three bounders with a fine 47' 6-3/4"

effort. Continuing in an erratic performance pattern, Steve Oulman

was ready to run and turned out a 1:51.8 half-mile that earned him

third place. Oulmoan's time was the second best he had ever run and

ranked third no the Seminole all-time list.

The Tribe collected four additional noteworthy performances in

the field events. Allen Laudis and Ray D-n both hurled personal best

throws as Seminoles of 196' 0" and 195' 6", respectively, in the

j avelin. Clearing 15 feet for the second week in a roW, Bill Jackson

placed third in the pole vault. Jim Sauers popped over 6' 6" to finish

second in the high jump.

Florida State was unable to muster enough points to match the

front running Florida Gators' total of 79; however, the Tribe's total

of 69 points easily outdistanced the University of Alabama for second.










261

May I found Florida State and Florida going head-to-head in

neet competition. A large Garet crowd witnessed the first Seminole

ph over the University of Florida since 1965 (FSU Track Office

11 May 1970). The Tribe captured 11 of the 17 events while pro-

g many strong nonwinning performances.

Irounao Ken Misner followed up a Tribe win in the 440-yard

with a sterling 4:09.0 victory in the mile run. Mister was

Able in the three mile run; however, the big Seminole surprise

ne second place finish by freshman Del Ranmers. The former Dunedin

ace fanner clocked a personal record 14:24.5.

Roger Peterson led a Tribe sweep in the 120-yard high hurdles

a a shocked and very quiet partisan crowd (Roberts, 1976). His

ig time of :14.5 was closely followed by John Fuss's :14.7 and

Smith's :14.9.

In the next two events victories were chalked up by Randy Stow

)ug Brown. Stow equalled his best quarter-mile with a time of

Doug Brown the Sarasota junior, claimed the 100-yard dash in

his best time of the 1970 season.

The momentum shifted drastically in the 380-yard run. Much to

alight of the onlookers, the Florida Caters swept all three

a in the half-mile. However, the 440-yard intermediate hurdles













to get second, but did. M1-- .. ;
victory was sweet for the r:- ... .- -1,1 .

Charles Galloway led a determined field event contingent. He

topped Florida's highly touted Ron Coleman in the long and triple

jumps. The long jump became Galloway's with a jump of 23' 10". With

his second 49-foot triple jump of the 1970 season, Galloway won his

specialty with a 49' 1/2" effort.

Roy Dunn and Allen Landis took the top two spots in the j avelin

with their first 200-foot throws in a Seminole uniform. Dunn was first

with a superlative toss of 222' 11". Remembering his first and only

competitive throw over 200 feet, Allen Landis stated:










The weight throwing events offered the scene for some strong

Seminole performances. John Snyder captured the shot put with a throw

of 53' 7-1/2". Finding that something extra, Chuck Crowder heaved the

shot 52' 1/2" for a personal best and second place. Dave Barton did

not win the discus; yet, he had the right to be proud. His second

place throw of 159' 6" was a personal record.













and bought a cigar for each member of the team (Long, J. L., 1976).

Coach Mike Long, a man who enjoyed a good cigar, was the last man to

board the bus. When he topped the last step and started to turn into

his front -o seat, Mike Long was faced with a bus load of jubilant

cigar-smoking Seminoles. "I did the only thing there was to do,"

related Mike Long. "I took out a cigar, settled back in my seat, and

lit up" (Long, L. S., 1976). Coach Long remembered many green faces

appearing a few miles down the road (Long, L. S., 1976).

The Seminoles were riding high after their first win over the

University of Florida in five years. On May 9 the Crimson Tide of

Alabama had a challenge waiting for the Tribe in Tuscaloosa. The

Florida State track team made a quick reentry into reality.

The night before the meet was filled with horseplay and water-

fights until the early hours of the morning (Long, J. L., 1976). After

the team had boarded the bus for the short ride to the stadium, a short

"talk" by Coach Long stressed the point that they were in Tuscaloosa to

compete, not socialize (Kaufman, 1975). As usual his short "talk" had

an immediate sobering effect. The remainder of the ride was a quiet

one (Long, J. L., 1976).

The two schools traded wins throughout the stiff competition

(FSU Track Office Files, 9 May 1970). Ken Misner and Del R-tes placed

first and second in both the one- and three-mile runs. Randy Stow lost

the quarter-mile by two-tenths of a second in :48.0 while Steve Oulman

won the half-mile by one-tenth of a second with a 1:52.8 clocking.

Charles Calloway edged the long jump field with a winning leap

of 23' 2". His victory margin was a scat one-quarter of an inch. The













scale was balanced when John Snyder's throw of 53' 3-1/2" placed him

second in the shot put, just one and one-quarter inch short of the

winning throw.

Scoring his first varsity point with a javelin throw of 195'

1" Dennis Rogers finished third behind Phillips of Alabama (221' 3")

and FSIJ's Roy Dunn (212' 0"). Jim Sauers became the best high jumpei

in Seminole track history with his winning jump of 6' 8".

The Tribe trailed 72 to 68 with only the mile relay left to

run. The Alabama team was extremely confident of their mile relay

ability as the Seminoles had potential but had not run a time that

worried the Crimson Tide (Roberts, 1976). Bernie Waxman related how

the crucial relay unfolded:


3 i t

wore on, the meet looked out of reach for the Seminoles.
As mile relay time approached, Mike Link was still sick




t E E i;?


i T











265

The Seminoles had won a great victory in the mile relay; how-

ever, the meet may have been lost if it were not for Assistant Coach

Jim Long and his sequence camera. In the high hurdles, Jim Broun had

finished second, but had been overlooked by the judges at the finish

line. Long had filmed the runners as they had crossed the line. The

Seminoles waited 15 seconds for the polaroid film to develop. The

picture showed Broun clearly second and, thus, the Seminole protest

was upheld.

The Florida State Seminoles met the Rattlers of Florida A & M

for the second time =n May 15. The result differed little from the firs

meeting between the two Tallahassee schools in 1969 as Florida State

used its overall depth and superior field event strength to completely

overwhelm the Rattlers 91 to 42 (FSU Track Office Files, 15 Mlay 1970).

Coach Mike Long held his ace distance runner, Ken Misner, out

of the mile in hopes he could achieve an NCAA qualifying time in the

three-mile run. Toiling virtually alone, Misner set an FSU, track, and

meet record of 13:52.4. His effort was easily under the NCAA qualifying

time of 14:00.0 (Long, L. S., 1976). His absence was not noticed in

the mile run as Del Ramers won in 4:16.0 and Jack Castner copped second

with a 4:22.0 clocking.

Bill Jackson spearheaded a field event effort that was over-

powering. The high flying junior soared 15' 7" for a school, track,

and meet record.

The FAMU contest was a night meet. I always preferred to


teammate and fellow vaulter Don Fuchs. The meet jumps were














foot."7~1-l- -r ? .?ii.
on my first vault with same to=m to spare. My vaults at 16
feet were decent, but I was a little psychedd out" at that
height, missing on all three attempts. (Jackson, 1975)

With meet record setting performances, John Snyder and Ray

Dunn won their respective events. Snyder copped the shot put with

toss of 53' 3-3/4", while Dunn hurled the j avelin 211' 0" for his

record. With the second best jump of his Seminole career, Jim Sauer

won the high jump at 6' 6-1/4". Dave Barton continued his steady

throwing in the discus with a victory toss of 158' 9".

The regular season was completed with only Ken Misner and

Charles Galloway qualified for the National USTFF Track and Field

Championships in Wichita an June 12-13 and the NCAA Track and Field

Championships in Des Moines, Iowa, on June 18-20. Neither man placed

in the USTFF Championships; however, Galloway, competing in the dccath-

Ion for the first time, made a fine showing by winning two of the ten

contested events, finishing tenth overall with 6641 points (FSU Track

Office Files, 18-20 June 1970). The point total was a new Seminole

record for the decathlon.

Summary. Prior to the start of the season, the FSU track

brochure proclaimed, "Florida State University's 1970 track team may

be the best in a long line of good ones fielded by the Seminoles" (FSU

Track Brochure File, Track 1970). The 1970 squad came extremely close

to fulfilling the prophecy.

The Seminoles captured the Coliseum Relays and the Jesuit

Invitational while finishing second in the Gulf Coast Five-Way Meet.

The Tribe posted dual meet victories over Auburn University. the












University of Alabama, the University of Florida, Florida A & M Uni-

versity, and Southern Illinois University. The lone setback came at

the hands of the University of Tennessee, 1970 SEC Outdoor Champions

(University of Georgia, 1976).

Charles Galloway registered the highest Seminole national

finish by placing tenth in the decathlon in the 47th Annual NCAA Out-

door Track and Field Championships. Earlier in the season, Galloway

had established a new FSU standard of 49' 11" in the triple jump.

Junior Ken Misner reset the two- and three-mile school records

for the third consecutive year. He moved through the two-mile in

8:54.5. His national qualifying time of 13:52.4 against the Rattlers

of FAMUI made him the first Seminole three-miler to run under 14 minute!

Vaulting extremely well throughout the season, Bill Jackson

culminated the year with a school record vault of 15' 7" in the last

dual meet of the year. Jackson had become the first Seminole to clear

15 feet indoors with his jump of 15' 1" in the Coliseum Relays. Jim

Sauers's 6' 8" leap in the high Jump was the third school record set i,

the field events.

The shuttle hurdle team of John Fuss, Barry Smith, Charles

Galloway, and Roger Paterson captured first place in the 480-yard

shuttle hurdles at the Florida Relays. Their time of :58.1 established,


















One of the biggest uncertainties was the status of footballers

Barry Smith and Eddie McMillan. In the past, both men had played a

prominent role in the Tribe's track fortunes but the hiring of a new

head football coach at Florida State made the status of the two me. in

track an unanswerable question. "I can understand perfectly that

Coach Larry Jones wants to have everyone out for spring practice,"

said Mike Long. "He has no argument from me there. But both Barry

and Eddie will be important members of our program. If we begin to

rely on them, their points will be important in the bigger meets" (FSU

Track Brochure File, Track 1971).

There were 18 lettermen returning including five school record

holders (FSU Track Brochure File, Track 1971). The veterans were

headed by all-America Ken Misner (distances), George Frank (discus),

James Sauers (high jump), Charles Galloway (triple jump and decathlon),

and William Jackson (pole vault). The response of these five senior.

to another arduous year of training and competition was a key factor

in the Seminole success hopes.

One of FSU's top all-time distance runners, Dick Roberts joined

the Florida State track coaching staff, consisting of assistant coaches

Darryl Guthrie and James Long. Roberts would be the head cross-country

coach, assistant track coach, and head recruiter. His flair for

recruiting was readily apparent with the signing of four outstanding

athletes to FSU grant-in-aids (FSU Track Brochure File, Track 1971).

The Seminoles' recruiting catch included Bobby Brooks, the fastest prep











miler in Florida high school track history; Joel Garton, class AAAA

high school quarter-mile champion; Jim Buck, junior college national

j -elin champion; and Rudy Falana, the first Florida prep long jumper

to leap over 25 feet (FSU Track Brochure File, Track 1971).

The Tribe was aided in their recruiting efforts by the addition

of $7,375 to the scholarship fund (Athletic Office Budget File, 1970-

1971). over the years, the scholarship fund had grown, but the ever

increasing cost of an education had eroded the value of the scholarship

dollar. In 1967, $14,000 of scholarship monies purchased almost 13 fu

scholarships (FSU Bulletin, 1967). By 1971, the scholarship fund had

grown to $31,500 (FSU Track Budget, 1971), but its buying power was

only slightly over 18 full scholarships (FSUBulltin 1971). The

actual dollars had more than doubled; yet, only five additional full

scholarships were realized.

The opening meet of the new season actually occurred in 1970.

The Seminoles began their schedule in Mobile on December 17 in the

Senior Bowl Indoor Track Championships. With the fall quarter com-

plated, Coach Mike Long only entered a token squad (Long, L. S., 1976)

Despite limited numbers, the Seminoles managed to tic Georgia Tech for

second place with 16 points. The Florida Gators ran away from the

pack with a total of 41 markers (PSU Track Office Files, 17 December

1970) '

Doug Brown led the Seminole effort with a school record set-












second place finishes. Chuck Crowder's and Bill Jackson's fourth

places in the shot put and pole vault, respectively, rounded out the

Seminole scoring.

A full contingent of Seminoles swung into action in an All-

Comers track meet in Knoxville on January 23 (FSU Track Office Files,

1971). The tartan floor of the Tennessee basketball arena served as a

flat 167-yard unbanked indoor track. Tennessee officials did not allow

the participants to use spikes in fear of damaging the basketball

playing surface (Long, L. S., 1976). These factors combined to make

the Tennessee track a difficult surface upon which to run fast times.

Freshman Rudy Falana was not awed by either the facility or the

college competition. The Largo long jumper bounded 23' 8" to win his

specialty. Fellow freshman, Joel Garren demonstrated curve running

prowess beyond expectations in the 440-yard dash (Long, L. S., 1976).

This exciting new prospect became the first Seminole to run the quarter-

mile under roof in less than 50 seconds. Garren used his speed to

establish position and his strength to retain his lead in the late

stages of the race. His win in the 440-yard dash was clocked at :49.5.

Junior George Kaiser mastered the difficult track and a strong

field to register a 1:59.6 victory in the half-mile. Ken Misner

scored the final Seminole victory by topping the two-mile field with a

fine time of 9:07.8.

The University of Tennessee was a strong premest favorite in

the mile relay. The Volunteers were the 1970 NCAA indoor mile relay

champions and all men returned (Long, L. S., 1976). Tennessee won

the race, but not before the Tribe foursome of Rudy Falana, Bernie












Waxmnan, George Kaiser, and Joel Garren gave the home team all they

could handle. Tennessee's margin of victory was a slight three-tenths

of a second. Tennessee was clocked in 3:23.5 while the Seminoles

finished second at 3:23.8.

The Seminoles traveled to Lexington, Virginia, to compete in

the 20th Annual VMI Winter Relays on February 6. At the conclusion of

the meet, the Tribe did not have much to show for the long bus ride

(FSU Track Office File, 6 February 1971).

FSU set school records in two obscure indoor events. The first

was the four-mile relay in which Del Ramers, Bobby Brooks, Jack Wise,

and Ken Misner loped to victory in 17:33.4. It was the first time the

Seminoles had ever competed in an indoor four-mile relay.

By one-tenth of a second, the shuttle hurdle team of Jim Broun,

Charles Galloway, John Fuss, and Barry Smith ran under the existing

school record. The Seminoles' clocking of :30.5 tied William and Mary

for fifth. This was only the second time a Tribe quartet had attempted

the seldom run indoor a ...t.

Eddie McMillan provided the Seminoles with their best perfor-

mance of the meet with his explosive Sprint in the 60-yard dash.

McMillan captured the event with a school record clocking of :06.2.

Ken Misner ran the second fastest indoor two-mile in Florida State's

track history with his second place timing of 9:00.9. Jim Broun

recorded his personal best in the 60-yard high hurdles with a third











Florida State's Rudy Falana developed an undiagnosed fever and

had to be admitted to the hospital. Bob Neylan, FSU's trainer, told of

his struggle to get the sick athlete to the hospital:

Our motel was out of town--in the middle of nowhere. Our
a. i stant coach, Dick Roberts, came to get me sometime after
midnight I checked Rudy and he was pretty bad. So, when I.
went to use a phone, the hotel manager had left and the phones
were closed. The restaurant was also closed. The only place
nearby was a barn and a small house....
I noticed a party at the house and went over to ask to use
the phone. .. the rescue squad eventually came to get Rudy.
Falana had to be put in the hospital with a 104 degree
temperature. I spent two more days in the motel on an "expired"
cr edi t card. The r-sce squad drove us to Roanoke and we flew
home. That sure beats 14 hours on the Seminole bus. (Neylan,
1975)

The Seminoles drove to Houston in station wagons (Jackson,

1975) for the National Federation Championships on February 12th. Th.

fast oversized track in the Astrodome aided the Seminoles in establish-

ing new school records in the quarter-mile, 100-yard dash, and mile

relay. Joel Garren flashed through the quarter-mile in :47.4 in his

preliminary heat before running sixth in the finals at :47.96 (Hosto

Chronicle, 14 February 1971). In addition to running lead-off on the

mile relay, Eddie Mc~illan ran the only indoor 100-yard dash in FSU

track history in :09.6 (FSU Track Brochure File, Track 1972), yet,

failed to place in the finals (Houston Chronicle, 14 February 1971).

Eddie Mc~iillan, Bernie Waxman, Randy Stow, and Joe Garren ran a school

record 3:13.3, but despite an unofficial :45.9 anchor leg by Garren

(Roberts, 1976), the Tribe failed to place in the mile relay.
















to win only three events, yet utilized their depth to scramble out a

seven-point victory over runner-up Georgia Tech (FSU Track Office Files,

26-27 February 1971).

The 1000-yard run had a "local boy makes good" aspect. FSU's

Jack Wise was coming back to Montgomery and wanted to show the home

folks that he had been doing well (Wise, 1975). The senior middle

distance runner was at his best as a 2:16.5 clocking earned him the

top spot. Wise's time was third on the Seminole all-time indoor list.

This race was the one that stood out in Wise's mind when he reviewed

his running career at Florida State (Wise, 1975).

Ken Misner and George Kaiser set new Florida State standards in

nomwinning performances. Senior Ken Misner became the first Tribe

miler to run under 4:10 indoors with his third place clocking of 4:09.8.

The distance ace was also able to win the two-mile with a time of

9:18.6. George Kaiser had a similar experience in the half-mile when

he rewrote the record and still finished behind two junior college run-

ners. Kaiser's time Was measured at 1:54.5.

The pole vault was the last remaining event to be contested.

Florida State trailed Georgia Tech by two points and desperately needed

a strong performance from their vaulters. Bill Jackson recounted how

the event unfolded:









7". McMillan placed third at 15 feet and Fletcher placed












fourth at 14 feet. It probably would have turned into a 3-way




Therefore, the Seminoles scored nine unanswered points to ring up an

exciting 45 to 38 triumph over Georgia Tech.

Prior to the NCAA Indoor Track and Field Championships, the

Seminoles were outdoors, participating in the Sixth Annual Jesuit Inv:

tional Championship. FSU was only able to win four events of which ti

were won by the untiring legs of Ken Misner (FSU Track Office Files,

6 March 1971). The St. Petersburg senior ripped off a 4:08.8 clocking

in the mile and added a superb 8:55.5 effort in the two-mile.

Jim Broun led a Tribe sweep in the 120-yard high hurdles as

Barry Smith, John Fuss, and Bob Neylan followed him across the finish

line. A view into the interesting career of Bob Neylan is provided b]

his recount of the Jesuit Invitational high hurdle race:

I was working out, running, and still treating pulls,
sprains, strains, and giving rubdowns. The clincher came at







big thrill--a sweep of the Gators. (Neylan, 1975)

Bruce McCampbell won the fourth Seminole victory with a throw

of 165' 8". The senior transfer student was competing in his first

meet for the garnet and gold. His throw thrust him into the second

spot on the ladder of all-time Seminole discus throwers. The Tribe's












Florida State tr ave led to Detroit on March 12-13 to compete

in the NCAA Indoor Track and Field Championships. The lone Tribe

entry was Joel Garren in the quarter-mile (FSU Track Office Files,

12-13 March 1971). The Bradenton quarter-miler placed a nonscoring

seventh after having won his preliminary heat in a school record

time of :49.2. Had Garren been able to duplicate his preliminary

time in the final, he would have moved up four spots in the rankings

and earned all-America honors. Garren's time in the final was

clocked at :49.9.

While Coach Mike Long was in Detroit with Joel Garren, the

Seminoles entered the Florida A & M Relays on an individual basis. A

driving rain storm dampened enthusiasm and eliminated eight of the 17

events scheduled on the card (Tallahassee Dpmorz9t, 14 March 1971).

The Tribe scored a victory in the distance medley relay with the slow

time of 10:24.8. No other Tribe entry broke into the victory column.

The Tribe was home on March 20 to battle the Salukis of Sout

Illinois. The Carbondale, Illinois, crew boasted a talented array of















record by one foot and 11 inches.

A Seminole victory resulted when Bruce McCampbell unleashed a

personal best throw of 167' 5-1/2" in the discus. These efforts were

indicative of the quality necessary for a Seminole victory. Unfort-n

ately, they were in short supply.

Florida State traveled to Gainesville on the following Saturday

for the 28th Annual Florida Relays. The Seminole squad set four new

school records, yet failed to win an event (PSU Track Office Files,

27 March 1971).

The distance medley team composed of George Kaiser, Randy

Stow, Del Ramers, and Ken Misner became the first Seminole contingent

to run this race under 10 minutes. Their second place time of 9:51.3

established a new Seminole mark by 14.6 seconds.

Jack Wise and Bobby Brooks joined Ramers and Mis-e in the four

mile relay to spin-out the second Tribe record. Although, the Seminole:

finished third, their time of 17:08.1 established a mark that still

stood at the time of this writing.

Ken Misner concluded the school record breaking performances in

the running events by racing Penn State's Greg Fredericks to the wire

before losing by a fleeting one-tenth of a second. Misner was given

the time of 8:50.2.

FSU's j -elin record was broken for the second time in two con-

secutive meets when Jim Buck hurled the spear 231' 6" for second place.

In the discus, George Frank uncorked his best throw since setting the












school record on May 10, 1968. His effort of 164' 10" earned him

fourth place and a great deal of personal satisfaction:




Florida Relays. I beat a lot of guys who were ahead of me
in high school. (Frank, 1975)

John Fuss turned in the second best time of his career in the

440-yard intermediate hurdles, even though the highest place that Fuss

could achieve with his :53.2 effort was fifth.

Florida State entered the Seventh Annual Gulf Coast Track and

Field Meet on April 17 in Tuscaloosa (Tallahassee Democrat, 18 April

1971). Injuries to freshman Rudy Falana and Joel Garren had left the

Seminoles hurting in three events. The Tribe scored only mne point in

their specialties, the 440- and 220-yard dashes and the long jump. In

the 220-yard dash, Joe Garren had the fastest qualifying time of :21.3.

Unfortunately, Carren pulled a hamstring in the finals and did not

finish the race. The furlong was eventually won in :21.6.

Ken M~isner continued to run wall in the one and three-mile runs.

He won the mile with a sparkling 4:08.8 and dominated the three-mile in

14:18.0. Misner was joined in the winner's circle by John Fuss. The

hard working high hurdler took the 120-yard high hurdles in :14.2, a

personal best that bettered all previous Seminole high hurdlers except

the recently graduated Mike Kelly.

Florida State established two new school standards in the field

events without a win. The fact that Bill Jackson lost the Dole vault




















from Alabama, and exhibitioner Jan Johnson who had recently
transferred from Kansas to Alabama. I knew I would have to
vault lel and I was "up" for the meet. The wind was b wing
in our faces and I was concerned at first bee use I felt a
tailing wind would give me a needed boost. My fears were dis-
pelled on my first practice j mp when the pole I had been
using felt too soft. I switched to a heavier pole and after
failing twice on the bar at 15 feet in practice, I decided to
watutlteevent began. I started at 15.feet, clearing
it and 15 t6" easily and the bar was moved to 16,11 1 knew
on my first vault, as soon as I pushed off the pole, that I
had the height. Another indescribable feeling. (Jackson,
1975 )

Jim Buck continued his strong throwing in the j avelin by estab

lishing a new school mark. The javelin ended its graceful flight when

the tip broke earth 233' 6-1/4" from the foul line. For the third con

secutive meet, Jim Buck had broken the school mark in the javelin.

Chuck Crowder unleashed his best throw ever in a garnet and

gold uniform. His shot sailed 55' 0" before smashing to the ground.

The throw made Crowder the third best shot putter in Seminole track

history.

A fifth place finish by John "Snapper" Starnes in the 440-yard

intermediate hurdles was a personal triumph. The Tallahassee freshman

ran a fine :53.3 effort that only Seminoles Nike Kelly and John Fuss

had bettered. Jack Wise was another Tribe athlete who gave his beat













The final tally showed the University of Florida far out front

with 82 1/2 points. Florida State and Alabama tied for second with 55

points apiece. In the last two confrontations between the Seminoles

and the Crimson Tide, only one point separated the two schools.

The Tribe traveled with a small squad to the 62th Annual Drake

Relays in Des Moines, Iowa, on April 23-24 (FSU Track Office Files,

23-24 April 1971). Ken Misner ran in his first six-mile race and tied

for seventh against some of the best amateur runners in the United

States. Misner's time of 28:28.0 set a school record for this new

event. The race was won by the future 1972 Olympic gold medal winner

in the marathon, Frank Shorter.

The highest Seminole finish was obtained by Jim Buck in the

javelin with a throw of 206' 9" for sixth place. On the basis of more

misses at 15' 6", Bill Jackson was deprived of a tie for sixth place

in the pole vault.

The Seminoles reunited as a team on April 30 in Tallahassee.

The Seminole effort was given a boost by the return of injured stars

Joel Garren and Charles Galloway. The Florida Gators were the victims

of a superb all-around performance by the Tribe as the Seminoles cap-

tured 11 of the 17 events, running up a staggering 92 to 53 victory

(Tallahassee Democrat, 1 May 1971).

The hurdles provided one of the keys to victory. The Tribe

shutout the Gators in both hurdle races. The crew of John Fuss, Jim

Broun, and "Trainer Bob" Neylan turned the trick in the 120-yard high

hurdles. Bob Neylan explained what that race meant to him:













No thrill matched the dual meet 92 to 53 win over Florida
at Tall ahassee. What a great moment for me. I was third
again. Braun and Fuss beat me, in :14.5. 1 can a 'y that
still i my bi gge't thrill even more than my coa chin, our high
school 1 team to the state championship this year. (Neylan,
1,75)

John Fuss led the 440-yard intermediate hurdle contingent to

their sweep of the Gators with a time of :53.1. "Snapper" Starnes

followed in :54.2 with Jim Broun, never known for great physical con-

dition (Long, L. S., 1976), holding on for third in :55.9.

Several Seminoles closed out their career against the University

of Florida with performances typical of their efforts in past Gator-

Seminole conflicts. Doug Brown won his third 100-yard dash against the

Gators in as many years with a time of :09.8. One Florida sprinter

managed to beat him in the 1968 dual meet when Brown was only a fresh-

man. Following so identical pattern, Ken Misnor completed the cycle

with a convincing victory in the three-mile run. His winning time was

14:01.3 -

The presence of Joel Garren erased a Tribe weakness in the 440-

yard dash that had developed when the talented freshman was injured in

the Florida Relays and reinjured in the Gulf Coast Five-Way Mleet.

Garren cruised through the quarter-mile in :47.4 to grab the top spot,

and then anchored FSU's victorious mile relay.

In the long and triple jumps, Charles Galloway responded to the

challenge. Shaking off the effects of chronic leg injuries, Galloway

sailed 23' 8" and 47' 2-3/4" to finish first and second. resoectivelv.













Bruce McCampbell continued his c-nsistant throwing by cop

c discus with a throw of 163' 7-1/4". Revenging an earlier los

orida's Jim Stites, Jim Buck won the javelin with a tbrow of 22

1/2". Stites had topped Buck's school record performance of 23

the Gulf Coast Five-Way Meet by almost four feet.

The psychological edge of the Gators was broken in the 88

a. Jack Wise told how it was done:




Gators must have had six half-milers that had turned in times
under 1:51.0. Tn 1971, the Florida two-mile relay set a worl
indoor record in the Astrodome. George Kaiser and I were the
dominant two for FSU and had only accomplished times in the
1:52.0 category.
All week prior to the race, Coach Long had been saying
,,tbe he f-m ile will make or break us in this meet." I didn't
.., much about the -et the entire week. All I knew was that












finish line going crazy. -. _J -7.- ,~in ;-.l.;
both ofus. He was smilin. i

This was a very satisfying victory for the Seminoles before a

home crowd. "I can 't pick out a single individual," said Mike Lmg.:

.IE-ryone of our kids came to win. They all did a fine job" (Talla-

hassee Democrat, 1 May 1971).

Florida State j ourneyed into Tiger country on May 8 for a

fourway affair including Louisiana State, Oklahoma State, Tulane, and

the Seminoles. The fray turned into a dog fight between LSU, Oklahoma

State, and Florida State. Times and performances were outstanding as

the final computations showed LSU with 62 1/2 points, Oklahoma State at

58 1/2, Florida State with 55, while Tulane trailed far behind with

six points (FSU Track Office Files, 8 May 1971).

The Seminoles won four events with three of them in the field

events. However, the Tribe set two new school records in running

events. The last seven school records set by the Seminoles came in

notwinning efforts.

Joel Garren cracked the Seminole record for the quarter-mile

run around two curves with a :47.0 clocking. The freshman was shoved

into third place by LSU'a Lloyd Wills (:46.5) and Oklahoma State's

Dennis Schultz (:46.6).

Jim Buck was slightly under his normal form, but still pre-

vailed in the javelin with a throw of 220 1". With his second best

throw of his short career at FSU, Bruce McCampbell won the discus at













Del Ramers, Jim Brown, and George Kaiser turned in their

fastest times in Seminole uniforms. Ramers captured fourth place in

the mile with a time of 4:11.6. Brown finished a step behind Jim

Bolding of Oklahoma State in the 120l-yard high hurdles with a clocking

of :14.3. Finishing in fourth, George Kaiser turned the half-mile

in 1:52.6.

With the meet riding on the mile relay, Bernie Waxman, Randy

Stow, George Sparling, and Joel Garren battled the home town Tigers to

the wire before being outleaned at the tape (Tallahassee Democrat, 9

May 1971). Joel Garren came from 10 yards back and lost only by inches;

to LSU's Lloyd Wills on the anchor leg. FSU clocked a school record

3:13.1 in their valiant effort to pull the meet out of the fire.

The team competition portion of the Florida State track

schedule schedule was completed in Bar-n Rouge, yet sany athletes,

including individuals not involved in national competition, continued

to work out.

Florida State entered the Florida AAU in Gainesville on May 22

(PSU Track Office Files, 22 May 1971). Joel Garren highlighted the

Seminole effort with his :47.2 victory in the quarter-mile. His

example was followed by Ken Misner who topped the six-mile field with

a winning time of 28:28.7.

Jim Brown and Bob Brooks set personal records in the 120l-yard

high hurdles and the three-mile run, respectively. Brown sailed over

the 10 barriers to best the field with a time of :14.2. Brooks

established a new freshman mark of 14:20.8 with his second place

finish in the three-mile run.










284

With his best throw since the Florida Relays, George Frank

captured the discus with a throw of 164' 0":


My most satisfying win in two years and the day I should
have broken my school record. I remember the woman 'a disco a
preceded and they had a super wind. But as soon as we
5 tasted the wind absolutely 'topped. After my last throw,
it started up again. The .1fic ial. Ie t me ""mo one more
which h measured at 172' 3", but didn't count of course.
(Frank 1975)

NCAA-bound Joel Garren and Bill Jackson headed a limited S

ole entry in the Auburn Invitational on May 29. The meet marked t

dedication of Auburn's new track facility to Wilbur Hutsell, who h

been associated with Auburn track since 1921 (Tallahassee Democrat

30 May 1971).

Joel Garren ran off with the 440-yard dash title as his ra

lasted only :47.5 seconds, establishing a new track record. Bill

amn continued to smooth out his vaulting style in preparation for

national competition. Jackson won the pole vault with a track ree

of 15 feet even.

With an effort of 164' 4", George Frank was second in the

cus. The Tallahassean closed out his Seminole career with his see

best throw of the season:




-;- -- --- i ---t ~-lii-- Ftjust ran out of track


The Seminoles gathered 19 points to finish fifth in a field of 12

competing schools.

Seminoles Bill Jackson, Joel Garren, and Ken Misner compete

in the National USTFF Championships in Wichita on June 10-12. The












most impressive performance was run by Ken Misner in the three miles

where the senior distance runner toured the 12 laps around the track

in 13:39.4 for third place and a new school record (Roberts, 1975).

Neither Jackson nor Joel Garren were able to place.

The following incident illustrated the hazards facing a pole

vaulter trying to travel:








carry the implements of your event.
A particular instance occurred upon leaving Dallas ou the
w y to Wichita to the National USTFF meet in 1971. We had
already taken our seats on the plane when the rear entrance
was opened and two men walked on carrying my poles. They
secured the poles in the aisle and left. About ten minutes
later the rear door opened again and they came in and took
the poles mut. _One of the stews rdesses came and told me that
















Florida State entered Ken Misner, Joel Curren, Bill Jackson,

and Charles Galloway in the NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships

on June 17-19 in Seattle. The Seminoles were able to garner one

seventh and one tenth place.

Ascertaining that his talents lay in the longer distances, Ken

Misner elected to run the six miles in the NCAA Championship. His













decision resulted in a race that culminated in Misner's last school

record in a Seminole uniform. With a time of 27:55.2 (New York Times,

19 June 1971), Misner finished seventh, one and four-tenths of a second

under the old NCAA meet record.

Competing in the decathlon, Charles Calloway ran, jumped, and

th-e his way to a school record point total of 6825. His culminative

total placed him tenth in the competition. Neither Jackson nor Garren

were able to place.

Summary. The 1971 season had begun with a different goal for

the Seminoles. The accent had been placed upon "big" meet performance

accompanied with a reduction in dual meets. Florida State ran only

two dual meets, defeating the University of Florida 92 to 53 and losing

to Southern Illinois University 83 to 61.

Florida State was generally successful in its attempt to d-vlol

prowess in large unscored competition. The Seminoles earned more

quality finishes in the Florida Relays than any other school (FSU Track

Brochure File, Track 1972). FSU was equally as successful in the

Carolina-Record Relays (FSU Track Brochure File, Track 1972). The

Tribe copped the Independent Division of the Coliseum Relays for the

fourth year in a row. Traditionally, the Coliseum Relays draws together

the top independent track powers in the deep South.

Quality individual performances were rampant among the Seminole













27:55.2 in the three- and si--ile, respectively. The distance running

star was joined in the four-mile relay by Jack Wise, Bobby Brooks, and

Del Rmers. This quartet became the Virginia Military Institute Winter

Relays champions setting a new indoor school record of 17:33.4 and

established the outdoor equivalent with a 17:08.1 clocking in the

Florida Relays.

Joel Garren, Eddie McMillan, and the mile relay all set new

school records on the oversized and very fast Astrodome track in Houston.

Garron flashed through the quarter in :47.4 and anchored the mile relay

with an unofficial :45.9 (Long, L. S., 1976). In addition to running

lead-off on the mile relay, Eddie McMillan ran the only indoor 100-yard

dash in FSU track history in :09.6 (FSU Track Brochure File, Track

1972). Bernie Waxman and Randy Stow ran the middle legs of the record

setting mile relay.

Bill Jackson and Jay Young shared the indoor school record in

the pole vault at 15' 7". The two men set the record at the Coliseum

Relays with Jackson being judged the winner on the basis of fewer

misses at 15' 7". Jackson became the first Seminole to clear 16 feet

outdoors in the vault. He sailed over 16' 1" to set his record in the

Gulf Coast Fi-eWay Meet in Tuscaloosa on April 17.

Jim Buck found the Tuscaloosa setting conducive to throwing.

The strong junior out of Seminole Junior College hurled the javelin

2331 6", bettering the school record for the third time during the

season. Competing in the NCAA Track and Field Championships, Charles

Galloway upped his school record total in the decathlon to 6825.













The foursome of George Kaiser, Randy Stow, Del Ramers, and Ken

Misner reset the outdoor distance medley record with a 9:51.3 clocking.

The mile relay composed of Randy Stow, Bernie Waxnan, George Sperling,

and Joe Garton set a school record in the four-way meet in Baton

Rouge. The Seminoles battled Louisiana State all the way only to be

nipped at the tape. The Tribe's time was clocked at 3:13.1.


1972

Continuing the trend away from dual meet competition, the

Seminoles' 1972 schedule listed six large relay carnivals and only two

dual meets, Southern Illinois University and the University of Florida.

Qualified Seminoles were slated to compete in both the indoor and out-

door NCAA Championships (FSU Track Brochure File, Track 1972).

Leading the Seminoles in the running events was sophomore Joel

Garren. Troubled by hamstring muscle pulls in his freshman year, the

Bradenton sprinter ran extremely wall when his legs were healthy. The

Tribe was very thin in the sprints and injury to Gotten would be debili-

tating. The graduation of John Fuss and Bob Neylan coupled with the

unexpected loss of Jim Broun left "Snapper" Starnes as the only letter-

man in either hurdle races.

Del Ramers and Bob Brooks had the unenviable task of filling

the untiring shoes of Ken Mister. The departed distance runner held

every school record in events of two miles and longer (FSU Track

Brochure Files, Track 1972).

The field events were the strongest in Seminole history.

Returning was oft injured, but extremely talented, Rudy Falana to head












the list of strong performers. Jim Buck, school record holder in the

javelin, was back for his senior year and was joined by Roy Dunn who

had redshirted the 1971 season due to injury (Long, L. S., 1976). Chu,

Crowder held the third spot on the all-time Seminole list in the shot

put with a throw of 55 feet even.

Bill Jackson, the Seminoles' first 16-foot pole vaulter, had

exited via graduation. Jackson's replacement was Allen McMillen who

had placed third in the national junior college championship and had .

best vault of 15' 9" (Long, T. N., 1975). The only field event that

appeared weak on paper was the high jump.

Florida State opened the 1972 indoor season in Mobile on Jan-

nary 12. Points were hard to come by as the Seminoles failed to win a

single event (FSU Track Office Files, 12 January 1972). The nine and

one-half point total placed the Tribe fifth in the final standings.

Joel Garren paced the Tribe effort with a 1:13.2 clocking in

the 600-yard dash. Garren's time was the second best in Seminole

history, but only earned him fourth place.

The majority of the Seminole markers came from the talented

field event corps. Newcomer Allen McMillen tied for third in the pole

vault with Alabamian Jan Johnson at 15' 0". Chuck Crowder delivered

his best indoor throw ever with a toss of 53' 2-1/2" in the shot put.

His throw was tile third best in the meet. Another third place finish

was the result of a 231 7-1/2" long jump by FSU's Rudy Falana.

The Senior Bowl had been held on Wednesday and the following

Saturday found the Tribe in Knoxville for a four-way confrontation

with Tennessee, Georgia Tech, and Virginia Tech. The final totals










290

found Tennessee an top with 93 1/2 points, the Seminoles a comfortable

second at 63, as Georgia Tech and Virginia Tech trailed with 40 1/2 and

19 points, respectively (FSU Track Office Files, 15 January 1972).

Although winning five of the 12 events, the Seminoles were

unable to match the overall power of the Volunteers. Del Ramers led

the FSU charge with an upset win in the mile run over a highly touted

field. The Dunedin junior registered the third fastest indoor mile

time for a Seminole with a clocking of 4:13.7. He copped a fourth in

the two-mile with a fine double of 9:24.5.

Bernie Waxman startled a quality field in the 440-yard dash

when he streaked to a :51.2 victory. His victims Included teammate

George Sperling who finished fourth.

Bolting out of the blocks, Eddie McMillan captured the 60-yard

dash in :06.3. He was only one-tenth of a second off his school mark.

Allen McMillen quickly erased Bill Jackson's name from the record

board by muscling ever 15' 8" to win the pole vault.

Competing in their third meet in 10 days, the Seminoles entered

the Third Annual USTFE Midwest Indoor Track Championships in Columbus,

Ohio, on January 22 (FSU Track Office Files, 22 January 1972). Joe

Garren found the 220-yard flat rubberized asphalt track to his liking.

He was nosed out in the final few yards of the 600-yard dash as his

1:12.2 clocking earned him second place. Garren also anchored the

mile relay team of George Sparling, Bernie Wazman, and Rudy Falana. FSU

finished third, but their time of 3:20.4 established a new school

record for normal sized indoor tracks.











291

Becoming the first Seminole vaulter to clear 16 feet indoors,

Allen McMillen's historic vault measured 16 feet even. McMillen'. bid

for victory fell four inches shy.

Chuck Crowder's third place earning throw of 53' 6" appeared

short in comparison with Jessie Stuart's winning toss of 62' 10-1/2";

however, C-oder's throw gained him second behind Allen Williams as the

best indoor shot putter at Florida State. The afternoon collegiate

session saw George Kaiser and Ron Fletcher capturing wins for the

garnet and gold. Kaiser raced to victory in the half-mile with a time

of 1:55.9. His time would have placed him third in the evening invita-

tional race. Fletcher ruled the pole vault in the afternoon fray with

a jump of 14' 6".

The team portion of the indoor season came to an end with the

Coliseum Relays on February 25-26 in Montgomery (FSU Track Office File.,

25-26 February 1972). The field event personnel were the only Seminoles

to win an event. Allen McMillen won the pole vault with a leap of 15'

7". Teammate Ron Fletcher was third with his first 15-foot jump

indoors as a Florida Stater.

Continuing his consistent throwing In the shot put, Chuck

Crowder tossed the shot 53' 7" to make the likeable Floridian the best

independent thrower in the South, The 600-yard dash won more points

for the Tribe than any other running event. George Sperling rose to

the number three spot on the all-time list with his second place

clocking of 1:12.4. He outdistanced Joel Garren who tied for third at

1:13.2 and Robin McEachin who tied for fifth with a time of 1:13.8.












George Kaiser and Jack Wise turned in fine performances in the

880- and 1000-yard runs. Kaiser was third in the half-mile with a time

of 1:54.8, only three-tenths of a second off his school record.

performing before home town fans, Seminole Jack Wise ran his

career best 1000-yard time of 2:15.4. The 1971 defending Coliseum

Relays champion bettered his previous winning time, yet only finished

third. Jack Wise explained what competing before a Montgomery crowd

meant to him:




but in a sense of preparing myself to return and say I'm
doing well and I'm going to display my improvement. (Wise,
1975)

Bob Brooks had his best indoor meet of his brief career at

Florida State. The St. PetersburS sophomore finished fourth in the

mile at 4:13.1, the second best time in FSU history. Brooks completed

his double with a personal best of 9:05.7 that earned him third in the

two-mile run. The only Seminole to have ever run faster at two miles

was Ken Misner. The two-mile relay team raced to a 7:46.9 clocking

that earned them the school record and second place.

The Coliseum Relays title rode on the mile relay. Despite a










293

the pole vault. The Tribe also captured the eight-lap and mile relays.

The Seminoles' winning efforts were concluded by George Sperling's

:51.6 jaunt in the quarter-mile and George Kaiser's 2:00.9 victory in

the 880-yard run.

Coach Mike Long took only one man to the NCAA Indoor Track and

Field Championships in Detroit on March 10-11. Allen McMillen per-

formed well; however, he just missed making the finals with a vault of

15' 10" (FSU Track Office Files, 10-11 March 1972).

While McMillen was laboring in Cobo Hall, the Tribe thinclads

were participating in the FAMU Relays in Tallahassee. The Socinules

captured 10 events including all four relays (FSU Track Office Files,

11 March 1972). Winners in individual events included Bob Brooks

(mile run), Joel G-ren (440-yard dash), Chuck Crowder (shot put and

discus), Del Ramers (two-mile), and Jim Buck (javelin). The clay track

in Bragg Stadium proved difficult to perform on and yielded time. that

were well below par.

The first outdoor dual meet of the season was against Southern

Illinois University on March 18 in Tallahassee. The Seminoles showed

flashes of brilliance, yet were unable to measure up in several events.

The Tribe fell victim to the Salukis by an 80 to 65 score (FSU Track

Office Files, 18 March 1972).

Allen McMillen performed well as the strong vaulter soared

16' 1-1/2" to become the best Seminole pole vaulter ever. He eased by

Bill Jackson's school re-ord by one-half inch. Ron Fletcher provided

McMillen with stiff competition as he cleared 15' 6" for second place.















to garner first place. Roy Durn, unleashed his second best career thr

as a Seminole of 216' 7" for second place.

The biggest surprise of the meet for the Seminoles was Bernar

Waxman. In light of Rudy Falana's injury in the FA14U Relays, Waxman

volunteered to try the long jump. Without ever practicing the event,

Waxman leaped 23' 11" to finish second, missing the top spot by only

one inch. The story of how Waxman found his runway checkmarks was

fascinating:








The Tribe won the 440-yard relay when the SIU quartet was dis

qualified. George Kaiser and Bill Weldon won the half-mile and 440-

yard intermediate hurdles with times of 1:53.7 and :54.4, respectivel:

for the two remaining Tribe triumphs in footracing events.

Footballer Eddie McMillart clocked a :09.7 in the 100-yard dasl

for a second place behind SIU's National AAU Champion Ivory Crockett.

George Sparling filled in very well for the injured Joel Garren in th,

440-yard dash. The talented sophomore broke 48 seconds for the first

time when he finished second in :47.9. However, the Seminoles were

unable to find a sprinter for the 220-vard dash as SIU sweet all threl





















1976). Allen McMillen cleared 16 feet for the second consecutive meet

when he placed fifth at 16 feet even, as four men tied for first at

16' 6".

The distance medley team ran under the 10-minute mark with a

fourth place clocking of 9:59.8. Although the place was not high, it

was only the second time a Tribe t cam had run this event under ten

minutes -

The Seminole squad traveled 400 miles by bus to Columbia, South

Carolina, for the 10th Annual Carolina State-Record Relays on April 1.

The Tribe accomplished little as a team, but the exploits of Allen

McMillen and Jim Buck turned the meet into a public relation triumph

(FSU Track Office Files, 1 April 1972).

Allen McMillen surmounted the magic 16-foot mark in the pole

vault for the third time in as many meets. He set a new Carolina State-

Record Relays mark with his vault of 161 1". Jim Buck captured the

javelin with a throw of 217' 5". Even though those were the only per-

formances of merit, the release in the Tallahassee Democrat sport.

page highlighted the positive aspects of the meet. The general reacti.

to the article spurred Coach Long to comment:















the Sixth Annual Dogwood Relays. The Tribe track machine was limping

on three cylinders. Injuries to Joel Garren and Rudy Falana, coupled

with George Kaiser leaving school for personal reasons, left Florida

State short of experienced athletes. The results of the Dogwood Relays

reflected this deficiency (FSU Track Office Files, 15 April 1972).

Chuck Crowder flipped the shot put 54' 1", his best throw of

the 1972 season, for only fifth place. Allen Mc~illen failed to clear

16 feet for the first time since March 18 and had to settle for third

place with a vault of 15' 6".

The most exciting occurrence in an otherwise disappointing meet

was the lead-off leg of the 88G-yard relay by Jimmy Cofer. Running in

an outside lane, Cofer set a torrid early pace. To the amazement of the

coaches, the stocky sprinter continued to move in the late stages of

the 220. The stopwatches of Mike Long and Dick Roberts had both timed

the sophomore in under 20 seconds flat. With Cofer having not placed

in a meet during the 1972 season, the PSU coaches felt an error had

been committed; second-guessing that the split time had been taken at

the wrong stagger mark. However, since Cofer had soundly beaten

several quality sprinters, Coach Long was sure he had run very fast,

but just how fast will never be known (Long, L. S., 1976). The

Seminoles quickly lost their mysterious lead and eventually finished

fifth with a time of 1:29.0.

Florida State entered Bayou Country on April 22 to battle

Louisiana State University, Mississippi State University, McNeese

University. Southwestern Louisiana State Universitv. and Southeastern










297

Louisiana State University. The Seminoles found the Cajons to be very

demanding hosts. The Tribe had regained the services of Joel Garren

and Rudy Palate, yet were only able to finish fourth (FSU Track Office

Files, 22 April 1972).

Chuck Crowder in the shot put and Allen McMillen in the pole

vault were the only Seminoles to win an event. The competition was

fierce, and often outstanding performances failed to win. Crowder had

the best throw in the shot put of 52' 3-3/4". McMillen rebounded from

his mediocre showing in the Dogwood Relays to set a new FSU record by

copping the hotly contested pole vault with a jump of 16' 5".

Two fine efforts in the distance events brought a small return

in points. Becoming the second fastest Seminole at three miles,

Ramers's 13:58.6 was only enough for second place. Meanwhile, a career

best of 4:10.0 in the mile earned Bobby Brooks a single fifth place

point. "Snapper" Starnes showed a glimpse of his 1971 form by finishing

fourth in the 440-yard intermediate hurdles with a :53.4 clocking.

The Florida-Florida State dual track meet on May 5 in Gaines-

ville was a complete reversal of the 1971 conflict. The Gators domin-

ated the meet by a lopsided 91 1/2 to 53 1/2 score (FSU Track Office

File., 5 May 1972).

The sprinting talents of Joel Gotten were displayed in the

dashes. Coach Mike Long had gambled his fragile-legged star in the

100- and 220-yard dashes, coming away with :09.7 and :21.2 victories.

Carrion's time in the furlong tied the school record. By anchoring

both relays, Garren brought the Tribe to a :41.0 tie in the quarter-

mile relay and victory in the mile relay with a 3:14.9 clocking.











The javelin produced the final Seminole triumph. Jim Buck and

Roy Dunn captured the top two spots with throws of 223' 5" and 220'

6", respectively.

The First A4nnual Southeastern Independent Track and Field

Championship was hosted in Tallahassee on May 13. FSU began the cham-

pionship meet for unaligned schools in the South on the same weekend

of the Southeastern Conference Championships. The concept was to

declare a southern independent champion.

Baptist College battled the host school fiercely before

succumbing to FSU by a 113 to 85 margin with Georgia Tech trailing

Baptist College by 17 points (FSU Track Office Files, 13 May 1972).

Bolstered by the return of Eddie McMillan from spring football drills

and a strong performance in the field events, Florida State captured

10 of the 17 events. Baptist College won six of the remaining seven

events with Georgia Tech taking one.

Eddie McMillan made his return noticeable by copping the 100-

yard dash in :09.8. Joel Garren completed a seldom seen FSU sweep of

the short sprints by winning the 220-yard dash with a :21.3 clocking.

The Bradenton junior's time was only one-tenth off Jerry McDaniel's

school record.

With the third fastest mile in ISO history, Del Rauers finished(

second in 4:08.3. A personal best of 14:09.6 by Bobby Brooks gave the

Tribe a win in the three-mile over Walton of Georgia Tech, the victor

in the mile run at 4:05.7.

The field events were the most prolific point getters for the

Seminoles. The often unseen men of track won six of eight events.










299

Jim Buck topped the j avelin with a heave of 226' 11". The spring of

Bernie Waxmnan's legs resulted in a Tribe triumph in the long jump.

Although he had not practiced the event recently, Waxman produced a

jump of 23T 9-1/2". Coach Long resisted the temptation to "improve"

his jumping style and W'axman, continued to jump well at meet time (Long,

L. S., 1976).

Bill Stinson bounced over the bar at 6' 6" to win the high jump.

This effort was the best jump of Stinson's career at Florida State.

With a toss of 51' 11-1/4", Chuck Crowder captured the shot put, and

than delivered a personal best of 146' 9-1/4" in the discus to finish

second.

The pole vault was a profitable event for the Tribe as Allen

M~cMillen led compatriots Ron Fletcher and Keith Ing-a with a jump of

15' 6". Fletcher placed second at 15 feet even, while Ingram's personal

record 14' 6" was third.

Noting a void of quality high hurdlers, Mark Middleton, a var-

sity swimmer, approached Coach Long about the possibility of helping

out after the varsity swimming season was completed. Middleton came

out for track and placed second with a time of :14.9.

Florida State entered the Tom Black Classic on May 20 in

Knoxville. The Tribe was paced by victories in the javelin, pole

vault, and the 5,000-meter run (Knoxviille-News-Sentine, 21 May 1972).

Jim Buck captured the spear throwing event with his heave of 216' 6",

and a vault of 16' 0" by Allen McMillan was the best in the pole vault.

The Seminoles received a surprising victory in the 5,000-meter run when











300

Del Ramers defeated highly favored Doug Brown of Tennessee with a time

of 14:25.1. Joel Garren finished second in the 200-meter dash, one-

tenth of a second behind the winning time of :21.1.

The 10th Annual USTFF Championships in Wichita on May 26-27

produced only one Seminole place. Joel Garren captured fifth place in

the furlong with a :21.5 effort.

The NCAA Track and Field Championships an June 1-3 in Eugene,

Oregon, was the final competition for the Seminoles. The spirit of

the Olympic year enthused the Tribe and inspired the performances of

Joe Garren, Del Ramers, and Allen McMillen.

A jump of 16' 0" earned McMillen the number eight spot in the

pole vault (FSU Track Office Files, 1-3 June 1972). An inspired per-

formance by Del Ramers in his preliminary heat of the 5,000 meter run

earned the Dunedin junior a place in the finals. in the finals, Ramers

time at two miles was below his personal best for that distance

(Roberts, 1976), but he still was running in last place. Although

finishing last in the finals, Ramers had achieved a personal triumph

through extraordinary competitive zeal. Joel Garren was able to

advance to the semifinals of the 220-yard dash before narrowly being

eliminated (Roberts, 1976).

Sumrmary. Florida State had a good indoor season winning the

Coliseum Relays title for the fifth time in five years. In addition t

the Relays title, the Tribe thinclads set two new indoor school record:

Allen McMillen became the first vaulter at FSU to clear 16 feet indoor

Joel Garren set the other record by turning the quarter-mile, on an

oversized track, at the National Federation Championships in :47.3.











301

Injuries kept the junior speedster from qualifying for the NCAA Indoor

Championships.

Florida State's trouble multiplied outdoors. The loss of Eddie

McMillan to spring football practice and periodic injuries to Joel

Gotten decimated the Seminole sprinting corps. The decision of George

Kaiser, indoor half-mile record holder, to leave school in midseason

left the Tribe vulnerable in the middle distance races. Trouble had

also stalked the Seminole long jumpers. In the Florida A & M Relay.,

Rudy Falana fell prey to knee damage that required corrective surgery

that summer (Roberts, 1976). FSU discovered the heretofore latent

jumping talents of Bernard Waxman. The senior jumped 23' 11" in his

first collegiate attempt in the long jump. The following week in the

Florida Relays, he sailed 24' 4-1/2" before pulling a hamstring in an

attempt to better his position. Wsocman's injury occurred on March 28

and he was unable to return to competition until May 5.

The Seminoles dropped both of their dual meets by losing to

Southern Illinois University 85 to 60 and the University of Florida

91 1/2 to 53 1/2. It was only the third losing dual meet season in

Mike Long's tenure at FSU and the fifth in the 23-year history of track

and field at Florida State.

Florida State had national qualifying performances from Joel

Garren, Allen McMillen, and Del Ramers during the outdoor sea.- .

McMillen and Ramers placed eighth and twelfth, respectively. in the

NCAA championships, while Garren was fifth in the national USTFF

championship 220-yard dash.
















Florida State University designed its 1973 recruiting Progr=m

for a smaller squad geared to large meet competition. Rising inflation

(U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 1975) bit deeper

into the track budget as there was no relief from the budlgetary cuts

enacted in 1972 (Athletic Office Budget File, 1972-1973).

Coach Mike Long consolidated the available scholarship money

to enable him to attract the "blue chip" athlete on a full scholarship

basis. This decision limited the Seminoles' chances for success on the

dual meet level, but opened new horizons on the national scene.

The Tribe was successful in recruiting five quality athletes.

Heading the list was Danny Smith, a Bahamian Olympian, who competed as

a junior college sprinter-hurdler out of Miami Dade North Community

College. Tyrone Frederick, a Mimpi-Dade North teammate of Smith, was

the best middle distance prospect ever inked to an FSU scholarship.

The Tribe continued to recruit the junior college athlete by signing

Charlie Harris and Randy Hutchinson. Harris was a national junior

college all-American in the triple jump, while Hutchinson had a best

throw of 238' 0" in the j avelin (FSU Track Brochure File, Track 1973).

The 1973 Seminoles had the talent to make ripples on the

national scene yet, dual meet competition exposed a depth problem.

The schedule was testimony to FSU's new philosophy with its emphasis

on relay carnivals and multi-school meets, The University of Florida

remlained as the sole dual meet on the 1973 schedule.













Florida State began their indoor schedule in Mobile for the

Eighth Annual Senior BmIl Indoor Track and Field Championships on

January 10. Danny Smith and Tyrone Frederick led a Seminole effort

that captured the title. FSU ran up 38 points for a nine-point advar-

tage over the second place Florida Gators (FSU Track Office Files, 10

January 1973). The Tribe's victory was its first in the six-year his-

tory of the Senior Bowl meet.

Smith dominated the short sprints by taking the 50-yard dash in

:05.4, and bested all of the 50-yard high hurdlers with a school record

clocking of :06.3. The short banked board curves were extremely diffi-

cult for Frederick to negotiate; yet, after repeatedly stepping off the

track Long, C. M., 1976), he surged down the short finishing straight-

away to win the 1,000-yard run. Frederick's time of 2:13.8 was the

best ever by a Seminole.

Mike Lee was the third newcomer to herald his arrival an the

scene. As a walk-on (Long, C. M., 1976), Lee found that a four-year

stretch in the Air Force had not dulled his jumping talents. With

three years of eligibility before him, Lee became the FSU indoor school

record holder in the high jump with his winning leap of 6' S".

Uncorking the second best indoor long jump in FSU history,

Charlie Harris had to settle for fifth place with his leap of 23'.

On January 25, the Florida State track team bearded the Seminole

bus, leaving the warm climate of Florida for the colder state of Ohio.

The Seminoles were distined for a showdown with the Buckeyes of Ohio

State University. The team spent Thursday night in Knoxville driving

the remaining distance to Columbus on Friday (Long, C. M., 1976).











304

The scratch meeting was held at 11;00 a.m. on Saturday. Coach

Bob Ekscamp did not disclose any of his team's performances, but did

double his best middle distance runner in the 880- and 1000-yard

runs opposite Tyrone Frederick. The psychological edge in the meet

rode on the outcome of their confrontations (Long, L. S., 1976).

The Seminoles broke out fast with Bob Brooks taking an unexpec-

ted 4:13.0 win in the mile run (FSU Track Office Files, 27 January

1973). Joel Garren followed with a fine :49.6 victory in the quarter-

mile. Following in second place was Steve Adams with a :50.6 clocking.

Danny Smith tied the school record of :06.2 in winning the 60-

yard dash. Finishing third, Charlie Harris clocked a surprising :06.3.

The Buckeye crowd of over 1,000 people were stunned as their favorite.

had yet to win an event (Long, C. M., 1976).

Ohio State was dealt a staggering blow when Tyrone Frederick

came off the last curve to overtake Kurtz of OSU to win a strategically

run 1,000-yard race in 2:19.8. Winning his second race of the day,

Smith easily took the 70-yard high hurdles in :08.4.

The Buckeyes finally won an event by finishing first and

second in the 600-yard run. A secondary infection resulting from an

untreated blister had removed Wes Koenig, FSU's number one 600-yard

man, from the race (Long, C. M., 1976). The meet had suddenly taken on

more excitement as the 880-yard run was the next event on the card.

Less than 40 minutes after the 1,000-yard run, Florida State was

calling on Tyrone Frederick to cool the Ohio State fire. The OSU

gamble failed as Frederick, in a sterling display of courage, duplicated













his stretch drive to nip Burley of Ohio State at the wire. Ohio

State's Kurtz finished in third place.

While FSU heroics on the track were unfolding before the fans,

the Seminoles were methodically overpowering the Buckeyes in the field

events. Charlie Harris won both the long and triple jumps with his 48'

11-1/2" effort in the triple, only two inches shy of Charles Galloway'.

school record, and a leap of 23' 2" in the long jump.

Osborn Brown and Jeff Nedimyer both captured school records in

their victory efforts. Brown easily won the shot put with a throw of

56' 2-1/2". His toss broke Allen Williams's old school mark by one

and one-half inches. Nedimyer tied the high jump school record of 61

8" set earlier in the season by Mike Lee, who finished second in the

competition at 6' 6".

An incident in the pole vault illustrated the innate toughness

of Keith Ingram. Ingram was FSU's second vaulter behind Allen McMillan:

who had set a new Ohio State Fieldhouse record of 16' 4-1/2" in the

1972 Ohio State Invitation Midwest Indoor Championships. A duel was

expected between McMillen and OSU's 16-foot vaulter Jim Green (Long,

L. S., 1976). While entering the bus wearing sandels, Ingram caught

his big toe on a jagged piece of metal. The injury was not serious,

but very painful.

While Ingram was warming up for the competition, Coach Curtiss

Long asked him if he was going to be able to vault. He replied, "Oh,

I'm going to vault. I am just trying to find the best way" (Long,

C. M., 1976), When thecompetition began, the gutty little performer

cleared 14 feet. Ingrams' vault loomed very important when the expected










306

duel between Mc~illen and Green failed to materiali-e McMillen did

not clear his opening height of 15' 6", thus moving Ingram into second

place behind Green's 16' V" vault.

After having run key mile relay personnel in several events,

Mike Long substituted in the relay for Garren and Frederick. An Ohio

State victory narrowed FSU's winning margin to 73 to 58.

Danny Smith traveled to Toronto, Canada, for the Maple Leaf

Games on February 4. The quick starting hurdler was going against

the best in the world. Smith qualified easily behind Willie Davenport,

the 1968 Olympic gold medal winner, in his preliminary heat. "In the

finals everything seemed normal," said Smith. "Usually my heart would

start to beat fast, but this time I was relaxed. I figured that if I

placed third or fourth in this field, it would be a good night"

(Tallahassee Democrat, 7 February 1973).

The starting pistol malfunctioned on the first start and the

runners were recalled. Smith did not feel that the false start had

any detrimental effect on his race. "When the gun fired the second

time, I was ready and got off well" (Tallahassee Democrat, 7 February

1973). He did not know when he took the lead, but knewe" he had hit the

tape a winner. "I was just coming out of the tunnel after hitting the

finish wall when the announcer said something, and the crowd gave a

big cheer. I guess it was about my time, but I really didn't know.

I was still happy about winning" (Tallahassee Demcrat 7 February

1973). Smith was not to know of his equalling the world record of

:05.8 until beine interviewed bv a television commentator moments












"I guess this is just about the greatest accomplishment ever

attained by a track athlete at Florida State," exclaimed Mike Long

(Tallahassee Democrat, 7 February 1973). Smith had only been running

the hurdles for 13 months, as he had been a sprinter at Miami-Dade

North Community College. With several good runners ahead of him, Smith

explained, "I was just messing around with the hurdles one afternoon

when Coach Richardson saw me and came over. He asked me to go back and

run them again. I was just hopping over them, but he felt I could run

the hurdles" (Tallahassee Democrat, 7 February 1973).

The Seminoles competed in the USTFF Championships in Montgomery

on February 9 with moderate success (FSU Track Office Files, 9 Febru-

ary 1973). The format of the Coliseum Relays had been revamped into an

invitational meet with no team championship. The Seminoles received

winning performances from Danny Smith in the 60-yard high hurdles

(:07.1) and Tyrone Frederick in the half-mile (1:53.3). Only five-

tenths of a second separated Frederick from a qualifying time for the

NCAA Indoor Championships in Detroit.

Second place finishes by Charlie Harris in the triple jump and

Jeff Nedimyer in the high jump highlighted the Seminoles' effort in

the field events. The remaining Tribe places in the invitation

division were thirds by Osborn Brown (shot put) and Allen McMillen in

the pole vault, and a fifth place by the mile relay team.

FSU received fine performances from their top competitors in

an All-Comers Meet in Knoxville on February 17 (Knoxville News-Sentinel,

















produced his best indoor vault of the 1973 season with an event winning

16' 4". Tyrone Frederick was the class of the half-mile field with a

1:53.4 clocking. The Seminoles' efforts were concluded with a 3:23.3

triumph in the mile relay.

Coach Mike Long sent Danny Smith, Tyrone Frederick, and Joel

Garren to the 1973 Ohio State Invitational Midwest Indoor Championships

in Columbus on February 23-24 (FSU Track Office Files, 23-24 February

1973). The trip was designed to give Frederick and Garren an opp-r

tunity to meet the qualifying standard for the upcoming NCAA Indoor

Championships (Long, L. S., 1976).

Smith, who had previously qualified, copped the 70-yard high

hurdles with a national collegiate record tying :08.1 (FSU Track Office

Files, 23-24 February 1973). Tyrone Frederick fell off a fast early

pace in the 880-yard run and became entangled in traffic during the late

stages of the race. His time of 1:53.1 set a new school mark, but

missed the NCAA standard by three-tenths of a second. The race was

disappointing as he obviously had the ability to qualify, but the

subtleties of indoor racing were confusing him (Long, L. S., 1976).

Joe Carren failed to make the finals of the quarter-mile with a slow

:50.7 in his preliminary race.

The only entries for the Seminoles in the 1973 NCAA Indoor

Track and Field Championships in Detroit an March 9 and 10 were Danny

Smith and Allen McMillen (PSU Track Office Files, 9-10 March 1973).











309

On the Monday prior to the championships, Danny Smith com-

plained in practice of a slight pain in his left knee. The next day

tendonitis had flared-up and Smith was barely able to walk. A corti-

sone injection was administered that afternoon, and the knee was better

on Wednesday when the two Seminoles departed for Detroit. The doctor

kept Smith on crutches but stated that running on the knee would not

cause further structural damage. The decision to run would be influen-

ced by the amount of actual physical pain. The final decision to run

was left to Danny Smith (Long, C. M., 1976).

The knee was better on Thursday and by race time on Friday,

Smith was ready to run. Sweeping through three preliminary races with-

out a loss, the hurdler recorded times of :07.0, :07.1, and :07.1,

respectively. In the finals, Smith was out fast, yet world record

holder Rodney Milburn was a shade faster. The two finished first and

second with Milburn getting the nod at :06.9. Danny Smith became the

first Seminole ever to win NCAA indoor all-American honors with his

:07.0 clocking. Allen McMillen failed to clear the opening height in

the pole vault, thus the four points garnered by Smith in the high

hurdles placed the Seminoles 26th in the nation.

While Coach Mike Long was in Detroit with Danny Smith and Allen

McMillen, assistant coaches Dick Roberts and Curtiss Long entered the

remaining Seminoles in the Florida A & M Relays. Heavy rain on Friday

forced the Rattlers to transfer the meet to the Leon High School

track. The Semi~nole performances reflected the change in venue as the

hard asphalt surface at Leon High School proved very fast.











310

Florida State, with its injury problems, stayed away from the

sprint races and limited the number of appearances for its quality

athletes. The Tribe strategy netted victories in all three relays

entered (PSU Track Office Files, 11 March 1973).

The two-mile relay team of Bob Flemning, Wes Koenig, Bob Brooks,

and Tyrone Frederick captured an easy victory with a fine early season

time of 7:40.0. The sprint medley relay was composed of athletes who

did not usually run on relays for the Seminoles. The desire of these

four man to win one of the green and gold trophies was illustrated by

Jules Sayers making a diving lunge to pass the baton to Bill Weldon.

The hard asphalt track extracted its toll in scraped skin when Sayers

fell after making the exchange (Long, C. M., 1976). Jim Cunningham, ran

the quarter-mile leg and handed the stick to Bob Fleming in second

place. The Winter Park High School product dogged the anchorman from

Morehouse College until the final curve. Moving to the outside,

Fleming began his kick that carried him to the tape a winner.

The mile relay trophy is called the "Grandaddy" and was the

object of intense interest (Roberts, 1976). The race was never in

doubt as Wes Koenig opened up a lead for the Seminoles on the first

leg that widened with every man. The men running the remaining legs

were Robin McEachin, Joel Garren, and Tyrone Frederick. FSU'a 3:14.5

was over four full seconds faster than the second place time.

Osborn Brown copped double victories in the shot put (53'

6-1/2") and discus (157' 11"). The black behemoth drew the open

admiration of the attractive FAMU trackettss officiating the weight













Elation and depression were emotions experienced by Jeff

Nedimyer in the high jump. The standards had read 7' 0" before his

successful attempt, but when the tape was put to the bar it measured

only 6' 10". The freshman from Titusville had a close miss at an

accurately measured seven feet, but bad to settle for victory and a

new school record at 61 10".

With a fine throw of 222' 5", Randy Hutchinson opened his

career at FSU with a victory in the javelin. He outdistanced his

fellow thrower Rich Richelderfer, who finished second at 201' 2". Con-

sidering that the first three hurdles were not set the proper distance

apart (Long, C. M., 1976), Bill Weldon's victorious :54.2 in the 440-

yard immediate hurdles was highly commendable.

The Seminoles journeyed to Baton Rouge on March 17 for a five-

way meeting with Louisiana State University, Southern Illinois Univer-

sity, Drake University, and the University of Alaba-a The Tribe was

only one point out of first place with five events remaining when the

injury jinxs cropped up again. With Charlie Harris in Tallahassee

sidelined by a sprained ankle incurred in a gymnastics class (Long,

C. M., 1976), a pulled hamstring suffered by Joel Garren in the 220-

yard dash was devastating. When Garren crashed to the track, FSU's

hopes of victory fell with him. The insuing gloom adversely affected

the Seminoles as the Tribe scored only four points in the last five

events to finish a dismal fourth (FSU Track Office Files, 17 March

11131*

Outstanding performances in the early going had placed the

Seminoles in the thick of the battle. Danny Smith won the 120-yard






















IcMillen finished second in the

ig height.

competition again on March 30 and

,n Gainesville. The Seminoles

a fourth (FSU Track Office Files,

azie, in the sprint medley relay.

y preracE favorite on the basis

opening 220-yard leg, Danny

e baton to Bill Weldon, who

21.4. The quarter-mile leg

staff held their breath as their

Garren ran a controlled race

retch, he seemed to straighten

a handed the baton to Tyrone

or stride with North Carolina

f the Kenyan Olympic silver medal

ponent on the half-mile anchor

he Kenyan's shadow as they

quarter. Ouko accelerated the

tenacious Seminole. The two

rederick drawing even. They


31 in the 30th Annual Florida Relays i

set three new school records and tied

30-31 March 1973). The first record c

North Carolina Central was made a heav,

of their two Kenyan Olympians. In the

Smith burned a :20.8 split, handing th

covered his furlong in a respectable :

belonged to Joel Garren. The coaching

gimpy-legged sprinter took the baton.

through the first turn. In the backst

and then recovered his stride. When b

Frederick, the Seminoles were stride f

Central. Robert Ouko, a 1972 member o

winning mile relay, was Frederick's op

leg. Frederick seemed to be part of t

matched strides through a fast first q

pace several times trying to shake the

man charged off the final curve with F











313

finish at the yarn brought a judge's decision in favor of Ouko of

North Carolina Central. However, the official splits on the two run-

ners showed Freder-ick one-tenth of a second faster at 1:48.7. Florida

State received the same overall time as the winners of 3:19.4. The

Seminoles time erased the school record set in 1958.

Danny Smith exploded from the blocks building a four-yard lead

at the end of five hurdles. As he began to tire, Smith's trail leg

lost its quickness. Charles Foster of North Carolina Central was

relentlessly regaining the lost ground, drawing even by the last hurdle.

Foster was clearly ahead as the two men hit the tape, but a desperation

lean by Smith earned him the identical time of :13.6 as given to the

winner (Long, C. M., 1976).

The two-mile relay won the watches on the second day of the

meet. Bob Fleming led-off in 1:54.0, placing the Seminoles in second

position, yet ahead of the favored Florida Gators. Bob Brooks and

Wes Koenig ran nearly identical races on the second and third legs.

Each ran hard in the early stages of his leg, but then a Gator runner

would slowly pull ahead in thehomestretch before the screaming partisan

fans. Tyrone Frederick took the baton five yards behind Gibson of

Florida and quickly closed to Gibson's shoulder. The first lap split

was a burner--:50,1 on Gibson. Frederick was content to follow until

about 300 yards from home. He accelerated to a position along side of

Gibson and the two runners briefly surged together before Frederick

irresistibly moved by. Slowly opening up an advantage, Frederick was

clearly in control at the finish (Long, C. M., 1976). The time of

7:28.2 was a new school record.













Mike Lee carved himself a piece of Jeff Nedimyer's school

record with a second place jump of 6' 10". FSU's Steve Smith won the

Division II high jump with a leap of 6' 6".

FSU made the difficult trip to Columbia, South Carolina, on

April 14 for a triangular meet with South Carolina and Auburn (FSU

Track Office Files, 14 April 1973). The Seminoles expected to win th,

meet, but an over-confident attitude proved fatal (Long, L. S., 1976).

The Seminoles started by winning the top two places in the mi:

run. Bob Brooks equalled his collegiate best of 4:10.0 to win the

event, followed closely by Bob Burr.

Doing yeoman duty, Danny Smith led-off the second placing 440-

yard relay, won the 100-yard dash (:09.7) and the 120-yard high hurdl,

(:14.0), and came in second in the furlong with a time of :22.2.

Rudy Falana always found a way to win against South Carolina .

The Largo, Florida, native bounded 23' 3-1/4" to cop the long j ump.

Uncorking his best career throw of 223' 7", Rich Richelderfer won the

j avelin. School record holder, Randy Hutchinson, overcame great pain

stemming from an elbow injury incurred in the FSU Invitational, to

place third with a throw of 201' 0".

Allen McMillen was brilliant in the pole vault. The school

record holder had been having an off year; his track record vault of

16' 4-1/4" was a welcome reversal of form.

The Seminoles' early momentum began to falter. Joel Garren

had reinjured a hamstring while running the 440-yard leg in the sprint

medley relay in Gainesville two weeks prior. With Garren not ready tc


















Coming off two very strong performances in the Florida Relays,

Tyrone Frederick followed his custom of kicking late. Frederick pas-

sed the leader on the final curve, but in turn was overtaken by Shelle:

of South Carolina. At this point in the meet, the momentum passed to

the Gamecocks of South Carolina (Long, C. M., 1976).

The Seminoles figured to take first and second in the high jum

The first went to Mike Lee at 6' 8"; however, Nedimyer, unable to put

it together, failed to place. At the conclusion of the meet, the

Seminoles walked slowly off the track accompanied by the jubilant

sounds of air horns and cow bells being wielded by the victorious

Gamecocks.

On a limited basis, Florida State entered the 64th Annual Drak

Relays on April 26 and 27 (FSU Track Office Files, 26-27 April 1973).

Assistant Coach Dick Roberts drove Danny Smith, Allen McMillen, Jeff

Nedimyer and Mike Lee in a station wagon to Des Moines (Roberts, 1976)

The Seminoles were represented in the box scores by Danny Smiti

and Allen McMillen. With a time of :14.0, Smith finished third in a

high hurdle race run into a stiff wind. World record holder, Rodney

Milburn was the winner in :13.5. McMillen cleared 16 feet even, fin-

ishing fourth only six inches below the winning height. The long car

ride home for Jeff Nedimyer and Mike Lee was compounded by the feelings

of frustration and disappointment, as both men failed to clear the

opening height in the high j ump.




















the German measles (Long, C. M., 1976). The University of Florida was

definitely favored to win the meet, but the Seminoles were not mothe-

matically out of the competition (Long, L. S., 1976).

Despite some very gutty individual performances, the -vrall

meet did not unfold favorably for the Tribe. The final score of 82 to

63 was not truly indicative of the closeness of the competition (FSU

Track Office Files, 5 May 1973).

Danny Smith was again a performance leader for the Seminoles.

Winning the 100-yard dash in :09.6 and the 120-yard high hurdles at

:14.1, Smith ran the first leg, in a losing cause, on the quarter-mile

relay, and placed third in the furlong. Smith was the only Seminole to

win a footrace.

Randy Hutchinson, a fiery competitor, ignored the pulsating

pain in his elbow to win the j avelin with a throw of 217' 8" (Long,

C. M., 1976). He bested teammate, Richelderfer by less than mne and

one-half feet, as the Tribe copped the top two spots.

Finding his best j ump of the season, Rudy Falana won the long

jump at 24' 3-3/4" with Charlie Harris leaping a career best of 23'

7-1/2" for second place. Harris added the top spot in the triple jump

to his credit at 46' 7-1/2". The all-around competitor had previously

taken third in the 100-yard dash and had anchored the 440-yard relay.

Jeff Nedimyer and Mike Lee swept the top two positions in the high jump













































With only the three-mile and the mile relay to be contested,

Florida held a 69 to 62 lead over the Seminoles. Bob Brooks set the

early pace in thethree-mile with two Caters dogging his heels. With

less than one lap remaining, DePeiza and Bridges of Florida sprinted

by Brooks to win by a comfortable margin. Coach Mike long removed Joel

Garren from the Tribe mile relay after the meet had been decided for

fear of reinjuring his leg. Winning the mile relay, the Caters

established the final score at 82 to 63.

Florida State hosted the Second Annual Southeastern Independent

Track and Field Championships on May 19. The Seminoles were victorious

by a narrow 10-point advantage over Baptist College of Charleston,

South Carolina (FSU Track Office Files, 19 May 1973).































:king was a personal best for Herman by seven-tenths of a second.

This race would easily be my most memorable from my fresh-
man year. I can clearly remember coming off the turn and rn
ning almost even with two other competitors. With three
hurdles to go, one runner missed stride and fell. That left
only one. We were separated by about four lanes on the track
and the race went down to the wire. I felt he had outleaned
me but the officials gave me the favor. They even ripped off
the other runner by putting him one-tenth of a second back.
That race really saved my freshman year which until then was
not very sparkling. (Herman, 1976)

The Seminoles were given a sweep of the horizontal jumping

Lts by Rudy Felons's 23' 11-1/2" leap in the long jump and a 49'

'4" effort by Charlie Harris in the triple jump. With the meet com-

.ed except for the pole vault, FSU and Baptist College stood tied a

points apiece. Seminoles Allen McMillen and Keith Ingram proved

l to the challenge. A 16-foot vault by McMillen won the event ove

mr of Fur- n. Taking third place, Ingram showed his mettle by

.vering a 1-5-foot jump, the best outdoor leap of his career. The

Baptist could muster was a fourth and fifth, giving Florida State













Florida State seat two men out to the llth Ann..1 USTFF Track

and Field Championsbips in Wichita on June I and 2. Tyrone Frederick

and Rudy Falana responded by bettering the NCAA qualifying standard,

earning USTFF all-A-erican honors in the process (FSU Track Office

Files, 1-2 June 1973).

Meeting an old friend and rival from Florida Junior College,

Frederick c-ninced Rudolph Griffith of Texas to set the pace for his

attempt to qualify for the NCAA Championships. Griffith was good to

his word taking an early lead with Frederick on his shoulder. The two

men maintained the front two spots until coming off the final curve.

Frederick made an attempt to pass; as he swung to the outside a momen-

tary path opened for Lowell of the Chicago Track Club to pass between

the two friends. Griffith was able to hold off Lowell's charge, but

Frederick had to settle for third (Frederick, 1975). Frederick's time

of 1:49.2 was a new school record and the first half-mile ever run by

a Seminole under 1:50.0. Rudy Falana rode a strong tail wind to sail

24' 10-1/4" to capture the number four spot in the long jump. His

jump was the best of his career at FSU and was just three-fourths of an

inch off the school record established by Sidney Gainey in 1966. The 10

points garnered by the two Seminoles ranked the Tribe in a tie for 18th

among the best track clubs and university teams in the country.

Florida State had nine athletes qualify for the NCAA Track and

Field Championships held in Baton Rouge on June 5-9 (FSU Track Office

Files, 5-9 June 1973). This was the largest number of athletes FSU had













The highest Seminole place was sixteenth by Charlie Harris in

the triple jump. Harris leaped 50' 1/2", only one inch off his career


bet' Danny Smith was the m~in Tribe hope for a high national finish.


The FSU hurdler broke the Louisiana State University track record with

a :13.5 clocking in his preliminary heat. His record stood for five

minutes as Rodney Milburn burned a :13.4 in the very next race. The

semifinal race proved fatal to Smith's chances for victory. Despite

being in position to qualify easily for the finals, Smith began to press

in an attempt to hold off a charge being mounted by North Carolina Cen-

tral's Charles Foster. In the process, Smith clipped the eighth hurdle

and hit the ninth barrier knocking himself out of the race (Long, C. M.,


17 'Tyrone Frederick was improving rapidly yet needed a break in


the draw of his preliminary beat for an outside chance to place (Long,

L. S., 1976). Unfortunately, he drew a strong heat as four men came

charging out of the last curve in a pack. With only three runners qualify

for the finals, Frederick finished fourth with a time of 1:49.5 (Long,

C. M., 1976).

Jeff Nedimyer and Allen McMillen failed to qualify for the

final in the high j ump and pole vault with jumps of 6' 6" and 15' 6",

respectively. Jumping 23' 11-1/2" in the long jump, Rludy Falana did

not progress to the finals. Randy Hutchinson had hoped to find one

good throw in his ailing arm to earn his way into the finals. The

gutty junior was unable to do so, but managed to throw a very respec-

table 220' 5". Bob Brooks found the three-mile field very tough.













When the pace quickened during the middle stages of the third mile,

Brooks was unable to stay with the leaders finishing twelfth in his

heat with a time of 14:04.8.

Summ~ary. Although failing to score at the NCAA Championships,

FSU had completed its shift from a dual meet team to a team oriented

toward multi-team competition. The number of men qualified for the

NCAA Championship attests to the success of the conversion. FSU

athletes had set 14 indoor and outdoor school records while winning the

Senior Bowl, finishing 24th in the NCAA Indoor Championships, and tying

for 18th in the USTFF Outdoor Championships. Three FSU men--Danny

Smith, Tyrone Frederick, and Rudy Falana--arned all-American honors.

The performances of individual Seminoles illustrated the quality

of athlete attracted to FED in 1973. Eleven of the 13 school records

set or tied were accomplished by athletes not on the 1972 roster.

Danny Smith stood out among the Seminole stars as the Bahamian Olympian

tied the world record with his :05.8 clocking in the Toronto Maple

Leaf Games 50-yard high hurdles. Among those defeated by Smith was

Rodney Milburn, the 1972 Olympic 120-yard high hurdles champion (FSU

Track Brochure File, Track 1974). The finishing touch to his 1973

indoor season was a second place finish in the NCAA Indoor Track and

Field Championships. His :07.0 clocking was a new FSU school record

and his second place finish made him the first Seminole to earn indoor

NCAA all-America honors.

Displaying national calibre times outdoors, Smith sped to a

school record :13.5 clocking in the preliminary heat of the 1973 NCAA

Outdoor Track and Field Championships. In addition, Smith led-off a












school record smashing sprint medley relay team composed of Bill

Weldon, Joel Garren, and Tyrone Frederick that registered a 3:19.4

clocking in the Florida Relays. The race was highlighted by a titanic

struggle on the anchor leg between Robert Ouko of North Carolina Cen-

tral and FSU's Tyrone Frederick. North Carolina Central won the race,

yet Frederick had the faster half-mile split of 1:48.7.

The 1973 season was a rollercoaster ride for Tyrone Frederick.

After setting a school record of 1:53.1 indoors and running his pheno-

m ena 1 split of 1:48.7 in the Florida Relays sprint medley relay,

Frederick was beset by middle-of-the-season upsets and the debilitating

effects of German measles. He soared to new heights with a 1:49.2

school record clocking in the 10th Annual USTFF Championships in

Wichita as his third place finish earned him USTFF all-America honors.

Charlie Harris became the longest indoor triple jumper in

Seminole track history, bounding 49' 8-1/2" to break Charles Galloway's

old mark of 49' 1-1/2". After suffering a severely injured ankle in a

physical education gymnastics class (Long, C. M., 1976), Harris was

forced to miss the NCAA Indoor Championships. 1. the outdoor season,

Harris went down to the last meet of the season before meeting the

NCAA qualifying standard. The powerful junior became the first FSU

triple jumper to break the 50-foot mark with his precedent setting













yet was brilliant in the Ohio State Midwest Indoor Championship, set-

ting an Ohio State Fieldhouse record and school record of 16' 4".

Mike Lee and Jeff Nedimyer shared the indoor school record of

6' 9" in the high jump. Nedimyer broke loose from his teammate in the

first meet of the outdoor season with a school record setting jump of

6' 10" in the Florida A & M University Relays. Not one to be outdone,

Lee tied Nedimyer's record when he cleared 6' 10" in the Florida Relay

At the end of the 1973 campaign, the two jumpers jointly held both the

indoor and outdoor high jump record.

Rudy Falana had the best outdoor season of his injury plagued

career. The Largo junior had overcome hamstring problems and two knee

operations before popping his 24' 10-1/4" Jump at the USTFF Champion-

ships in Wichita. Finishing fourth in the competition, Falana was the

second Seminole to earn USTFF all-American honors.

Improving with each meet of the season, Randy Hutchinson set a

FSU j -elin mark with a toss of 235' 1". The Sunday morning following

the meet, he awoke with a throbbing pain in his elbow. Rest and

therapy allowed Hutchinson to continue to compete, but the pain was










324

During the hard times of inflation (U.S. Department of Health,

Education, and Welfare, 1975), FSU had come full cycle in its fight

to recruit enough talented athletes to field a competitive dual meet

team. Despite not having the squad size to compete with the best,

Coach Mike Long had gone back to scheduling dual meets. The logical

reasoning deduced that an attractive home schedule was based upon the

dual meet; however, the primary recruiting objective remained the

talented full scholarship athlete.

The 1974 Florida State track squad had a few weak events, yet

a host of talented performers kept the Seminoles competitive with the

teams on the schedule. Reading the list of returning lettermen were

all-Americans Danny Smith, co-holder of the 50-yard high hurdle world

record; Tyrone Frederick, the first Seminole to run under 1:50.0 in

the half-mile; and Rudy Falana, who had placed fourth in the National

USTFF Outdoor long jump.

Charles Harris teamed with Falana to give the Seminoles unpre-

cedented strength in the long and triple jumps. Harris had become the

first Tribe triple jumper to carry further than 50 feet, accomplishing

this feat twice in 1973.

A limited amount of available scholarship money allowed the

Seminoles to recruit only three new men. FSU invested its money wisely,

capturing two widely sought after sprinters on full scholarship grants

and a promising freshman javelin thrower on an out-of-state tuition

waiver*

Junior college all-American (FSU Track Brochure File, Track

1974). Vasco Bradlev brouaht to the Seminoles a wide range of talents.













The slender sprinter had a :09.4 hundred and a :20.8 220-yard dash to

his credit. In addition to his obvious value on sprint relays, Bradley

had jumped 24' 6" in the long jump.

Tallahasseean Jesse Forbes was the best high school sprinter

in the nation in 1973. His credentials included Golden West champion

in the 100-yard dash and member of the 1972 nati ona 1 junior Olympic

team that competed against West Germany, Poland, and USSR. Forbes had

a best time of :09.4 in the 100-yard dash (FSU Track Brochure File,

Track 1974).

Bill N~arozanich was a burly, strong-armed freshman recruited to

fill the j avelin gap left by Richelderfer's decision not to return to

school. Narozanich had potential and figured to give the Seminoles

depth in an event subject to sudden injury.

In addition to its three returning all-Americans, PSU had five

returning school record-holders. The total contingent manning two

school record setting relays was returning intact. The school standard

bearers included Mike Lee (high jump), Jeff Nedimyer (high jump),

Osborn Brown (shot put), Randy Hutchinson (j avelin), Charlie Harris

(triple jump), and Joe Carren (440-yard dash).

Florida State's ability to cover every event with at least one

good athlete gave the Seminoles good reason to be optimistic. Coach

Mike Long qualified the outcome of the season by saying, "it depends a

lot on the three "B's". We =ast stay healthy, hungry, and happy" (FSU

Track Brochure File, Track 1974).










326

Florida State opened the 1974 indoor season by defending their

1973 Senior Bowl title. The meet was held on Wednesday, January 17 in

Mobile (FSU Track Office Files, 10 January 1974).

Bob Brooks, Danny Smith, Osborn Brown, and Joel Garren each won

one event apiece. Smith copped the 50-yard high hurdles in :06.1. The

senior hurdler also finished second in the 50-yard dash behind Auburn's

Clifford Outlin. Outlin later won the 1974 NCAA Indoor 60-yard dash

(FSU Track Office Files, 8-9 March 1974).

Bob Brooks and Bob Burr finished holding hands in the two-mile.

The judges awarded the victory to Brooks, although, both men were

clocked in 9:04.9. With a throw of 53' 5-1/2", Brown proved his

superiority in the shot put. It was his best toss since March 10,

1973.

Completing the Semninole victory efforts, Joel Garren won the

440-yard dash in :50.6. The quarter-mile was a ne event for the Senior

Bowl, thus when Garren outlasted Pearlie Harris of Alabama, he became

a Senior Bowl record holder (Long, C. M., 1976).

An incident occurred in the 50-yard high hurdles that showed

the integrity of Mike Long. Competing in the preliminary race, Jim

Broun appeared to finish last. When the names of the six finalists were

read, Broun was among the chosen. The high hurdles had concluded the

afternoon preliminaries, but Mike Long went directly to the meet

referee to explain the situation. With his man not deserving to be in

the finals, Long offered to withdraw him if the correct runner could

be located. The meet referee explained that there had been no protest













lodged; therefore, as far as the officials were concerned, Jim Braun

was in the finals (Long, C. M., 1976).

The finals were run later in the evening with Jim Braun again

finishing last. Soon after the race, the results were announced.

Broun had been unexplainably picked fourth. Fate had decided Bra=n

deserved better than his running had indicated.

FSU had bused to Mobile on Tuesday and returned to Tallahassee

after the meet on Wednesday night. Friday morning saw the Seminoles

boarding the bus for Jackson, Mississippi, for the Southeastern USTFF

Track and Field Championships (Long, C. M., 1976). The road-weary

Seminoles should have been lethargic, yet the traveling proved a tonic

as FSU set five new school records and tied another (FSU Track Office

Files, 21 January 1974).

Danny Smith roared out of the blocks to annihilate a class

field of hurdlers. Smith's time of :06.9 was the fastest time run in

the nation by a collegian (Tlaase eort 22 January 1974).

Following Paul Bannon of Memphis State for two and one-half

laps, Bob Burr set sail, blowing to a 8:52.1 victory. Burr's time bad

been bettered by a Seminole only once in 26 years.

Charlie Rarria hit the magic mark of 50 feet even to establish

a new indoor school record. Harris finished third behind two of the

best triple j mpers in the South. Equalling the Seminole high jump

record of 6' 9", Jeff Nedimyer finished third in the high jump as Dan

Hobson of Alabama won the event at 7' 1/2".

FSU's distance medley team ran to an easy victory with a

clocking of 10:00.0, the second fastest time by a Seminole quartet.











328

Bob Brooks gave a strong performance in the two-mile run finishing

third at 9:00.6. Although Osborn Brown only finished fifth, his

improvement to 54' 1/2" was a welcome sight to the coaching staff

(Long, C. M., 1976).

FSU's mile relay consisting of Joel Garren, Wes Koenig, Tyrone

Frederick, and Vesco Bradley raced to victory with Frederick coming

from behind to defeat Jackson State, the 1973 NAIA mile relay champions

(Tallahassee Democrat, 22 January 1974), in a school record 3:19.1.

The nonscored competition had provided the Seminoles with a

competitive atmosphere conducive to running fast times and good field

event performances. The Tribe had responded favorably with Danny Smith

and Charlie Harris qualifying for the NCAA Indoor Championships (Talla-

basses Democrat, 22 January 1974).

FSU packed a full squad on the bus headed for Bloomington,

Indiana, for the Third Annual Indiana Relays on February 2. The S-m

inoles made the long trip worthwhile (PSU Track Office Files, 2 February

1114),

Danny r'.ith continued to show awesome form by striding through

the 70-yard high hurdles in a national collegiate record tying :08.1

(Tallahassee Democrat, 3 February 1974). Vesco Bradley got locked up

in a tight battle with Bobby Cox of Indiana in the 440-yard dash. The

Hoosier managed to hold-off a stretch drive by Bradley to win in :49.1.

Bradley finished second in :49.2, tying Gotten's indoor school mark.

Missing an opportunity to qualify for the NCAA Indoor Championships,

Frederick still managed to tie the FSU balf-mile indoor record by













winning the event in a new meet and fieldhouse record of 1:53.1

(Tallahassee Democrat, 3 February 1974).

The Florida State middle distance men were superb. The two-

mile relay team of Wes Koenig, Bob Brooks, Bob Burr, and Tyrone Freder-

ick bettered the old school record by 10.5 seconds. Koenig put the

Seminoles in the middle of the pack on the first leg. With a split in

the 1:51s, Bob Brooks began to move through the maze of men ahead of

him. The baton passed to Burr with only Indiana ahead of the Scminole

Im-ediately, Burr began to move on the man ahead of him. Dogging his

adversary relentlessly, Burr moved by in the late stages of the race,

giving Frederick a slight lead. Frederick made a fatal error of set-

ting a slow pace, letting Steve Heidenreich of Indiana close easily.

It first appeared that Heidenreich was content to follow, but with one

and one-half laps remaining, Heidenreich suddenly spurted by, opening

a five-yard lead before the startled Seminole was able to respond.

Frederick made a token effort to catch the fleeting Hoosier, but was

unable to match Heidenreich's sprint (Long, C. M., 1976). The SeminolE

finished second in a school record and NCAA qualifying tine of 7:35.8.

The distance medley relay team of Brooks, Bill Weldon Burr,

and Del Ramers was unable to stay competitive during the early stages

of the race. Although Burr and Ra-crs attempted to close, the Tribe

finished a well-beaten third behind the winning time of 9:48.8. Rudy

Falana placed fourth in the long j mp at 23' 7-1/2" while Charlie HarrJ

was finishing a respectable sixth in the triple jump with a leap of

48' 1-112".











330

Ron Fletcher had the best day of his indoor career at FSU.

The stylish vaulter cleared a personal best of 15' 7", making two very

close jumps at 161 0". On that particular day, Fletcher was the best

of the vaulters.

The Seminoles concluded a successful meet with a second place

finish in the mile relay. A fierce battle with Indiana ..sued as

Bradley's :49.1 anchor leg brought the Tribe home second with a 3:17.9

mark, only f-urtenths of a second off the NCAA qualifying standard.

The meet had been very gratifying as the Tribe had placed in nine of

the 11 events entered.

FSU loaded 12 men into two station wagons for the long journey

to Champaign, Illinois. Coach Mike Long had turned the responsibility

for the team during the First Annual Illini-USTFF Indoor Classic, on

February 22-23, over to his young assistants, Dick Roberts and Curtiss

Long,

With snow lightly swirling outside (Long, C. M., 1976), the

Seminoles turned in hot times inside Ruff Gymnasium, (FSU Track Office

Files, 22-23 February 1974). Bob Burr turned in a second place finish-

ing 4:07.0 in the mile run, setting a new FSU indoor mark against stroi

competition. He returned to the track in the two-mile to place third

in 8:58.3.

Charlie Harris finished second behind Charles Ehizuelen of

Illinois in the triple jump. Harris's disappointment was tempered by

his school record performance of 50' 7-1/4".

The attempt to qualify Joel Garren for the NCAA Indoor Ch-o

pionships was one of the prime reasons for the trip. The senior













quarter-miler had not run a qualifying time and the Illinois 260-yard

indoor track provided an excellent opportunity to meet the standard.

In the open 440-yard dash, Barren fell a heart-breaking two-tenths over

the NCAA standard of :49.0. With good position coming off the last

curve, the sprinter had faded to fourth in the long homestretch (Long,

C. M., 1976). Coach Dick Roberts requested that an official time be

kept on Garren on his lead-off leg in the mile relay. Coach Bob Wright

of Illinois agreed and had his assistant, Jim Weineke oversee the

clocking. Garren ran hard, but was tiring fast coming home. Battling

hard, the plucky quarter-miler held on to register a NCAA qualifying

time of :49.0.

Florida State University took nine men to the 1974 NCAA Indoor

Track and Field Championships in Detroit an March 8-9. FSU parlayed a

victory by Danny Smith and a fourth place by Tyrone Frederick into a

seventh place finish in the national meet (FSU Track Office Files,

8-9 March 1974).

Danany Smith duplicated the exact times he had run in the 1973

NCAA competition. The fleet Smith was reworded with the NCAA 60-yard

high hurdles championship. Smith copped the finals with a bl-zing

:07.0 clocking. Smith's victory made him the first Seminole trackman

to ever win an NCAA championship event. The victory also conveyed













into third place on the backstretch. Entering the final turn, it

appeared as if Frederick had the run necessary to win the race.

Frederick moved off the curve but his charge faltered only a few

strides from home, as a desperate leao by Roger Chadwick of Nebraska

nipped him at the wire for third place. Frederick finished in fourth,

one place away from all-American honors, with a clocking of 1:52.7.

With an effort of 50' 2-3/4", Charlie Harris finished ninth in

the triple jump. Vesco Bradley failed to move out of the preliminaries

of the quarter-mile with a time of :50.1. Joel Garren also failed to

qualify for the quarter-mile final with a slow time of :51.3. Garren's

heat was characterized by an excessive amount of physical contact,

eliminating all chances for anyone to run a fast time. The two-mile

relay team could not find the magic of the Indiana Relays, as their

time of 7:50.1 placed them last in their heat. Jeff Nedimyer failed to

make the opening height of the high jump.

The Seminoles' eight point total ranked the Tribe in a tie for

seventh. This was the highest national ranking that any FSU track team

had ever achieved.

The Seminoles begaa their outdoor season with their own invita

tional meet on March 23. The FSU Chevron 440 track was still under

construction, forcing the meet to be held on the Godby High School

track *

There were no point totals kept in the informal meet. Danny

Smith and Charlie Harris turned in the best performances for the Tribe.

Smith clocked a respectable :09.7 in his victory in the 100-yard dash.

Harris disregarded the hardness of the asphalt runway to triple jump





















was the second year this procedure was utilized to accommodate the

quarter break. The method seemed to work as the Seminoles were again

ready to run (FSU Track Office Files, 29-30 March 1974).

The key man for the Tribe was Danny Smith. The amazing sprints:

hurdler won the 120-yard high hurdles, and launched the victorious 440-

yard and sprint medley relays. Smith was out very fast in the high

hurdles, slowing before the tape, yet still winning easily in :13.8.

The Keamney-Raborn most valuable performer trophy was awarded to Smith

in recognition of his outstanding efforts.

Jesse Forbes, a standout sprinter, was making his first

appearance as a Seminole. He had been sidelined by a knee operation

in December 1973 designed to correct damage suffered in a fall football

injury. Forbes was not full-speed, but the other three men on the 440-

yard relay wanted him on the anchor leg (Long, L. S., 1976). His

recovery had been very closely monitored by the team physician and the

team trainer. The pain was still present, but Forbes's knee was deemed

ready for its first test in competition.

The preliminaries in the quarter-mile relay saw Tom Whatley of

Alabama erase a large Seminole lead by moving by a struggling Forbes

on the anchor leg. The first three men, Danny Smith, Vesco Bradley,

and Joel Garren vowed to give the courageous Forbes a lead in the

finals that could not be overcome. They were good to their word and













with Forbes running well on the second day, the Seminoles grabbed a

:40.6 school record setting victory.

Florida State University and the University of Florida battled

in the sprint medley relay. The long awaited duel between Florida's

talented freshman Wimpy Alexander and Tyrone Frederick proved to be a

Seminole delight. Danny Smith and Vasco Bradley ran the furlong legs

with Joel Carren in the quarter-mile. Tyrone Frederick was the anchor

man in the finishing 880-yard leg. FSU and Florida were very close at

the end of three legs with the Gators enjoying a slight advantage.

Frederick took the baton behind Alexander, swiftly closing the gap.

The Seminole was content to follow Alexander through the first 660

yards, but Frederick challenged for and took the lead at the 220-yard

pole on the second lap. Alexander stuck to Frederick around the last

turn, but faded in the last 50 yards. The Seminole victory was timed

in 3:22.2 (Long, C. M., 1976).

The two-mile relay was another Frederick dominated nightmare

for Florida Coach Jimmoy Carnes. The Seminoles wanted to stay close to

the lead on the first three legs, thus allowing Frederick a shot at

the victory. Bobby Brooks, Wes Koenig, and Robert Burr faced the diffi-

cult task squarely, running very competitive races to give Frederick

his chance. Needing no more, Frederick set a very fast early pace

taking the lead. Although contrary to his normal race pattern, the

fast early pace coupled with Frederick's strength in the late stages

was too much for his opponents. FSU's third relay victory was timed in

7:32.0. The Seminoles were the only school to win three relay victories













Randy Hutchinson's elbow was still the source of considerable

pain, yet he was determined to compete. The coaching staff had advised

against throwing because the preliminaries were in the morning and the

finals in the afternoon. The problem was complicated by the fact that

preliminary throws did not count in the finals (Long, L. S., 1976).

Defying the odds, Hutchinson threw, placing third with a toss of 222'

III'

With the Florida State track still under construction, the dual

meet with Mississippi State was held at Godby High School track on

April 13 (FRO Track Office Files, 13 April 1974). The Seminoles started

the meet on a discouraging note. The 440-yard relay anchormen, Jesse

Forbes dropped the baton about 20 yards from the finish line. The

freshman had januzed the tip of the baton into his thigh, thus popping

the stick from his hand. However, the rest of the meet belonged to the

Tribe, as the Seminoles swept all but one of the remaining 16 events to

run up a 104 to 41 triumph.

Vesco Bradley keyed the Seminole assault with victories in the

100- and 220-yard dashes. Bradley and Danny Smith both tied the

hundred school record of :09.5 with Bradley receiving a judge's decision.

Bradley dominated the furlong in :21.3 to register an easy win.

Disregarding a poor take-off board and an asphalt runway, Rudy

Falana rang up a 23' 6-1/2" victory in the long jump. Charlie Harris

took the triple jump, under similar conditions, with a jump of 47'

2-1/2". Randy Hutchinson won the javelin with a throw of 221' 11".

Overcoming a smII landing pit, Jeff Nedimyer jumped 6' 8" to win the
















the site of the old facility. The 220-yard straightaway was eliminated

but a chute was kept at both ends allowing the 100-yard dash and the

120-yard high hurdles to be run in either direction. Donations by

Richard Wolfe bad purchased two customized landing areas for the pole

vault and high jump, giving the Seminoles the finest j umping facilities

in the South (Long, L. S., 1976). The discus circle was moved to the

north end of the infield, so that the throwing sectors ran parallel

with the football field eliminating a chance of a legal throw sliding

across the pole vault and long jump runways. All runways and jump

approach aprons were constructed of Chevron 440, except the javelin

runway which remained grass.

The Seminoles were fired-up remembering their embarrassing

experience in Columbia in 1973. Motivated by heavy pre-meet publicity,

the Tribe was keenly anticipating the competition.

Florida State opened the meet with a very fast :40.7 victory in

the 440-yard relay (FSU Track Office Files, 20 April 1974). Danny

Smith, Vesco Bradley, Joel Garren, and Jesse Forbes were the men who

ran the second fastest quarter-mile relay in the history of Seminole

track.

The mile run was an exciting race as Jim Schaeper of South

Carolina and Bob Burr clipped of the first three laps in near four-

minute mile pace. On the last lap, Schaeper began to kick some 330 yard

from the finish line. Unfortunately, Burr let him go some ten yards

on the backstretch before closing the gap in the finishing straightaway.
























In the high hurdles, Smith came from behind when South Carolina's

Bernie Allen struck the last hurdle falling victim to Smith's finishing

kick. Smith's time of :13.8 was a new track record. With only mee

event intervening his two race., Smith copped the 100-yard dash with a

quick :09.6 clocking.

Vasco Bradley won the 220-yard dash with another :21.3 effort.

Mike Schelley of South Carolina duplicated his stretch drive of 1973 to

nip Tyrone Frederick in the half-mile with a 1:51.1.

The Seminole field eventmen were superb. Jeff Nedimyer became

the first Seminole to clear the fascinating seven-foot barrier in the

high jump. Bill Roberts, the meet announcer, had directed the crowd's

attention to the southeast end of the track, where, in the shadows,

Nedimyer was approaching the bar resting at seven feet. His first two

attempts were near misses. The sophomore now had only one jump left.

He approached the bar, planted his left foot, driving his right knee

across his body, leaving the ground in the now familiar Fosbury flop.



















Rudy Falana continued the vendetta against South Carolina w

a 1974 best of 24' 9-3/4" in the long jump to win the event. At thl

conclusion of the long jump competition, he told spectators that "h

and Charlie were going to win the long and triple jumps" (Long, C.

1976). Harris proved his friend a prophet with a winning j ump of 51

7", establishing a new outdoor school record in the triple jump.

With the best day of his career, Keith Ingram won the pole

vault at 15' 10". The Pompano Beach senior had a very near miss at

16' 1", as his dream of a 16-foot remained unfulfilled.





soft so I knew my speed and strength were better and I was
ready for a bigger pole. (Ingram, 1976)

As Florida State put Danny Smith on a plane for the Drake R,

in Des Moines, Iowa the rest of the Seminole track traveling squad

boarded the FSU bus bound for Tuscaloosa and the Alabama Invitation,

Track and Field Meet on April 27 (FSU Track Office Files, 27 April























An interesting sidelight occurred in the half-mile. Ban Vaug

was scheduled to run in the second heat of the 880-yard run. Just

prior to the race, Vaught was sitting in the stands beside assistant

coach Curtiss Long. Asked if he was to run the half-mile, Vaught

replied, "I'm in the second heat" (Long, C. M., 1976). There was no

second heat as the two races had been combined at the starting line d

to a number of contestants dropping out of the competition.

Coach Mike Long was unhappy when learning of Vaught's failure

to enter the race. It had always been a policy at FSU that after the

athletes were given the meet information, the responsibility for bein

ready at race time was a personal obligation. Long was not interests

in Vaught just making the trip to see the meet, so he entered him in

the three-mile run. Finishing with a high-stepping sprint, Vaught

placed fourth with a time of 16:40.2.

Henry Reshard was a hard working freshman quarter-miler. mn

this day, Reshard received some reward for his diligent practice. It

good natured runner finished third in the open 440, and recorded a

personal record :48.3 split in the mile relay.

The Seminoles rode the bus down to Gainesville on Mav 4 for t













the 440-yard relay. The sky pictured an evil omen for the Seminoles

as the Gators eventually won 12 of the 17 events, scoring upsets in

three key events (FSU Track Office Files, 4 May 1974).

Florida opened the meet with a startling upset in the 440-yard

relay. The Gators put together excellent exchanges and came away with

a meet record time of :40.5. The Seminoles had been handicapped by

the absence of anchorman Jesse Forbes. His knee had failed to

strengthen, forcing a decision to forego further competition for the

remainder of the 1974 season. On the anchor leg of the relay, Danny

Smith was overtaking Beaufort Brown of Florida in awesome fashion, but

ran out of real estate with the University of Florida holding on for

a one-tenth of a second triumph.

For the second consecutive year, FSU's Tyrone Frederick was

ill for the Florida dual meet. The middle distance star started coming

down with the flu the night before the meet. Frederick ran the mile in

the hope of covering both the mile and 880-yard runs. Frederick c-m

peted hard in the mile, but only managed to finish third. When Freder-

ick was unable to recover after the mile, Coach Long did not enter him

in the 880-yard run, FSU's gamble was lost as the Cators swept all













being run down hard, held on for a narrow victory. The first three

places all had the same time of :09.8 with Vesto Bradley and Danny

Smith finishing second and third, respectively, for the Seminoles.

The best single performance of the meet was turned in by Steve

Ott of Florida. In the high jump, Ott cleared 6' 10" on his first

try, with Seminole Jeff Nedimyer needing two attempts before clearing

this height. Behind on misses, Nedimyer had to jump seven feet to have

any chance of winning. Both men failed on their first attempts at

7' 1/4" and Nedimyer missed his second attempt, Ott electrified the

crowd by skimmoing over the bar on his second jump (Long, C. M., 1976).

Jeff Nedimyer gathered himself for his final effort. The jump was an

excellent try, but having barely grazed the bar, it fell from the stan-

dard. The win was Ott's first outdoor victory over Nedimyer.

The FSU vaulter failed to make a height against the University

of Florida for the second year in a row. The stormy weather offered

mitigating circurmstances, yet Florida had one man equal to the

challenge.

Rudy Falane and Charles Harris gathered two of the five Sem-

inole victories. Falana copped the long j mp with a leap of 24' 4-3/4"

while Harris finished second at 22' 8-3/4". Harris won the triple jump

with a leap of 48' 7-3/4" with Falana third at 45' 8".

Vesco Bradley was untouchable in the furlong with an NCAA

qualifying time of :21.0. His mark also broke the school record of

:21.2 formerly held by Jerry McDaniel.

Del Ramers, Bob Burr, and Bob Brooks started off in the three-

mile with a chant of "Cogswell's Turn" emanating from a group of

















miler and the chant reflected Florida almost total domination

competition. However. in this small microcosm of the meet, ti

inoles were superior. Del Ramers separated himself from DePi(

two and one-half-mile mark. Then Burr passed the slowly fadi,

with one lap left. Brooks roared passed DePieza in the homes


is sixth attempt by taking off in back of the board, and traversing

4' 11" for victory and a share of the school record.

In the 120-yard high hurdles, LSU's Larry Shipp was off the

locks fast and enjoyed an early lead. Danny Smith pulled even with

Maor over the last hurdle and won the footrace to the tape by a chest.










343

Shipp owned the fastest time in the world with a wind-aided :13.1.

The wind for Smith's :13.4 school record was a legal 3.5 mph.

Florida State hosted the Southeastern Championships on May 18.

The Seminoles controlled the meet from the outset, running up a 172 to

82 advantage over runner-up Baptist College (FSU Track Office Files,

18 May 1974). The pattern for the meet was established early as Del

Ramers, running the third fastest mile by a Seminole and a personal best

of 4;06.5, led a Tribe sweep of the top three places in the mile run.

Bob Brooks topped the three-mile with a 13:58.0 as Bob Burr was second

and Ramers finished fourth.

Tyrone Frederick was able to outlast the two Brown brothers

from South Carolina with his best time for the 1974 season of 1:49.6.

Danny Smith defeated Bernie Allen with a stretch drive in the 120-yard

high hurdles with a new track record time of :13.8.

Jeff Nedimyer, having never lost the high jump in a home meet,

continued his winning ways with a leap of 6' 9". Osborn Brown was the

best of the shot putters with a heave of 51' 3", closing out a prod-e

tive career at Florida State. Also competing in his last home track

meet, Rudy Falana won the long jump with a leap of 23' 9".

The Seminoles arrived in Knoxville for the Smoky Mountain

All-Comers meet on May 24 with a selected entry. Outstanding perfor-

mances were turned in by Tyrone Frederickt, Bob Burr, and Mark Herman.

Frederick charged home in the half-mile to narrowly miss winning the

race, but in the process set a new school record of 1:49.0. Running

under the old school record for the mile for the second time, Burr













placed second with a very competitive 4:04.5 clocking. Mark Herman

was very pleased with his :52.9 victory in the 440-yard immediate

hurdles:





seconds, and one sixth in the Florida Relays. My most memor-
able race was probably the All-Comers meet at Knoxville. Until






Florida State sent two men to the 12th Annual USTFF Champion-

ships on May 31 and June 1. Tyrone Frederick ran an outstanding race

in the 880-yard run. The Seminole middle distance runner tied the

FSU record with a fourth place finishing 1:49.0 (FSU Track Office Files,

1 Jun. 1974).

Unleashing his best jump of his track career, Charlie Harris

finished third with a mark of 51' 8-1/4". The Seminoles 10-point total

ranked the Tribe in a tie for 12th among the country's best track

clubs and university track teams.

Ron Fletcher made the trip to the USTFF Outdoor Championships

on his own money, as the Tribe budget was depleted. He was in search

of the elusive 16-foot pole vault. Knowing that his last opportunity

was before him, Fletcher wanted to take his final fling. Vaulting well,

Fletcher cleared 15' 31" on his first attempt. Unfortunately, he was

unable to make 15' 9", bringing his vaulting career to an end.

The Seminoles took eight men to the NCAA Outdoor Track and

Field Championships in Austin on June 6-8. Daony Smith captured all















received outstanding performances from Vesco Bradley,

and Tyrone Frederick. Six-hundredths of a second

ey from a berth in the finals of the 220-yard dash as

hool record setting :20.88 in his semifinal heat.

another semifinalist but his 1:49.5 clocking in the 880-

t quite fast enough to make the final 12 runners. Harr

in the triple jump with his leap of 50' 8", yet was

the finals. Jeff Nedimyer, Bob Brooks, Rudy Falana,

re unable to advance out of the preliminary competition

.Florida State University celebrated their 26th arnci-

k and field with an awesome assault on the record books

lea were the most prolific record setters in the histoi

ty. The Tribe established 15 new school marks while


Danny Smith led the para&e

by establishing one new mark and t

clocking in the 60-yard high hurdl

clocking in the country by a colle

Olympian held a share of the world

and owned part of the collegiate E

Smith was the 1974 NCAA Indoor 60-

all-American honors with a :07.0 c

Tyrone Frederick broke hiE


Seminole indoor record breaking

:another. Smith sped to a :06.9

His time was the fastest

:e hurdler. The 1972 Bahamian

=od in the 50-yard high hurdles,

ind 70-yard high hurdle records.

I high hurdle champion, earning

ing.

i indoor school mark of 1:53.1 in
















ick failed to make NCAA all-American

he top three finishers in each event

awarded all-America certificates.

Dl indoor record in the one mile run.

Ken Misner while in high school,

ame from the FSU record board with

JSTFF classic. Continuing to improvE

bounded 50' 7-1/4" to up his own

jumper finished a nonscoring ninth

P.

r of breaking Joel Garren's old

:49.0 clocking. Jeff Nedimyer

teammate Mike Lee with an NCAA




ol marks in two of the three relays

a relay time turned in by Wes Koenig,

rederick was under the old record by

some was timed in 7:35.8 in the First

elay team of Joel Garren, Koenig,


Burr rose up and erased Misner's

his 4:07.0 clocking in the Illini

in the triple jump, Charlie Harri

school mark. The Seminole triple

in the 1974 NCAA Indoor triple ju

Vasco Bradley had the hou

quarter-mile mark of :49.2 with a

-rstled the high jump title from

QualifvinR iump of 6' 11".
















100-yard dash. The :40.6 440-yard relay record run was launched by

Smith, followed by Vasco Bradley, Joel Carter, and Jesse Forbes.

Vesco Bradley shared or set three school records during the

1974 season. The slender sprinter set an FSU standard in the furlong

with a :20.88 clocking in the -einfinal beat of the NCA& 220-yard

dash. In addition, Bradley joined Al Cato, Ken White, and Danny Smith

as co-holders of the IOG-yard dash school mark at :09.5 and leaped

24' 11" in the long jump to tie Sidney Gainey's school record. Tyrone

Frederick and Charlie Harris had outstanding performances in the

12th Annual USTFF Outdoor Championships. Frederick ran the second best

half-mile of his life, running two-tenths of a second off his school

record with a 1:49.2. His fourth place finish made him an USTFF all-

American for the second consecutive year. Harris leaped 51' 8-1/4" in

the triple jump to better his own school standard. Capturing third

place, Harris's jump earned him USTFF all-American honors.

Bob Burr erased one of the most prestigious school records from

the board. Mike Conley was considered by his contemporaries as the

best athlete on a talent-laden 1958 squad. His mile record of 4:05.7

had survived for 16 years before falling under the spikes of Bob Burr.

Burr's time was recorded at 4:02.4. In the Smoky Mountain All-Comers

meet, Burr ran under Conley's old mark for a second time with a 4:04.5

clocking.

Jeff Nedimyer became the first Seminole high jumper to clear the

magic seven-foot barrier. His feat came under the lights against the



















With the conclusion of the 1974 season, this study comes to an

end. As the track team rises from the ashes of the previous season to

renew itself each fall, it is hoped that future chroniclers will pick

up the narrative thread at more or less regular intervals in a coatinu-

ation of the recording of the history of track and field at Florida









































APPENDIX A



A CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OFF
INDCOR AND OUTDOOR SCHOOL RECORDS






























349














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APPENDIX B



A LIST OF OUTSTANDING PERFOKMERS































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APPENDI)X C



SCHEDULES ANDD MEET RESULTS































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APPENDIX D



TRAYT ROSTERS

































546
















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19rs 19~n IPII 191~

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O



















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L I





















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V1
VI
N


















Y*I~LIY IBLX Nill rlSL.il XUEIIF.
YhRSTTI ~~M~K NI1) rlELa PIOSIERS

Llii
1911

IIEM FOhSH ilUill EVbCII hsSiimNI i(l*Ill
~U*e Long ntxo long RIElirrO ilipr~a





























w


















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vl
vl
c-

















BIBLIOGRAPHY



Annual Report: 1947-1948, Department of Physical Education,
D :


Annual Re r ir;~-; - .. ?-r








Brw, Douglas. Personal c-nnnications to Curtiss Long, 4 July 1975.

Cato, Alton. Personal co-iiinications to Curtiss Long, 28 May 1975.




Conley, J I it.... Ierew








r-r




FY 1950-1951












FY 1968-1969
FY 1969-1970
FY 1970-1971
FY 1972-1973

555



























































Osceola Hall, Florida State Univerl
Interview, 15 June 1975.

FSU Track Reuminon at the h-m of mik~
5ee, Florida. Interview, 15 May 1976

Personal cc-umications with Curtis!
375.

Personal communications with Curtisr
















Harrell, Jimmy. Personal communications with Curtiss Long
9 September 1975.

Henderson, Jerry. Personal communications with Curtiss Lc
15 May 1975.

Herman, Mark. Personal communications with Curtiss Long,

Husbank, Richard. Florida State University, Tallahassee,
Interview, 9 December 1975.

Ingrami, Keith. Personal communications with Curtiss Long,
June 1976.

Jackson, William. Personal communications with Curtis. Lc
19 July 1975.

Jacob, Bruce. Personal communications with Curtiss Long,
December 1975.

Jarrett, Kenneth. At the home of Curtiss Long, Tallahasse
Florida. Interview, 6 June 1975.

Kaufman, -: r z: L


Kelly, Michael. Personal communications with Curtiss Long
May 1976.

Landis, Allan Personal communications with Curtiss Long,
June 1975.

Long, Curtiss. Personal Recollections. June 1976.





Long, L. N. At the home of Louise Long, Tallahassee, Flot
Interview, 13 May 1976.

Long, L. S. At the home of Mike Long, Tallahassee, Florid
Interview,, December 1975 and April 1976.









55S


Long, T. cl


Lorenz, Floyd. Personal comuications with Curtiss Long, 18 June
1975.

McDaniel I-










Hiller, Kenneth. "The Relay Exchange." Athletic journal (March
1953); 7-8.

Nedimyer, Jeff. Personal communications with Curtiss Long, 15
May 1976.

NI-spapers. For the convenience of the reader, a comprehensive
listing of newspapers has been compiled on page 565.

NeylaxI, Robert. Personal communications with Curtis. Long, 18
June 1975.





Olsen, Stephen. Personal communications with Curti.. Long, 20
September 1975.

Parker, Elwood. Personal communications with Curtiss Long, 10
October 1975.

Phifer, r T 7- FI 3i?-, Interview,






Ruff, Doyle. Personal communications with Curtiss Long, 25
September 1975.


Scm lz r _









559






Terwilli. J 7i_-i---..i-: r'-



Thombles~- c.i ;-.?. _.. L



U.S. Department of Health, Education, a'i F
Bulletin. Washington, D. C.: -;. -r; :.
1975.

7 ..~ -~ ~.1 .... I .~ir-. rack








Wa-man, Bernard. Personal co-runications with Curtiss Long, 27
April 1976.

Wise, Jack. Personal co-munications with Curtiss Long, 15 July 1975.
























28 March 1950, University of Miami.
1 April 1950, Mercer College.
15 April 1950, Emory University.
29 April 1950, Florida Southern College.
6 May 1950, Mississippi College.
20 May 1950, Dixie Conference Championships.
1 July 1950, National Decathlon Championships.
28 March 1951, Duke University.
31 March 1951, Mercer College.
21 April 1951, Emory University--Davidsmn Colleg
5 May 1951, Mississippi College.
12 May 1951, Hwoard College.
19 May 1951, Dixie Conference Championships.
I March 1952, Southern Conference Indoor Games.




19 April 1952, Mercer College.
26 April 1952, Georgia Tech--University of Georgi
3 May 1952, Mississippi College.
6-7 June 1952, National Intercollegiate Champi-n
4 April 1953, Mercer College.
18 April 1953, Florida AAU Championships.
25 April 1953, Georgia Tech--University of GeorgJ
9 May 1953, University of Miami.
16 May 1953, Mississippi Southern College.
27 March 1954, Florida Relays.
3 April 1954, Mercer College.
24 April 1954, Georgia Tech--University of Georgl
I May 1954, Loyola. University.
8 May 1954, University of Miami.
15 May 1954, Mississippi Southern College.
2 April 1955, Mercer College.
16 April 1955, Florida AAU Championships.
23 April 1955, Georgia Tech--University of Georgi
30 April 1955, Loyola University.







































14 March 1959, Louisiana State University.
26 March 1959, Furman University.
28 March 1959, Florida Relays.
11 April 1959, University of Florida.
18 April 1959, News-Piedmont Relays.
24-25 April 1959, Pennsylvania Relays.
2 May 1959, Florida A&U Championships.
12 March 1960, University of Miami.
21 March 1960, Furman University.
24 March 1960, Louisiana State University.
26 March 1960, Florida Relays.
1-2 April 1960, Texas Relays.
25 April 1960, University of Florida.
7 Mlay 1960, Florida AAU Championships.
25 February 1961, Memphis JC Indoor Track Caruival.
23 March 1961, University of Alabama
25 March 1961, Florida Relays.
27 March 1961, Furman University.
8 April 1961, Louisiana State University.





















23 Februan, 1963, Memphis JC Indoor Track Carnival.
16 March 1963, Furman University.
27 March 1963, Roanoke College.
30 March 1963, Florida Relays.
6 April 1963, Carolina State-Record Relays.
20 April 1963, University of Florida.
27 April 1963, Drake Relays.

7 F7 ill'L T~r : l~"


26 march 1964, University of South Carolina.
28 March 1964, Florida Relays.
4 April 1964, University of Florida.
6 April 1964, University of Tennessee.
13 February 1965, Coliseum Relays.
19-20 February 1965, Southeastern USTFF Championship
27 March 1965, Florida Relays.
2 April 1965, Auburn University.
5 April 1965, University of South Carolina.
10 April 1965, University of Florida.
11-12 June 1965, USIFF Championships.
26 February 1966, Jesuit Invitational.
5 March 1966, University of Miami.
19 March 1966, Southern Illinois University.
28 march 1966, University of Tennessee.
2 April 1966, Auburn University.
6 April 1966, University of Florida.
25 February 1967, Jesuit Invitational.
4 March 1967, University of Miami.
18 March 1967, University of Tennessee.
27 March 1967, University of Alabama.
I April 1967, Auburn University.
8 April 1967, University of Florida.
22 April 1967, Gulf Coast Five-Way.
15-17 June 1967, NCAA Championships.
17 February 1968, Tennessee Relays.
1-2 March 1968, Coliseum Relays.
23 March 1968, News-Piedmont Relays.
30 March 1968, Florida Relays.
1 April 1968, University of Alabama.









































1 May 1970, University of Florida.
9 May 1970, University of Alabama.
15 May 1970, Florida A & M University.
18-20 June 1970, NCAA Championships.
17 December 1970, Senior Bowl.
23 J sonary 1971, All-Comers Meet.
6 February 1971, VMI Winter Relays.
26-27 February 1971, Coliseum Relays.
6 March 1971, Jesuit Invitational.
12-13 March 1971, NCAA Indoor Championships.
20 March 1971, Southern Illinois University.
27 March 1971, Florida Relays.
23-24 April 1971, Drake Relays.
8 May 1971, Louisiana State University--Okla
University--Tulane University.
22 May 1971, Florida AAU Championships.
12 January 1972, Senior Bowl.
15 January 1972, Southeastern USTFF Champion
22 January 1972, USTFF Midwest Indoor Champi
25-26 February 1972, Coliseum Relays.
10-11 March 1972, NCAA Indoor Championships.
11 March 1972, Florida A & M University Rela
18 March 1972, Southern Illinois University.
24-25 March 1972, Florida Relavs.


















University~--University of Southeastern Louisiana.
5 May 1972, University of Florida.
13 May 1972, Southeastern Independent Championships.
1-3 Jun. 1972, NCAA Champi-nhips.
10 January 1973, Senior Bowl.
27 January 1973, Ohio State University.
9 February 1973, USTFF Collegiate Indoor Championships.
23-24 February 1973, Ohio USTFF Midwest Championships.
11 March 1973, Florida A & M University Relays.
17 March 1973, Louisiana State University--Southern Illinois
University--Drake University--University of Alab-ma
30-31 March 1973, Florida Relays.
14 April 1973, University of South Carolina--Auburo Universi
26-27 April 1973, Drake Relays.
5 May 1973, University of Florida.








8-9 March, NCAA Indoor Chmmpionships.

rir.Ii.! rr








565




Atlanta Constitution, 25 May 1952.

24 May 1953.


21 May 1961, p. 49.

Baton Rouge Sunday Advocate, 12 May 1974.

Chattanooga Daily-Times, 9 February 1964.

20 February 1966.
12 February 1967.

Fort Myers (Florida) News-Press, 1 August 1953.

Gainesville (Florida) Sun, 18 April 1954.

Houston Chronicle, 15 February 1970, sec. 3, p. 6.

14 February 1971, sec. 3, p. 4.

Jacks-nille Florida Times-Union, 15 April 1951.





Kn-wille (Ternnessee) Ness-Sentinel, 21 May 1972.








Luveme Rock County (Minnesota) Star., 13 February 1943.

Miami Herald, 5 May 1957.

18 March 1959.
12 March 1961.
10 March 1963.
2 January 1964.
9 January 1966.

Mobile Register, 29 Dccember 1965.









566

Montg-mry Advertiser, 21 January 1960.

5 February 1961.
19 February 1967.
2 March 1969.
29 February 1970.

Ne York Tinies, 27 April 1958, sec. 5, p. 4.






24 April 1965, p. 22.
25 April 1965, sec. 5, p. S7.
30 April 1966, p. 22.
1 May 1966, sec. 5, p. S7.
29 April 1967, p. 27.
15 June 1968, p. 45.
26 January 1969, sec. 5, p. S4.
26 April 1969, p. 26.
21 June 1969, p. 21.
19 June 1971, p. 22.
22 June 1971, sec. 5, p. S6.
4 June 1972, sec. 5, p. S4.

Orlando Sentinel, 5 March 1972.

Tallahassee Florida Flambeau, 10 May 1960.

20 May 1960.

Tallahassee Democrat, 23 January 1948.

18 August 1948.
1 October 1948.
9 April 1950.
14 May 1950.
20 May 1950.
22 April 1951.
6 May 1951.
13 May 1951.
11 May 1952.
24 May 1952.
28 March 1953.
16 May 1954.
15 May 1955.
8 April 1956.
15 April 1956.
fCi ll L'--





















Iz Apr I 19-V.
19 April 1959.







25 March 1961.
28 March 1961.
15 Ap ril 1961,
22 April 1961.
11 March 1962.
8 May 1962.
7 March 1964.
15 March 1964.
27 March 1964.



29 March 1966.
3 April 1966.
5 March 1967.
19 March 1967.
2 April 1968.
8 April 1968.
21 April 1968.
2 March 1969.
9 March 1969.
22 March 1969.
8 February 197C
12 April 1970.
14 March 1971.
18 March 1971.
1 May 19 71.
9 May 1971.
30 May 1971.





Tampa Tribune, 28 March


























he entered Florida State University, receiving a B. S. degree from that

institution in the fall of 1966. Continuing his education at Florida

State University, he received a M. S. degree in 1968. During the -un

of 1968, he entered the U. S. Air Force as, a special services officer.

After a four-year tour of duty, including eleven oths in Viet N=,,