Title: East Coast of Florida: the new Florida General information and hotel list, 1901-1902
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Title: East Coast of Florida: the new Florida General information and hotel list, 1901-1902
Series Title: East Coast of Florida: the new Florida General information and hotel list, 1901-1902
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FLORIDA


AST COAST
$ OF $

.ORIDA.
HE NEW FLORIDA.


GENERAL INFOR-
ATION i& AND
OTEL LIST


1901-1902


PUBLISHED BY
EAST COAST RAILWAY


~ ~








1 FLORIDA EAST COAST
31(l

I COMPANYA.

F _LIN I ME ATES SEASON 1901-02.
AAC
In order that early visitors to Florida may be inconven-
ienced as little as possible by reason of the destruction of a
number of hotels at Jacksonville during the recent disas-
trous fire, it has been decided to open the Alcazar at St.
Augustine on November 2d, 1901.
We also invite particular attention to the recent improve-
ments at Palm Beach. In addition to changing the loca-
tion of the bridge across Lake Worth and bringing the
trains into Palm Beach just north of the hotels, instead of
south of them, the hotels and surroundings have been
changed and improved to such an extent that patrons of
past seasons will scarce recognize the hotels in their new
setting.
The Hotel Royal Poinciana now contains 1,500 rooms
and is the largest permanent Hotel in the world.
In this connection we announce the opening and closing
dates of all the Hotels of the Florida East Coast Hotel Co.,
for the season 1901-1902.
ST. AUGUSTINE.
HOTEL ALOAZAR-Opens November 2d, 1901; closes May 1st, 1902.
HO EEL CORDOVA-Opens November 21, 1901; closes May 1st, 1902.
J I'SEPH P. GREAVES, Manager.
HOTEL PONCE DE LEON-Opens January 15th, 1902; closes April
15th, 1902. ROBERT MURRAY, Manager.
ORMOND.
HOTEL ORMOND-Opens January 12th, 1902; closes April l4th, 1902.
ANDERSON & PRICE, Managers.
PALM BEACH.
THE BREAKERS-Opens December 21st, 1901; closes April 2d, 1902.
HOTEL ROYAL POINCIANA-Opens January 15th, 1902; closes
April 9th, 1902. FRED STERRY, Manager.
MIAMI
HOTEL ROYAL PALM-Opens January 11th, 1902; closes April 2d,
1002. H. W. MERRILL, Manager.
NASSAU, N. P., (Bahama Islands.)
ROYAL VICTORIA-Opens December 21st, 1901; closes April 9, 1902.
HOTEL COLONIAL-Opens January 15th, 1902; closes April 2, 1902.
H. E. BEMIS. Manager,
ATLANTIC BEACH.
THE CONTINENTAL-Opens April 2d, i02; closes September slt,
1902. H. W. MERRILL, Manager.






















T HE old City Gateway is the most
Conspicuous relic of the elab-
orate system of fortifications
which once defended St. Augus-
tine. It now stands open, typi-
cal of the friendly welcome which is
extended by St. Augustine for her own
people and in behalf of the entire East
Coast of Florida-the winter resort
section of America-to all who may
seek health, comfort or pleasure in
"The New Florida."


~I~-:








he East Coast of Florida






I jLORIDA, the most pic-
Sturesque State in the
THE ) Union, is divided, top-
ographically, into
NEW ." ^* three sections-the Western,
FLORI A the Central and the Eastern.
FLORIDA Strangely enough the wonder-
ful possibilities of the strip
of territory bordering on the
Atlantic Ocean, and popular-
ly known as the East Coast
were the last to be discovered. The rise of this
section in popularity has been most rapid, until,
today, the East Coast is Florida, in so far as the
great mass of winter tourists are concerned.
The tourist in search of sunshine, when gray
skies and wintry winds have settled down upon
the North, will, if he is wise, travel directly to St.
Augustine, as sleeping and parlor car lines cen-
tralize at this, the fashionable winter rendezvous.
What a charm, a mystery, it must be to the un-
initiated to leave a. land of piercing cold, drifting
snow and terrible blizzards, and after a few hours'
ride on one of the handsome passenger trains
which are now in the Florida service, to find ones
self beneath a most perfect sky, where the sun
sheds his blessings o'er his subjects always with a
kindly spirit. No snow; no ice; no piercing winds
to chill the blood; no leafless, lifeless trees; no
drooping flowers; no aching hearts. Nothing but
joy and sunshine and gladness greets the winter
visitor to "The New Florida."








., ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA, K ed


H ERE is a resort which may be
37 Miles from Jacksonville said to fulfill all the require-
Fare, one way, $1.50
Round trip,- - 2.90 ments that might be laid down for
a winter resort anywhere on the
globe. It is all things to all men. It offers that variety which
is more than spice-is, indeed, the very bread and butter of the
tourist's existence-and it is susceptible of as many changes as
the weather has moods. You may ramble in the quaint, narrow
streets, with their overhanging balconies, and dream of the


A ST. AUGUSTINE STREET.
fierce love affairs and fiercer quarrels which ebbed and flowed
here in the old days. You may sit in the old Cathedral-the
oldest place of worship in America-and conjure up a thousand
fancies of the folk who worshipped here when all Florida was a
king's domain, or you have but to stroll a block to come within
range of the strains of music, the whirl of the dancers and the
splash of fountains which typify life and enjoyment of it.
5









.1 1.


A BIT OF T1E bEA WALL, ST. AUGUSTINE.

The new St. Augustine never palls. You may linger here a
year or a day, and when the train bears you away, you will feel
the keenest, most poignant sense of loss that can come to the
nomad in this wandering age. The wise man does not attempt to
"do" St. Augustine, to accept the parlance of the professional
sight seer. Instead, he settles down and lets the quaint old town
grow upon him and meanwhile gradually gets in touch with its
happy-go-lucky life, aimless and listless if you like, but new and
strange and romantic, redolent of the past and so indefinably
soothing as it creeps into his veins and nerves, that he feels a
strong temptation to linger here after the lights in the hotels
have gone out and the splash of the fountains has died away.
The journeyed American may imagine he has known the ideal
hotel existence, but it is a misapprehension if he has not visited
the capital of the winter resort kingdom. There are three splen-
did hotels in St. Augustine, which may be said to stand as the
pioneer monuments to that new era wherein the American people







have learned how to take and enjoy a holiday. The Ponce de
Leon is the largest and most renowned of these tarrying places
of the tourist, but the Alcazar and Cordova are worthy seconds.
All three are constructed of a remarkable concrete made from
finely ground beach shells-a substance well nigh indestructible
and which preserves its appearance unimpaired. The most pro-
nounced Spanish style of architecture was followed in the form-
ulation of the plans for these great structures, and yet so fine a
sense of harmony was ever manifest that each palace is distinct-
ive in appearance, and at the same time contributes to an ensemble
which is unsurpassed. Every adjunct of furnishing and decora-
tion which the imagination could conjure has been provided in
these hostelries ; every luxury and convenience which human in-
genuity could devise is at the disposal of the guests. They have
a floral setting unsurpassed by any villa in the South of France,
and when multi-colored incandescent bulbs scattered like dew
through the foliage, glow with flame, the scene is worthy the
storied sights of fairyland. On the great square known as the
Alameda, on which the three hotels face, is situated the Casino,
and it is in very truth a temple of amusement. Here a band
plays every forenoon and evening, and the pleasure-loving throng


PONCE DE LEON, ST. AUGUSTINE.
7





























ALCAZAR, ST. AUGUSTINE.
may dance, or bowl, or bathe, or do any of a dozen other things
that bring sparkle to the eye and color to the cheeks.
It is not unlikely that these three splendid hotels would be
crowded from Christmas to Easter were they set down in the
midst of a barren desert, so matchless are their appointments
and so self-sufficient are they in the matter of diversions; but St.
Augustine has "show places" and such show places! Verily they
should make glad the heart of the sight-seer who has wandered
from city to city only to find high buildings, immense water-work
plants and imposing tombstones. In St. Augustine there still
remain many priceless relics of the old regime. In the Plaza is
the odd building which tradition has declared was once a slave
market, and nearby is Treasury street-the narrowest thorough-
fare in America. Old Fort Marion is here, a frowning fortress,
built in 1756, and where visitors may see the frightful dungeons
and be told of the gruesome instruments of torture which con-
tributed to make confinement there in the old days a nameless
terror.
At St. Augustine a river, an inlet and the ocean flank the town,
and the tourist who is disinclined to trust himself to the more
8







tempestuous sea may have the full enjoyment of life upon the
water by confining his expeditions to the Matanzas river. Driv-
ing is a popular pastime, one of the favorite drives being to the
bathing beach on the ocean.
OTHER DRIVES-Out San Marco Avenue, across San Sebastian
River and return through New Augustine; to Ponce de Leon
Springs ; to Moultrie.
POINTS OF INTEREST-Old Fort Marion; Sea Wall; Plaza ; Slave
Market; Old Huguenot Cemetery ; Military Cemetery, with mon-
ument to Major Dade, and the old City Gateway.



















SLAVE MARKET, ST. AUGUSTINE.
AMUSEMENTS-Golfing, links of the Florida East Coast Golf
Club, also St. Augustine Golf Club; surf bathing; boating; driv-
ing cycling; clay pigeon shooting; fishing; pool swimming, and
dancing at the Casino and concerts at the hotels evenings.
HUNTING-Is indulged in to some extent, quail, pigeon, duck
and marsh hen can be found near town ; bear, deer and turkey a
few miles away. Guides and dogs may be had at reasonable
rates.
TRANSFER CHARGEs-From Railroad Station to any part of
town, twenty-five cents for each passenger and twenty-five cents
for each piece of baggage.
Following is a list of hotels and boarding houses:







HOTEL PONCE DE LEON.
SOpen during January, February, March and April. Robert
Murray, Manager. Accommodates 500. Rates $5.00 per day
and up.
HOTEL ALCAZAR.
Open November to April inclusive. Joseph P. Greaves, Man-
ager. Accommodates 400. Rates $4.00 per day and up.
HOTEL CORDOVA.
Rooms only. Accommodates 300.
HOTEL MAGNOLIA.
Open December 1st to May 1st. Palmer & McDowell, Pro-
prietors. Accommodates 300. Rates $3.00 to $5.00 per day;
$15.00 to $30.00 per week. This hotel is pleasantly and cen-
trally located on St. George street, but one block from the post-
office, Plaza and Ponce de Leon, and only five minutes ride from
the depot. The house has been much improved during the past
two years. It is in a thoroughly sanitary condition, has public
baths and toilets on each floor and fifty rooms4with private
baths. First-class orchestra which furnishes music twice daily
Laundry in connection with house.
THE HOTEL GRANADA.
H. W. Wauchenhusen, Proprietor. Open December to May
15th. Accommodates 150 guests. Rates $2.50 and upwards per


-04


4,
A..


CORDOVA, ST. AUGUSTINE.
10






























A PRIVATE RESIDENCE, ST. AUGUSTINE.

day. Special weekly and monthly rates. Located at the corner of
King and Granada Streets, facing the Alameda." The appoint-
ments are all that could be desired, rooms light, airy and cheer-
ful, daintily furnished in white and gold, and arranged single or
en suite, with or without private bath.
THE BARCELONA.
R. E. Hasseltine. Accommodates 70. Rates $2.00 to $2.50
per day, $10.00 to $18.00 per week. Open November to May.
Two blocks from station. All modern improvements. Perfect
sanitary arrangements. Good family table and home comforts.
THE VALENCIA.
Mrs. Mary Frazier. Accommodates 75. Open November 1st
to May 30th. Rates $2.50 to $3.00 per day; $15.00 to $20.00
per week. Delightfully situated on St. George Street, south of
Plaza. Private baths, steam heat, and modern conveniences.
Special attention paid to table.
THE FLORIDA.
F. C. Hayden, Manager. Open all the year. Accommodates
11


a I .dft







250. Rates $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00 per day. Special weekly
and nionthly rates. The tourists' and travelers' favorite. Con-
Sveniently located and one of the most attractive hotels in the
city. All modern conveniences and sanitary plumbing.


THE MAGNOLIA, ST. AUGUSTINE-SEE PAGE 10.

THE NELIGAN.
Mrs. H. Neligan, Proprietor. Accommodates 20. Rates
$1.50 to $2.00 per day. $8.00 to $10.00 per week. A select
family boarding house, located on South and George Streets, a
few moments walk from the Plaza, postoffice and all points of
interest.
THE MONSON HOUSE.
A. V. Monson, Proprietor. Open all the year. Rates $1.50
to $2.00 per day; $7.00 to $12.00 per week. Delightfully sit-
uated overlooking bay and ocean. Forty feet from seawall.
Two minutes walk from old Spanish fort. Guests have free use
of row boats. Fishing grounds within a distance of fifty yards
to two miles. Hot and cold baths. Perfect sanitary arrange-
ments.








THE PALMETTO HOUSE.
J. S. Bentley, Proprietor. Open all the year. Rates $1.50
per day; special by the. week. Near the City Gates and Old Fort
overlooking bay and ocean.
LYNN'S ARCADE HOTEL.
T. J. Lynn, Manager. Open the entire year. Accommodates
75 guests. American and European plan. European plan 50c.
to $1.00 per day. First-class cafe on lower floor. Cuisine and
service unexcelled. New house, newly furnished, up-to-date and
modern in every detail. Centrally located on St. George Street,
opposite the Florida House.
SPEAR MANSION.
Mrs. A. R. Spencer, Proprietor; J. 0. Lumsden, Manager.
Open all the year. Rates $2.00 to $3.00 per day; $10.00 and
up per week. One block from Ponce de Leon and postoffice.
Convenient to all points of interest. Opposite Casino. About
ten minutes walk to golf links. Home cooking a specialty.


THE FLORIDA HOUSE, ST. AUGUSTINE-SEE PAGE 11.
13



























THE. BUCKINGHAM, ST. AUGUSTINE.
Large grounds beautified by lawn, flowers and shrubbery. Every-
thing in thorough sanitary condition.
THE TEAHEN HOUSE.
W. M. Teahen, Proprietor. Open all the year. Rates $1.50
per day; $7.00 per week and up. Accommodates 30. Pleasantly
located at the corner of St. George and St. Francis Streets in a
most desirable part of the city, two blocks from postoffice.
Large sunny rooms suitable for families. Vegetables from own
garden.
THE BUCKINGHAM.
G. L. Bryant, Proprietor. Open January 1st to April 15th.
Accommodates 75. Rates $2.50 to $4.00 per day. $17.00 to
$25.00 per week. Delightfully located in a large garden of
roses and date palms, facing the Alameda, opposite Hotel
Alcazar.
LA POSADA.
Mrs. H. A. Rumley, Proprietor. Open all the year. Rates
$1.50 to $2.00 per day; $6.00 to $9.00 per week. A pleasant
family hotel in a most desirable part of the city, two blocks from
Ponce de Leon and convenient to all points of interest. Sur-
rounded by broad verandas and spacious lawns, making it a most
comfortable and homelike place.








HASTINGS, FLORIDA. 1

H ASTINGS is the center of a
18 Miles from St. Augustine. profitable farming section,
Fare: One way - 70
Round trip - $1.35 the soil being particularly adapt-
ed to the production of tubers.
During the past season 43,000 bushels of Irish potatoes were


SPEAR MANSION, ST. AUGUSTINE-SEE PAGE 13.


shipped from this station and 23,000 bushels of sweet potatoes.
Early vegetables and sugar cane also yield good profits.

HUNTING-Quail and pigeon shooting good; wild turkey and an
occasional deer within a few miles.

MIDDLETON HoUSE-D. A. Middleton. Accommodates 40.
Rate $1.50 per day.








S PALATKA, FLORIDA. ]


ALATKA is the county seat
28 Miles from St. Augustine. of Putnam County and head
Fare: One way $1.15 of deep water navigation of the
Round trip 2.30
St. John's River. Here are sev-
eral lumber establishments which manufacture sash, doors and
blinds from cypress, supplying not only the local trade, but
making shipments to all parts of the United States.
Principal amusements are boating on the St. Johns and ex-
cursions up the famous Ocklawaha River to Silver Springs.
Golfing.
Quail, snipe, pigeon, ducks, wild turkeys, deer and alligators
in this vicinity.
Fishing in the St. Johns; bass, bream, sheephead, trout, mul-
let, etc.
























THE NELIGAN, ST. AUGUSTINE-SEE PAGE 12
THE NELIGAN, ST. AUGUSTINE--SEE PAGE 12.






HOTELS AND BOARDING HOUSES.
THE (;RAIIAM J. Watkins Lee, Proprietor. Accommodates
100. Rates $2.50 per day and up. The hotel overlooks the St.
Johns River and is conveniently located to all boat landings.
THE ARLINGTON -L. Falk, Proprietor. Rates $2.00 per day;
special by week.
THE CLAY HousE-Mrs. Willie Metcalfe, Proprietor. Accom-
modates 22. Rates $1.00 per day; $6.00 per week. Pleasantly
situated corner Reid and Fourth Streets, opposite court house,
convenient to depots and steamboat landings.







n -














THE MONSON HOUSE, ST. AUITIUSTINE.-SEE PAGE 12.
Mrs. H. A. Grey, boarding house. Rates $1.50 per day; spe-
cial by the week.
Mrs. Ebert, boarding house. Rates $1.50 per day; special by
the week.
Mrs. A. M. Haughton, boarding house. Rates $2.00 per day;
special by week.
Mrs. Jos. Haughton, boarding house. Rates $1.00 per day;
special by week.
Transfer from station to hotel 25c. per passenger, and 25c.
for each piece of baggage.








11 SAN MATEO, FLORIDA.

P)LEASANT village on St.
30 Miles Prom St. Augustine Johns River. There are a
Fare, one way = $1.20
Round trip - 1.95 number of orange groves and
tobacco farms. Hunting in the
immediate vicinity and fishing in the St. Johns River is good.
BOARDING HOUSES.
E. J. Williams, boarding house. Rates $1.00 per day; $6.00
per week.
J. D. Gray, boarding house. Rates $1.50 per day; $6.00 per
week.
C. A. Bailey, boarding house. Rates $1.50 per day; $6.00
per week.


1 ORMOND, FLORIDA. T


68 Miles from St. Augustine
Fare: One way - $2.70
Round trip - 4.35

name to conjure with. It


RMOND, or Ormond-on-the
Halifax, is to the person
who has ever sauntered down the
incomparable East Coast" a
is the "half-wayhouse" in the


THE PALMETTO HOUSE, ST. AUGUSTINE-SEE PAGE 13.






most successful campaign against care and worry ever de_
vised. Here the tourist going southward, brimming with
enthusiasm over the wonderful sights he has seen, and pleas-























LA POSADA, ST. AUGUSTINE-SEE PAGE 14.
antly expectant over those to follow meets the tourist going in
the other direction, who is not one whit less appreciative. It
is an old winter resort, Ormond-on-the-Halifax, but so rejuv-
enated and rehabilitated that its former patrons would scarce
recognize it in its brilliant new dress. Here the tourist may
alternate the pleasures of the water with rambles in forest
glades or excursions to orange orchards full of promise. The
ocean too, is within reach, with all its attendant opportunities
for enjoyment. Admirably situated on the Halifax River is the
Hotel Ormond, another of the mansions of public entertainment
maintained at the same standard of excellence as its sisters up
and down the coast. From the wide verandas of this hotel a
view may be obtained which would satisfy the devotee of almost
any form of scenery.
A careful record of the temperature kept at Ormond during
April goes to prove the assertion that is often made by those



















HOTEL ORMOND, ORMOND.
who live in Florida that April is a very cool and delightful
month. The occasional hot days that sometimes occur during
the Florida winter are almost never known in April.
The average temperature taken at 5:00 A. M., April 1st to
9th inclusive at Ormond for the past three years was in 1899,
590; in 1900, 50.080, and in 1901, 56.440. In 1900 the temper-
atures were not taken after the 9th, but in 1899 and 1901 the
average each year up to the 15th was 56.73, and in the present
year the average temperature up to the 22nd inclusive was
56.090, and for the seven days ending the 22nd, average was
54.570, the third week in April being the coldest.
April in the north being almost invariably such an execrable
month, it would eem desirable for tourists who are already
in the south, and who have little else to do but secure their own
comfort, if not the safety of their own lives, to tarry longer and
enjoy the finest month of the Florida year.
A bridge spans the Halifax River from the mainland to the
beach side, and horse cars run at regular intervals from the
Railway Station, meeting all trains. Fare between Station and
hotel ten cents and twenty-five cents for each piece of baggage.
Surf bathing, golfing, cycling and driving are popular amuse-
ments for the visitors to Ormond. Attractive outings are the
daily excursions and picnics up the Tomoka River. Launches run
from the Hotel Ormond up to the head of navigation, making the
round tripf in half .a day. The trip can also be made in sail or
row' boats `an4 an ehjoVable variation is to meet the tally-ho at
20






Tomoka Cabin, where luncheon is served, and return to the hotel
over one of the most picturesque roads in Florida.
*A list of hotels and boarding houses follows:
THE ORMOND-Anderson & Price, Managers. Open during
January February, March and April. Accommodates, 500.
Rates, $5.00 per day and up.
HOTEL COQUINA-Situated on a high bluff directly overlooking
the ocean. While it offers all the delights of the sea shore, it is
only ten minutes walk, or five minutes by horse car, from the
orange groves and palm-shaded walks on the banks of the Hali-
fax. It is two miles from the Florida East Coast Railway Sta-
tion on horse car line. Open all the year. Rates, $2.50 per day,
$12.00 to $17.50 per week; special by the month. For further
information address, D. B. Matheson, Proprietor.
ROSE VILLA-Mrs. Frank Mason. Open November 1st to May
1st. Accommodates 20. Rates, $2.00 per day; $10.00, $12.00
and $15.00 per week. Conveniently located on Granada Avenue
near postoffice. Horse cars pass the door from depot to beach.
Large, airy, spacious and well-lighted rooms; broad verandas. A
pleasant and comfortable home for winter guests.
THE RIVER VIEW-Mrs. E. Lee, Proprietor. Rates, $2.00 per
day; $8.00 to $12.00 per week. A first-class, family house, cen-
trally located on Granada Avenue on the river front, opposite
postoffice, on horse car line from depot to beaih.















HOT$V U ./ L/ 0




^ F





THE GRANADA HOUSE-F. It. Moore, Proprietor. Rates, $2.00
per day, $10.00 per week. Newly furnished Table unsurpassed
Free 'bus to and from trains.


I DAYTONA, FLORIDA.

D AYTONA might be designated
74 lrlles from St. Augustine with appropriateness the "For-
Fare: One way $2.95 est City of the South." Her streets
Round trip 4.70 are arched with sylvan festoons, and
her artistic, handsomely maintained
homes exhale an atmosphere of peace and utter contentment
which is so essential a requisite of vacation enjoyment. Day-
tona is preeminently the province of the cottagerr," but the













temporary sojourner will find showered upon him that same deli-
cate and ever watchful hospitality which strips a sojourn in
Florida of the minor cares which harass the transient resident
in other climes.
Two bridges span the Halifax River and afford communication
with the shining ocean strand which rejoices in the highly appro-
priate appellation of "Silver Beach." On the peninsula or ocean
side are also the settlements known as City Beautiful and Sea-
breeze.
City Beautiful is the national headquarters of the Mental Sci-
entists. Their annual meeting is to be held here, commencing
November 28th, 1901. At Seabreeze is an ocean pier for sea
fishing.

























ROSE VILLA, ORMOND.-SEE PAGE 21.
A line of automobiles is operated between the Railway Station
and the settlements on the East Side. Charge for transfer,
passengers, twenty-five cents, and twenty-five cents for each piece
of baggage.
Amusements and pastimes are the same as at Ormond. Places
of interest are: Old Spanish Mill, No. 9, Tomoka Cabin, Big Tree,
Mt. Ararat and Spruce Creek.
Hunting and fishing good. Experienced guides and dogs may
be had at reasonable rates.
LIST OF HOTELS AND BOARDING HOUSES FOLLOWS:
THE COLONNADES (CITY BEAUTIFUL)-C. C. Post, Proprietor; Jas.
P. Vining, Manager. Open all the year. Accommodates 160.
Rates, $3.50 to $5.00 per day; special by the week and month.
A modern hotel, with electric lights, steam heat and private baths.
The dining room is large, with three sides of plate glass, and
guests rooms are commodious and arranged in desirable suites.
Afternoon Teas in the Sun Parlor are a pleasant feature of this
hotel.
THE RIDGEWOOD (DAYTONA)-Rose & Langworthy, Proprietors.
Open December 1st to May 1st. Accommodates 150. Rates,
23

























THE RIVER VIEW, ORMOND-SEE PAGE 21.


$3.00 per day and upwards; special by week or month. An at-
tractive house with a bright airy office, pleasant sleeping rooms,
in a perfect sanitary condition. A pleasant feature of "The
Ridgewood" is the "Solarium" built on the southeastern corner of
the house and entirely enclosed in glass. Another attraction ie.
the roof garden situated in the center of the house and one story
higher than the main part where a grand view of the surrounding
country and the ocean is secured. Hot and cold sulphur baths on
each floor.
THE CLARENDON INN (SEABREEZE)-Leonard Gill, Manager.
Open all the year. Accommodates 125. Rates, $2.50 per day
and up; special by week and month. 'Bus between train and
hotel. Doubled in size, and a fine new dining room looking out
directly on the sea has been added.
SCHMIDT'S VILLA (DAYTONA)-Henry Schmidt, Proprietor. Open
all the year. Accommodates 60. Rates, $2.50 per day; $10.00
to $15.00 per week. Located on the river, commanding a most
attractive view in every direction. During the summer the house
has been enlarged by the addition of a wing on the south side.
24







Rooms single or en suite. Baths and lavatories, sanitary plumb-
ing. The cuisine is in charge of a competent chef. New dining
room with sunny exposure.
FOUNTAIN CITY HOTEL (DAYTONA)-L6onard Despland, Propri-
etor. Open all the year. Rates, $2.50 per day; $17.00 per
week single; $25.00 per week double. A new hotel of fifty
rooms, two blocks from depot and one block from the river and
bridge.
THE BREAKERS BY-THE-SEA AND COTTAGES (SEABREEZE)-H. L.


A STREET IN DAYTONA.
Kochersperger, Proprietor. Gomez A. Pacetti, Manager. Open
all the year. Accommodates 250. Rates, $2.50 per day; $12.00
to $15.00 per week. A new, modern, seaside hotel, located 200
feet north of the ocean pier. Large, well ventilated rooms and
sun parlor facing the ocean. Twenty-eight ocean bath houses and
fresh water shower baths in connection with the hotel. The long
line of cottages on the beach, connected with The Breakers, have




























BOULEVARD OF "CITY BEAUTIFUL," DAYTONA.

all been renovated, repainted and refurnished throughout.
THE PALMETTO HOUSE (DAYTONA)-C. 0. Chamberlain, Propri-
etor. Open November 15th to May 1st. Rates, $2.00 to $3.00
per day; $12.00 to $21.00 per week.
THE CITY HOTEL (DAYTONA)-Geo. H. Matthews, Proprietor.
Open all the year. Accommodates 20. Rates, $2.00 per day;
$10.00 per week.
THE OAKS (DAYTONA)-Mrs. M. E. Silvernail, Proprietor. Open
November 1st to June 1st. Accommodates 40. Rates, $1.50
to $2.00 per day; $8.00 to $12.50 per week. All modern improve-
ments. House heated by hot air. Newly furnished.
TROY HOUSE (DAYTONA)-Mrs. Mary Troy, Proprietor. Open
October 1st to May 15th. Accommodates 50. Rates, $2.00
and up per day; $7.00 to $10.00 per week. Located one block
from depot and postoffice.
EUROPEAN HOUSE (DAYTONA)-A Osborn, Proprietor. Open all
the year. Rates, $1.25 per day; $7.00 per week. Located on
Orange Avenue. Everything new and convenient.
26






PORT ORANGE, FLORIDA.

PORT ORANGE, a cozy vil-
79 Miles from St. Augustine. large on the banks of the
Fare One way $3.15
Round trip - 5.00 Halifax, is very popular with a
certain few, on account of the
abundance of fish and game in the vicinity. The peninsula
opposite is one-fourth of a mile wide, with a good roadway







ii4










THE COLONNADES, "CITY BEAUTIFUL"-SEE PAGE 23.
to the ocean beach. Cycling, boating, surf bathing and
driving are among the pastimes indulged in, but fishing and hunt-
ing seem to attract the majority of the sojourners at Port
Orange. The usual varieties of fish and game are found here.
Experienced guides, with dogs, may be had at reasonable rates.
The only hotel at Port Orange is the, Port Orange House,
W. Brohm, Proprietor, open December to May, accommodates
45; rates, $2.00 per day, $9.00 per week and upward; a
two-story house, located on the river front, with wide verandas
facing east and west, and a sunning porch on the south side.
Comfortable rooms, sanitary plumbing and good cooking. Fresh
fish and oysters, and vegetables from the hotel garden, are
specialties. Sail and row boats free to guests.
27



























THE RIDGEWOOD, DAYTONA.-SEE PAGE 23.


S rNEW SMYRNA, FLORIDA.

N EW SMYRNA was settled
89 Miles from St. Augustine in 1765 by Andrew Turn-
Fare one way - $3.55
Round trip 5.60 bull, who has left, in the many
curious and interesting relics,
still in a good state of preservation, in and around New
Smyrna, reminders of the former Spanish grandeur and glory.
The tourist in search of old Spanish tradition and folk lore,
and the historian will find here much to interest him in the
contemplation of the days and peoples long since departed. The
ruins of what is known as Columbus' Chapel, and the Old
Rock House, which overlooks the inlet, and of which we have
no history, with the old Turnbull Canals, are the principal ob-
jects of interest. The well and favorably known New Smyrna
or Coronado Beach, accessible by bridge and shell road, is less
than thirty minutes from the railway station. It is noted for
its hard, smooth surface, and extends for miles north and south.
28






The cyclist and automobilist will find this ocean driveway and
the miles of shell roads around New Smyrna his chief source of
pleasure.
Fishing here is not excelled by any place for variety and
quantity available and the ease and facility with which they are
landed. Not infrequently one person has caught more than one
hundred pounds of sheephead or bass in one day. The illustration
gives an idea of the fisherman's experience at New Smyrna.
To those who are in search of health, pleasure and rest; the
sportsman looking for big game," and the fisherman who wants
fish, New Smyrna offers peculiar and advantageous facilities.

OCEAN HOUSE.
F. W. Sams, Proprietor. Open December to May. Accom-
modates 100. Rates $3.00 per day; $15.00 per week; $60.00
per month. Located on the banks of the famous Indian River,
north, and offers many attractions to the tourist, pleasure seeker
and sportsman. It is modern and commodious, supplied with
sanitary plumbing, baths, etc. In addition, a large sulphur pool
has been constructed for those who are afflicted with rheuma-
tism and kindred troubles and who will find its peculiar medic-
inal properties well adapted to their needs. Special advantages
to those in search of pleasure, recreation and sport.



















SCHMIDTS VILLA, DAYTONA-SEE PAGE 24





















FOUNTAIN CITY HOTEL, DAYTONA.-SEE PAGE 25.


1,0 LAKE HELEN, FLORIDA. .

LESS than a mile south of
109 Miles from St. Augustine the station a Lake Helen
Fare One Way . $4.00
Round Trip . 5.60 situated on high pine bluffs and
overlooking a number of clear
and beautiful lakes, is located the Southern Cassadaga, or
Spiritualists' assembly ground. This association was formed
for two chief objects: To establish a winter resort for Spir-
itualists, and those interested in the investigation of the
science, and to provide a place for all those who desire a quiet
spot. The air is laden with the fragrance of the resinous pine.
There are no disagreeable insects, for the reason that there
are no swamps in the neighborhood.
It is also claimed by them that there is a natural psychic
adaptation to a spiritual work and that the selection of the loca-


7M


'~a~





tion was made by spirits who understood the earth's magnetic
and psychic currents, and that this particular spot is highly con-
ducive to spiritual and mediumistic development, and a veritable
Mecca for the restoration of spiritual health and strength. This























PALMETTO HOUSE, DAYTONA-SEE PAGE 26

place is fast growing into importance, and each year finds many
persons assembled upon its grounds, impelled thither by various
motives. Many are seeking a quiet, restful home for the winter
season. Others are desirous of investigating the phenomena of
Spiritualism and studying its philosophy. Some are impelled by
curiosity, together with many devoted adherents of the faith.
The annual meeting commences on the first Sunday n February
and continues six weeks. The best talent is always secured to
represent the cause and the time is well taken up with lectures,
seances, classes for spiritual and mediumistic instruction. Music
dramatic entertainments, dances and progressive euchre parties.
THE HARLAN HOTEL-Miss S. Kempe, Proprietor. Open De-
cember to May. Accommodates 150. Rates $2.50 to $3.00
per day; $12.00 to $20.00 per week. The house is mod-
ern, comfortably furnished, has electric bells, baths, and the
31





appointments are all that could be desired. The water supply
is from artesian wells. The hose is located in a pine tree park
of 20 acres, overlooking Lake Helen, within convenient walking
distance of the railroad station. Ample amusements such as
tennis, croquet, billiards, bowling and boating. The hotel sup-
plied with best products of the country, and employes are all
trained northern servants.


'iHE OAKES, DAYTONA-SEE PAGE 26.


HOTEL WEBSTER AND HEALTHFUL REST-O. B. Webster and
M. I. Webster, Managers. Open November to May. Accommo-
dates 70. Rates $1.75 to $2.25 per day; $8.00 to $12.00 per
week. Special rates on application before January 15. House
enlarged. New dining room, parlor, office and baths. Located
on a knoll overlooking two beautiful lakes; one-half mile from
Lake Helen depot and five minutes walk from Camp Cassadaga,
amid the tall pine trees. Building heated throughout by the hot
water system. Golf, tennis, croquet and boating free to guests.
32


























TROY HOTEL, DAYTONA.-SEE PAGE 26.


ORANGE CITY, FLORIDA. ,t4

RANGE CITY is an inland
1a4 rlilesromSt. Auguste. village beautifully situated
Round trip . 5.60 and surrounded by gently undu-
lating hills. Many persons find-
ing the coast climate rather strong, have sought more interior
points and are at once attracted to Orange City by the home at-
mosphere which seems to surround the place; the home circle is
at once enlarged to receive the new comer, who soon feels like
one to the manner born.
Orange City has a health record superior to most places in
the State, owing not only to its situation, but very largely to the
remarkable purity of the water, which should always be one of
the first things to consider in going to a new locality. A care-
ful analysis of the mineral spring water here shows that it con-
tains no organic matter or vegetable deposit. Orange City Min-
eral Water is rapidly becoming known in other parts of the
State and is being shipped to a number of places.
3a






There are many attractions in the near vicinity and daily
winter picnics and excursions are enjoyed by the visitor and
guest. Opportunity for pleasant daily and evening gatherings
all that can be desired. An excellent library and reading room
open to the public every day.
Cottages can be rented at reasonAble rates aad good boarding
and hotel accommodations for the tourist.
For information address Mrs. E. A. Hill, Orange City.
EAST LAWN.
Chas. N. St. John, Proprietor. Open November 1st to May
15th. Rates $2.00 per day; $8.00 to $10.00 per week. The
house is situated 600 feet from Twin Oaks station and passen-
gers leaving train there have to pay no charges for transporta-
tion of baggage. Orange City Mineral Springs and Deerfoot
Mineral Spring water used on table. Rooms newly refitted.
Baths with hot and cold water, large closets, and fireplaces.
TWIN OAKS COTTAGE.
J. L. True, Proprietor. Opens November to May. Rates,
$2.00 per day; $7.00 and up per week; $24.00 and up per
month. Pleasantly located on high rolling pine land, two blocks
from railroad station. No charge for transfer of passengers


EUROPEAN HOUSE, DAYTONA-SEE PAGB 26.
31





and baggage. With such as desire a quiet winter home among
pleasant surroundings correspondence is invited.



1^ HAWKS PARK, FLORIDA.


A PLEASANT little village
91PMles f m St Augusne. on-the banks of the Hills-
Pare: One way $3.65
Round trip . 5.70 boro River. The shore here is
the highest on the East Coast
for many miles, and a more healthy locality cannot be found.
The river, protected by a narrow peninsula, separating it from
the ocean, is a paradise for the smooth water sailor, and the
home of all kinds of craft, from canoe to houseboats. It has


PORTO RANGE HOUSE, PORT ORANGE-SEE PAGE 27.
here a depth of twelve feet in the channel beyond which are
hundreds of islands which it is a pleasure to explore.
A two hours sail, winding among the islands and through the
most beautiful reaches of the river to Turtle Mound is a pleas-
ant excursion from Hawks Park. This great mound of shells
is on the river shore near the ocean and is a landmark seen from


L


-T
--~''-------~- ----~~~-- ------





























SEA BASS AND TROUT, NEW SMYRNA-SEE PAGE 29.
far out at sea. It is about sixty feet high and some three hun-
dred feet long.
BAYVIEW HOUSE-H. W. Dunklee, Proprietor. Rate, $2.50
per day, special by the week. A home-like, comfortable place.
Furnished shore cottages to let by D. R. Marshall, room 1, No.
24 Park Place, New York.


l, OAK HILL, FLORIDA.

A SPLENDID point for hunt-
100 lilies from St. Augustine ing.and fishing. Ducks
Fare: One way. $4.00
Round trip . 6.25 very plentiful; frequently, dur-
ing the past season, twenty-
five to fifty ducks were brought in as-the result of a day's hunt-
ing.
H. S. Baker, boarding house, open all the year; rate $1.00
per day, $5.00 per week; one mile from the station and one-
fourth mile from the river. No charge for transfer of passen-
gers and baggage. Communicate with H. S. Baker in advance.
36





























HUNTING PARTY, NEW SMYRNA.


A TITUSVILLE, FLORIDA. {

C COUNTY SEAT of Brevard
118 fliles from St. Augustine County; junction of the
Fare: One way . $4.70
Round trip 7.35 Sanford Branch with main line;
on the banks of the famous
Indian River, which, at this point, is seven miles wide. Canav-
eral Club is on the beach opposite Titusville. Hunting consists
of duck, snipe and various kinds of water fowl; larger game
a few miles in the interior. The lagoons and bayous close by
afford the rarest of wild duck shooting. Boats and boatmen,
who will provide decoys and blinds and attend the shooter in
all their wants, can be obtained at reasonable rates. Fishing
is also very fine. The streets of the town are shelled, making
good bicycle riding. Pleasant drives along the banks of the
river and through the hammocks and orange groves adjacent to
the town.


~LrrS' -C






THE INDIAN RIVER HOTEL-J. G. Bast, Lessee and Manager.
Open all the year; accommodates 75 guests. Rates $2.50
per day, $10.00 to $15.00 per week. Pleasantly located,
overlooking the broad sweep of the river, and three blocks from
the station. Rooms single or en suite. Baths. Baggage transfer
twenty-five cents. A good table, comfortable beds and careful
attention to the welfare of the guests.


OCEAN HOUSE, NEW 3MYRNA-SEE PAGE


4 ENTERPRISE, FLORIDA. e

F NTERPRISE is a station on the
155 irlles South of St. Au. ,, Titusville Branch of the Flor-
gustine. Fare: ida East Coast Railway, situated on
Oneway . $4.20
One ay $4.20 the north side of Lake Monroe,
just opposite Sanford. Good hunting and fishing in the neighbor-
38







hood. Guides with trained dogs can always be had at reasonable
rates. An ideal spot for out-of-door sports.
THE ARCADE-Catherine Krullar, Manager. Open all the year.
Accommodates 40. Rates $1.00 per day; $25.00 per month.
Located on the banks of the lake and only a short distance from
the railway station. Large dining room, parlor and dancing hall.
Table supplied with vegetables and fruit from house gardens.


SANFORD, FLORIDA. ls

SANFORD is the terminus of the
166 Miles from St. Augus- Sanford branch of the Florida
tine. Fare:
Oneway . $4.20 East Coast Railway, and the ter-
minus of the regular line of St.
Johns River Steamers. The town is the outgrowth of the settle-
ment made here by Gen. H. S. Sanford soon after the Civil War.
The black bass fishing here is said to be the best in the State.
One rod last season frequently bringing in 120 pounds in one day.
Other fresh water fish are plentiful.
Small game plentiful three miles from town. Guides and boats
always ready for hunting or fishing trips.


AUDITORIUM, CAMP CASSADAGA-LAKE HELEN






















COTTAGE OF MRS. C. P. PRATT, LAKE HELEN.
THE NEW SANFORD HOUSE-Inglehard & Ackerman, Proprietors.
Open January to April. Rates, $2.50 to $4.00 per day; $J7.5-
to $28 per week. Accommodates 300. Only one block from the
railway station and overlooking Lake Monroe. Free 'bus for
transfer of guests. Large sulphur bathing pool, sun parlor and
launches for the use of guests. Orchestra music mornings and
for dancing evenings.


.^ COCOA, FLORIDA,

SOCOA is a busy town on the
137 Miles from St. Augustine. C Indian River, with a long
Fare: One way . $5.50 wharf where railway traffic with
Round trip 8.45
the many towns and small settle
ments on Merritts Island is conducted.
Oranges, grape fruit or pomelo, and other citrus fruits are
abundant. Hunting and fishing good. Excellent boating facili-
ties, and good roads invite driving and cycling.
THOMAS COTTAGE-Mrs. M. A. Thomas, Proprietor. Open all
the year. Accommodations for 15. Rates $1.50 per day;
special by week and month. The cottage will be enlarged to
double the size before the season opens. New bath rooms. Cen-
trally located.







S INDIANOLA, FLORIDA.


LOCATED on Merritt's Island,
Railway Station L opposite Cocoa. It is claimed
COCOA. that the temperature on Merritt's
Island is several degrees warmer
than the mainland, owing to its being surrounded by water and
for that reason the citrus fruit trees on the island were not dam-
aged by the freeze of several years ago-1894-5.








;. .. . . . ..









HOTEL CASSADAGA, LAKE HELEN.
THE INDIANOLA HOUSE-G. W. Schuyler, Proprietor. Open No-
vember 1st to May 1st. Accommodates 20. Rates, $1.50
per day; $8.00 per week. A boarding house with the freedom
and comforts of a hotel. Large rooms, all looking on the river.
Hot and cold sulphur baths. By notifying the proprietor visit-
ors will be met at Cocoa Station and transferred to the house in
our own launch without charge.
MERRITTS-RAILWAY STATION COCOA.
Situated on Merritts Island, nearly opposite Cocoa.
NEVIN'S RIVERVIEW-J. J. Wilkinson, Manager. Rates on ap-
plication.





















HOTEL WEBSTER, LAKE HELEN-SEE PAGE 32.


ROCKLEDGE, FLORIDA.

SOCKLEDGE receives its
139 Miles from St.Augustine. name from the formation
Fare one way $5.55
Round trip 8.60 of the west bank of the Indian
River, which is here ledged by
broken strata of coralline rock known as coquina. It is a
charming spot, and a favorite tourist resort. The home of the
Indian River orange, there being several large bearing groves
in the immediate vicinity.
Fine shell roads along the banks of the river north and south
for driving and wheeling. Hunting is good. Both salt and fresh
water fishing. Guides and trained dogs, with wagons, at reason-
able rates.
POINTS OF INTEREST-Hammock drive, shell road by river side;
Fairy Land, Indian shell mounds; Merritt's Island, the Mecca of
all alligator hunts; Cocoa Beach, a hard beach suitable for bicycle
riding and surf bathing; Banana River, an inland sound, famous
for its wild ducks; Lake Poinsett, noted for its black bass fish-
ing; bearing orange groves, the Rp#kledge hammock is the larg-
est orange-raising district in the world; Branley, pineapple and
banana plantations; Tropic, vegetable an& tropical gardens; In-
dianola, Dr. Hill's famous grounds.
42






HOTEL INDIAN RIVEB-Boggs & McDowell, Managers. Open
January to April. Accommodates 300 guests. Rooms single or
en suite, with or without private bath. Rates, $3.00 and upward
per day: $17.50 and up per week. No transfer charges from
trains. Baggage transfer, twenty-five cents. The hotel is situ-
ated fifty yards from the station, and the walk to the house leads
through part of the 100-acre orange grove by which the hotel is
surrounded. The hotel has in its construction embodied' he most
advanced ideas in point of comfort, convenience an" general
completeness. Steam heat, elevator, electric lights telegraph
office, tennis court, billiard and pool tables, etc. A first-class
orchestra furnishes concert music during the day and music for
dancing in the evening.
THE PLAZA-S. H. Peck, Manager. Open December to May.
Accommodates 200 guests. Rates, $2.50 to $4.50 per day. A
large, handsome, modern hotel, new and strictly first-class.
Every room heated by steam, and rooms with or without private
bath. Located in the midst of an 80-acre bearing orange grove
on the banks of the Indian River.
THE NEW ROCKLEDGE HOTEL AND COTTAGES-H. P. Shares &
Son, Proprietors. Open December to April. Accommodates 125.



















' V ,,ss. .. ...

TWIN OAKS, ORANGE CITY-SEE PAGE 34.
43



























EAST LAWN, ORANGE CITY-SEE PAGE 34.
Rates, $2.50 and upward per day; $15.00 to $25.00 per week;
special rates until January 20. Located on the banks of the
river 300 yards from station. Rooms with or without private
bath. House heated by steam. Billiard room, bowling alley and
other indoor amusements. A Daimler launch and boats owned
by the house constantly in use by the guests.
WHITE'S COTTAGE-J. J. White, Proprietor. Open December 1st
to May 1st. Accommodates thirty guests. Rates, $1.50to $2.00
per day; $8.00 to $10.00 per week. A select, family boarding
house, one-eighth mile from station. Special attention paid to
fishermen. Boats and guides furnished when desired.

S EAU GALLIE, FLORIDA. t

14 NLY one and one-half miles
154 liles from St. Augustine from the famous fishing
Fare: One way $6.15
Round trip . 9.50 and d uc k shooting grounds at
the mouth of the Banana River.
Saltwater fishing in the Indian and Banana Rivers, and fresh
water fishing at Lake Wilmington.






















TWIN OAKS, ORANGE CITY-SEE PAGES 33 AND 35.
POINTS OF INTEREST: Pelican Island, Oak Lodge, Ocean
Beach, the Indian mounds, Banana River, Tropic, Ostrich Farm
at Courtenay, pineapple farms at Aspinwall.
HOTEL GRANADA-Gleason Brothers, Managers. Open No-
vember to May; ac.,ommodates 50. Rates $2.50 per day and
up, special by the week or month. A good, homelike hotel at
reasonable rates in a natchless climate and a healthful location.
Supplied with both soft and sulphur water. Free baths. Within
five minutes' walk of the station. A fleet of launches in connec-
tion with the house.
INDIAN RIVER INN-P. A. McMillan, Proprietor. Open all
the year. Rates $2.00 per day, special weekly and monthly
rates. Table supplied with fish, oysters and game in season.


ELBOURNE, FLORIDA.


M ELBOURNE is located on
158 Miles from St. Augustine. a bluff, thirty feet above
Fare: One way . $6.30 the level of the Indian River.
Round trip . 9.75
The Chautauqua of the Tropics,
under the direction of Dr. W. L. Davidson, is held here in March
of each year. Splendid hunting and fishing.






HOTEL BELLEVIEW-W. R. Campbell, Proprietor; Mrs. E. M.
Campbell, Manager. Rates $2.50 and $3.00 per day, $12 per
week and upwards. Located near station, postoffice, schools and
churches, overlooking the river. Tennis lawn and row boats free
to guests. Baths and good sanitary arrangements. Fish, game,
oysters, Northern meats, fresh fruits and vegetables. .
HOTEL CARLETON-F. Robertson, Proprietor. Open October
1 to June 1; accommodates 40. Rates $2.00 per day, $9.00
to $12.00 per week. Beautifully situated on a high bluff, over-


INDIAN RIVER HOTEL, TITUSVILLE-SEE PAGE 38
looking the river; five minutes' walk from the station or steam-
boat landing. Bowling alley, tennis, trap shooting, etc.


1i- SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA. Wi

SITUATED in the midst of
179 rifles from St. Augustine ) the Indian River bean fields.
Fare: One way . $7.15
Round trip . 11.00 Good hunting and fishing.
PRIVATE BOARD-Mrs. James
Morrow. Open all the year; accommodates 25. Rates $1.50
per day, $8.00 per week, $30.00 per month. Table sup-
46






plied with fresh milk and butter from Jersey cows, and veg-
etables and fruits from the house garden.


,t FORT PIERCE, FLORIDA. 8

FORT PIERCE is located in
206 niles from St. Augustine. a sub-tropical region, in
Fare one way .. $8.25
Roundtrip 12.60 the pineapple belt, opposite the
famous Indian River Inlet, and
near the earthworks of old Fort Pierce, of Seminole War fame, and
the Indian burial mounds. Hunting and fisi ing are special fea-


SANFORD HOUSE, SANFORD-SEE PAGE 40.


tures. It is a conceded fact that a greater number of Tarpon, the
' Silver King," have been caught in the Indian River Inlet than
in any other part of Florida. Other fish, with which the waters
teem, are: Spanish mackerel, Jew fish, King fish, blue fish, sharks,
saw fish, river trout, black and channel bass, red snapper, lady
fish, spotted sea trout, sailors' choice, mangrove snapper, mutton
fish, groupers, grunts, etc. Guests of the Fort Pierce Hotel last
season, from January 15 to March, caught with hook and line
eleven thousand and seventy (11,070) pounds of game fish, be-
sides a number of Tarpon and Jew fish, the weight af which were






not taken. Wild ducks, quail, snipe, plover and water fowl are
found in large quantities along the river, while in the flat-woods
will be found bears, deer, wildcats and turkeys; also the alliga-
tor in his native haunts. Competent guides, with horses and
dogs, as well as row and sail boats and naptha launches at
reasonable rates.
FORT PIERCE HOTEL-F. M. Tyler, Manager. Open all the
year; accommodates 75. Rates $2.50 per day and up-
wards, special weekly and monthly rates. The hotel is situated
on an elevation, directly on the river, with an attractive and
unobstructed view in all directions; most completely and taste-
fully furnished, with all modern improvements, hot and cold
baths. Rooms light and airy, single or en suite.

EDEN, FLORIDA. 1

IN the pineapple belt, with
218 riles from St. Augustine I acres of pines on either side
Fare: One way . 70 of the railway. Hunting and
Round trip 13.35
fishing as good as at other points
along the river. Fruits and early vegetables in the greatest
abundance.


THOMAS COTTAGE, COCOA-SEE PAGE 40.
48





























DRUMFISH CAUGHT AT ROCKLEDGE.
THE NETHERBY-Mrs. M. A. Curtis, Proprietress. Open
November 15 to April 1; accommodates 20. Rates $2.00
and $2.50 per day, $10.00 to $15.00 per week. This house was
originally built as a private home, but is now opened as a select
boarding house to supply the needs of the public. Passengers
may leave the train at Ruxton, one mile south of Eden, and save
all transfer, as the platform is on the grounds of The Netherby.
Particular attention paid to the table.



A JENSEN, FLORIDA. Sa

A LSO in the midst of the
221 rlles from St. Augustine pineapple belt, and the lus-
Fare: One way $8.85
Round trip 13.50 cious fruit, ripened on the plant
may here be eaten at its best.
Good fishing from the docks along the banks of the river;
better sport at the Inlet, six miles distant. Quail are plenti-
49







ful in the immediate vicinity; larger game two to five miles
inland.
HOTEL AL FRESNO-J. L. Jensen, Proprietor. Open all the
year; accommodates 60. Rates $2.00 per day, $8.00 to $12.00
per week.


- I STUART, FLORIDA. 1


LOCATED opposite St. Lucie
22Miles ro St. Augustine. Inlet, at the junction of the
Fare one way $9.00
Round trip .. 3.75 St. Lucie and Indian Rivers.
Fishing at the Inlet and in the
two rivers unsurpassed. Quail, snipe, ducks, deer and wild hogs
may be found within a short distance.


HOTEL INDIAN RIVER, ROCKLEDGE-SEE PAGE 43.
DANFORTH'S-ON-THE-ST. LUCIE-J. S. Danforth, Proprietor.
Open all the year; accommodates 25. Rates $2.50 per day,
special by the week. Five minutes' walk from the station. No
charge for transfer of baggage.
PRIVATE BOARD-B. Kitching. Open all the year; accom-
modates 10. Rates $1.50 per day, $7.00 per week.







4 WEST JUPITER, FLORIDA. <4S


STATION directly opposite
247 Miles from St. Augustine Jupiter lighthouse, on the
Pare: One way .. $9.90
Round trip . 15.05 peninsula across from Jupiter
Inlet, the southern terminus of
the Indian River. Life saving station on the beach opposite,
point where battleship Oregon first reported her arrival after
her famous run from the Pacific coast. Also terminus of the
Nassau cable. Most southern U. S. signal station. Good hunt-
ing and fishing in the vicinity.
CARLIN HOTEL.

'M. M. Carlin, Proprietor. Open all the year. Accommodates
20. Rates $2.00 per day; $10.00 per week.


1 WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 4


O N Lake Worth, opposite
264 liles from St. Augustine ePalm Beach. Thriving
Pare: One way. $10.55
Roundtrip . 17.00 modern town of about 3,000.
Nice buildings, pretty streets,
city water works, electric lights, parks and progressive citi-
zens. Hunting and fishing unsurpassed.


PLAZA, ROCKLEDGE-8EE PAGE 43.
51






























NEW ROCKLEDGE AND COTTAGES, ROCKLEDGE.-SEE PAGE 43.
THE SEMINOLE-F. E. Pinkham, Proprietor. Open November
to May. Accommodates 75. Rates $2.00 to $3.00 per day;
$10.00 to $20.00 per week; $40.00 to $75.00 per month. Lo-
cated on the west shore of Lake Worth, commanding an unob-
structed view of the lake. Everything first-class; white cooks
and white waitresses. Billiard room and large sample room
free to guests. Livery in connection with house. Transfer
charges 25 cents.
THE PALMS.
J. C. Stowers, Proprietor. Open November to May. Accom-
modates 75 guests. Rates $2.00 to $3.00 per day; special by
the week. A first-class, homelike hotel on Lake Worth, near
railroad station and points of interest. Special features: Cour-
teous attention, superior table and service, reasonable rates. Ex-
perienced white waitresses in charge of dining room. Electric
lights and bells. Transfer charges 25c.
PARK COTTAGE-Mrs. Fred E. Pinkham, Proprietor. Open.
November to May. Accommodates 20. Rates $2 50 to $3.00


- I V., : *AFpr- I"*"- F-IrRk,~nn






per day; $15.00 to $25.00 per week. A select boarding house
of high standard. Everything first-class. Persons desiring a
quiet, homelike place will do well to correspond with the pro-
prietress.
THE HOLLAND.
L. D. Lockwood, Proprietor. Open November to May. Ac-
commodates,20. Rates $2.00 per day; $10.00 to $12.00 per


WHITES COTTAGE, ROCKLEDGE-SEE PAGE
week. A charming winter home fronting on the Lake. All
modern conveniences.

& PALM BEACH, FLORIDA. <*

PALM BEACH has been
265lnilesfromSt. Augustine. pronounced by many per-
Fare: One way .$10.80
Round trip . 17.00 sons who have circled the globe
to be the most beautiful place
in the world and the others who have seen it and yet not enjoyed
such opportunities for comparative observation, have without
exception, accepted the verdict as manifestly just. Conceive an






island broken from the mainland and separated from it by a sheet
of water possessing the fascination of an inland wood bordered
lake, while the opposite side is bathed in the grandeur of the open
sea. This, in a word, is the position of the strip of land that
was selected for site of the magnificent Royal Poinciana and the
Breakers. On the side which looks out upon the Atlantic stands
the Breakers with wide verandas and broad promenades, seem-
ingly devised especially that the ocean breezes might sweep up
and down their vast esplanades and fritter away into zephyrs
around their supporting columns. Half a mile west, directly
across the island, stands the Royal Poinciana, which, as recent-
ly enlarged, ranks as the largest hotel on earth. It faces Lake
Worth and the mainland beyond. Connecting these two twen-
tieth century taverns is a broad asphaltum promenade flanked
on both sides by a high screen of the most superb tropical vege-
tation and illuminated at night by myriad electric bulbs.
The climate of Palm Beach makes this winter resort a most
agreeable place of residence during the snow time months and
that the American epicures of enjoyment are rapidly so discov-
ering is eloquently attested by the number of wealthy citizens
who have within the past few years, built palatial villas in this
vicinity. Warm and soft is the air as on a spring day in a
northern valley, and yet never devoid of that bracing invigora-


LAUNCHES, HOTEL GRANADA, EAU GALLIE.
-54






















HOTEL GRANADA, EAU GALLIE-SEE PAGE 45.

tion which causes the sojourner to be ever ready for golf, ten-
nis or surf bathing. It was the boast of the gallant Southerners
during the civil war, that they could dance all night and fight
all day. The present day dwellers in this most admirable of the
nation's play grounds, might with apologies to the sentiment,
alter it to a confession of ability to dance all night and indulge
in the various athletic sports all day, so stimulating is the elixir
which the atmosphere pours into the lungs. Nearby is a strange
spring which fable declares is the youth dispensing fount so
eagerly sought by Ponce de Leon, and the average visitor, upon
the conclusion of a visit to Palm Beach, would be willing to de-
clare that there is more foundation than tradition for the con-
tention.
In this principality of the leisure class vegetation has run
riot. Nowhere else on the continent may one find so many dif-
ferent kinds of trees and shrubs and plants growing apparently
under natural conditions. This is the home of the cocoanut.
Trees laden with the great green husked nuts block the path at
every turn, and intermingling with them are palms of various
kinds, the omnipresent palmetto, orange, lime and lemon trees
and bearers of dozens of different kinds of edible.fruits which
the benighted visitor from the north scarce knows even by
name.





There is an alligator farm which may be visited for the pur-
pose of witnessing the life of thousands of alligators of all sizes
and ages, and there are possible trips along narrow "trails" cut
through jungles as thick as any in Africa, the journeys being
fraught with just a spice of excitement from the rumors of wild
cats which now and then put in an appearance along these wind-
ing highways. Best of all is the novelty of the mode of con-
veyance. There is but one horse on the island and he is kept
busy drawing the horse car between lake and ocean, conse-
quently all traveling must be done either on bicycles or by means
of ingenious wheel chairs-an American improvement on the



















ONE OF THE VILLAS AT PALM BEACH.
rickshaws of India and Japan. Palm Beach is one of the few
resorts in the world where the visitor may find gaiety or retire-
ment in a measure exactly in accord with his wishes. A bright
fashionable life may be lead in the maelstrom of a splendid whirl
of amusements and frivolities which constantly swirls around
the hotels-veritable temples to diversion of every sort; but
there are also innumerable quiet sunny corners and vine clad
porches and balconies where the invalid or the recluse may
drink in nature's beauty without a single jarring note.
HOTEL ROYAL POINCIANA-Fred Sterry, Manager. Open dur-






ing January, February, March and April. Accommodates 1,500.
Rates, $5.00 perday and upward.
THE BREAKERS-Fred Sterry, Manager. Open December to
April. Accommodates 600. Rates, $4.00 per day and up-
ward.
HOTEL PALM BEACH-Charles A. Stone, Manager. Open
December to May. Accommodates 500 guests. Rates, $3.00 per
day and upward; special weekly rates. Enlarged and improved.
Delightfully located between Atlantic ocean and sub-tropical
Lake Worth, fronting close on the water and within five minutes
walk of Royal Poinciana railway station. Outside rooms (suit-
able to the climate). Spacious rotunda and piazzas. Porters
with bicycle chairs meet all trains. Transfer charge, twenty-five
cents. For further information address Hotel Palm Beach, Palm
Beach, Fla.. P. O. Box 131.
HOTEL HIBISCus-Open December to April. Accommodates
60. Rates, $2.50 per day and up; special by the week. For
further particulars address the manager, Palm Bach, Fla.


ROYAL POINCIANA, PALM BEACH -SEE PAGE 5;.
57





















THE BREAKERS (FORMERLY THE INN), PALM BEACH--SEE PAGE 57.


< LANTANA, FLORIDA. |


N EAR the foot of Lake
272 Miles from St. Augustine Worth at the beginning of
Fare; One way $10.90
Round trip . 17.00 the vegetable farms. There
are also several growers of fancy
pineapples in this vicinity. Good hunting and fishing.
LANTANA HOUSE-M. B. Lyman, Proprietor. Open all theyear.
Accommodates 10. Rates, $2.00 per day; $12.00 perweek.


S BOYNTON, FLORIDA. 1I


LOCATED on the ocean beach
276 niles from St. Augustine L t the foot of Lake Worth,
Fare: One way. $11.05 at the foot of Lake orth
Round trip 17.00 and in the heart of the farming
lands of Dade County. Nearly
the whole list of garden vegetables and various tropical and
semi-tropical fruits do well in the moist, muck lands in this sec-
tion. Vegetables are planted from October to February, and







5-


FT. PIERCE HOTEL AND ANNEX, FT. PIERCE-SEE PAGE 48.
are marketed from December to June. Hunting and fishing is
equal to that at any point along the coast.
HOTEL BOYNTON AND COTTAGES-Major N. S. Boynton, Propri-
etor. Open January 1st to May 1st. Accommodates 100. Rates,
$2.50 to $3.00 per day; $15.00 to $18.00 per week; $50.00 to
$65.00 per month. A cottage hotel, with large, well-furnished
sleeping rooms, large dining room, wide halls and verandas.
Lighted by gas, and with all modern improvements. Only fifty
feet from the ocean beach. Surrounded by cocoanut palms, trop-
ical shrubbery and velvet lawn. If guests prefer the quiet of a
cottage, they can be accommodated at same rates.

k FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA Is

SO named from an old fort of
305 Miles from St, Augustine Seminole War times. Sem-
Fare: One way $12.20 inole Indians come here to do
Round trip . 18.50
their trading. Numerous veg-
etable farms and groves of citrus fruits surround the town.
Plenty of good hunting and fishing.
59





THE WALLACE HOUSE-A. J. Wallace, Proprietor, Open all
the year. Accommodates 25. Rates, $1.50 per day, $9.00
per week.


LEMON CITY, FLORIDA. &c

A THRIFTY settlement on
326Milesfrom St. Augustine. Biscayne Bay where the
Fareo.eway $13.05
Round trip .. 19.80 people are chiefly engaged in
the cultivation of citrus groves
and vegetable gardens. Good fishing at Norris' Cut, and hunting
in immediate vicinity.


THE NETHERBY, EDEN.-SEE PAGE 49.
CARY HousE-J. T. Cary, Proprietor. Open all the year. Ac-
commodates 20. Rates, $2.00 per day; $10.00 per week.


[V MIAMI, FLORIDA. -


A S will be seen from what
330 Miles from St. Augutine follows, Miami, clean,
Fare: One way. $13.20
Round trip . 20.05 placid and beautiful-a perfect
city in a perfect clime-is the
hub of a wheel, each of the spokes of which leads to some
60





land where life and conditions are very different from those which
obtain in the United States, and yet the tourist who journeys
to this sun-bathed paradise and never ventures beyond, would be
well repaid for a trip of twice the length. Upon a crowning point
of land, overlooking Bay Biscayne, a lagoon sheltered from the
Atlantic by coral islands, has been set down the Hotel Royal Palm
-a link in the chain of pleasure palaces which stretches from the
tropics to the frontier of the land of snow and ice. Miami has
homes and churches and streets which would delight the champion
of better municipal conditions; the streets are lighted, by electric-
ity, and the town has a complete waterworks system. Encircling
her on every side are cocoanut groves, pineapple plantations, and
the most bountiful truck gardens in the world, where the winter
visitor miy eat strawberries and fresh vegetables while his friends
at home are struggling through huge snowdrifts. The man who


PITCHING'S BOARDING HOUSE, STUART-SEE PAGE 50.


















HOTEL ROYAL PALM, MIAMI-SEE PAGE 63.
has never sailed a boat in his life will be tempted to essay the
task at Miami. The sight of the gently rippling water and the
smoothly-gliding, white-winged craft, have here a fascination
more potent than that exerted elsewhere, and one which few per-
sons who have remained for any length of time in this magic city
have been able to resist.
The livery service at Miami is all that could be desired and the
charges reasonable. Transfer from railway station to hotel,
twenty-five cents, and twenty-five cents for each piece of baggage.


CARLIN HOTEL, WEST JUPITER-SEE PAGE 51.
62

























THE PALMS, WEST PALM BEACH.--EE PAGE 25.
HOTEL ROYAL PALM-H. W. Merrill, Manager. Open during
January, February, March and April. Accommodates 500.
Rates, $5.00 per day and upward.
HOTEL BISCAYNE-S. Graham, Proprietor. Open November 1st
to May 1st. Accommodates 150 guests. Rates, $3.00 per day
and upward; $18.00 to $35.00 per week. The Biscayne is the
second largest hotel in the city, and a modern-built structure,
provided with all the conveniences. Furnishings, cuisine, etc.,
unsurpassed. Rooms en suite with bath.
THE EVERGLADE-T. N. Gautier, Proprietor. Open October
1st to June 1st. Accommodates 40 guests. Rates, $2.50 per
day; special weekly and monthly rates. Centrally located; con-
venient to all points; two blocks from Biscayne Bay. Electric
lights, baths, large reading room.


KEY WEST, FLORIDA. ^

T HE terminus of the Florida
460 Miles from St. Augustine East C o ast Railway-the
by steamshlpfrom Miami. great tourist highway is at
Fare: Oneway. $18.90
Round trip .. 33.20 M i a m i, which is the point of
embarkation for a fascinat-
ing a group of side trips as may be found anywhere in the
63









I_______- .-s n04Ei*~L: ~(- r' I


THE HOLLAND, WEST PALM BEACH-SEE PAGE 53.
world. For one thing the tourist may take steamer for Key
West, that strange, cosmopolitan little community, which has
the honor of being the southernmost city of the United States.
It is a strange, picturesque nook. You can almost imagine your-
self set down in another land. The most alluring cigar factories


MOUTH OF MIAMI RIVER.
64
























THE CARLEION, MELEOURNE.-SEE PAGE 46.


in the world are here, and the visitor may watch dusky senors
and senoritas deftly shaping the celebrated Havana perfectos
which sell for more than a dollar each, or he may take a peep at
the headquarters of the turtle trade, and see prepared for ship-
ment North some of the largest turtles in the world, or, finally,
the sightseer, seeking for new sensations, may stand on the wharf
or journey forth in a boat and watch some of the branches of
sponge fishing, the most unique industry in the United States,
and one which he may see practiced on such a scale nowhere else
in the republic. Finally, Key West is the angler's paradise.
Nearly two hundred varieties of edible fish abound in the waters
around Key West. And to give just a tinge of romance to this
whole picture there may usually be found at anchor off Key West
one or more of the Nation's majestic war vessels-the most in-
fallible of all the white messengers of peace-with their swagger-
ing blue jackets coming ashore now and then to add to the med-
ley of costumes which are flaunted in the streets of Key West.
Connection is made at Miami with steamers of the Peninsular
(& Occidental Steamship Company for Key West.




















HOTEL BELLVFIEW, MIYLBOURN-E$ E PAGEC 46.


FHAVANA, CUBA. I $I


By Steamship from Miami
Pare one way, from St.
Augustine,. $31.40
Round trip. 54.20
From this port may be enj





. .-


MIAMI, this new metropolis of
the far South, is the gateway
too, to all that wonderful region
which has lately come under the
protection of the American eagle,
oyed the shortest and pleasantest sail


HAVANA LINE STEAMER.
416


ji~irr

























FISHING NEAR EAU GALLIE.
to Havana, the metropolis of the West Indies. This city is rap-
idly becoming semi-American, while retaining its choicest antiq-
.o


THE EVERGLADES, MIAMI-SEE PAGE 62.





cities. Excursions may be made by rail to all parts of the
Pearl of the Antilles, or by boat skirting its shores.
Florida East Coast Railway trains connect at Miami with steam-
ers of the Peninsular & Occidental Steamship Companyfor Havana.


'1%S,
~JI~--S


THE ROYAL VICTORIA, NASSAU-SEE PAGE 70.


THE EVERGLADES. &

FROM Miami a small boat will
West of liami. carry the curious visitor up in-
to the wildest stretches of the
Everglades, the last of the vste
lands east of the Mississippi which remain unreclaimed, and which
have held for years all the mystery and romance and tradition
which mind can conjure up. Here he may catch a glimpse in
their native haunts of the Seminoles, the sole remaining remnant
of the Indian tribes that once roamed over Dixie. They are simple,
tractable people, but they cling to their striking costumes, and
these, combined with the novelty of their habitations and the un-






























THE BOYNTON, BOYNTON--8EE PAGE 59.
usual specimens of handiwork which they press upon the visitors
as souvenirs, add just the touch of weirdness which is needed
to make complete the ensemble of the picture.



NASSAU, N. P., Bahama Islands.


A ND finally, the incipient globe-
By Steamship from a m trotter may speed from Miami
Fare from Miami:
Round Trip $20.00 to alluring Nassau, Bahama Isl-
ands-a model city set in a shell
of surpassing beauty. It is still another realm he enters soon as
he sets foot on these "Isles of June," the domain of His Majesty
Edward of the United Kingdom, and he sees the insignia of sov-
ereignty in the palace of the Governor appointed by the Crown;
in the constabulary, native negroes patroling the streets. Life
at Nassau is a careless, easy-going existence. It is an ideal place
C9







to rest, and yet, the temporary sojourner may find an infinite
number of things to occupy his time if he wish instruction as well
as entertainment. By the expenditure of a few pennies he may
induce a horde of agile negro boys to give such an exhibition of
diving as probably he may never witness again; he may golf on
as fine links as can be found anywhere, and at night he may jour-
ney out to the wonderful Lake of Fire and witness the fantastic
creations of the illuminated water, surcharged with a splendor
rivaling that of any electric fountain. With a fine insight into
the needs of the pleasure-seeking world there has been provided
at Nassau two hostelries worthy of the setting. The new Hotel
Colonial stands opposite the harbor entrance and a two-story
promenade extends to the water's edge; whereas the Hotel Royal
Victoria is equally advantageously located for facilitating enjoy-
ment of all the diversions of the place from sun bathing to trop-
ical surf sports.

HOTEL COLONIAL-H. E. Bemis, Manager. Rates $5.00 per
day and upwards. Open during January, February and March.

HOTEL VICrORIA-H. E. Bemis, Manager. Rates $4.00 per
day and upward. Open during December, January, February,
March and April.


" IwE ~.er s ul


COLONIAL, NASSAU.
70






S ATLANTIC BEACH. ,

The latest acquisition to the system of hotels of the Florida
East Coast Hotel Company is The Continental," at Atlantic
Beach, twenty-one miles east from Jacksonville. #
)The shore line at this point, as it was originally, was quite
similar to that of North Beach, near St. Augustine-a huge
bank of sand rising twenty or thirty feet above the water and
sloping away toward the hammock of cabbage palmetto and live
oaks, a quarter of a mile distant. This bank has been utilized


THE CONTINENTAL, ATLANTIC BEACH.
to level off forty acres or more, upon which the hotel is located,
and an embankment of heavy plank and timber about ten feet
high and a large part of a mile in length, has been erected
above high tide to keep back any encroachment of the sea, now
or in the future.
One of the first attractions that meets the eye as the traveler
arrives at the carefully constructed depot, is this almost per-
fectly leveled field, as smooth as a house floor. It really has a
fall of eight feet in a quarter of a mile-just sufficient to carry


4W4






away excess of water in a heavy storm. When this forty acre
tract shall have been embellished with flower beds, fountains,
etc., it will be one of the most beautiful places on the coast.
"The Continental," being the latest of all the great Florida
hotels, possesses some attractions over all others. In archi-
tectural design it is well balanced and pleasing to the eye; in
fact, it is pronounced by those well qualified to express an opin-
ion, as nearly perfect as possible. At first glance, from a front
view, it reminds one of the old San Marco, or as that fine struc-
ture would have been, without its towers; yet this hotel has
nearly twice as much frontage on the sea, and has an air of
greater refinement, a more finished aspect than the San Marco
in its palmiest days ever presented.
Extending along the entire front, around the south end and
in the rear of the hotel are covered verandas, detached from the
main building, though connected by passage ways at all the
main entrances. These verandas are charming to the last de-
gree. Furnished with large, easy, gaily-colored rockers, they
constitute the general lounging lace of the guests, and, truly,
no more enticing place can be found.
Reaching out into the sea is another attraction, which is very
popular-the ocean pier. It is some eight hundred feet long,
twenty feet wide, twenty feet above tide water, and covered
some two-thirds of its length. Here one can watch the mighty
waves in their ceaseless ebb and flow, enjoy the invigorating
breeze equally as well as on shipboard, and without that most
disagreeable of all ailments, sea-sickness
Going to the end of this pier early one morning, while the
surface of the water was like a polished mirror, swimming
about in the rising tide was seen first, a large school of sea
trout, and as they turned their speckled sides to the sun, they
shone like silver. A four-foot shark swimming among them
actually had to push them aside; but if it snapped at them, they
wera always out of the way. Next, came along a six-foot tar-
pon near the surface and evidently having just had his break-
fast, for he swam through a school of mullet and paid no at-
tention to them. Next, were seen several fine specimens of the
shark family, not at all dangerous, for they are more afraid of
man than he is of them; and, lastly, a little before the morning





breeze came up and spoiled the show, a school of a dozen tarpon
appeared near the surface. They varied from four to six feet
ih length and seemed to take great delight in showing their
shining sides to the sun. This pier from which'all this is seen
is constructed on cabbage palmetto piling, braced with mighty
pine logs set at a sharp angle and fastened at the top with im-
mense bolts so that when the torredo gets in his fine work
under water, the logs can be removed and others substituted.
Within doors the Continental is the very quintessence of all
that is up-to-date, and calculated for the comfort and pleasure
of the summer guests. In its furnishing the highest point of
excellence and subdued harmony have been attained; nothing de-
sirable remains unsupplied. One change from old style customs
is quite noticeable, the rotunda or main hall is the only general
parlor ia the building. Experience has demonstrated that ladies
prefer seats in the rotunda at all times when not outside or in
their own rooms. This arrangement gives abundance of space
to private parlors, reading and writing rooms, etc., all of which
are in constant requisition.
Like all the East Coast hotels the rooms are arranged accord-
ing to approved plans, sanctioned by men, who have made the
hotel business a life time study. No pajns or expense have been
spared to minister to the every want of the traveler. Such beds
as one finds here would soothe to rest the most confirmed victim
of insomnia that ever traveled.
The surf bathing on this bea-h is superb. Every convenience
for the safety and enjoyment of those who go down to the
vastyy deep for a swim'," has received careful attention. Life
lines extend along the whole front of the grounds; life-boats that
can be made to plow their way through heavy breakers with
men always at hand who know how to manage them, are pro-
vided, and danger is reduced to the minimum. Then the tem-
perature of the water is so warm that one can remain in it al-
most indefinitely without a chill. Let one try this in the
northern watering places and he will soon find a marvelous
difference. Sea-bathing in Florida waters is one of the greatest
enjoyments of life, and nowhere is it more pleasant than at
Atlantic Beach.







10 GOLF LINKS EVERYWHERE. 1.9


The latest and most popular of out-door sport to find a home at
the Florida East Coast resorts was the ancient and royal game
of Golf. As to this exhilarating and health-giving recreation the
wishes of tourists were anticipated, for in 1897 links were laid
out at St. Augustine, Palm Beach and Ormond. Ore year
later, links were added to the attractions of Miami and Nassau.
Thousands of dollars were spent in making this system of links
the best in the South, and the venture has proved a tremendous
success. The series of tournaments held last winter were well
attended, and at some of the events there were as many as eighty
entries for the preliminary rounds. In the annual games that
followed on the Northern links in the spring the advantage of
the winter's play proved wonderfully effective, Several of the
crack players-going from the Florida East Coast links to the
spring meetings-were in such good form, that it proved, in
several cases, an easy task for them to carry off prizes from the
celebrated players and strong favorites.
The same careful attention and liberality in the matter of first-
class and well-kept links, and numerous and elegant prizes, will
obtain this season as prevailed last winter. It is a foregone con-
clusion that the Florida East Coast resorts will be the rendez-
vous all the winter through for practically all the leading golfers
of the United States, and play will be continuous from the first to
the last of the season. Should a visitor wish to remain but
one day at the resort at which links have been established he
can obtain a membership card for that day. Should he hol!
card for a longer period, the card obtained at one place is good
for membership on each and all of the links under the control
of the Florida East Coast Hotel Co. A lover of golf can land
at the station with his clubs and start play half an hour after-
ward if he choses.
The golf season in St. Augustipe is longer than at any other
resort on the East Coast. It begins with the opening of the
Hotel Alcazar, and continues until May. At other places the
links open with the hotels of the Florida East Coast Hotel Co.

























































CLUB 'AMIP.O

PflM ERA3 Cf.'A.t

Member of o.e
Member of alt


I...21..Marla San~ob

3...1,5..Fiddler Crab Id.
4...2SO..Tower D.Ihe
5.. 5.8. O'ba~thrn
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9 212-1--c- do Leon
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/ To Hallfax River--

LINKS


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CLUB K
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a0 'eemher ofone.
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5.... 4...Boyal PnRIr
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7 .... 150...Trropl.
s 279 *g..Elbo.
9 422 Ses south
22 Y4d.


-JI I














NASSAU GOLF LINKS
have been improved
since last season and
Shave been increased to
nine holes. i *. ~









4 ST. AUGUSTINE





Hotel Ponce de Leon.
Open during January, February March and April. Robert
Murray, Manager.
Hotel Alcazar.
Open November to May. Joseph P. Greaves, Manager.
Connected by indoor passage with the new Hydro-Therapeutic
Baths.
Ho'el Cordova.
Open November to May. Suites, three to ten rooms each,
furnished or unfurnished, and for housekeeping or not, as de-
sired.
The Hydro-Therapeutic Baths.
Open December to April inclusive. The finest baths in the
world. The only baths in the United States whose patients can
have all winter, from December to May, every day, out-door air
and sunshine, and enjoy with their families the life of a great
winter resort. Treatment nnder the supervision of a skilled
medical attendant.
Hot and cold Saline and Hydro-Electrical Baths for rheuma-
tism, gout, and all nervous diseases. Complete Electrical Baths,
Static, Sensorial, Galvano-Faradic currents with Hydro-Electrical
Douche. Massage in all its branches by graduates.
The Schott system for heart disease.
The Nauheim Baths.
The famous Hydroiodided Mineral Witer from Clarendon
Springs, Vermont, will be the drinking water furnished the
patrons of'the Baths. After a long series of experimental tests,
this water, which is scientifically bottled at the Spring, so that
its gases and other evaporating but efficacious properties are re-





trained, is selected, as it produces throughout the digestive tract,
and in anemia and kidney and liver disorders, obesity and cuta-
neous affections, the most advantageous effects.

The Casino.
Open November to May. Entertainments, dancing, theatricals,
concerts, cake walks, semi-saline swimming pool, bowling,
billiards, tennis, bicycles and bicycle riding academy.

Furnished Cottages.
Delightfully located and of different sizes, for rent for the
winter season, October or later to May or June.

Fresh Milk.
A dairy of registered Jerseys is owned and controlled by the
Florida East Coast Hotel Company, that guests and children in
the St. Augustine hotels and cottages may be supplied with milk
equal to the best obtainable at the North.

Golf.
Links open December to May 1st. While Northern links
are snowbound, frozen or muddy, the links of the Florida East
Coast Golf Club are in prime condition.
New Club House.
Links on which was held the Winter Championship of 1898,
1899, 1900. Elegant condition from constant work throughout
the summer.

Drives and Bicycle Paths.
Many miles have been added to those on the peninsula, on the
Mainland and on Anastasia Island.

Launches and Sailboats.
St. Augustine still holds its own as the ideal spot for sailing
parties.

Schools.
Accommodations for children, with competent instructors in
kindergarten as well as higher branches.









4 ORMOND





Hotel Ormond. Open during January, February, March
and April. ANDERSON & PRICE, Managers. Enlarged,
remodeled, rearranged; 130 new bath room suites; new
dining room and kitchen; electric lights throughout; electric
elevators.
Beach Pavilion. Midwinter ocean bathing; dressing room;
for bathers.
The Tomoka River. New 12-knot Daimler Lyunch, ca-
pacity for 150 passengers, making round trip dai.y between
3 and 10 o'clock P. M. Wonderful day and night scenery
without having to be out all night.
The Ocklawaha of the East Coast.
Golf. Links will be in elegant condition from continuous
work throughout the summer.
B-cycle Paths. New paths laid out. Old paths extended
and repaired. Lockers arranged in Beach pavilion for
beach bicyclists.
Drives. Livery enlarged and improved. Number of drives
increased. The most beautiful and typical Florida drives
in the south, through the palms and palmettos, moss and
dense foliage.
Schools. Accommodations for children, with competent in-
structors in kindergarten as well as higher branches.
Milk. The Florida East Coast Hotel Company has com-
pleted arrangements so that the guests and children in its
hotels and cottages may be supplied with milk equal to the
best obtainable in the north.
Launches, Canoes and Sailboats. The Halifax River is an
ideal spot for all these excursions, and boats of all kinds
are moored in front of the hotel.
Palace electric launches, fitted with 'searchlight for night
trips and fishing, made by the Electric Boat Company,
New York.









& PALM BEACH. &







Hotel Royal Poinciana. Open during January, Feb-
ruary, March and April. FRED STERRY, Manager. En-
larged and rearranged. Now thelargest hotel in the world.

The Breakers, (formerly The Inn). Open during Dv-
cember, January, February, March and April. FREID
STERRY, Manager. Enlarged and re-arranged.
Golf, Gun Club and other Sports. Links will he even better
thnn last year.
Salt-Water Swimming Pool. And midwinter ocean bath-
ing in the surf. Hot and cold salt-water baths.
Milk. The Florida East Coast Hotel Company h.is com-
pleted arrangements so that the guests and children in its
hotels and cottages may be supplied with milk equal to the
best obtainable in the north.
House Boats and Fishing. For fishing parties, and fish din-
ner or luncheon parties.
Launches and Sailboats. Renovated and repaired and many
new ones added. Palace Electric -Launches, fitted with
searchlight for night trips and fishing, made by the Electric
Boat Company, New York.
Bicycle Paths and Walks. New trails. Old ones cut and
widened. Cycle chair livery very much enlarged and im-
proved.
Alligator Farm. Very interesting feature at end of cycle
chair ride through the jungle trail.
88









I MIAMI.







Hotel Royal Palm. Open during January, February,
March and April. H. W. MERRILL, Manager. Tropical
gardens enlarged and improved. Special bachelor accom-
modations with shower baths, etc., added.

Swimming Pool. Salt-water, open-air swimming pool, and
hot and cold salt-water tub baths.

House Boats and Fishing. Specially located for bone and
tarpon fishing. Fitted for fish dinners and luncheon parties.

Milk. The Florida East Coast Hotel Company has com-
pleted arrangements so that the guests and children in its
hotels and cottages may be supplied with milk equal to the
best obtainable in the north.

Golf. Finest links in the south, covering seventy acres of
tropical prairie. Club house; lockers; professional instructor.
Regular boats will run half-hourly from the Royal Palm
Boat Pavilion to the Club House on the Golf Links, and
Everglades, landing within a short distance of the new
Water Works.

Drives and Bicycle Paths. Many miles of new limestone
rock Macadamized roads and paths.
Launches and Pleasure Boats. Many new boats and Inunches
added.
Launches will run regularly to the house loats and tish-
ing grounds.
Schools. Accommodations for children, with competent
instructors in kindergarten as well as higher branches.
Avenues and Streets. City lighted by electricity.

















Hotel Colonial. Open during January February, and
March. H. E. BEMIS, Manager. Entirely new. Erected
on site of Fleming Square and Government Barracks, op-
posite harbor entrance.
Two-story disconnected promenade extending to water's
edge, and protected sea basin for electric launches.
Accommodations for six hundred guests.

Hotel Royal Victoria. Open during December, Jan-
nary, February, March and April. H. E. BEMIS, Manager.
Remodeled and many bath suites added. Electric elevator.
Grounds on the north graded to Shirley street, and on the
south to East Hill Street, and beautifully laid out.
Distilled water will be used at the Hotels Colonial and
Royal Victoria.

Launch Excursions. In Nassau's beautiful harbor, marvcl-
ously beautiful by moonlight.

Tropical Surf Bathing. Surf bathing daily thronglhout the
winter.

Beautiful Sea Gardens. Special facilities will be provided
for reaching them this winter.
Phosphorescent Lake. Special facilities for reaching it and
for seeing its wonderful effects.
Golf. Links will he in fine condition from ,continuous
work throughout the suilllnllr.
Drives and Bicycle Paths. Hundreds of Miles of Macad-
amizd limestone roads all over the island of New Prov-
idence.


NASSAU.








o TO THE SPORTSMAN. I



H UNTING all along
the East Coast is
good. Q u a i pigeon
snipe and small game
are abundant near the
railway; but lar ger
game is more shy and
must be hunted in lo-
calities less thickly set-
tled. Snipe are more
plentiful south of New
Smyrn a, partiEularly
near Titusville, on what
is known as the Indian
River prairie. Water
and shore birds, such as
ducks, plover and the
crane species are found
everywhere. Deer and
wild turkeys are num-
erous a short distance
from the towns and
settlements, the favor-
ite resorts of the deer
being in the flat-woods,
THE COCOANUT TREE. where young and ten-
der vegetation is plentiful. Bears, wild cats, wild hogs,
panthers and alligators are scarce; but guides know their haunts
and frequently find them within a few miles of the settlements.
Florida is one of the most celebrated States in the Union, for
fishing as well as hunting, and no part of the State can equal the
East Coast, particularly the lower section. Tarpon feed as far
north as New Smyrna, but are only taken in large numbers
from the St. Lucie River, near Fort Pierce, Palm Beach, Lake
Worth Inlet and the inlet to Biscayne Bay. These waters ara
warm and Tarpon and other large fish come inside to feed. King






fish and Jew fish, often weighing two hundred to three hundred
pounds, and other large varieties are abundant about Jupiter
Light and southward, through the Florida Keys. Salt water trout
are taken with rod and reel in large numbers from the rivers and
tributaries, Matanzas, San Sebastian, Halifax, Hillsboro and
Indian Rivers and the many other water courses along the East
Coast. Sheephead, whiting and a great variety of pan fish are
caught from bridges, piers, docks and row boats all along the
Coast. Other varieties of fish that are plentiful in season, are:
Drum, black fish, flounder, red snapper, black grouper, blue fish,
mangrove snapper, sailors' choice, yellow-tail, bone fish, mutton
fish, Spanish mackerel and grunt. They are caught all the way


















SEMINOLE INDIANS.

from St. Augustine to Key West. In and about the waters of
Nassau, Bahamas, the variety of fish, both large and small, is
even more numerous.
The fish of commerce are the mullet, mackerel, cavalia and
a few other varieties. Nothing is more interesting to a tourist
than a day's outing with a crew of professional fishermen.
For East Coast hook-and-line fishing the proper bait ;s
shrimp, minnows, small clams, crabs, fiddlers and cut bait of all
kinds, The King fish, which affords great sport for deep sea
fishermen, will take almost anything. The bait commonly used
is small mullet or a piece of block tin moulded into the shape of




























QUEENS STAIRCASE, NASSAU.


a small fish. Craw-fish is also a choice cut bait. Masters of
sailboats and guides can always be relied upon to secure the best
kind of bait; they are always interested in a day's catch, and
do all they can to make it as large as possible.
Fishing, hunting and sailing ih the vicinityo.f St. Augustine
is good all through the season. Fish are taken from the bridges
and docks in front of the city, and from the jetties and small
boats off Anastasia Island. Shark fishing is one of the exciting
pastimes, and boatmen will guarantee the landing of a big
fellow at any season of the year. There are plenty of quail
within a few miles of town, during the first part of the open
season ; but later hunters become too numerous and the birds
go into the swamps and places difficult of access. Guides will
take sportsmen to localities where deer and wild turkeys can
be found. There is good hunting for quail, snipe, wood pigeons,
deer and turkeys between St. Augustine and Palatka, particu-
larly in the neighborhood of Hastings, half way between
these points.


1 I
~ ~iii~~sl~ii~~

h_



























Sportsmen who wish fine fly fishing can be accommodated on
the St. Lucie River. The station for disembarking is Stuart.
- Mr. J. S. Danforth, at Stuart, makes a specialty of this sport.
Gentlemen can take the morning train from Palm Beach and
will be met at the station with launches and professional
guides. After the day's sport they can return to Palm Beach on
the evening train, in time for dinner. Lunch for the day should
be brought along from the hotel.
For further information communicate with Mr. J. S.
Danforth.







S TO THE HOMESEEKER. I

F you are are going to move, why not investigate the East
Coast of Florida? This is the home of the Orange, Lime,
Pomelo, Lemon and Pineapple, besides a variety of tropical
fruits too numerous to mention, and the greatest vegetable
farming section of the country. Climate is the healthiest. (See
U. S. statistics.)
This company has lands adapted to all the various fruits and
crops grown in this latitude for sale at reasonable prices to
single settlers or to colonies. Also improved and unimproved
city properties.


TOMATO FIELD, BOYNTON.
The Railway Company will offer special inducements and ad-
vantages for location of factories. As the East Coast of Florida
offers more opportunities for the investor and manufacturer,
with a greater variety of undeveloped resources than can be
found within a similar area in any other place in the United
States. We name only a few in this limited space: Deposits of







paint, from which nine distinct colors are made; sand adapted to
the manufacture of glass; kaolin, one of the best clay deposits
for brick making in the State; hardwoods, such as white oak
hickory, magnolia, ash, bay, madeira, mastic, prince, lignum,
vitae and others; there are exceptional openings for more can-
neries, cigar factories, fibre factors and various kinds of wood-
working plants.
THE FLORIDA EAST COAST HOMESEEKER is devoted to the inter-
ests of the East Coast, published at Miami, Fla.; subscription
price 25c per annum. Sample copies sent on application. For
further information, address Mr. J. E. Ingraham, 3d Vice-Presi-
dent, Florida East Coast Railway, St. Augustine, Fla.










S GENERAL

INFORMATION





STOP-OVER PRIVILEGES ON WINTER
TOURIST TICKETS.
Stop-off will be allowed within final limit of ticket regardless
of transit limit, at stations on Florida East Coast Railway south
of Jacksonville, provided the train passenger is on is scheduled
to stop at station at which stop-over is desired. Notify con-
ductor at time of examining ticket.
STAMPING RETURN TICKETS.
The return portion of winter tourist tickets may be validated
at St. Augustine or Jacksonville, thus allowing the full return
transit limit from those points; this in order that persons desir-
ing to stop over at these cities on the return trip may do so
without inconvenience. When stop-over is not desired on the
return trip, it is suggested that tickets be validated at desti-
nation, and baggage checked through. Get tickets stamped at
last stop-off station.
LOST TICKETS.
The company does not hold itself responsible for tickets lost
by purchasers. Notify the nearest agent of loss, and fill in and
sign the form he will furnish for the purpose. We will then
have the ticket lifted, if presented for passage, and returned
to owner. Get receipts for all fares paid or tickets purchased
to take the place of portions of lost tickets.
Considerable annoyance may be avoided, if, at time of pur-
chase, a memorandum is kept of form and number of ticket,
with date and place of purchase and destination. In case of
question bAtweeo holder and conductor, the latter's claim should
be paid, taking receipt, and all irregularities reported tu the
general office will be adjusted.






TRANSPORTATION OF BICYCLES.

Bicycles will be transported free over the Florida East Coast
Railway. Same to be considered part of free allowance, and
charges collected on excess weight at current rates. Free allow-
ance is 150 pounds on each whole ticket, and 75 pounds on each
half ticket.

TRANSPORTATION OF DOGS.

Dogs not crated, but securely tied or chained, will be trans-
ported free in baggage cars of regular passenger trains when ac-
compa'ied by caretaker or owner. Dogs in crates may be
checked, but charge, at excess baggage rates, will be made for
full weight. No free allowance on dogs in crates.

SLEEPING-CAR RATES, F. E. C. RY.

Upper Berth... ...................................... 2 50
Lower Berth...................... ................... 3 00
Section........ ...................... ................ 50
Drawing Room................. ....................... 9 00
Passengers occupying SEATS in sleeping cars will be charged
same rate as for parlor cars; no SEATS to be sold in sleeping car
after ten o'clock at night nor to destinations at which the sched-
uled arrival is after ten o'clock at night, except that seats may
be sold on sleepers Miami to Palm Beach.

CHAIR-CAR RATES.


These rates apply "
in | I I i
either direction. C -

JcKs$onville. ..... $0.5( ,1 75 $0.75 ,i1 0l0 $1 25
St. Augustine.. ...... 5') .50 1 00 1.25
Evst Palat'a ... .0 .. 50 75 1 00
Ormnon .5 .i .. 5 .75
Deytona........... .75 50 I .25 .50 .75
New Smyrna. 1 00 .75 .25 .25 .50
Ti;usvillo.. .... 100 75 .50 ...... .25
Ro'kledge......... 1.25 1 00 .75 25
Ft. Pierce ..... 1 75 1.50 1.25 50 50
Palm Beach. .... 2.00 1 75 1.50 1.25 1.00
Miami. .......... 2.00 2 00 2 00 ] 2.00 1.75





$1.75 1$2 00 $2.00
1 75 2 00 2.00
1 25 1 75 2.o00
1 25 150 2.001
1.25 1 50 2.00
1 00 1 25 2.00
.50 1 25 2.00
:50 1 00 1.75
... 50 1.25
5) :75
1.25 1 .75 ......







keg BWest aVana (lagan


TIIE Peninsular & Occidental Steamship Co., operate,
the steamers between Miami and Key West, Miami
and Havana, and Miami and Nassau. Arrivals at and de-
partures from Miami will be so arranged as to connect with
the passenger trains of the Florida East Coast Railway.
The service to Key West is year round, two trips per week
in summer and tri-weekly during winter tourist season.
The service to Havana is year round, semi-weekly during
the summer months and tri-weekly during January, Feb-
ruary, March, and April.
The Nassau steamer, S. S. Miami, is operated only Jan-
uary to April. During the month of January sailings will
he twice each week. During February and March sailings
will be three times per week, and during April, on account
of the business slacking up about this time, the sailings
will be semi-weekly.


SEXFpEo$ A1ENIE$



AT every agency station of the Florida East Coast Rail-
way is also an agent of the SOFTIIERN EXPRESS COM-
pany, which forwards express matter on the fast passenger
trains of this Company, in charge of special messengers and
in connection with other responsible Express Companies to
all points accessible to express.


Money Orders Sold to All Points
in the United States and Canada.


First Class service, courteous treatment and reasonable
rates.





TOURISTS are advised to Purchase
STickets to St. Augustine, the termi-
nating point of the through Vestibule
Trains from New York and the East
and from Chicago and the West. At St.
Augustine Tourist Tickets are on sale to
all parts of the State. it .0 .t 5t


I


I


For Further Information, additional
copies of this Pamphlet, or a hand-
some Souvepir Album, address
J. D. RAHNER,
A. G PP. A., F. E O. R ..
ST. AvUGUSTINE, FLA.




























(OPYRIGITET D OCTOBER 1901
-BY-
.1. 1). RAIINER, A. (. P. A.,
-FOR-
THE FLORIDA EAST COAsT
RAILW AY COM PANY




1N Er 't :u re !..1.810 -- 1itl

j rHO% ;..1 ,-O,''1 ..



Cf l..J~. ', Pi-. .. ..1
Fvro A CKS. t O i Lc h, .... hr u" -in lfnoa(


...T I Utroteel h'odo 1el
hoimis.I icoile? orders
b -rarl ir.ir ... Casineo
\ lit i ANArTil A
From JACKSONVILLE the r.,i-:ian d exti-nt.1 .ith,.l. t thrl.,uih I-.ne n \ r.i-~Jil. L. i
with hero? and th rv t, i'. ,l-,;iy? 'alr-i-tt- v. ith it, t,:,,-rrl. F ..-Pa ~ 'l lt ,a, il
ipjlf ;' iu r th- ,lc ,n q+. cri,v.. th 4,f thi Fl,,r;.Jti H iinn ,-,k.. I l .,rria I' ."" I
ST. AUGUSTINE, thlh the Miitlan'. ItC ,r u n the e t Ihi 4 r - '. '
S.rha ,tian ,,r th- net It, .nigrfri.-n h,.telk It all- ,:,rr,,,,irnd ,l
h.mei,. i..-y.:ling -te r~lv -hi-re, n t n n th.Ie [trja.h, .. h re it i- ( .
Un,',irT ,'rii-d. lirev ani i an,.i-rit I.,ndn-irk-. -t
Neair St. Aiqzi-Ir in-. ari.Jd v ;ihr, rilioM .Iri.irr: *-r v. he-hicl w '"" g,.! l '
*l;-tan-i l. ia MTilt ri. tiarh it- i r r.e Vii-vair.l at i Tl i ....... l I- I. i -~
tations .; and Nlatanza, with Ite old- furt. Fr-.m. St. Arig-li tne ii .
.- the railroad extends in a southwpesterly direetiin to ----i-
EAST PALATrA through the pine lands. with here and. there the bright ":
green of the sugar cane. Again it takes a s,.thea3terly dire.-- : -, L
tir.n, and ..-n af'tr .:arinng th.- Eaot P'.latlti :t-di,"n ,,- rt "
an.d only gllnip-s ,. i the io hn -.n i- r
ST. JOHNS RIVER is ntiten.
SAN MATEO, illi ith t h-jatifil h.--up-r arrgi-I Ith I..'.v I. ... r n or". r 0-- ,,,, O
fA n the St. .,rhri Rit -r. rand neri .iv r., J- -l. .lel t, 'i. fr ,3 rn ,'hl.. SrnJ.,. r- III p ..k I
bv bra nci-h e gr. ij..> fr.ni E f rt Palatkai. w rT.-. ih- f 'H ai. '* :
TOMOKA RIVER t O nt i)rr,.n.l frni E P.it. l l- rI,-,a r-t-nls thr.i, tgh. Dayt na o,,
a n-tL nr.-t,- tinwilr-r -.ti.,n. 'The Tm-rn kLa i a tat the l .lj .t' thr 0 o .
East _,.at. Ner t e ?e'r '_- P he n t -iri r--- -
ORMOND., whre the Hi iTEL i.RMOtN[ iN 1... t ,i. ..] nted f.r it ii hilieng ', .h.% ri.. ...''
and driving, ieupled with a hard h.-aih, 'Ah-re a spin fIn the Blue Sp.ring r .' u,,. .
bicycle or behind a pair if goio, hborrs,- iA nim,-t rnWj.'t,.Il-. L. a B 'v Smyrna
DAYTONA, the city of winter cottage life; niles -f beautiful r.id,-. Snod F.. i;, a Is
also bicycle trail connecting the two towns-Ormondi anil Daytona. Sanord F .",0':" "'" 0 "
NEW SMYRNA, the site of the early English settlement of Florida: ruins
of ancient sugar mills, bricks for which were hrought from Holland.
Trains connect here for Lake Helen, Orange City and DeLand. L' ,Hjs. p, I
To the east, between the Tomoka and Turnrull Ray. rnnitant views of the aUS
HALIFAX River add to the beauty of the scenery; and at this print i4 seen the lightho use ati ILI
NEW SMYRNA INLET, the mouth of the Halifax River. Su.n after leaving New Smyrna, the A tli
HILLSBORO RIVER adds its picturesqueness to the landscape, and before actually M E lE.
realizing it. and just after passing ri-;bec..,,n o a a- l.....
WEST SHILOH, the rustic bridge over the headl-ater- of the Tilh l .
INDIAN RIVER is pas-ed. an. i th.- br,-al and 1-taurifil In.i.. River s[.rcaad- ,Lit t, tle Ta.t- "" ", C.
wiaril,. iith MIare rtt.- Llan. J ,a ii.ltri n-k. n.t l-. f..r ir te ..- ~-llInt In-lian t iver ,..ranger--. I- N ..,,' B.,h
Fr,.nm the h,-ad.r-aterI nf th- Iniiarn Riter t, H 0r... ., i.i
TITUSVILLE, alhng the bank i.f the- rivar. i the htm- if ih. -r.rn-. v liitr- indli (Iite i
h-r-oin. dl 'k-, ajnd ti-h. Here: asri. Igri,, -.f i.ilm i illhrl "t;iihlv-r'.-- [it-rn.'" ciara.se '_" -al
i.f their likerie-. to eon rmTii:..,i fta their d .-iter with the h: nln ..iuek in the ground. a-i .i .
Titusnille ais the County St-t of Brvrrl County. and. uith ran Ialli-, sa the 1
p. i ncipal shipping point fur fruit and vegetable. Connection is made at Tituaviile
with steamers for the m 0m l.
CANAVERAL CLUB. Between Titusville and
EAU GALLIE are mnan\ ..f th- larne.st .-r.n're gr.-e.', in thi- Stat. an.] at nt t ""
ROCKLEDGE ilsnttiti-e- of tlief may I sn .n the trh- t,. At E:js Iullie the Inlian Liverrrn I. ..
BANANA RIVER j.iin. Tiati i. th, n.-rthern nlinitr ift . iite tl "i,.-,n d.ir" pineapple group in g.. '
THE RAILROAD -kirt the .hire .t .f Ithi Inrlien F;i-i f..r .-ne lIrlrir and t-.vrtnri .-fie nile-n, an]/ ;lurne U -"' .".
rrT-nte. 'reek; a:nd river nr .'h,,;e bi-.;r', al mir h t th e alr.ieadJ lriiutit'ul ,'-ntr' Frm
MELBOURNE. a thriving N-w Eneland t illrri. t,.. Ena pd n' i
FORT PIERCE, the ,ctaern enid -.f the liner,f ft'.rts an.l i...-k.Idl. rretoheJ ar.r.l; s the State i ."t '
during the great Semino:,le War. pin, .ppli,- Il.intati..,ri, ar, n --tlea le frinil tiniI to time. '. l,
After I-asing Furt Pi-r.'e, h,, rv-r, tile rua:i ev.t.n.js thr.ugli nii-. fiand n iles / , '.., ..
of pineapple pilanti. passing at ji, .,: i... a; B "' '.
EDEN the plantation and home of the pioneer pinealpplh planter. Captain Ri.b-ardl. At ..-'
ST. LUCIE, four miles north of Fort Pierce, and vistible frlm the train, is the Ainter S '''
home of Senator Quay. / or i
JENSEN, a thriving Swedish settlement, also has large pineapple plantations. o0
POTTSDAM is on the St. Lucie River, opposite St. Lu.ie Inlet and Sewall's Point. F C, 3m
Here is some of he hhe n the igheState. ,t St. Li e-4 IS R.ar .its
HOBE SOUND, a settlement of yvrung Enalishnien engaged in pineapple culture. / ,t Piece, .
Part of the Indian River. Beautiful home srilre in the bankli of the atund. r0AliYO 0
WEST JUPITER Lighthouse. at the Jupiter Inlet. vi\iible from the train; view- of tlhe '
ocean. Southern endl .-. I lIlian River anil junctin .f Indian River, L.,-iahat-:hie .... i
River and Lake nP.rth r'retk. S,-eni ,.,f the r"-nrane: "E.i-t .noels End -,f the i-i
Na.ssau ,"j l,-., anil p-iint at uhi-h the iir'oin riaJd.- -ret report tir.p n arrint in H r R -l.
lih.m- walter-s aft' r her f'airTn u trip fr,.im ti PIa-r'.. .A.li
WEST PALM BEACH, ,in the vi-:t hail: f4 Lak.- \\.,rtl. heaial.iirtl-r r.ir tlI fii.-' oi A COertl- :~
Lake \V..rth pioeai plppl ar.trt itla u i s. pp.l -ite. I r,,"'"
PALM BEACH. Hre the train ia,'cs rki-r Lak, \W-irth Bril ;-- ti, the n..td htl-Is. ROYAL obl eSou .
POINt'IANA and THE BREAKERS. S-..ni, f thi :tirn-.ti..n.; "t PAim Br-a-h -ire: Th Jnpiter '
immren-e s.alt-wat-r --.vinm;nin p.I.,l: surf t.Aling :;i.; .1-. f t I-a.:h year ; Lhe- originall m B i. s.,io~ a.
Indian trails, n-ow biyclel paths; the Oc-an Pier. extending ,ne-third nuile o)ul into the< la,
ocean, from which can be caught almost any kind of finh one desires, and one never i r o i
returns empty handed. .. w" i.1r,
LANTANA, 0.outhern end ..f L.ike W'.rtir. Th, heart -f the -.el-etrateid Mnrninig ;l].ry Muck We"t Pali "tL B!" aPlln Beach
Lands." on nhich l.rce iiiiarntilli- ..f rv-et.iil.h- are ai+i.. Tie ,re t drainaige .:nal. ri.s h e Brrakenr
BOYNTON AND LINTON. C..l..ni fi..m Mi-hiti.Ln and. Neiw Y..rk. Luarg a.rt.-rnte under L c. l ""r'
euitiva-tin in toimiat..e.. bearing an.] either vi-getail.,-I L:rI .- .I-C rv irn N,-,'.'ily lanttel ,ii.i, RGol. pi ne Gair
fr.inge and lemrn and grape fruit grm. :s. ,aB .i" iis.[0. "r'
FORT LAUDERDALE. Old Indian furt. Her-- tI ai t -rji i. uu'ill. II vel.,..mc.i. and itd I.-arture .- [ir, .' i L
speeded. by Seminisle botv. and girls. Thi- f.irmciL in tlmiir natlre undte-i. n
NEW RIVER, diroing directly from the heart -.f the- .o ,-.
EVERGLADES. Orange tree., ..f great age, unhurt by the great frrezte of IS'4I. rI 'n" i 1i
MODELO. A floirrihirng ciIlony rf thrifty Danes. settled in pine lan.d. Beginning of .. ,
drain. f...r reo.laiming the great New, River marsh. Large quantities, of pineapples. '*": i--.
lemnt.ns, grape fruit andi reti-ahles grown. F.i
HOLLANDALE. A S,'edi-h Lutherqn e..li-.r. frn.m New Y..rk. settled fr.r thi purpo e .f f','ii .
vegetable 'r.'ringr on New Riter niar-h land. i.a,
ARCH CREEK. Nalrinrl r--k bridge o.'er til; beautiful .treai n. lhi. i. t.n
of the iutl-t ..f the Erergla-le-.
LEMON CITY. Rr,-idents [irinipally en.ga ed in n- t\ 4i',
lemon and i-itrus fruit growing. Fir t vi f 1! ,Miamii & -.
BAY BISCAYNE. t b.' '., F!,
MIAMI, the future meltr,.poli, of Fl.rida. HOTEL RoC' i ,.:4-..0 r. e,! -'
RHiYAL PALM. Paved streets. sewters. --t 0 &-" .,A.. :.' .. ; H
v.':ter w.r rk.. P iseay rive DriveI long L_ ( ;
I-,y sh,,rei. L,,ta f.,r rich and /' 4, tc
p...r. Terrminu-, of / .--- / ao ,.
FLORIDA EASI COAST RAILWAY. '' / I .. :'",*i',
Lan.ls capable iof raising .
trorpii.al fruits. tOrg.ni.:d a Sa Do .. .- IS AND
city go'vernlm.nt r ape I l... .. ....r i 'l
Florida, Fott r Rk BI OF rLOR.ID. ... ,R .B... YhF.e r, N-..
Light. Flurida Keys, 0 AV: b:.i ..a -SH.-uh I m JAl ,
Key Lap-n. Norris A'Ut. olf -. "
C'oev-arn it Gr.ve, h.-llie of
Mr. Kirk Mi nr.. In n. .
this vicinit\ are tl ,he ,; ,
it:n..-n f Mr Mun- :A; ;" .
r,' --t.,r-r-,. "The *'" 0 IO
Flaming.. Feath-r," te-l. -o t st r1
"Wakulla." et.. "Key ei. I
P. & C. STEAM- FLORIDA I I S TR .IT
SHIPS t,, I l
KEY WEST, 4' c-A)
N A S S A U ., ^ 1 j I t "____
HAVANA ys, it 0'0."o cr--it,
--fr'm in--- H an .. V P "'


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