Group Title: Series of delightful tours through Florida with prolonged visits at St. Augustine, Tampa, Lake Worth and other popular resorts: season of 1895.
Title: Series of delightful tours through Florida with prolonged visits at St. Augustine, Tampa, Lake Worth and other popular resorts: season of 1895.
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Title: Series of delightful tours through Florida with prolonged visits at St. Augustine, Tampa, Lake Worth and other popular resorts: season of 1895.
Series Title: Series of delightful tours through Florida with prolonged visits at St. Augustine, Tampa, Lake Worth and other popular resorts: season of 1895.
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7-) TOURS TO2i<


AND C 7U BA N
Leaving Boston Jan. 10 and Jan. 24.
Leaving New York Jan. II and Jan. 25.
Lf a R.1 hl I elp" Jij. II and Jan. 25.
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Hotel Royal Poinciana, Palm Beach, Lake Worth, Fla.






SEASON OF 1895.


A Series of Delightful Tours
THROUGH


FLORIDA,
WITH PROLONGED VISITS AT

ST AU(USINN, TAMPA, LAKE WORTH,
AND OTHER POPULAR RESORTS.

Five Parties Returning with Personal Escort. The Tickets also Good to Return
on Any Regular Train until May 31.


RAYMOND & WHITCOMB,
BOSTON OFFICE: 296 Washington Street, opposite School Street.
NEW YORK OFFICE: 31 East Fourteenth Street, Lincoln Building, Union Square.
PHILADELPHIA OFFICE: 20 South Tenth Street, Mutual Life Insurance Building.









MAP OF
THE PENINSULA OF
FLORIDA
LSTINE




4ONO
AY TONA 0
MfWsMYRNA













v^|^'S 1






SEASON OF 1895.


A SERIES OF FLORIDA TOURS.

FLORIDA stands without a rival as the possessor of the leading winter resorts of
the Atlantic Coast. In no part of the United States is the climate more deli-
cious. Nowhere can there be found more beautiful lakes, more picturesque
rivers, broader ocean beaches, or more magnificent hotels. At the earnest solicitation
of many persons.who have traveled under our arrangements in former years across
the continent to California, Mexico and Alaska, or to the World's Columbian Exposi-
tion, or through Europe by special train, we have perfected the most elaborate plans
for a series of tours through Florida in January, February and March, 1895. In thus
providing superior facilities for visiting the land of flowers we have the hearty co-
operation of the managers of the railroad and the hotels which owe their existence to
the remarkable foresight and untiring energy of Mr. Henry M. Flagler, as well as those
of the Plant System, and the other hotels and railways of the State. Our excursion
enterprises have long included every other part of North America, and this addition
to the list will be found in every particular most delightful.
The attractions of Northern and Central Florida are somewhat familiar to the
public. With the completion this year of Mr. Flagler's admirably built and splendidly
equipped railroad, extending almost the entire length of the east coast, and with the
opening of his latest enterprise, the elegant Hotel Royal Poinciana on Lake Worth,
it becomes possible for the first time to visit the tropical part of the State also with
ease and comfort. The vast and magnificent establishment just named is a fitting







counterpart of the grand hotels at St. Augustine, Ormond and Tampa. Our arrange-
ments contemplate a leisurely trip to Lake Worth and return, including on the way
all of the principal places of interest in the peninsula. Every phase of Florida life
and scenery will be brought under observation. We are to visit alike the east coast
and the west coast, the rivers and lakes of the interior and the Indian River country,
the two largest cities, Jacksonville and Tampa, fashionable St. Augustine and purely
tropical Lake Worth. There are to be prolonged stays at each of the three largest
hotels in the State, the Hotel Ponce de Leon at St. Augustine, the Tampa Bay Hotel
at Tampa, and the Hotel Royal Poinciana at Palm Beach, Lake Worth. Interest-
ing visits to Jacksonville, Palatka, Ormond, Winter Park and Rockledge are also
provided for. An excursion from St. Augustine up the romantic Ocklawaha River by
steamer to Silver Spring and back, and also up the St. John's to Sanford and return
will be a novel and delightful feature of the trips. The round of travel, in short,
will embrace all of the places of historic, picturesque or climatic interest in Florida,
and the tours will not be hurried, but there will be ample time for rest and enjoyment.
Our methods of conducting travel have been known for many years to be the most
perfect attainable, as the names of our thousands of patrons, including the first families
of New England and the Middle States, well attest; and the Florida trips will be
carried through in the same superior nianner that characterizes our tours to California,
Alaska, Mexico, and the Yellowstone National Park.

PERSONAL ESCORT AND ATTENTION.
Our patrons will not be left unceremoniously to shift for themselves on arrival at
Jacksonville on the outward trip, but will have the benefit.of the personal care and at-
tention of our agents in visiting the more Olistant and less easily accessible parts of






the State. This advantage will be appreciated particularly by ladies traveling with
out other escort. Members of our parties who wish for more time in Florida will have
the additional privilege of prolonging their stay at will and returning North either
independently, on the regular through trains at any time during the winter and spring,
or with personally conducted parties on certain convenient dates, as shown in the
itineraries. Those who are compelled to shorten their stay, through sickness or
other- causes, will have the same opportunity to return on any day. Throughout
Florida our parties will be under the charge of competent conductors, who will relieve
the passengers of all the ordinary cares and annoyances of travel. Those who leave
the parties at any point may likewise apply to our representatives for information or
assistance with regard to railroad train service, hotel accommodations, the checking of
baggage, securing of sleeping-car berths, forwarding of mail, etc.
FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT.
Our "stop-over "arrangements are such as to obviate entirely the objection which is
sometimes made to membership in tourist parties, that the traveler is thereby com-
pelled to return home at a fixed time. The tourists will keep together on the outward
journey, and those who continue with the parties throughout Florida will have the
advantage of constant personal escort and attention. But those who desire to remain
at St. Augustine, Ormond, Tampa, Lake Worth, or, indeed, at any other place visited
Sin Florida, longer than the scheduled periods, may do so without being confined to
any definite programme arranged in advance. We have also completed arrangements
under which several parties will visit the beautiful island of Cuba, and pass a full
week in the picturesque tropical city of Havana, sailing from Port Tampa, Fla., and
returning to that point: Full information about these delightful tours will be found
in the latter part of this book.





A COMPREHENSIVE TOUR.
The route of our excursions, both to and from Florida and in that State, will be
found unusually attractive. Visits are to be paid on the outward trip to the splendid
Lookout Inn on the summit of historic Lookout Mountain at Chattanooga, Tenn., and
also to the interesting and progressive city of Atlanta. On the homeward journey some
time will be devoted to Savannah, and also to Washington, the National Capital.
These halts by the 'way not only afford opportunity for sight-seeing at delightful places
not ordinarily visited in going to and from Florida, but also br ak the railroad journey
at convenient aid restful intervals. The train schedules, indeed, will be such as to
require only two nights in sleeping cars on the outward trip from Boston to St.
Augustine, and only one night on the return from St. Augustine to Boston. In Florida
our parties will visit all of the more famous resorts, and some of great interest not in--
cluded in the ordinary rounds of travel. The hotels at which we shall have accom-
modations are well known as the finest of their respective cities or resorts. Our list
includes the Park Avenue Hotel, or The Brunswick, New York; Lookout Inn, Look-
out Mountain; the Hotel Aragon, Atlanta; the Hotels Ponce de Leon, Alcazar and
Cordova, St. Augustine; the Putnam House, Palatka; the Hotel Ormond, Ormond;
the Tampa Bay Hotel, Tampa; The Seminole, Winter Park; The Hotel Indian River,
Rockledge; the Hotel Royal Poinciana, Palm Beach; The De Soto, Savannah; and
the Ebbitt House, Washington. A detailed account of the climate and other natural
attractions of Florida its countless lakes and winding rivers, its leading cities, and
palatial hotels, and a description of the route to be taken by our parties to and from
Florida and throughout that State will be found on pages 21-72.
. .For daily itineraries of the tours see pages 13-I9.






SHOW THE PARTIES WILL TRAVEL.
Our arrangements for these tours include the best attainable accommodations for
comfortable travel. Both on the outward and homeward trip between Boston and
New York special parlor cars on the New York, New IHaven & Hartford Railroad will
be provided. From New York to Chattanooga we shall have a special Pullman vesti-
buled train with dining car over the Royal Blue line and Shenandoah Valley route,
and the sleepers will go through to Atlanta'and St. Augustine over the Southern
Railway line. Pullman cars will also be employed on the extended trips in Florida.
Returning from Lake Worth to St. Augustine, palace cars are likewise to be brought
into requisition, and the Pullman sleepers will come through from St. Augustine to
Savannah, Washington, and New York, over the Florida Central & Peninsular,
Southern, and Royal Blue lines. With many years' experience in conducting tourist
parties, both in America and Europe, we are thoroughly familiar with the require-
ments of the best class of travelers, and nothing that can add to the comfort. and
elegance of these trips will be overlooked.
PRICES OF TICKETS.
The price of tickets for these tours will be as follows:-
Boston .. $.345.00
New York $325.00
Philadelphia $322.00
These prices cover all traveling expenses for the entire trip in accordance with the
annexed itinerary, including first-class passage over all routes going and returning;
side trips from Chattanooga to Lookout Mountain and return, and St. Augustine up
the Ocklawaha and St. John's Rivers to Silver Spring and Sanford, respectively, and






return; a double berth (half a section) in the sleeping cars and-seats in parlor cars;
meals in the dining car -or at hotels or dining stations en- route, as set forth;
hotel accommodations at New York (for the Boston passengers), Lookout Moun-
tain, Atlanta, St. Augustine, Palatka, Ormond, Tampa, Winter Park, Rockledge,
Palm Beach, Savannah, and Washington; stateroom berth and meals on the Ockla-
waha and St. John's River steamers; all transfers to and from hotels and carriage
rides mentioned in the itinerary; services of conductors; all transportation, transfer
and care of ordinary checked baggage -in short, every needed expense of the entire
round trip from Boston, New York or Philadelphia back to the same point.
BAGGAGE ARRANGEMENTS. I
Baggage to the amount of 150 pounds for- each full ticket will be transported free,
all in excess of that weight being liable to extra charge at the customary rates.
Each passenger should check his baggage to Chattanooga, Tenn. The checks will
bd taken up on the train, and all checked baggage will be under the charge of the bag-
gage master of the excursion, who will relieve the passengers of care with regard to
it. Hand baggage in every case. must be looked after by the owner, and it is advisable
to take no more or heavier luggage of this description than can be conveniently carried
-into and out of cars, omnibuses, or hotels.
HINTS ABOUT CLOTHING.
The.wardrobe of the Florida tourist should include b6th winter and summer cloth-
ing. The former will of course be required when leaving home. During the stay in
Florida such apparel as is suitable for spring and autumn at the North will be
generally worn. Occasional northers may be-felt, and for such times, as well
as for out-door evening wear, or.for drives, or excursions on the water, overcoats,







shawls, or other wraps should be at hand. Dust will be encountered, but the heat is
not likely to be oppressive anywhere on the route of our excursions. For out-door
exercise at the seashore, serviceable clothing and stout walking shoes or boots are
desirable. Bathing suits may be taken for use in the southern part of the State.
MAILING DIRECTIONS.
Members of our parties who have no definite plans in regard to their movements in
Florida, and who are unable to leave precise mailing directions with their friends, can
have their letters addressed "Care Raymond & Whitcomb, Hotel Alcazar, St. August-
ine, Fla.," andthe same will be forwarded to any point requested. In order to get
their mail promptly, persons whose movements are undecided should register their
addresses as often as changed at our St. Augustine office, as above.
SUGGESTIONS ABOUT JOINING A PARTY.
Persons desiring to join one of our parties should send their names to be registered
as early as convenient. A name is registered as soon as an intention to go is expressed,
and this registration secures a place in the cars, at hotels where sojourns may be made,
and in every way insures membership in the party. No payment of money is required
in this connection. If circumstances prevent the person from going, notice of the fact
should be sent to us, and the name will be taken from the list and the next applicant
permitted to fill the vacancy. Tickets can be taken and paid for at the convenience
of the passenger any time to within five days of the date of departure, and should the
passenger even then be prevented from going, the mohey will be refunded. The
advantage of sending in names early is readily seen. In all cases the parties are:
limited in numbers, and it frequently occurs that they are filled qfore the dates
of departure.




16
Persons are not compelled to come to the starting point for the purpose of joining
an excursion, but may connect with the train at any convenient point along the route.
The sleeping-car berths are assigned previous to the date of starting, and those belong-
ing to passengers who join at points on the route are invariably held for them until
they are required.
STOP-OVER PRIVILEGES.

Members of our parties who desire to prolong their sojourns in Florida, or to travel
through that State independently, can do so. The tickets are limited to use with the
scheduled excursions, in accordance with the regular itineraries, until arrival at Jack-
sonville, Fla., on the outward trip. Beyond that point entire freedom of movement is
allowed. The railroad tickets for the various lines traversed in Florida, and for the
return trip from Jacksonville north, wil. Je good until May 31, and may be used by the
holders independently at any time. The plan. of our trips thus permits the widest
possible liberty.
Persons who leave their scheduled parties in Florida have the privilege of returning
North with any subsequent party under personal escort, as well as independently on
any train any day,
Members of our excursions who leave their regular scheduled parties should bear
inmind the information given below :
Slthose who desire to return with a party must register their names for the particular.
datj at least one week in advance of the time of leaving St. Augustine. All appli-
cations for registration should be made to Raymond & Whitcomb, Hotel Alcazar,
St: Augustine, or C. P. Harrell, Agent Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian River
SIalway, Hotel Royal Poinciana, Palm Beach. The parlor and slteping-car coupons






Journey must be forwarded to one of the above addresses at least
omdwance of tAe date of departure. Where this rule is not observed, places
aig;ng cars will not be held, and the names-will not be placed on the room-
the hotels io Savannah and Washington.
returning independently must exchange their parlor and sleeping car
s specified thereon. Applications for parlor or sleeping car accommodations
bd m ade in advance (and as early as possible) by persons returning independ-
to Raymond & Whitcomb, Hotel Alcazar, St. Augustine; or W. D. Allen, Agent
nville, St. Augustine & Indian River Railway, St. Augustine; or C. P. Harrell,
4 Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian River Railway, Hotel Royal Poinciana,
Mesc h.
WHEN TICKETS SHOULD BE TAKEN.
Sfor the Florida tours should be taken on or before Saturday, January 5, for
party, and Saturday, January 19, for the second party,
STickets for the excursions, additional copies of this circular, and all needed in-
ion can be obtained of
RAYMOND & WHITCOMB,
SWashington Street, (Opposite School Street) Boston.
31 East Fourteenth Street, Lincoln Building, Unicu Square, New York.
20 South Tenth Street, Mutual Life Insurance Building, Philadelphia.





































UT INN, LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN,.,CHATTANOOGA, TENN.






ITINERARIES.


TWO TRIPS THROUGH FLORIDA.

r Jan. Tour No. i. First Day.- Leave Boston at 10.03 A. M. from the station
yv, Jan. 24. Tour No. 2. of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Park
1i parlor cats. Members of the party should check their baggage to Chattanooga. The checks
'takcit up on the train, and the baggage will be delivered at the rooms of the owners at Lookout
arkstupplied with the excursion tickets, and these, with the owner's name and home address
iBoribed thereon, should be attached to every trunk, valise, or other piece of baggage, to serve as
sewans of identification. The train willleave Providence at 11.13 A. M., New London 1.03 P.:M.,
w Haven 2.30 P. M.; lunch en route; arrive in New York at 4.30 P. M. ; transfer to the Park
Hotel, Wm. H. Earle & Son, proprietors, or The Brunswick, George Swett, manager.
iDAv,.Jan. i. Tour No. i. Second Day.-Carriage transfer from the hotel to the
AY, Jan. 25. Tour No. 2. station of the Central Railroad of New Jersey, foot of
y streetb where New York passengers will join the party; leave New York by ferry at 9.oo A. M., 1
Heave Jersey City at 9. 12 A. M. in a special train of vestibuled Pullman palace sleeping cars, with
car; proceed southward by the Royal Blue line, Baltimore & Ohio and Norfolk & Western Rail-
,leaving Bound Brook at 1o.oo A. M., Philadelphia (Baltimore & Ohio station, Twenty-fourth and
tnut streets, where Philadelphia passengers will join the party) at 11.42 A. M., Wilmington 12.16
M., Baltimore 2.25 P. M., and Washington 3.30 P. M.
a NOTr.- Baggage should be checked from New York, Philadelphia or other points to Chattanooga.
previous paragraph. .
SSATURDAY, Jan. 12. Tour No. I. Third Day;.-En route on the Norfolk & Western and
SATURDAY, Jan. 26. Tour No. 2. Southern Railways; arrive in Chattanooga, Tenn., at 2.30
p. M.; transfer from the Central station by the Chattanooga & Lookout Mountain Railway to the Look-
out Inn, M. S. Gibson, manager. ... .






Soe:, NoB.-_. Railway time changes at Bristol, Tenn., from Eastern standard, or 75th meridian, to Central
standard, or gosh meridian- one hour slower.

Jan. 13*
SSuD.AY. Jan. 3. Tour No. i Formth Day.- At Lookout Inri.
SUNDAY, Jan. 27. Tour No. .
'MONDAY, Jan. 14. Tour No. I. Fzift Day.- Transfer from Lookout Inn to thp Central
MONDAY, Jan. 28. Tour No. 2. station by the Chattanooga & Lookout Mountain Railway,
and leave Chattanooga by the Southern Railway at 2.oo P. s.; arrive in Atlanta'at 7.30 P. M. to the
Hotel Aragon, Chas. F. Dodge, manager.
TUESDAYa, Jan. 5. Tour No. i. Sixth Day.- In Atlanta. Carriage ride, visiting the
TUESDAY, Jan. 29. Tour No. 2. Capitol, Grant Park, the principal residence streets, and
other points of interest in and about the city; leave Atlanta by the Southern Railway at 7.30 P. M.
WEDNESDAY, Jan, x6. Tour No. x. Seventh Day.- From Jesup southward by the Savannah,
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30. Tour No. 2. Florida & Western Railway; arrive in Jacksonville at 8.25
A. M.; breakfast and dinner at the Union station dining rooms; carriage ride about the city; leave Jack-
sonville by the Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian River Railway at 12.45 P. M.; arrive in St. Augus-
tine at 2.oo P. ; omnibus transfer to The Ponce de Leon, C. B. Knott, mangaer.


THURSDAY, Jan. 17. Tour No. x.
THURSDAY, Jan. 31. Tour No. 2.
FRIDAY, Jan. x8. Tour No. I.
FRIDAY, Feb. i. Tour No. 2.
SAittRAY, Jan. I9. Tour No, I.
;SAIRDAY, Feb. Tour No. a.
: SUNDAY, Jan. 20o. Tour No. x,
SUNDAY, Feb. 3, Tour No. 2.
S : .Mo;I9AY,4Jan. 21. Tour No. .,
S,.I. MonnAY, Feb. 4. Tour No. 2.


SEighth Day.- At St. Augustine.


Ninth Day.- At St. Augustine.


Tenth Day.- At St. Augustine.

Eleventh Day.-iAt St. Augustine.

S-. Twelfth Day.- At St. Augustine.






'bh. Tour No. I. Thirteenth Day.- At St. Augustine.
5. Tour No.2.
V5 Jan. 23. Tour No. i.
e, Jan. 23. Tour No. 2. Fourteent Day.- At St. Augustine.
H i l 'eb. 6. Tour No. 2.
Jan. 24. Tour No. ) Fifteenth Day.- At St. Augustine.
a4s, Ifb. 7. Tour No. 2.
Jan. 25. Tour No. i. Sixteenth Day.- At St. Augustine.
Ay, Feb. 8. Tour No. 2.
PAY, Jan. 26. Tour No. Seventeenth Day.- At St. Augustine.
A, Feb. 9. Tour No. 2.
VAi, Jan. 27. Tour No. i. Eighteenth Day.-At St. Augustine.
IAY, Feb. 28. Tour No. 2.
DAY, Jan. 28. Tour No. I. Nineteenth Day.- At St. Augustine.
siAY, Feb. xo. Tour No. 2.
T.-Parties will be formed during the stay in St. Augustine for a trip up the Ocklawaha and
's Rivers, leaving on different dates, and returning four days later, making-the actual time at the
Ponce de Leon eight and three-fourths days.
tDAY, Jan. 29. Tour No. i. Twentieth Day.-Transfer from The Ponce de Leon to
SDAvsY, Feb. 12. Tour No. 2. the Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian River station,
leave St. Augustine at 9.20 A. M.; arrive at Ormond at 11.50 A. M.; transfer to the Hotel Ormond,
rson & Price, managers; carriage ride, visiting the village of Ormond, the hammock forest with
dold Spanish ruins, the principal orange groves, the bank of the Halifax River, and the ocean beach.
E WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30. Tour No. I Twe -rst Day.-At Ormond.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13. Tour No. 2.
THURSDAY, Jan. 3 r. Tour No. Twenty-second Day.-Transfer to the station, and leave
THURSDAY, Feb. 14. Tour No. 2. Ormond by the Jacksonvi'le, St. Augustine & Indian
Liver Railway at 11.50 A. M.; from Orange City Janction southward by the Jacksonville, Tampa & Key
West Railway; dinner at Sanford; from Sanford southward by the South Florida Division of the





I6

Savannah, Florida & Western Railway; arrive at 7.05 P. M. at Tampa Bay Hotel, Tampa, J, H. King,
manager.

FRIDAY, Feb. x. Tour No. 2.
FRIDAY, Feb. 5. Tour Xo.. Tzwxenty-third Day.- At Tampa Bay Hotel.
SATURDAY, Feb. 2. Tour No. x.
SATURDAY, Feb. 6. Tour No. 2. Twenty-fourth Day.- At Tampa Bay Hotel.
SUNDAY, Feb. 3. Tour No. x.
SUNDAY, Feb. 1. Tour No 2. Twenty-fifth Day.-At Tampa Bay Hotel.
SUNDAY, Feb. 17. Tour No. 2. *
MONDAY, Feb. 4. Tour No. x. Twenty-sixth Day.- Leave Tampa Bay Hotel at 9.30
MONDAY, Feb. i8. Tour No. 2. A M. ; arrive at Winter Park at 12.45 P. M.; to The
Seminole, D. P. Hathaway, manager.

TUESDAY, Feb. 5. Tour No. x. Twenty-seventh Day.- Leave Winter Park at 12.45 P. M.;
TUESDAY, Feb. 19. Tour No.2. 2 from Sanford eastward by the Jacksonville, Tampa & Key
West Railway to Titusville, and from Titusville southward by the Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian
River Railway; arrive at Rockledge at 5.00 P. M.; to the Hotel Indian River, Andrew S. Lee, proprietor.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6. Tour No. ,. Twenty-eighth Day.- At Rockledge.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20. Tour No. 2.
THURSDAY, Feb. 7. Tour No. Twenty-ninth Day.- Leave Rockledge at 2.00 P. M., and
THURSDAY, Feb. 21. Tour No. 2. arrive at West Palm, Beach at 7.00 p. M.; transfer across
Lake Worth to the Hotel Royal Poinciana, Palm Beach, Henry W. Merrill, manager.
FRIDAY, Feb. 8. Tour No. i. Thirtieth Day.- At Lake Worth.
FRIDAY, Feb. 22. Tour No. 2.
SATURDAY, Feb. 9. Tour No. x. 1
SATURDAY, Feb. 23. Tour No. Thirty-first Day.- At Lake Worth.

SUNDAY, Feb. 2. Tour No. Thirty-second Day.- At Lake Worth.
SUNDAY, Feb. 24. Tour No. 2.






's. Tour No. x.
b. 25. Tour No.2. Thirty-third Day.- At Lake Worth.

12@b TourNo. x
Sab. Tour No. Thirty-fourth Day.- At Lake Worth.

i Feb. 27. Tour No. 2.
r Feb. 27. Tour No. 2. Tkirty-iffth Day.- At Lake Worth.

Feb. 14. Tour No. x. } Thirty-sixthDay.- At Lake Worth.
Feb. 28. Tour No. 2.

Y Feb. NS. Tour No. } Tirty-seventh Day.- At Lake Worth. -
ir, March x. Tour No. 2.

A a Feb. 6. Tour No. Thirty-eighth Day.- At Lake Worth.
RDAY, March 2. Tour No. 2.

Y, Fb. Tour No. Tkirty-nit Day.- At Lake Worth.
DAY, March 3. Tour No. z. .

iNDAY, Feb. I8. Tour No. x., Forti Day.- AtLake Wort.
M DAY, March 4. Tour No. 2.
EO~Jt.- For the accommodation of persons who wish to prolong their stay in Florida, three addi-
al parties will return North with personal escort. The returning itineraries are as follows: -

TUESDAY, Feb. 19. Tour No. x. Forty-first Day.- Transfer to the station of the Jackson-
TUESDAY, March 5. Tour No. 2. ville, St. Augustine & Indian River Railway, West Palm
TUESDAY, March 19. Tour No.'3. Beach, and leave at 8.oo A. M. in palace cars; dinner at the
TUESDAY, April 2. Tour No. 4. Hotel Indian River, Rockledge; arrive in St. Augustine at
TUESDAY, April s6. Tour No. 7.30 P. M.; transfer to The Alcazar, C. B. Knott, manager.




i 18
WBDNESDAY, Feb. 20. Tour No.. .
WBDNESDAY, March 6. Tour No. 2.
WEDNESDAY, March 20. Tour No. 3. Forty-second Day.- At St. Augustine.
WEDNESDAY, April 3. Tour No. 4.
WEDNESDAY, April 17. Tour No. 5.


THURSDAY, Feb. 21. Tour No. i.
THURSDAY, March 7. Tour No. 2.
THURSDAY, March 21. Tour No. 3.
THURSDAY, April 4. Tour No. 4.
THURSDAY, April 18. Tour No. 5.
Watson & Powers, managers.


Forty-third Day.- Transfer from the hotel, and leave
St. Augustine by the Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian
River Railway at 1.30 P. M.; from Jacksonville northward
by the Florida Central & Peninsular Railroad; arrive in
Savannah at 7.30 P. M.; omnibus transfer to The De Soto.


FRIDAY, Feb. 22. Tour No. I. Forty-fourth Day.--In Savannah; carriage ride, visiting
FRIDAY, March 8. Tour No. 2. the principal business and residence streets, Forsyth Park,
FRIDAY, March 22. Tour No. 3. Bonaventure Cemetery, and Thunderbolt; transfer from
FRIDAY, April 5. Tour No. 4. The De Soto to the Florida Central & Peninsular station,
FRIDAY, April x9. Tour No. 5. J and leave at 7.15 P. M.
NOTE.- Railway time changes at Columbia, S. C., from Central standard, or goth meridian, to
Eastern standard, or 75th meridian one hour faster.


SATURDAY, Feb. 23. Tour No. I.
SATURDAY, March 9. Tour No. 2.
SATURDAY, March 23. Tour No. 3.
SATURDAY, April 6. Tour No. 4.
SATURDAY, April 20. Tour No. 5.
SUNDAY, Feb. 24. Tour No. x%
SUNDAY, March ro. Tour No. 2.
SUNDAY, March 24. Tour No. 3.
SUNDAY, April 7. Tour No. 4.
SUNDAY, April 21. Tour No. 5.


Forty-fifth Day.-From Columbia northward by the
Southern railway; breakfast at Danville; arrive in Wash-
ington at 2.55 P. M. ; omnibus transfer to the Ebbitt House,
H. C. Burch, manager.



I Forty-sixth Day.- In Washington.




'9
gJ Tour No. x. Forty-seventh Day.-Omnibus transfer from the hotel to
xi. Tour No. 2. the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad station, and at 8.00 A. M.
5S. Tour No. 3. take Pullman palace cars for New York; members of the
Tour No. 4. parties who do not wish to visit New York can proceed
as. Tour No. 5. J directly through to Boston, arriving at the New York, New
Railroad station, Park square, at 9.00 P. M.; arrive in Philadelphia (Reading Ter-
er of Twelfth and Market streets) at 11.26 A. M.; lunch on the train; arrive in
43 r. M.; by ferry from Jersey City to Liberty street, New York, arriving at 1.55 P. M. ;
by carriage to the Park Avenue Hotel or The Brunswick.
SFeb. 26. Tour No. i. Forty-eighth Day.- Transfer from the hotel to the Grand
March ia. Tour No. 2. Central station, Forty-second street; leave New York in
March 26. Tour No 3. drawing-room cars at 10.03 A. M., and proceed to Boston
agy, April 9. Tour No.4. via the Shore line; lunch on the train; arrive at New
4^,v, April 23. Tour No. 5. Haven at x1.55 A. M., New London at 1.26 P. M., Provi-
?5 p. m., and Boston (New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad station, Park square) at

,--As this itinerary is made up in advance of the announcement of the winter time tables of
as railroads, slight changes may be necessary.








































LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN BATTLEFIELD AND MOCCASIN BEND.







TWO TRIPS TO FLORIDA.

IT Leaving Boston, New York and Philadelphia.
Syor wida tourist parties will leave Boston from the New York, New Haven
'.aytford Railroad Station, Park Square, at 10.03 A. M., Thursday, January Io,
Thursday, January 24, respectively, in parlor cars, and proceed directly to
glrk, a transfer being made from the Grand Central station to The Brunswick
SIrk Avenue Hotel. Luncheon will be provided en route. The train passes
Providence, New London, New Haven and other cities, where persons who
can join the parties. Carriages will be taken the following morning to the
Sof the Central Railroad of New Jersey, foot of Liberty street, and the travelers
wve New York by ferry at 9.00 A.M. and Jersey City by train at 9.12 A. M.
ibers of the parties who start from New York will depart from the station of
ntral Railroad of New Jersey, foot of Liberty street, at 9.00 A. M., and take the
'Blue line train at Jersey City at 9.12 A. M. Friday, January ii, or Friday, Janu-
The route southward is by way of Bound Brook and Philadelphia. Philadel-
passengers will take the train at the Baltimore & Ohio station, Twenty-fourth
IChestnut streets, at 11.42 A. M. The train passes through Chester, Wilmington,
Otimore, and Washington, and passengers can join the party at these points.
At Havre de Grace the train crosses the Susquehanna River. Historic Harper's
irry, with its wild scenery, and its romantic interest due to John Brown's famous
Id, is also on this line. At Shenandoah Junction, W. Va., we reach the Norfolk &
western Railroad, and the journey over that and the Southern Railway Company's
stem takes the traveler through rich and productive sections of Virginia and Tenn-







essee. Roanoke, Va., Pulaski, Salem, the seat of Roanoke College, and Bristol, which
stands upon the boundary line in both Virginia and Tennessee, are upon this part of
the line. The Norfolk & Western road traverses a rich mineral section, and many
prosperous towns in addition to those we have named have grown up along the route.
At Bristol we enter upon the extensive Western division of the Southern Railway
System. Many flourishing Tennessee towns and cities are passed through, including
Johnson City, Jonesboro, Morristown, and Knoxville,.
Chattanooga and Lookout Inn.
Chattanooga, Tenn., will be reached Saturday afternoon, aphd rp shall remain there
until Monday afternoon, making the delightful Lookout Inn,'p the summit of Look-
out Mountain, our abiding place. The ascent is made over thea4Cfitanooga & Look-:
out Mountain Railway. The historic city of Chattanooga, ~ is situated on the.
south bank of the Tennessee River, has already assumed a pomIinent place among
the leading cities of the South. Before the war it had nearly 5-0o inhabitants. The
census of 1890 gave the city a population of 29,100oo, while the sabWubs were accredited
with 1400ooo more. The surroundings of Chattanooga not only have much historic
interest in connection with some of the greatest events of the late war, but are
extremely picturesque. Viewed from any height within the city-Cameron Hill, for
example, which may be ascended by means of an inclined railway -the widespread
scene presents*great diversity. The two objects that instantly command attention are
the winding Tennessee River, which enfolds the city like a huge serpent, and the bold
heights of Lookout Mountain, rising 2,300 feet above the sea, just beyond the south-
western suburbs, where the river makes a great bend. It was on those heights that
General Hgoker fought his famous "Battle above the Clouds," November 24, x83.




s3
Upon the very sunimit of Lookout Mountain, with a magnificent outlook toward&
the east, stands Lookou: Inn. This splendid hotel, with ample accommodations for'
500 guests, owes its maintenance and present success to New England enterprise.
The hotel is 365 feet long and four stories high. It is a modern structure, built iq the
best manner, and is one of the most elegant and commodious hotels of the present
day. The manager is Mr. M, S. Gibson, an experienced hotel man.
Atlanta.
Returning from Lookout Inn to Chattanooga by the mountain railway on Monday,
we continue onward over the Southern Railway line, past the fields of some of the
severest engagements of the Civil War, by way of Dalton and Rome, to Atlanta.
Our headquarters for a day in Atlanta will be at the Hotel Aragon.
Atlanta is the capital of Georgia, the largest city in the State, and in r89o was
exceeded in population by only four cities south of the Potomac and the Ohio- New
Orleans, Louisville, Richmond and Nashville. By the census of that year ti'had
65,533 inhabitants. The "directory count" in the autumn of the same year made the
population 88,939, and in 1893 it was io6,88x. Atlanta has an elevation of about Ix,oo,
feet above the sea, standing on the dividing ridge between the Atlantic Ocean and the
Gulf of Mexico, and boasts of an equable climate, perfect drainage and a very low
death rate. There are 50 miles of paved streets, iSo miles of paved sidewalks,: 50
miles of sewers, Ior miles of electric street railway, and z2 miles of.dummy linas.
Streets radiate in every direction from the Union Depot as a centre. The principal
public buildiings are the State Capitol, the Court House, the Custom House, and the
Chamber of Commerce, besides which there are many handsome business edifices.
The Grand Opera House, adjoining the Hotel Aragon, is said to be the third largest




24
in the United States, having seats for 2,700 people. The Capitol occupies an entire
block bounded by Capitol avenue, Washington, Mitchell and Hunter streets, and was
finished in 1889 at a cost
of $I,ooo,ooo. It is 325
feet in length by 172 feet
in breadth, and four stories
high, with a noble dome
from which there is a
splendid view of the city
and the surrounding coun.
try, including Kennesaw,
Lost and Stone Mountains
in the distance. Admission
to the dome is allowed on
permits to be obtained
at the adjutant-general's
office on the first floor of
the building. The old co-
lonial records, in perfect
condition, are preserved in
the State library. Atlanta
has numerous excellent
Hotel Aragon, Atlanta. public schools. Among
the finest churches at6 the Second Baptist, Washington and Hunter streets, and
the First Presbyterian, Marietta street. There is a noteworthy monument to Henry




25
dy, "Journalist, Orator, Patriot," on Marietta street, near the Custom
Sand one to Gen. J. B. McPherson in McPherson Park. Piedmont Park
ns the extensive Exposition Grounds, and Grant Park is a beautiful public
of 145 acres. Ponce de Leon Springs is a resort with a small lake and other
ions. Fort McPherson, or McPherson Barracks, a United States military
the western end of the city, is occupied by four companies of artillery
of infantry, 350 men in all, under Col. Livingston. It is the headquarters of
department of the South. The reservation covers 236 acres, and $1,5oo,ooo has
been expended on its improvement. It may be reached by electric cars from
4etta and Forsyth streets. Peachtree street is the handsomest residence street.
new and elegant Hotel Aragon, of which Charles F. Dodge is manager, is on
ihtree street. A carriage ride will include the principal points of interest in
rita and its charming suburbs.
From Atlanta to Jacksonville.

, suming our southward journey over the Southern Railway Company's Western
tm, the parties will leave Atlanta Tuesday night and arrive in Jacksonville the
wing morning. The Southern Railway follows the general direction of Sherman's
Vus march to the sea, through Macon, Eastman, Helena and other towns to Jesup,
ite connection is made with the Savannah, Florida & Western Railway, belonging
e extensive Plant System of railroad and steamship lines. From Jesup the route
Sway of Waycross and Callahan. Between Folkston and Boulogne names ap-
priately suggestive of the former English possession of Georgia and continental
spation of Florida -the train crosses St. Mary's River, and we are at length in
ptate of our destination, Florida, the land of Easter flowers. Strange vegetation




20
already greets the eye. The palmetto with its waving crown is a pleasing introduction
to the luxuriant verdure of this tropic clime. Flowers, however, are hardly in season
in January and February.
Many generations of explorers, representing three great nations, have preceded us
in searching out the attractions of the southeastern corner of North America. Florida
was first made known to Europeans by the Spaniard, Ponce de Leon, who landed near
St. Augustine on Easter Sunday, 1512, and gave the country, in commemoration of the
day, the name of Pascua Florida. Hither came, nearly 30 years later, Ferdinand de
Soto. With an English colony in Georgia and French control of Louisiana, Florida
was at first a very indefinite region. By the middle of the eighteenth century, how-
ever, it had become circumscribed into substantially its present limits, and as thus
defined it was ceded by Spain to England in 1763, to be retroceded in 1783, and finally
sold by Spain to the United States in 1819. The population in 1830 was 34,730, and
in 1890, 391,422. Florida has 4,440 square miles of water surface, or more than any
other state, Minnesota, with 4,160 miles, coming next in order.

Jacksonville.
Upon the acquisition of Florida from Spain in 1819-21, General Andrew Jackson
became the first governor of the territory, and in his honor the city of Jacksonville,
founded in 1822, was named. With a population of 17,201 in 1890, an4 some 25,000
or 3,oo000 at the present time, including the suburbs, Jacksonville is the railroad and
commercial centre of the state. There is a large and growing trade in lumber, fruit,
grain, and other commodities. The city is pleasantly situated on the left bank of the
St. John's River, twenty-two miles from its mouth. The river here flows from west to
east, and is a broad and noble stream, navigable for ocean steamers of moderate





,Tkhe streets are laid out at right angles, Bay street, parallel with the river,
principle business thoroughfare. Fine live oak and other shade trees are
SThe city possesses half a dozen flourishing churches, good schools, three
ly newspapers, electric lights, and the usual public edifices, the new Post
,the corner of Forsyth and Hogan streets being the most imposing. With
even climate of an average winter temperature of 55 degrees, the health of
is excellent, and, though the natural attractions are not remarkable, many
rn people make it their winter home. The leading hotels face St. James Park,
square liberally adorned with semi-tropical flowers, trees, and shrubs. A
ride about the city Wednesday forenoon will give our parties an idea of tie

SJacksonville we proceed by the Jacksonville, St: Augustine & Indian River
*y, thirty-eight miles to St. Augustine. The train crosses the St. John's River
A iron bridge one quarter of a mile long, which affords a splendid view of the'
j in both directions, and of the city of Jacksonville on its northern shore. The
Ny between +he St. John's and the Atlantic is a level and sandy tract of pine
S.but sparsely populated. From the neat station in St. Augustine there will be
Omnibus transfer to the famous hotel, The Ponce de Leon.
The Florida Peninsula.
s peninsula of Florida, stretching from 25 to 31 degrees north latitude and 8d to
grees 44 minutes west longitude, includes the southernmost part of the mainland
p United States. Texas,, at the mouth of the Rio Grande, falls just short of the
iel of Biscayne Bay. Western Florida, bordering on Alabama, belongs geograph-
to that State. The average width of the peninsula is about 120 miles, its length





28
40o miles. In physical character, the entire State is an extreme illustration: of
the sandy and marshy belt of country which forms the seaboard all the way from the
Potomac to the Mississippi. The gradual widening of the peninsula, by the formation
of new belts of sand just above, the level of the sea, may be observed at many points
along the coast. The central lake region is about 200 feet above the ocean, and con-
tains perhaps the most fertile lands in the State. The general range of elevation is
from ten feet to 300 feet: The drainage of the peninsula is principally north through
the St. John's River, soutl through the Kissimmee, and west through various streams
emptying into the gulf. All of these rivers are necessarily somewhat sluggish. The
area of the State is 58,680 square miles, or a little greater than that of England and
Wales, and one and one-fifth times that of New York.

:Climate.
Although Florida lies wholly.within the temperate zone, the greater part of tthe
"Stte' is essentially tropical in its climate, vegetation, and natural products. Stretch-
in$ nearly 40omiles to the south-south-east from the main body of the continent, the
climatic and agricultural conditions of the peninsula are determined in great rdeastre
by the proximity of the two bodies of water that wash its shores -the Atlantic Ocean
on the east and the Gulf of Mexico on the west. Southern Italy is io degrees farther
north, but has a warmer climate. The range of temperature in Florida is compar-
atively small, and the-maximum is not excessive. Lake Worth, however, the southern-
most settlement of any considerable importance, about latitude 27 degrees, is on the
parallel of Southern Sicily, Egypt, and Northern India, and shows many of the
characteristics of purely tropic climes.
Throughout the State the prevailing winds from the southeast are continually bring-




29
ing in pure fresh air from the ocean. Being tempered as they cross the Gulf Stream,
thley.have the effect of producing a remarkably equable climate. The mean annual
tertmperaiure of the State is 73 degrees, the thermometer seldom rising above 90 degrees
;in summer, or falling below 30 degrees in winter. The difference between the summer
and the winter average is usually less than20 degrees. Light frosts occur now and then
from November to March in the northern part of the State,but are almost unknown in
Southern Florida below Rockledge or Tampa. The range of the thermometer in
Northern Florida is from 96 to 26 degrees; in Central and Southern Florida from 96
to 43 degrees. Summer is the rainy season. Throughout the winter there are seldom
more than four or five rainy days a month in Northern Florida, while at Lake Worth
entire exemption from rain from November to May may be anticipated.

Soil and Natural Products.
With a geological formation such as is found in the coral islands of the Pacific
Ocean, a climate approaching that of the tropics, rainfall sufficient even for light sandy
fields, so that irrigation is unnecessary, 240 days of sunshine every year, and a won,
derful variety of soils very curiously distributed; the farm and orchard products of
Florida are numerous. The ist includes many tropical plants, all of those classed as
semi-tropical, and some indigenous to the temperate zone.
Throughout the State the warmth and moisture of the climate compensate in great
measure for the infertilityy of the soil, and, -with proper cultivation,.almost.the entire
State may be made one great garden. Even in the drier seasons, heavy dews suffice
to preserve the freshness of the verdure. The list of forest trees is almost endless.
There are several choice species of pine, including the yellow, the pitch and the white
p 1, and various kinds of oak. Other natural woods are the hickory, maple, ceFor,





30
elm, bay, ash, sweet gum, wild orange, swamp cypress, magnolia, dogwood, laurel,
satinwood, lignum-vitae, and palms; and, in the south, the cocoanut and other strictly
tropical trees. Palmettos grow everywhere in large variety and with the utmost
luxuriance. There are many wild trees of the citrus family, among them, besides the
orange, the lemon, lime, shaddock, pomegranate, and citron.

Agriculture and Horticulture.
Fruits and vegetables in almost infinite variety grow in one part of Florida or
another, and may be made commercially profitable if attention is given to the choice of
soil, methods of cultivation, and markets. Below the 28th parallel oranges may be
raised without danger from frosts. The cocoanut thrives on Lake Worth and the
pineapple in the same region, and on the Keys. Figs, olives, and English walnuts are
produced successfully. Sugar cane and rice may be grown on the lowlands, and the
cereals flourish generally where the soil is not too light. The culture of tobacco,
which was extensive before the war, has lately been revived with favorable prospects.
Cotton has always been a suitable crop for the pine lands.
The cultivation of vegetables for shipment to the No thern markets in winter and
early spring, which began only a few years ago, has .already reached extensive pro-
portions. Florida has a monopoly of this trade for several weeks of the year. Toma-
toes, beans, and cucumbers have so far been the leading products forwarded, tomatoes
the most profitable. The autumn and winter are best suited for vegetable growing,
and beans, peas, cucumbers, cabbages, and potatoes mature while the Northern States
are still covered with snow. Beets, turnips, lettuce, asparagus, sweet potatoes, rad-
ishes, and every other known vegetable are raised to perfection.
Orange growing, though the best known general industry of the State, is likely to





3x
become still more prominent under improved methods of cultivation. Florida oranges
are shipped almost continuously from October till May, and it is claimed with good
reason that the "fruit is of better quality, and of richer flavor, and of greater variety,
than can be produced in any other part of the known world." Other members of the
citrus family, such as limes, lemons, and grape fruit, can be grown successfully in a
large part of the State. Early peaches are remunerative. New varieties of grapes
have been found profitable and many kinds of plums and pears do well. In Southern
Florida, besides other tropical fruits not so well known, grow pineapples, bananas,
dates, guavas, and cocoanuts. From the guava, which is raised with little difficulty, is
produced the guava jelly of commerce.
Fish and Game.
Large game abounds in the forests and swamps of Central and Southern Florida,
and smaller game everywhere, while both the inland and the coast waters teem with
fish. Among the wild animals are black bears, panthers, several species of wolves
and foxes, raccoons, opossums, and deer. The birds are of all kinds. Within easy
walking distance of the principal towns in Western Florida quail abound in marvelous
numbers. In most of the counties of the peninsula there are plenty of wild turkeys
and water fowl. The red deer is found through the whole east-coast country. The
varieties of fish are numberless. Sharks are plentiful in the seacoast waters, and are
sometimes found well up the St. John's and other rivers, and the inland streams are
famous for their alligators, though these reptiles are much less numerous and smaller
than the tourist usually imagines them beforehand.





32
St. Augustine as a City.
Many points of resemblance between summer life at Saratoga or Newport and win-
ter life at St. Augustine will at once occur to the visitor. The Florida resort has a
permanent population of about five thousand people. During January, February, and
March this number is at least doubled. As an established all-the-year-round" city,
St. Augustine possesses the various characteristics of modern urban civilization. It
has an abundant water supply from unfailing artesian wells, plenty of foliage, clean
concrete pavements of unsurpassed excellence, gas and electric lights, a fire depart-
ment, stores of all kinds, public buildings and private residences of recent design, as
well as older ones suggestive of the era of Spanish occupation, and a group of hotels
which are both very large and remarkably picturesque. As a fashionable winter resort
St. Augustine has the prestige of years as well as of a delightful situation, convenient
of access, and a healthy climate. The mean annual temperature is about 70 degrees,
and the winter temperature 58 degrees.
St. Augustine is usually spoken of as the oldest permanent settlement of Europeans
within the limits of t.e United States, having been founded by the Spanish General
Menendez, September 8, I565. Its only possible rival in point of age is Santa Fe,
N.'M. The town began to acquire fame as a winter resort for Northern people
about half a century ago. The Civil War, during which it changed hands three times,
checked its progress only temporarily. Its later distinction dates from the opening of
the Hotel Ponce de Leon and its neighbors in 1888. In its streets, residences, hotels,
churches, and general appearance, the St. Augustine of to-day is anything but an ancient
moss-grown town.- The Spanish population has long since almost disappeared. Very
few old buildings remain. Nevertheless the odor of antiquity still prevails throughout




33
narrow and quaint St. George and Charlotte streets; with their buildings of coquina
with over-hanging balconies, as well as in the shadow of the "City Gate" and under
the walls of Fort Marion; and it is
strengthened rather than weakened by
the proximity of the Ponce de Leon and
its companions, whose striking architec-
ture is that of an earlier age.
The Matanzas River, one of the north-
ernmost of the sounds which border the
east coast of Florida, has two inlets from
the ocean, forming an island known as
Anastasia Island. St. Augustine is sit-
uated on the west bank of the river, or
bay, nearly opposite the northern inlet.
It is about two miles across the bay and'
the island to the Atlantic. A much
narrower river, the San Sebastian, flows
southward behind the town and enters
the Matanzas. The city thus occupies a
narrow peninsula, open only to the north.
The most interesting relic of Spanish
possession for upwards of two centu-
ries now remaining is the curious City Gate, St. Augustine.
"City Gate." A fort was erected by the
Spaniards on the Matanzas, and a deep ditch was cut all the way across to the San




34
Sebastian, the earth that was excavated being thrown up on the inside to form a
parapet. To afford exit from the town a gateway was constructed at a convenient
point. There are yet standing in fair preservation the two square towers of the gateway,
each twenty feet high, with the two stone sentiy boxes and thirty feet of flanking wall
on either end. Along Otange street there ate also traces of the moat and parapet.
The towers are very oldbut their exact date is unknown. The gate is at the upper
end of St. George street, an easy walk from the hotels. All the places of interest in
St. Augustine, indeed, are within a space of three-quarters of a mile in length by half
a mile or less in breadth. Fort Marion, on the Matanzas, adjoining the "City Gate,"
is another reminder of the years of Spanish rule. Menendez built a wooden fort on or
near this spot in i565. The present fort, whose material is coquina, was begun some
time before I665, and was finished in 1756. It is the only sample of mediaeval fortifi-
cation on this continent, and is considered a splendid specimen of military engineering
as developed at the time of its construction.
The sea wall, extending aloqg the river front for three-quarters of a mile from Fort
Marion to St, Francis Barracks, affords a pleasant promenag~e, with views of the' har-
bor. A small force of United States troops occupies the barracks, and, as at all mili-
tary posts, their guard mountings, dress parades and band concerts are an interesting
Utetr of St A6gustine life. Grace Church (Methodist), a beautiful edifice of stone,
*.ib corner of Cordova and Car.rre streets, was the gift of Mr. Henry M. Flagler,
*I o eroJetd the imposing Memorial Presbyterian church on Valencia and Sevilla
ds edifi is the most elaborately decorated in St. Augustine, and its lofty
-s. b pcous from every direction.
.' .. .




35
The Magnificent Hotel Fonce de Leon.
r resort in the world can boast of a group of hotels so beautiful in design,
worthy in construction as St. Augustine's. The Ponce de Leon, The Alcazar,
Cordova, as well as the churches just mentioned, are the result of the fore-
ergy, and public spirit of Mr. Henry M. Flagler. .Through an early visit to
he became interested in the undeveloped possibilities of the State as a winter
r Northern people, and among the first results of the far-reaching plans which
was the erection of these three remarkable hotels. Prosecuting his designs
failing interest, and most fortunate in the selection of his architects and other
khrs', there sprang up at St. Augustine a series of edifices marvelous for their
r of conception, originality in execution, and richness of adornment. Another
totel, The Royal Poinciana at Lake Worth, has this year been added to the list
|brilliant enterprises, and the east coast of Florida thus possesses a group of
led winter resorts, in which every American citizen can justly take pride.
lpad and generous conception of possibilities as yet unrealized in any part of
| entered into the design of the beautiful Hotel Ponce de Leon. The scheme
dfor nothing less than a palace, with towers, courts, fountains, and cool retreats,
let amid appropriate surroundings, in design to embody the beauties of Spanish
pture, with decoration suggestive of the romantic history of St. Augustine, and
lr detail of construction, adornment, and appointment to be worthy of its position.
Objected structure was.not to have the seclusion of a private home, but as a hotel
Give greater impress to the city. The style of architecture selected was accord-
hat of the Spanish Renaissance. The grounds chosen as a site were the most
ful in St. Augustine, with groves of orange and lemon, moss-hung lanes, orange
sys, mqlberries, magnolias and myrtles, palms and palmettos, lawns, hedges and.







: I


HOTEL PONCE DE LEON, ST. AUGUSTINE.





37
SAmid these surroundings has risen the Hotel Ponce de Leon-named
the discoverer who here first sighted the Florida shore-imposing in
aceful in proportions, beautiful in design, and exquisite in the'profusion
of its decorative details. It is not merely a hotel but an example of ex-
ectural design, commanding admiration and repaying careful study.
ings stand on three sides of a large open court, and a one-story portico
gateway extends across the fourth or front side. Figures seem almost
in speaking of such a work of art. It may be mentioned however, as of
rest, that the main edifice, together with its annexes and the court, covers
acres. The frontage on King street is 380 feet, and on Cordova street
Ihe hotel has 450 rooms. The nain parlor is 104 by 53 feet in size, and
,Coom 150 by 90, with seats for 800 guests. There are two handsome.towers
High. The peculiar structure of the walls is famous the world over. The
material is solid concrete, made of shells and sand brought from Anastasia
id first employed by F. W. Smith in the construction of his beautiful winter
,.the Villa Zorayda, opposite The Ponce de Leon. The loose shells (which,
.on exposure to the air, in their natural condition form the coquina stone)
id with sand and cement, boards were set up on edge, with a space between
thick as the wall was to be, and the composition was poured in. As it
i more was added, and a solid wall was thus built up. Brick and terra cotta
I relieve the gray of the concrete.
.approaches the hotel, attention is first attracted to the graceful towers, then
at dome, and then to the broad roofs, with their red tiles, overhanging por-
corner turrets. The color effects are in the highest degree pleasing. "The
$ tint is the delicate gray of the concrete, which admirably sets off the red of





38

the brick work and the Spanish roof tiles. Passing through the portico we enter the
fountain court, a delicious mass of tropical foliage and brilliant flowers. Beyond the
court is the
grand en-
trance, an'
Search twenty
feet wide.
The vesti-
bule operis
upon a corrin
dor suiround-
ing a rottn-
da which oc"
cupies the
great central
space of the
main build-
ing. On the
right a. broacl
hall leads
past the
hotel .o ffi.ce
Hotel 'Cordova, St.- Augustine. to var i. u
to various
public rooms, another on the left leads to the parlor; and directly opposite, a hrbad
marble stair-way ascends to the dining hall. The pavement of vestibule, corridor






39
and rotunda is a mosaic of marble, aid spacious fireplaces suggest hospitality. The
rbtunda is four stories in height, with arcades and galleries at each story. Among
'the rich fur-
nishings of
the grand
parlor is a
carved man-
tel, with a
clock of tran-
sparent Mex-
ican onyx. sii
In the mag-
nificent din-
ing room
there is a cul-
mination of
the wealth
of ornament,
that charac-
terizes the
entire estab-
lishineit..
Beauty of Hotel Alcazar, St. Augustine.
form- is supplemented by richness and harmony of color and exquisite taste alike in
private rooms and public apartments. The minutest details %are most carefully





40
wrought out, and the magnificent furnishings make of this grand institution a verita-
ble palace. The Ponce de Leon is under the experienced and efficient management
of Mr. C. B. Knott, who has been identified with the St. Augustine hotels for many
years, and is deservedly popular with the traveling public.
The Alcazar and The Cordova, under the same management, are fitting complements
for The Ponce de Leon, whose general characteristics of elegance and comfort they
also manifest. Connected with the Alcazar is the Casino, with Persian and Turkish
baths, a great swimming pool, entertainment halls and theatre, bowling alleys, lawn
tennis courts, etc.
A delightful excursion from St. Augustine includes Anastasia Island, St. Augustine
Light, and South Beach. A railway crosses the island from the ferry landing. The
lighthouse is 150 feet high to the lantern tower, the lamp being 165 feet above the
sea, and the light is of the first order, flashing once in three minutes and visible nine-
teen miles. Longer trips may be made to North Beach, Fort Matanzas, etc., and
the opportunities for aquatic sport are unsurpassed, the sheltered harbor being well
adapted for steam launches, yachts, and row boats. There is a flourishing yacht club
of 300 members.

The Ocklawaha River.
During the stay in St, Augustine the party will be divided into sections for a four-
days' excursion up the Ocklawaha and St. John's Rivers. These smaller parties will
leave the city on different days, for the better accommodation of the passengers, on
account of the limited capacity of the river steamers. Starting from St. Augustine on
Monday morning, for example, we shall proceed by the Jacksonville, St. Augustine &
Indian River Railway to Palatka, and there take one of the boats of the Ocklawaha




























OCKLAWAHA RIVER.


^






42
Navigation Company (Hart's Daily Line) for the trip up the Ocklawaha to Silver
Spring and return. Arriving at Palatka again Wednesday morning, we are to spend
a day there at the Putnam House, and in the evening take the St. John's River steamer
for Sanford. Thursday will be devoted to the trip down the St. John's, and on Friday
morning we shall take the Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian River train for the
return from Palatka to St. Augustine. This excursion gives the visitor the best possi-
ble view of the rivers, orange groves, and strange animal and vegetable life of the
interior of Florida.
The Ocklawaha is a narrow, tortuous stream of varying depth and a considerable
current, whose name, meaning "dark crooked water," is significant of its character.
It issues from Lake Griffin, near the centre of the State, and joins the St. John's oppo-
site Welaka, twenty-five miles above Palatka, after a course of 280 miles. The lower
part of the river is navigable for small steamers. Our tour on board of the Okee-
humkee or the Astatula includes in each direction twenty-five miles of the St. John's
River, ioi miles of the Ocklawaha, and nine miles of the Silver Spring Run, and the
round trip gives us the entire journey by daylight either going or coming. The
steamers, though necessarily small, stern-wheel affairs, with flat bottoms, drawing only
a few inches of water, are comfortable. The Ocklawaha flows nearly all the way
through an almost impenetrable cypress swamp, and has no banks except tree trunks
rising from the water. The average width of the swamp is a mile and a half.
Immediately after leaving Palatka we pass on the East Palatka shore an orange
grove yielding 3,000 boxes annually. At Buffalo Bluff the Jacksonville, Tampa &
Key West Railway bridge opens to give us passage, and just above Welaka we enter
on the right the mouth of the Ocklawaha. The water is deep and black, and often
reflects strangely the dense forest that grows down to its very edge. Save for a few















































































OCKLAWAHA RIVER STEAMER.


,


*r


.rr.~63\





44
infrequent landings, where promontories of high land project into the stream, the
swamp is unbroken for the next 1oo miles. Live oaks and majestic cypresses inter-
mingle with cabbage palmettos, maples, bay trees, magnolias, and swamp holly, with
never-ending drapery of Spanish moss and bunches of mistletoe which, from the upper
part of the steamer, may often be plucked from the trees. Here and there we encoun-
ter great rafts of cypress logs which almost block the channel. The timber is owned
in tracts of thousands of acres, and is cut for Northern markets. The trees are
girdled some weeks before they are felled, for the wood is very heavy and when full of
sap sinks in water like lead. The river is so narrow and crooked that again and again
on turning corners at right angles the nose of the boat strikes the shore, first on one
side and then on the other, and the passengers have endless amusement in watching
the crew work her off. The scene is weird beyond description as the sun goes down
behind the trees and great fires of pitchpine knots are kindled in iron pans on the top
of the pilot house, to illuminate the river as the boat pushes on through the night,
while the cries of panthers and the kindred limpkins are perhaps heard in the swamp.
If the day be warm and bright, alligators will be seen now and then; but while fifteen
years ago 2,000 or 3,000 might have been observed on the round trip, fifty or seventy-
five make now a very good record.
Early the next morning after leaving Palatka the boat turns to the right out of the
dark and gloomy Ocklawaha into the marvelously clear Silver Spring Run, and at
the same time out of the swamp into more open country. The upward trip ends at
Silver Spring,-the head of the run,-the largest and most beautiful spring in Florida,
and the traditional "Fountain of Youth" which was sought for by Ponce de Leon.
The spring is a circular basin several hundred yards in diameter, and 6o to 80 feet
-deep, in which gushes forth a stream of water of so great volume that the "run "





45
leaves it a deep river, ioo feet wide, and so clear that coins may be seen distinctly on
the blue rock at the bottom. Leaving Silver Spring after a brief stay, the return trip
will occupy the remainder of the day and the following night.
Palatka.
Our stay of twelve hours at Palatka will be at the large and elegant Putnam House,
under the management of William Catto, the proprietor of the Hotel Tudor, Nahant,
Mass. The Putnam House occupies an entire square one block from the steamboat
landing, and is furnished with every modern improvement, including elevator, gas,
and electric bells, steam heat in the halls, fireplaces in all of the parlors, and baths
on each floor. With a population of upwards of 3,000, and the largest town above
Jacksonville on the St. John's, Palatka has a pleasant situation on the west bank of
the river, and the mildness of its climate attracts many visitors. Orange and lemon
groves abound in the surrounding country, and there are walks and drives in every
direction. Boats and small steamers can be obtained for short excursions on the St.
John's or up the tributary creeks, and there is good fishing and hunting.

Up the St. John's.
After a day in Palatka we take the steamer City of Jacksonville or Frederic De
Bary, of Clyde's St. John's River line, for the trip up the St. John's to Sanford,
with a return down the river to Palatka the following day. This schedule gives
the party by daylight the romantic scenery of the upper St. John's and the broad
waters of Lake Monroe and Lake George. In former years St. Augustine and the
St. John's constituted the limit of a Florida tour, and the river has lost none of its
earlier attractiveness. The original name of the stream, given it by Jean Ribeau,






46
who crossed the bar at its mouth May I, 1562, was La Riviere de Mai, in honor of the
day of its discovery. This name the Spaniards changed into San Mateo, while the
English rechristened it once more, the St. John's. The St. John's rises among the
swamps of Southeastern Florida, flows toward the northwest through an exceedingly
level country for over 300 miles, at Jacksonville turns eastward, and reaches the
Atlantic Ocean twenty-five miles from that city. During the early part of its way, it
runs for thirty miles parallel with the Indian River of the coast, and not over ten
miles therefrom. Large steamers go no farther than Sanford, 193 miles by the river
from Jacksonville. For sixty miles below Sanford the St. John's is comparatively
narrow and often crooked, but throughout the last I60 miles of its course it is seldom
less than half a mile wide, and here and there expands into lakes, of which Lake
George, the largest, is about twelve miles long and nine miles wide.
We arrive at Sanford the morning after leaving Palatka, cross Lake Monroe, a
beautiful sheet of water about twelve miles long, and five wide, touch at Enterprise,
near which place are the extensive grounds of Frederic De Bary, and, just below the
Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West Railway's fine iron bridge, begin our descent of the
St. John's. For several miles the river is very tortuous, and has in places less than
five feet of water, and the steamer often "slows down in rounding unusually sharp
points. Coxetter Bend, where two reverse curves come in close succession, is parti.
cularly worthy of note. The banks of the stream are much of the way lined with
waving palmettos and tall cypresses, with their bare trunks, spreading arms, and
drapery of moss, while smaller trees of almost infinite variety clothe the shores of the
river in its long straight reaches with dense masses of foliage. Now and then the
country is more open and orange trees grow close to the water's edge. Herons and
water turkeys abound in the marshes, and numerous turtles and infrequent alligators




47
slide into the stream as the steamer disturbs their repose. Most of the old alligators
of the St. John's, however, have been killed and the young taken by fishermen. There
are numerous landings on the river, from which during the season hundreds of
thousands of boxes of oranges are shipped to the North. A pretty island in Lake
George is known as Drayton's Island. We shall arrive at Palatka in the evening,
and the following morning return thence to St. Augustine by rail.

St. Augustine to Ormond.

From St. Augustine the parties will continue onward sixty-eight miles down the
coast to Ormond, the train running first in a southwesterly direction to East Palatka,
on the St. John's, and then southeasterly to the Atlantic. The country both sides of
St. Augustine is held to be remarkably well adapted for grape culture, and near Moul-
trie there is a vineyard of 175 acres of Niagara grapes. Between Palatka and Ormond
the line crosses a region of "flatwoods." From the Ormond station there will be a
transfer to the elegant Hotel Ormond.

The Halifax River and Other East Coast Sounds.

The village of Ormond lies on the western shore of the Halifax River, as St. August-
ine is on the western shore of the Matanzas. The Hotel Ormond is on the east bank
of the river, here a little over half a mile wide, while three-fourths of a mile still far-
ther east we come to the ocean beach. These remarkable bodies of water known as
rivers extend nearly all the way from St. Augustine to Palm Beach, and, as we shall
see much of them, first and last, some account of their formation will be of interest.
The Halifax and Indian Rivers then, are not "rivers," and Lake Worth is not a


4'.
' .n::-TM




48
"lake." They are all, strictly speaking, long and narrow sounds or lagoons, parallel
with the Atlantic coast, separated from it by a strip of land of varying width, and con-
nected with it by infrequent inlets. If the sounds were continuous there would be but
one river, some 310 miles in length, reaching from Mayport, at the mouth of the St.
John's River, to Hypoluxo, at the south end of Lake Worth. Their continuity is
broken at various places,
the interval where there
is no river ranging in
length from about six hun-
dred yards between the
Indian River and the Mos-
quito Lagoon to twenty-
four miles between the
Halifax and the Matanzas.
Across some of the shorter
isthmuses canals have al-
ready been constructed.
The Florida East Coast
Line Canal and Transpor-
tation Company is opening
The ,Broad Halifax, near Ormond. others, and still more are
p#o ed, and it is' probable that uninterrupted coinmunication through these inland
the tered channels from St. Augustine, if not, indeed, from the St. John's at its
monutikit Like Worth, will be established ultimately. The usefulness of the sounds
for slitAg, however, is limited by 'their shallowness. The greatest depth of Lake




49
Ive feet, and there is only two and a half feet of water on the bar across
Jnlet, so that this beautiful sound is valueless as a harbor. The Indian
0out the same depth as Lake Worth. The water of these lagoons is
iount of their connection with the ocean, but is modified by the rivers
into them. The St. Lucie River, for instance, draws water from the
ijd is a considerable stream.
at St. Augustine and going south along the coast we have first in order
River, about fourteen miles long, terminating at Matanzas Inlet. The
Liver heads some twenty-four miles farther on, and in turn extends twenty-
,southward, to Mosquito Inlet. Ormond lies near the northern end of the
-th Daytona six miles south. It is about twelve miles through the narrow
Hillsborough River, from Mosquito Inlet to the broader Mosquito Lagoon,
Wth is fifteen miles. The Haulover Canal," three-eighths of a mile in
eects the Mosquito Lagoon with the Indian River near its head, twelve
of Titusville. From this point the Indian River stretches away i6o miles
h,. terminating at Jupiter Inlet. Two insignificant creeks, which are to be
to a canal eight miles in length, unite the Indian River with Lake Worth,
t of water finally is twenty-two miles long. The general width of the entire
ktands is from half a mile to one mile.

The Hotel Ormond.
1tl Ormond, under the management of Anderson & Price, opens earlier in
Sand continues open later in the spring than most of the Florida hotels,
1vorite resort for New England people. Broad and well-kept grounds,
noble trees, and adorned with brilliant flowers, slope down to the bank of







































HOTEL. ORMOND, ORMOND.





5'
While from the upper turrets there is in the opposite direction an enchant-
I ocean. The Ormond is thoroughly modern and unusually homelike.
-Jheat, fireplaces in many rooms, electric bells, gas, bath-rooms on each
itor, and an unlimited supply of water. There are no surrounding build-
Iobus veranda extends along the entire front of the house, affording a
vruade and glorious sunset views. The Casino includes a large ballroom
pointed stage. The servants are all from the North, and most of them
g40iMountain hotels. -The Halifax gives every opportunity fori fishing, its
Iing sea bass, salt water trout, sheepshead, and many other kinds of fish.
r groves are close at hand, and in the neighboring semi-tropical forests
]ghtful walks, requiring from five minutes' to an hour's time, under the
is, palmettos, oaks, and magnolias, and in the midst of the perfume of the
>m, yellow jasmine, and other tropical flowers. The walk or drive to the
i a marled road terminating on a beach than which there is no finer on
coast. It is as smooth and hard as a floor, affording for bicycles or car-
msarpassed course that stretches away for thirty miles without a break.
Nf the beach is from 300 to 600 feet, and its inclination is alnost'imper-
favorite water excursion is by steam launch five miles up the Halifax to
Sthe Tomoka, and, then for ten miles farther up that narrow and tortuous
resembles the Ocklawaha in the density of its tropical foliage, and sur-
i exhibit of water fowl and alligators. From Buckhead VBluff, a bold
o.: n the right bank of the Tomoka, there: can be. seen across the river a
Wtos marking the line of the King's Road," which was built by the Eng-
1 century, from St. Mary's, Ga., 400 miles south through Florida. Ormond
a few places in Southern Florida where long drives are practicable.






During their stay our .parties will be given a drive, including the village of Ormond,
the hammock forest beyond (in which there are some interesting ruins of an old Span-
ish settlement), the largest orange groves, the bank of the Halifax, and the ocean
beach.
From Ormond, on the Atlantic Ocean, it is about 175 miles across the peninsula to
Tampa, on the Gulf of Mexico. Leaving Ormond we proceed southward through
Daytona to New
Smyrna, where Dr.
William Turnbull es-
tablished a colony of
1,500 Minorcans in
1769. At New Smyr-
na we turn to the
west, reaching the
St. John's again at
Orange City Junc-
tion, and from this
point we ascend the
valley a few miles to
Sanford, on Lak e
-Monroe. Sanford is
a progressive town
of 2,ooo inhabitants,
whose trade with
The Tally-ho on Ormond Beach. Southern Florida is




53
rge orange groves are found in the vicinity. From Sanford we cross
a. southwesterly direction, proceeding to Tampa by way of Winter Park,
I.lmmee, and Lakeland. Orlando is distinguished for its fine vineyards,
and vegetable gardens. The city occupies an eligible position on the
between the Atlantic and the Gulf, has beautiful clear water lakes on
4404 is a busy and enterprising place of 3,000 population. On arriving at
rpIleave the train at the doors of the splendid Tampa Bay Hotel.
Tampa and the Tampa Bay Hotel.
poast line of about 475 miles in length on the Atlantic Ocean, and 675 miles
tff of Mexico, and a longer water front than any other State possesses,
t has few good harbors. The soundings off the shore are almost every-
.low, and deep bays are infrequent. There is, however, on the Gulf, just
,ide 28 degrees, and near the centre of the western coast, a noble bay in
Largest vessels can find shelter, and at its head there has sprung up a city
bAdy rivals Jacksonville in commercial importance. Known to the Spaniards
U, Santo Bay, this arm of the sea, extending inland about thirty miles, is now
opa Bay. Tampa is the name of the young metropolis. The distance from
0e is 240 miles. Tampa is of interest historically as the spot where De
" May 25, I539. From this place he started on the search for gold which
0the discovery of the Mississippi. The upper part of the broad bay is cleft
' peninsula into two heads, Hillsborough Bay on the east and Old Tampa
West. Into the former flows the Hillsborough River, and on the eastern
i stream, just above its mouth, the city of Tampa is situated.
ithbe river, and overlooking the city, near enough to enjoy the benefits of






urban life, yet in the retirement of spacious grounds, was erected fit '89o the mag-
Snificent Tampa Bay Hotel. Florida owes this palatial winter resort to the sagacity
and enterprise of Mr. H. B. Plant, the head of the Plant Systent of railroad and
steamship lines. The hotel and its surroundings in every detail embody refined taste,
made visible by the ample expenditure of money. The entire estate, including the
land and the buildings, cost $2,oo,,ooo, and the furniture and fittings $o00,ooo more.
The external appearance of the hotel is impressive, while elegance and refinement
characterize its spacious apartments. Moorish patterns of ddme and minaret are
everywhere displayed in the architecture, and the horseshoe and the crescent in orna-
mentation. The hotel, in the main four stories high, is constructed of red brick, with
rolled steel beams, and has brick partitions and tile floors and ceilings. It is 511 feet
long and contains nearly 500 rooms. Broad verandas extend along the sides of the
-main edifice and are continued past the "Solarium" and the dining-room, which
adjoin it at the north end, affording a continuous walk of 1,260 feet in length on each
side, while the walk around the entire structure on the. outside is exactly one mile
long' A spacious hallway extends from south to north through the ceAtre of the
building, opening midway into a .rotunda adjoining which on the south is a broad
stairway adorned with bronzes of life size. The grand parlor, opening from the
north hall, contains many rare pieces of furniture, sculpture, and painting, brought
from Furope by Mr. and Mrs. Plant. The rotunda is seventy-eight feet square and
thirty feet high, with an overlooking balcony supported by marble columns. The
dinilg-room at the extreme north end of the building is octagonal in form, lighted
fronmabove, and decorated with costly tapestries and scteens. The furnishing of the
sleeping apartments is in keeping with that of the public rooms." From the east front
of tOe hotOel a lawn lopes away to the water's edgE, while the grounds, with their











low,
Ten
3,
li M Was
q will
Pw- K,
o Top
10 ti
fp
C 1AMO 3
ft.N
Was,,.

> 46V
way,
A


:4.` -



too
pap
MO Aw
v;.
tA






ig,
Al 1 still-

kill . . . .
1 Ix oil A OM'






tropical and semi-tropical foliage extending in every direction, cover, all told, 150 acres
of park area. Refinement, elegance, and luxury appear in every aspect of the vast
establishment, and its popularity from the start attests the sound judgment of its
projector. The Tampa Bay Hotel is most ably conducted by Mr. J. H. King, a hotel
man of extended experience, large acquaintance, and noteworthy ability, who is also
charged with the general management of Mr. Plant's other Florida inns. The trains
of the Plant System bring the traveler within the hotel enclosure.
The city of Tampa claims a population of 22,000. It has grown rapidly during the
past year, on account of the removal of many cigar manufacturers with their help
from Key West. The cigar shops are mostly located in the suburb of Ybor City.
Tampa has Roman Catholic, Episcopal, Methodist, Baptist, and Christian churches,
an opera house, paved streets, gas, water works, electric lights, sewers, street cars,
and other modern improvements, and, with a delightful climate, combines the advan-
tages of sea shore and inland situations. Good fishing and hunting are within easy
reach, and boating and driving are daily amusements.
In order to reach deep water for ocean steamers the railway line continues on to
the south, down the peninsula, nine miles beyond Tampa and eight from the Tampa
Bay Hotel to the shore of Old Tampa Bay. There, at Port Tampa, the terminus of
the Plant System has been established. A pier a mile long stretches out into the
water, and at its farther end, in addition to the usual buildings for freight and pas-
. senger traffic by railway and steamer, there is a'neat and comfortable hotel, The Inn,
under the same management as the Tampa Bay Hotel. The steamers of the Plant
System leave Port Tampa for Key West, Havana, Mobile, and other Gulf ports, and,
with the rapid development of the phosphate industry of the State, it has become an
important point for shipping to the Atlantic Coast and Europe.





57
Winter Park.
We return eastward from the Tampa Bay Hotel, by the South Florida Division of
\he Savannah, Florida & Western Railway, ninety-eight miles to Winter Park, where
We stop for a day at a third hotel belonging to the Plant System--The Seminole.
Winter Park is situated near the centre of the peninsula, not far distant from seven
small lakes- Osceola, Maitland, Mizell, Virginia, Killarney, Sylvan, and Berry -and
has become one of the recognized resorts of the State, if not, indeed, the most promi-
nent resort in the interior. Twelve lakes can be seen from the hotel. Lake Osceola,
the largest, is five miles in circumference. The surface of the entire peninsula of
Florida is dotted with lakes ranging in size, from Okeechobee, forty miles long and
thirty wide, down to a few acres. These bodies of water have a great influence
on the climate. The vast swamp known as the Everglades, lying south of Okeecho-
bee, and covering an area of 60 by 160 miles, is in reality a lake varying in depth from
one to fifty feet, and filled with islands, and even hills, whose dense vegetation makes
of them one great jungle. Winter Park is in the midst of the lake region, where clean
pine forests abound, the soil is good, the air dry, and climate mild. With an elevation
of over 1oo feet above the sea, the drainage is excellent. The surrounding country is
made up of high pine lands sloping both to the north and to the south from the ridge
on which the town stands, and the lakes are filled with pure clear water from never-
failing springs, and are connected by swiftly flowing streams. Winter Park was estab-
lished by an incorporated company of Northern people in 1885, and its principal
institution Rollins College, a non-sectarian school for both sexes -was founded
soon afterward. The college buildings stand on the shore of Lake Virginia and over-
look the town. The principal streets of the village are broad and well kept, with
plank or gravel walks, and there are three or four pretty churches, and numerous






modern private residences surrounded by orange groves or tall pines "draped with
mist-like mosses." There is a permanent population of 800 persons. No town in
Florida has a more finished air, or is more suggestive of the quiet, rural communities
of New England. The Seminole is a large, modern hotel, four stories in height, with
steam heat
in the halls
and public
room s, gas,
and complete
appoint-
ments iin
all respects.
'It stands in
the midst of
pleasanri't
grounds slop.
ing down to
one of th.e
lakes. The
SSeminole, to.
gether with
The Seminole, Winter Park. the Tampa
Bay Hotel and the, Inn at Port Tampa, is under the-general management of Mr.
J. H., King, with Mr. D. P. Hathaway as its efficient resident manager.




59
H i Titusville.
Winter Park we continue eighteen miles farther on the South Florida Division
t System to Sanford. At Sanford we take the Jacksonville, Tampa & Key
ay for Titusville, where we reach the Atlantic Coast, or rather the famous
llel with the coast, known as the Indian River. The route from Sanford
d the western and northern sides of Lake Monroe, by way of Monroe, Enter-
tion, and Enterprise. The distance from Sanford to Enterprise is tenmiles
hough only five miles directly across the lake. There are no places of import-
the thirty-six miles between Enterprise and Titusville. Titusville is the
at of Brevard County, and a small straggling town of I,ooo population, which,
,is the natural centre of trade for a large part of the east coast.- Steamers
een Titusville and various points down the Indian River, and in former
fore the arrival of the railroads, it was the invariable place of outfit for canoe-
Syachting expeditions. 'From Titusville our train proceeds over the Jackson-
.Augustine & Indian River Railway twenty miles southward to Rockledge.
Rockledge.
opgh we have glimpses of the Indian River at Titusville, we first come upon its
) at Rockledge. This is the most famous resort on the river, and-the home of
rivaled Indian River orange. Rockledge, like St. Augustine, is situated on the
Ond facing the river, which, opposite the town, has the width of about a mile
,quarter. The settlement is farther from the ocean than any other place of im-
ice on the east coast except Titusville. Across the Indian River lies Merritt's'
I, on the farther side of which is another lagoon called the Banana River, and
id that in turn, Cocoa Beach, or Oceanica, on the Atlantic, a few miles south of
Canaveral. Merritt's Island is some thirty miles in length, extending, with the




6o
Indian River on the west and the Banana River on the east, from a point opposite
Titusville nearly to Eau Gallie. Along the river front, north and south of Rockledge,
the magnolias, oaks, and palmettos have been left as a wind-break for the magnificent
orange groves which have made the Rockledge hammock famous. The hammock,
three and a half miles in length, is indeed one continuous orange grove. Halifax
River and Indian River oranges are usually considered the finest in the world. The
Mediterranean cannot equal them. The perfect Florida orange is thin-coated, heavy
and full of sugar, and, as grown at Rockledge or Ormond, no doubt owes some of its
peculiar characteristics to the nearness of the groves to the sea. The name of Rock-
ledge is significant of the fact that here for some distance the river bank is a coquina
rock formation. The "ledges," however, are not particularly conspicuous. There
-are some 300 cottages extending up and down the river, and a shell road connecting
Rockledge with Cocoa, one and a half miles north, affords a pleasant walk or drive.
The surface of the river is dotted during the season with yachts of every kind, and a
small steamer makes two trips daily down the river some six miles to Fairyland," on
Merritt's Island. The visitor there is well repaid for climbing a low hill on Dr.
William Wittfeld's estate by the fine view which it affords of the Indian and the
Banana rivers, Merritt's Island -and the ocean in the distance. Fairyland" has an
extensive pineapple plantation, one of the northernmost in the State, as well as orange
groves, banana trees, guavas, palms, magnolias, and other tropical vegetation. Delicious
oysters are taken from the river, as well as large sea trout, bluefish, and mullet.
Our stay at Rockledge will be at the extensive Hotel Indian River, which stands on
the principal street overlooking the water. It is a roomy structure of modern design,
having passenger elevator, electric light, steam heat, and all other conveniences of a
first-class hotel, with its appointments, cuisine, and service all that could be desired.




461
nda and parlors, with its broad verandas overlooking extensive grounds
y rare tropical plants, flowers; and trees, through which a lovely river
*ented, suggest repose. A magnificent orange grove, one of the finest
Just in the rear of and belonging to the hotel, affords another beautiful
WTge pavilion for music.and dancing, a billiard parlor, and tennis courts are
many provisions made for the pleasure of patrons. Its proprietor is Mr.
Lee, who is also well known in connection with important hotel interests
sin.
B The East Coast.

ng from Rockledge by the Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian River Rail-.
are to go yet southward through nearly two degrees of latitude. The line is
with the Indian River throughout its extent, often within sight of the water,
..perhaps more frequently at some distance inland. With the construction of
railroad over which we are traveling, a wonderful impetus has been given to
elopment of Southern Florida. Reaching first from Jacksonville to St. Augus-
an to Daytona, and later yet to Rockledge, the extension of the East Coast
Lake Worth was taken up by Mr. Henry M. Flagler some two years ago with
tomary energy, and the result was seen in its completion to West Palm Beach
ch. The line is splendidly built and admirably equipped, brings rich agricul-
Jands into market, creates new horticultural possibilities, and affords a direct
Seditious route for travel from the older resorts of Northern Florida to thebeau-
egion in the vicinity of Lake Worth. South of Rockledge the country is uniformly
and sandy, with vegetation growing more.and more purely tropical as we approach
orrid zone. Three rivers of considerable size are crossed,--the Sebastian, St.





62
Lucie, and Jupiter. The St. Lucie River, where it is spanned by the railroad bridge,
is a broad estuary which turns the line a long way out of the direct course. The
principal stations between Rockledge and West Palm Beach are Eau Gallie, Mel-
bourne, Sebastian, Fort Pierce, Eden, and West Jupiter, but the country is thinly
populated and the few settlements are on the river to the east. Eau Gallie lies oppo-
site the point of junction of the Indian and Banana Rivers. Fort Pierce is the prin-
cipal trading post for the Seminole Ilidians, a remnant of this once famous tribe still
living among tihe Everglades. In- the vicinity of the- Sebastian River-we pass from
the land of the orange into the country of the banana and the pineapple. The rail-
road terminates at West Palm Beach, on the mainland shore of Lake Worth, 301
miles, south of Jacksonville, 263 from St. Augustine, and 195 from Ormond, and a
small steamer conveys the passengers about half a mile across the lake to the Hotel
Royal Poinciana, Palm Beach.

Pineapple Plantations.
The culture of the pineapple on the east coast of Florida is a comparatively recent
commercial industry. Indeed, no pineapples were raised for market anywhere in the
State before i86o, in which year Benjamin Baker of Key West procured some slips
from Havana and planted an experimental patch on Plantation Key. For a few years
fabulous' profits were realized, and the business, thus originated, has grown to im-
portant proportions. The Indian River plantations are still young, and the bulk of
the crop comes from Key Largo, Plantation Key andUpper Matacombe. The plant
is peculiarly susceptible to cold, being almost invariably injured, unlike the orange,
even by light white frosts,, so that its cultivation is necessarily confined to regions
within the tropics or close upon their border. On the Indian River and the Gulf





63
pineapple is grown on the ordinary sandy soil. The plants are set out in
two to three feet apart each way, and each plant, one or two feet in height,
and narrow, curving and sharply serrated leaves, growing to the height of
wo feet, produces on its summit a single fruit. Thorough cultivation is neces-
d the plantations require, renewal from slips every few years. Most of the
of the soil, in fact, is appropriated in five or six years, unless thorough fer-
n is practiced. Only a part of the crop is marketable, pines less than four
in diameter being usually rejected as unfit for shipment. Though the soil is
e for the production of pineapples all along the east coast, the largest and most
able plantations as yet established are af Eden and Jensen.

Cocoanut Trees.
r first sight of the cocoa-palm in full bearing is obtained on the shores of Lake
h. Hundreds of tall trunks marked with peculiar rings rise from the ground,
of them erect and others sharply inclined, while from their green crowns depend
bunches of green-husked nuts. From Lake Worth southward along the coast
e tip of the Florida peninsula, then up the western coast as far as Charlotte
or, and on the Keys, the cocoanut culture has become one of the leading indus-
of the State, and promises to rival even the raising of pineapples. The oldest
,nut grove on the mainland is at the mouth of the Miami River on Biscayne Bay,
S150 trees were set out nearly fifty years ago. The cocoa-palm is more sensitive
ists than almost any other known plant, and Its cultivation can never be profitable
t where frosts are unknown. The tree likes the proximity of the sea, but is not
:ular as to the elevation or quality of the land on which it grows. It is claimed
L single tree in full bearing will produce enough food to support a man in case of





64


necessity, averaging' one nut
per day. In Florida, however,
the average is not 9ver twenty
nuts per month.. The tree
blossoms and the nuts ripen
throughout the year without
cessation.
Lake Worth.
Lake Worth, the southern-
most of Florida's east coast
sounds, owes its distinction
both to its geographical sit-
uation and its own exceptional
natural beauty. A lagoon of
shallow salt water, having a
length of twenty-two miles and
a. width of half a mile to one
mile, it is not unlike the Ma-
tanzas or the Halifax. The
Gulf Stream washes the nar-
row peninsula that separates
lake from ocean, and the lati-
tude of twenty-six and a-half


Cragin's, Lake Worth.





65
degrees is essentially tropical. The shores of the lake thus maintain luxuriant
vegetation, whose distinguishing characteristics are different from those observed
farther north. The hotels and winter homes of Palm Beach are surrounded by,
Groves of stately cocoa-palms instead of the orange groves of Rockledge or Ormond.
Nowhere else in the United States is there so great a variety of fruit and vegetable
growth in one locality. Side by side with the potato, the sweet corn, and the tomato
of the North are found the banana, pineapple, guava, mango, tamarind, grape fruit, and
almond. On Pitt's Island, near the upper end of the lake, are some remarkable
banyan trees. Equally at home are the cork tree, eucalyptus, mahogany, and mimosa.
There are" said to be 400 different trees and shrubs on Pitt's Island, some of them
unnamed. .Deer, turkeys, ducks, and other small game are abundant, and the water
of the lake teems with fish of all kinds. The peninsula is comparatively elevated,
affording excellent sites for the cottages which have already become numerous,
though hardly a dozen years have elapsed since the beauties of Lake Worth were first
made known in the North by adventurous yachtsmen or canoeists.

The Hotel Royal Poinciana.
On the eastern shore of .Lake Worth, and within half a mile of the Atlantic Ocean,
there was erected during the summer of 1893, by Mr. H. M. Flagler, as a.splendid
counterpart of his hotels at St. Augustine, the vast Hotel Royal Poinciana. This im-
mense establishment, in which there are over 500 rooms, is under thp accomplished
management of Mr..Henry W. Merrill of the Crawford House in the White Mountains.
Through long and wide experience in hotel affairs, coupled with an obliging, courteous
and engaging manner, Mr. Merrill has become most pleasantly known to thousands of
people, and the popularity and success of The Royal Poinciana under his direction are






66
assured. The hotel derives its name from the Poinciana Regia, a magnificent tropical
tree growing in abundance all about the grounds and in the surrounding country. It
is at all times an. object of exceeding grace and beauty, but when blooming it is a
blaze of splendor. Unfortunately, it blooms in midsummer, so that winter tourists
will not enjoy the sight.
"Lake Worth is the only place in the United States," says a traveler who is thor-
oughly familiar with the country, "where a lady can sit on the hotel veranda every
evening all winter long in full dress and without a wrap." The mildness of the cli-
mate needs no greater compliment. Day after day may be passed in the mellow sun-
shine or under the shade of the spreading cocoanut palms with perfect restfulness and
content, and constant accessions of strength from the balmy air. Outdoor existence
is an unceasing delight. The perfect calm of the lake suggests frequent excursions
on the water, and rowboats, yachts, and steam launches in great variety carry their
daily companies. A pleasant trip is that up the lake to its head-waters, or in the
opposite direction to Pitt's Island and Juno. Parties occasionally make a longer tour
to the famous Jupiter light, Fishing affords most excellent sport, with the novel
excitement of great variety in the catch. From the observatory of the hotel the eye
surveys a vast expanse of land and water, including almost the entire length of
Lake Worth and of the narrow peninsula that separates it from the Atlantic, with the
broad ocean filling the eastern horizon and the mainland stretching away in the west
towards the mysterious Everglades. The-scene at dusk is one of entrancing beauty,
and the glory of Lake Worth's sunsets lingers long in memory. No lovelier spot
invites the tourist to exchange the snow and ice of winter in northern lands for a
period of rest and enjoyment in the warmth and luxury of the tropics.


















































DINING ROOM, MOTEL ROYAL POINCIANA, PALM BEACH, LAKE WYUKIM.






68
The Royal Poinciana is in the colonial style of architecture, with foundations of
concrete and brick. The upper portions are of wood. The total length of the build-
ing is 455 feet. The main facade comprises the rotunda, the main building, And the
north and south pavilions, the main building being 52 feet wide, and the rotunda and
pavilions 90 feet. The hotel rises six stories hi'from th fotandation. It fronts on
the lake, but all the rooms look out on either the lake or the ocean. The rotunda,
occupying a space of 1oo by 85 feet, is of pure colonial design, and, while it contains
the offices, will be used as was the sitting room of the old colonial days -as a meet-
ing place for the various members of the family who will winter in this "Florida
Colonial Home." From the back of the rotunda, and directly opposite the entrance,
ascends a noble staircase of quartered oak. This grand staircase leads into the music
room or casino, which is octagonal in shape, fitted with a portable stage, and seats at
least i,ooo guests. The music hall is surrounded with verandas, from which guests
may get the delightful breezes from the ocean, and a fine orchestra is provided. The
hotel contains 506 sleeping rooms, 524 closets, and 125 private bathrooms, besides the
public baths. The rooms are all connecting, and are comfortably furnished with cool
mattings, delicate draperies, and dainty bed linen. The beds are the best obtainable.
Ample and airy rooms, tasteful but simple furnishings, and inviting freshness in every.
thing, are the marked features of the house. The dining hall, capable of accommo&
dating 900 guests, is in the north pavilion, and is exquisitely finished, its high walls
done in cream white. The windows are draped with embroidered muslin, and the
tables, each seating six, are covered with handsome damask, beautiful china, shining
silver, and glittering glass.
Fronting on the lake, the hotel also overlooks the ocean. Nowhere on the Atlantic
cast is there more enjoyable surf bathing during the entire winter, the warm Gulf




.69
Stream touching the shore, and rendering the water warmer than the atmosphere. On
the beach there has been erected a pavilion two stories high, the upper floor of which
is open and arranged as a lookout. The lower floor of the building is fitted up with
bath tubs, and is supplied with hot.salt water. A swimming pool, 50 by 150 feet
in length, the depth running from three feet to six feet, affords a safe bathing place
for ladies and children. It is furnished with an abundant supply of fresh salt
water.
Between the lake and the sea are rich hammock lands, which have been utilized for
gardens. From the hotel to the lake, a distance of about 300 feet, the grounds have
Been laid out by an experienced landscape gardener, and nothing is wanting to make
them attractive. They include foliage plants of brillianXred, yellow, and purple, ten
feet high, the flaming red, broad-leaved hibiscus, moon-flowers, morning glories,
ascension lilies, white and red oleanders, etc., and the magnificent cocoa-palms. The
hotel is abundantly supplied with pure soft water from one of the many fresh water
lakes on the main-land.

From Lake Worth to Savannah.
The .parties will leave Lakp Worth for the homeward journey Tuesday morning,
-February 19, and Tuesday morning, March 5, respectively, taking palace cars at West
Palm Beach. Arriving at St. Augustine in the evening, two nights and a day are
to be passed at The Alcazar, and on Thursday the travelers will proceed to Jacksonville,
and thence continue northward to Savannah, Ga. The route lies over the Jacksonville,
St. Augustine & Indian River Railway, from West Palm Beach to Jacksonville, and
the Florida'Central & Peninsula Railroad from Jacksonville to Savannah. Yulee and
Everett are the principal stations horth of Jacksonville, Fernandina and Brunswick




7yo
being on the coast some distance east. The line crosses the St. Mary's, Altamaha,
Ogeechee, and other rivers. On arrival in Savannah a transfer to The De Soto will
. follow.
Savannah.
Savannah, the "Forest City," shares with St. Augustine the romance of the settle-
ment of the Atlantic Coast. Beginning with the founding of. the place by James
Edward Oglethorpe in 1733, English resolution here came into conflict with Spanish
arrogance there, and the possession of the country between the Savannah and the St.
Mary's continued in dispute for many years. John and Charles Wesley and George
Whitefield were among the first comers. The town was held by the English during
the greater part of the Revolution, and in the Cit War its position made it the natu.
ral seat of important military operations. Since 1865 Savannah's progress has been
rapid, and its population has increased until 06oooo inhabitants are claimed at the
present time, against 30,709 in I880, and 43,189 in &89o. The city stands on the south
bank of the Savannah River, eighteen miles from its mouth. Forsyth Park, ten
acres in area, with twenty acres in addition used as a parade ground, is almost in the
heart of the city. From this park Bull street, the principal promenade, leads north-
ward to the river, passing through five squares, in four of which there are monuments
to Count Pulaski, Sergeant Jasper, W. W. Gordon, and Gen. Nathanael Greene,
respectively. The handsomest residences and gardens, and most imposing public
buildings of the city are on Bull street. Liberty and South Broad streets are also
wide avenues lined with handsome houses. In the Telfair Academy of Arts and Sci-
ences, Savannah has the finest art gallery in the South. 'The imposing new court
house was built in 1889-91. The city is rich in churches and benevolent institutions.
Its most important commercial interests are cotton an. rice. There are many popular




71
resorts in the suburbs, with delightful drives over hard shell roads. The famous Bona-
venture Cemetery is distinguished for its avenues of live oak trees with Spanish moss.-
We shall pass one
day in Savannah, at r
the splendid new De
Soto Hotel,and there
will be a carriage
ride to the principal
places of interest.
The De Soto, under
the management of
Watson & P6wers,
occupies the entire
square bounded by
Broad, Bull, Harris,
and Drayton streets, "
and both without and :
within is a magnifi-
cent piece of archi- The DeSoto, Savannah.
tecture. Over $I,ooo,ooo has been expended on its construction and adornment.
From Savannah Homeward.
Leaving Savannah Friday evening our route northward is by the Florida, Central &
Peninsular Railroad to Columbia, S. C., and 'the Southern Railway Company's line
thence to Washington, by way of Charlotte, Greensboro, Danville, Lynchburg, and
Charlottesville. We have breakfast Saturday morning at Danville, and arrive in,






Washington in the afternoon. We cross the Savannah River about 4o miles o6rth of
Savannah, the Congaree at Columbia, and the James at Lynchburg. Many battle-
fields, both of the Revolution and 'the Civil War, are on the line. In the battle of
Guilford Court House near Greensboro, N.C., Cornwallis defeated Greene in 1781.
Between Charlottesville and Washington military operations were almost continuous in.
i86r-65. Orange and Culpepper were at different times headquarters of the Union
Army. At Rapidan we cross the famous Rapidan River, and at Rappahannock the
Rappahannock, while the station at Manassas is almost on the scene of the two battles
of Bull Run. A'Confederate monument on the left marks the field. We pass through
Alexandria, c0oss the Potomac over the historic '"Long Bridge," and on arrival in
Washington go to the Ebbitt House to remain over Sunday.
Leaving Washington Monday, February 25, or Monday, March II, there will be an
omnibus transfer from the hotel to the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad station, from
whence the train will depart northward at 8ooA. M. (New England passengers who
do not wish to visit New York can proceed directly through to Boston, arriving at the
New York, New Haven & Hartford station, Park Square, at 9.0o p. M.) Lunch will
be provided on the train. On arrival in New York carriages will convey the party,
from the Liberty street ferry to the Park Avenue Hotel or The Brunswick, which
will be reached about 2.30 P. M. There will be a sojouri at the hotel until the
ensuing forenoon, when the passengers will, be transferred to the Grand Central
station, Forty-second street, in'time for the.. Shore line train which leaves at 1o.03
A. M. Drawing-room cars will be furnished for the ride to Boston, and lunch will
be served en roete. The train will reach the -Park Square station of the New tYork,
New Haven & Hartford Railroad at 4.-0 P. M,





,* SRSON OF 1698

Fe UR SPLENDID TRIPS
-.TO-. -
*. T -- ,.


* FLORIDA AND CUBA,*
-- ... .- ---U;,: *.
--INCLUDING VISITS TO -
ST. AUGUSTINE, TAMPA, LAKE WORTH;
WINTER PKRK, ORMOND, ROCKLEDGE,
And Other Favorite Resort.s
---AND--
A 1WtEEf I$ THE CITY OF: 4AIVArda.

RAYMOND & VVHITCOOMB,
BOSTON: OffIC: 296 Washington Street, opposite School Street.
NEW YORK OFFICE: 31 East Fourteenth Street, Lincoln Buil4digUnnfi: ::
PHILADELPHIA OFFICE: 20 Southl Tenth Street, lutuae Life Insuran c :te Ii I
." .. .. + .-. ; .. ,








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PLAZA DE ARMAS AND CAPTAIN GENERAL'S PALACF


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SEASON OF 1895.


TOURS TO FLORIDA AND CUBA.''

L ESS than thirty hours' sail to the south from Pott TamPt,'aFlA, acto dihe'Gulf
of Mexico and the Strait of Florida, lies the pictuiesque'city 6f.Iavnat 'he1
capital of the tropical island of Cuba. Discovered by.' Co fihls bh I tis t,
voyage, Cuba has ever been a country of remarkable interest. Its: iiliiti&^
strange beyond measure to American eyes. Perpetual 'spring'retigstt 1 gaOt
its lovely valleys, among its rugged mountains, and on its broad' pkid~shis' Wif iA 'til
of marvelous fertility, and an abundance of moisture, the fi'ddutift ~ii j ae su a;- la
cane, tobacco, coffee, pineapples, bananas,: and c6unttfesA'ohf6r frit~ishcise ife' is'
tropic sunshine. The city of Havana, with a population tt~ o qkat6 1t nillibri sobulth
affords such contrasts as are to be seen only in sotith6t'n litdi.1 i'trisitor ever
tires of observing its peculiar architecture, its endless tii~ ib otbris es 'it hiktkets
and churches, its theatrical and other entertainmehtstil A' tJ iiitsi k
did gardens of royal palms and other noble trees iriHti' d r~tyf, dr t~Iia &bi e
commingling of wealth and poverty. Havana, indreer; is tof 'ac l o
miles of sea voyage lie between its splendid iharbdr'atidnl'd raif pl bthYt'bl' iedsterh rn
Florida, and even this short and agreeable Ocean s ailtsizrit6eprpt a esaht visit'
to Key West, the southernmost city of' the Ufiited idtatf.c ;h:t b:G iL e'n i r
fold attractions of a Cuban visit within readh- i f okli .pbrCtdbii~;We'h e i'atic ranh .' .
ments for four parties to visit Havana in Janu ~a and'-February;, 895,' ihi' 1 Afii

... . '





76
with extended tours through Florida. A full week will be passed on the island. This
period will be ample for visits to the various places of interest in Havana, and also
for short excursions from the city to Marianao, Matanzas, and elsewhere.
On the outward journey from Boston, New York and Philadelphia to St. Augus.
tine, and also on the homeward trip from Lake Worth or St. Augustine, the tourists
who are to visit Cuba, and the Florida tourists whose programme is given in the
former part of this book, will travel together, constituting in each case only one
party. After their arrival from the North at St. Augustine the former will proceed
through Florida and visit Cuba with personal escort on their own special itinerary.
The several Cuban parties will visit precisely the same places in Florida that have
already been described in connection with our Florida tours, but will make some-
what shorter stops at the different hotels. The various places will be seen in the
same order, and the stop-over privileges will be the same after the return from Havana.
The only difference in any respect between these tours and those already outlined, so
far as the Florida part of the journey is concerned, is in the shorter time given to that
State, as shown by the itineraries.
For a full account of the general arrangements for the trips with respect to personal
escort and attention, stop-over privileges in Florida and returning home (the tickets
being limited.to use with the party until the return from Cuba), baggage regulations,
clothing, mailing directions, etc., see pages 4-II; for a description of Florida and of the
route to be followed and the places visited between Boston and Tampa, pages 21-56;
and for an account of that part of Florida to be visited after returning from Cuba, and
the homeward journey, pages 57-72. A sketch of the Cuban part of the our, which
will occupy ten days' time from the departure from Port Tampa until the return
there, is given hereafter.





77
COST OF THE TRIP.
The price of tickets for these tours will be as follows:--
Boston, .. 39o.oo
New York, ..... 370.00
Philadelphia, 367.00
These prices cover all traveling expenses for the entire trip inaccordance with the
annexed itinerary, including first-class passage over all routes going and returning;
side trips from Chattanooga to Lookout Mountain and return, St. Augustine up the
Ocklawaha and St. John's Rivers to Silver Spring and Sanford, respectively, and
return, and Havana to Marianao and return; a double berth (half a section) in the
sleeping cars and seats in parlor cars; stateroom berth and meals on the Ocklawaha
and St. John's River steamers and the steamer from Port Tampa to Havana and
return; meals in the dining car or at hotels or dining stations en route, as set forth;
hotel accommodations at New York (for the Boston passengers), Lookout Mountain,
Atlanta, St. Augustine, Palatka, Ormond, Havana, Tampa, Winter Park, Rockledge,
Palm Beach, Savannah, and Washington; all transfers to and from hotels and car.
riage rides mentioned in the itinerary; services of conductors; all transportation,
transfers and care of ordinary checked baggage; in short, every needed expense of
the entire roundtrip from BostonNewTYork, or Philadelphia back to the same point.

CUBAN MONEY.

United States money usually commands a premium of 7 per cent to Io per cent
over Spanish gold in Havana, while Spanish gold is at a similar premium over Spanish
silver. American money is thus worth 14 per cent to 20 per cent more than Spanish





78
silver. The tourist will experience no difficulty in exchanging United States bills for
Cuban money either at Port Tampa, on ship board, or after arrival in Havana, and is
likely to get about $6 in Spanish silver for a $5 United States bill. Prices in the stores
will be stated specifically as so much in gold or silver, as the case may be. Gold coins
of the following denominations are in limited circulation: Onza, equal to $17 ; Media
onza, $8.50; Centen, $5.30; Doblon, $4.25; Escudo, $2.1 2). The following are the
values of the silver and copper coinage in common use: Peso, silver dollar, Ioo cents;
mediofpeso, silver half dollar, 50 cents; dos (2) pesetas, 40 cents; peseta, 20 cents; dies
(I0) centavos, io cents; cinco (5) centavos, 5 cents; dos (2) centavos, or diez (o1) centimos,
2 cents; centavo, or cinco (5) centimos, I cent.
The conductor of the party will render all possible service in aiding its members to
exchange money, etc.

NOTARIAL CERTIFICATES REQUIRED.
American citizens are permitted to visit Cuba without passports, but a notarial cer-
tificate, stating that the bearer is a citizen of the United States, is required. This
certificate must be vised by the Spanish authorities during the stay.in Havana. The
conductor in charge of the party will make all necessary arrangements for securing the
certificates and having them vised, thereby relieving the tourists of all annoyance and
expense with regard to this matter.

LETTERS AND CABLE MESSAGES.
Mail intended for the members of our parties during their stay in Havana should
be addressed, "Care Raymond & Whitcomb, Hotel Pasaje, Havana, Cuba," and
"Via Tampa, Fla.," should also be written on the envelope. Letter postage is 5 cents





79
per half ounce, and newspaper postage 2 cents for 4 ounces or less, and I cent
additional for each additional 2 ounces or fraction thereof.
For directions for sending mail to points in Florida, see page 9.
Our registered cable address in Havana will be "Pasaje." Friends of passengers
need not use the passenger's full name and address in directing a cablegram, but only
the last name, with our cable address. For instance, a passenger whose last name is
Smith will find that messages will reach him safely and promptly if addressed merely
"Smith, Pasaje, Havania." This brief address will save considerable expense, as every
wold and initial are charged for in the address and signature, as well as in the
message.
WHEN TICKETS SHOULD BE TAKEN.
Tickets for the Florida and Cuba tours should be taken on or before Saturday,
January 5, for the first and second parties, and Saturday, January 19, for the third and
fourth parties.
02 Tickets for the excursions, additional copies of this circular, and all needed
information can be obtained of

RAYMOND & WHITCOMB,
296 Washington Street, opposite School Street, Boston.
81 East Fourteenth Street, Lincoln Building, Union Square, New York.
20 South Tenth Street, Mutual Life Insurance Building, Philadelphia.























V '4






4b















I VOW,
A -A"'c





Hote Paa e Haana







ITINERARIES.


TOURS z AND 3 THROUGH FLORIDA AND CUBA.
THURSDAY, Jan. o1. Tour No. 1. First Day.- Leave Boston at o.o03 A. M. from the station
THURSDAY, Jan. 24. Tour No. 3. of the N-w York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Park
square, in parlor cars. Members of the party should check their baggage to Chattanooga. The checks
will be taken up on the traip, and the baggage will be delivered at the rooms of the owners at Lookout
lun. Tags are supplied with the excursion tickets, and these, with the owner's name and home address
mainlyy inscribed thereon, should be attached to every trunk, valise, or other piece of baggage, to serve
as a ready means of identification. The train will leave Piovidence at 15.x3 A. M., New London 1.03
P. M., and New Haven 2.30 P. M.; lunch en route; arrive in N-ew York at 4.30 P. M.; transfer to the
Park Avenue Hotel, Wm. H. Earle & Son, proprietors, or The Brunswick, George Swett, manager.
FRIDAY, Jan. i. Tour No. I. Second Day.- Carriage transfer from the hotel to the
FRIDAY, Jan. 25. Tour No. 3. station of the Central Railroad of New Jersey, foot of
Liberty street, where New York passengers will join the party; leave New York by ferry at 9.0o A. M.,
and leave Jersey City at 9.12 A. M. in a special train of vestibuled Pullman palace sleeping cars, with
dining car; proceed southward by the Royal Blue line, Baltimore & Ohio and Norfolk & Western Rail-
roads, leaving Bound Brook at 10.00 A. M., Philadelphia (Baltimore & Ohio station, Twenty-fourth and
Chestnut streets, where Philadelphia passengers will join the party) at 11.42 A. M., Chester at 11.58 A. M.,
Wilmington 12.16 P. M., Baltimore 2.25 P. M., and Washington 3.30 p. M.
NOTE. Baggage should be checked from New York, Philadelphia, or other points to Chattanooga.
See previous paragraph.
SATURDAY, Jan. 12. Tour No. I. Tkird Day.-En route on the Norfolk & Western and
SATURDAY, Jan. 26. Tour No. 3. Southern Railways; arrive in Chattanooga, Tenp., at 2.30
P. M." transfer fiom the Central station by the Chattanooga & Lookout Mountain Railway to the. Look.
out Inn, M. S. Gibson, manager.
NOTE.- Railway time changes at Bristol, Tenn., from Eastern standard, or 75th meridian, Q Cetral
standard, or 9oth meridian one hour slower.






82

SUNDAY, Jan. 13. Tour No. I. F urn Day.-At Lookout Inn.
SUNDAY, Jan. 27. Tour No. 3.
MONDAY, Jan. 14. Tour No. I. I Fifth Day.-Transfer from Lookout Inn to the Central
MONDAY, Jan. 28. Tour No. 3. station by the Chattanooga & Lookout Mountain Railway,
and leave Chattanooga by the Southern Railway at 2.00 P. M.; arrive in Atlanta at 7.30 p. M.; to the
Hotel Aragon, Chas. F. Dodge, manager.
TUESDAY, Jan. 15. Tour No.. Sixth Day.- In Atlanta. Carriage ride, visiting the
TUESDAY, Jan. 29. Tour No. 3. Capitol, Grant Park, the principal residence streets, and
other points of interest in and about the city; leave Atlanta by the Southern Railway at 7.30 P. M.
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16. Tour No. x. Seventh Day.- From Jesup southward by the Savannah,
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30. Tour No. 3. Florida & Western Railway; arrive in Jacksonville
at 8.25 A. M.; breakfast and dinner at the Union station dining rooms; carriage ride about the city;
leave Jacksonville by the Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian River Railway at 12.45 p. M. ; arrive in
St. Augustine at 2.00 P. M.; omnibus transfer to The Ponce de Leon, C. B. Knott, manager.
THURSDAY, Jan. 17. Tour No. I. ktDay.-At St. Augustine.
THURSDAY, Jan. 31. Tour No. 3.
FRIDAY, Jan. IS. Tour No. x. I Ninth Day.-Transfer from The Ponce de Leon to the
FRIDAY, Feb. r. Tour No. 3. Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian River station, and
leave St. Augustine at 9.20 A. M. ; arrive in Palatka at 10.35 A. M. ; go on board one of the steamers of
the Ocklawaha Navigation Company (Hart's Daily Line) for the trip up the Ocklawaha River to Silver
Spring and return; meals and stateroom berths furnished.
SATURDAY, Jan. i9. Tour No. I. } ent Day.-On the Ocklawaha River.
SATURDAY, Feb. a. Tour No. 3.
SUNDAY, Jan. 20. Tour No. I. Eleventh Day.-Arrive in Palatka at an early hour; to
SUNDAY, Feb. 3. Tour No. 3. the Putnam House, Wm. Catto, manager; in the evening
go on board one of the steamers of Clyde's St. John's River line for the trip up the St. John's to San-
ford and return; meals and stateroom berths furnished.
MONDAY, Jan. 21. Tour No. i. Twelfth Day.-On the St. John's River, returning to
MONDAY, Feb. 4. Tour No. 3. Palatka in the evening; to the Putnam House.





83
TUESDAY, Jan. 22. Tour No. x. Thirteenth Day.- Leave Palatka by the Jacksonville, St.
TUESDAY, Feb. 5. Tour No. 3. Augustine & Indian River Railway at 1o.oo A. M.; arrive
at Ormond at x1.50 A. M.; transfer to the Hotel Ormond, Anderson & Price, managers; carriage ride,
visiting the village of Ormond, the hammock forest with its old Spanish ruins, the principal orange
groves, the bank of the Halifax River, and the ocean beach.
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23. Tour No. i.
WE 23. Tor No. 3. Fourteenth Day.- At Ormond.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6. Tour No. 3.
THURSDAY, Jan. 24. Tour No. i. Fifteenth Day.-Transfer to the station, and leave Or-
THURSDAY, Feb. 7. Tour No. 3. mond by the Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian River
Railway at 11.50 A. M. ; from Orange City Junction southward by the Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West
Railway; dinner at Sanford; from Sanford southward by the South Florida Division of the Savannah,
Florida & Western Railway; arrive at Port Tampa at 7.00 P. M.; supper at The Inn; go on board one
of the steamers of the Plant Steamship line, and leave Port Tampa for Havana at 8.oo P. M.
FRIDAY, Jan. 25. Tour No. x. Sixteenth Day.- On the voyage to Havana, including a
FRIDAY, Feb. 8. Tour No. 3. stop of several hours at Key West; carriage ride, visiting
Fort Taylor, the South Battery, Key West Light, etc.
SATURDAY, Jan. 26. Tour No. I. Seventeenth Day.-Arrive in Havana at 6.00 A. M.; trans-
SATURDAY, Feb. 9. Tour No. 3. fer to the Hotel Pasaje, F. Polvoroso y Ca., proprietors,
or the Hotel Roma, John Repko, proprietor; in the afternoon carriage ride, visiting the Captain-Gen-
eral's Summer Palace, the Cemetery, the suburb of Vedado and the Prado.
SUNDAY, Jan. 27. Tour No. x. Eigkteenth Day.- In Havana.
SUNDAY, Feb. 1o. Tour No. 3.
MONDAY, Jan. 28. Tour No. x. t Nineteenth Day.- In Havana. Excursion to Marianao,
MONDAY, Feb. x. Tour No. 3. J where a pineapple plantation will be visited.
NOTE.-This excursion may occur on a different day, to suit the convenience of the party.
TUESDAY, Jan. 29. Tour No. x. Twentieth Day.- In Havana.

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 3o. TourNo. Twenty-first Day.- In Havana.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13. Tour No. 3.






84

THURSDAY, Jan. 31. Tour No. r. Twenty-second Day.- In Havana.
THURSDAY, Feb. 14. Tour No. 3.
FRIDAY, Feb. r. Tour No. x. Twenty-third Day.- In Havana.
FRIDAY, Feb. 15. Tour No. 3.
SATURDAY, Feb. 2. Tour No. i. Twenty-fourth Day.--In Havana. Transfer from the
SATURDAY, Feb. I6. Tour No. 3. hotels to one of the steamers of the Plant Steamship line,
and sail at 12.30 P. M.
SUNDAY, Feb. 3. Tour No. x. Twenty-fifth Day. -On the voyage from Havana; arrive
SUNDAY, Feb. x7. Tour No. 3. at Port Tampa in the eve.*. -; by the Savannah, Florida
& Western Railway to the Tampa Bay Hotel, Tampa, J. H. King, manager.
MONDAY, Feb. 4. Tour No. I. Twenty-sixth Day.- At Tampa Bay Hotel.
MONDAY, Feb. x8. Tour No. 3.
TUESDAY, Feb. 5. Tour No. x. }Twenty-sevent Day.- At Tampa Bay Hotel.
TUESDAY, Feb. x9. Tour No. 3.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6. Tour No. x. Twenty-eigkth Day.- Leave Tampa Bay Hotel at 9.30
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20. Tour No. 3. A. M. ; arrive at Winter Park at X2.45 P. M. ; to The
Seminole, D. P. Hathaway, manager.
THURSDAY, Feb. 7. Tour No. x. Twenty-ninth Day.- Leave Winter Park at X2.45 p. M .;
THURSDAY, Feb. 2x. Tour No3. 3 J from Sanford eastward by the Jacksonville, Tampa &
Key West Railway to Titusville, and from Titusville southward by the Jacksonville, St. Augustine &
Indian River Railway; arrive at Rockledge at 5.00 P. M.; to the Hotel Indian River, Andrew S. Lee,
proprietor.
FRIDAY, Feb. 8. Tour No. x. Thirtieth Day.- Leave Rockledge at 2.00 P. M., and
FRIDAY, Feb. 22. Tour No. 3. arrive at West Palm Beach at 7.00 P. M.; transfer-across
Lake Worth to the Hotel Royal Poinciana, Palm Beach, Henry W. Merrill, manager.
SATURDAY, Feb. 9. Tour No. Thirty-rst Day.At Lake Worth.
SATURDAY, Feb. 23. Tour No. 3.

SUNDAY, Feb. xo. Tour No. Thirty-second Day.- At Lake Worth.
SUrNDAY, Feb. 24. Tour No. 3.





85
MONDAY, Feb. Tour No. Thirty-third Day.-At Lake Worth.
MONDAY, Feb. 25. Tour No. 3.
TUESDAY, Feb. 12. Tour No. i. )
TUESDAY, Feb.26. Tour No. 3. Thirty-fourth Day.-At Lake Worth.
TUESDAY, Feb. 26. Tour No. 3.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. Tour No. Thirty-fifth Day.-At Lake Worth.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27. Tour No. 3.
THURSDAY, Feb. 1. Tour No. Thirty-sixth Day.- At Lake Worth.
THURSDAY, Feb. 28. Tour No. 3.
FRIDAY. Feb. 15. Tour No. i. Thirty-seventh Day.- Transfer to the station of the Jack-
FRIDAY, March i. Tour No. 3. sonville, St. Augustine & Indian River Railway, West
Palm Beach, ana leave at 8.00 A. M. in palace cars; dinner at the Hotel Indian River, Rockledge;
arrive in St. Augustine at 7.30 P. M. ;'omnibus transfer to The Alcazar, C. B. Knott, manager.
SATURDAY, Feb. 16. Tour No \.
SATURDAY, aFe. 1. Tour No. Thirty-eighth Day.- At St. Augustine.
SATURDAY, March 2. Tour No. 3.
SUNDAY, Feb. 17. Tour No. x.
SUNDAY, eb.r Tour No. Thirty-ninth Day.-At St. Augustine.
SUNDAY, March 3. Tour No. 3.
MONDAY, Feb. x8. Tour No Fortieth Day.- At St. Augustine.
MONDAY, March 4. Tour No. 3. I
TUESDAY, Feb. g. Tour No. Forty-frst Day.- At St. Augustine.
TUESDAY, March 5. Tour No. 3.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20. Tour No. Forty-second Day.- At St. Augustine.
WEDNESDAY, March 6. Tour No. 3.
NOTE.- For the accommodation of persons who wish to prolong their stay in Florida, three additional
parties will return North with personal escort. The returning itineraries are as follows: -
THURSDAY, Feb. 21. Tour No. i. Forty-third Day.-Transfer from the hotel to the station
THURSDAY, March 7. Tour No. 3. and leave St. Augustine by the Jacksonville, St. Augustine
THURSDAY, March 21. Tour No. 5. & Indian River Railway at 1.30 P. M.; from Jacksonville
THURSDAY, April 4. Tour No. 6. northward by the Florida Central & Peninsular Railroad
THURSDAY, April x8. Tour No. 7. J arrive in Savannah at 7.30 P. M.; omnibus transfer to The
De Soto, Watson & Powers, managers.








FRIDAY, Feb. 22:. Tour No. I.
FRIDAY, March 8. Tour No. 3.
FRIDAY, March as. Tour No. 5.
FRIDAY, April 5. Tour No. 6.
FRIDAY, April x9. Tour No. 7.


86
SForty-fourit Day.- In Savannah; carriage ride, visiting
the principal business and residence streets, Forsyth Park,
Bonaventure Cemetery, and Thunderbolt; transfer from
The De Soto to the Florida Central & Peninsular station,
and leave at 7.x1 P. M.


NOTE.- Railway time changes at Columbia, S. C., from Central standard, or goth meridian, to East.
ern standard, or 75th meridian one hour faster.


SATURDAY, Feb. 23. Tour No. I.
SATURDAY, March 9. Tour No. 3.
SATURDAY, March 23. Tour No. 5.
SATURDAY, April 6. Tour No. 6.
SATURDAY, April 2o0. Tour No. 7.

SUNDAY, Feb. 24. Tour No. r.
SUNDAY, March 10. Tour No. 3.
SUNDAY, March 24. Tour No. 5.
SUNDAY, April 7. Tour No. 6.
SUNDAY, April 21. Tour No. 7.


Forty-fifth Day.- From Columbia northward by the
Southern Railway; breakfast at Danville; arrive in Wash-
ington at 2.55 P. M. ; omnibus transfer to the Ebbitt House,
H. C. Burch, manager.




SForty-sixth Day.- In Washington.


MONDAy, Feb. 25. Tour No. x. Forty-seventh Day.- Omnibus transfer from the hotel to
MONDAY, March zs. Tour No. 3. the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad station, and at 8.00 A. M.
MONDAY, March 25. Tour No. 5. take Pullman palace cars for New York; members of the
MONDAY, April 8. Tour No. 6. parties who do not wish to visit New York can proceed
MONDAY, April 22. Tour No. 7. directly through to Boston, arriving at the New York, New
Haven & Hartford Railroad station, Park square, at 9.00 P. M ; arrive in Philadelphia (Reading Ter-
minal station, corner of Twelfth and Market streets) at 11.26 A. M.; lunch on the train; arrive in
Jersey City at 1.43 P. M.; by ferry from Jersey City to Liberty street, New York, arriving at 1.55 P. M.;
transfer therefrom to the Park Avenue Hotel or The Brunswick.





87
TUESDAY, Feb. 26. Tour No. I. 1 Forty-eighth Day.- Transfer from the hotel to the Grandc
TUESDAY, March 12. Tour No. 3. Central station, Forty-second street; leave New York in
TUESDAY, March 26. Tour No. 5. drawing-room cars at 10.03 A. M., and proceed to Boston
TUESDAY, April 9. Tour No. 6. via the Shore line; lunch on the train; arrive at New Haven.
TUESDAY, April 23. Tour No. 7. at II.55 A. M., New London at 1.26 P. M., Providence at
3.15 P. M., and Boston (New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad station, Park square) at 4.30 P. M.


TOURS 2 AND 4 THROUGH FLORIDA AND CUBA.

THURSDAY, Jan. IO. Tour No. 2. First Day.- Leave Boston at 0o.03 A. M. from the station
THURSDAY, Jan. 24. Tour No. 4. ) of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Park
square, in parlor cars. Members of the party should check their baggage to Chattanooga. The checks
will be taken up on the train, and the baggage will be delivered at the rooms of the owners at Lookout
Inn. Tags are supplied with the excursion tickets, and these, with the owner's name and home address
plainly inscribed thereon, should be attached to every trunk, valise, or other piece of baggage, to serve as
a ready means of identification. The train will leave Providence at 11.13 A. M., New London 1.o3 p. M.,
and New Haven 2.30 P. M.; lunch en route; arrive in New York at 4.30 p. M.; transfer to the Park
Avenue Hotel, Wm. H. Earle & Son, proprietors, or The Brunswick, George Swett, manager.

FRIDAY, Jan. i Tour No. 2. Second Day.-CarriAge transfer from the hotel to the
FRIDAY, Jan. 25. Tour No. 4. station of the Central Railroad of New Jersey, foot of
Liberty street, where New York passengers will join the party; leave New York by ferry at 9.00 A. M.,
and leave Jersey City at 9.12 A. M. in a special train of vestibuled Pullman palace sleeping cars, with
dining car; proceed southward by the Royal Blue line, Baltimore & Ohio and Norfolk & Western Rail-
roads, leaving Bound Brook at Io.oo A. M., Philadelphia (Baltimore & Ohio station, Twenty-fourth and
Chestnut streets, where Philadelphia passengers will join the party) at 11.42 A. M., Chester at 1.58 A. M.,
Wilmington 12. 6 P. M., Baltimore 2.25 P. M., and Washington 3.30 P. M.
NOTE.-- aggage should be checked from New York, Philadelphia and other points to Chattanooga.
See previous paragraph.






88
SATURDAY, Jan. 12. Tour No. 2. ThirdDay.-En route on the Norfolk & Western and
SATURDAY, Jan. 26. Tour No. 4. Southern Railways; arrive in Chattanooga; Tenn., at 2.30
P. M.; transfer from the Central station by the Chattanooga & Lookout Mountain Railway to the Look-
out Inn, M. S. Gibson, manager.
NOTE.- Railway time changes at Bristol, Tenn., from Eastern standard, or 75th meridian, to Central
standard, or 9oth meridian one hour slower.
SUNDAY, Jan. 13. Tour No. 2. Fourth Day.--At Lookout Inn.
-SUNDAY, Jan. 27. Tour No. 4.
MONDAY, Jan. 14. Tour No. 2. Fifth Day.- Transfer from Lookout Inn to the Central
MONDAY, Jan. 28. Tour No. 4. Station by the Chattanooga & Lookout Mountain Railway,
and leave Chattanooga by the Southern Railway at 2.00 P. M.; arrive in Atlanta at 7.30 P. M. to the
Hotel Aragon, Chas. F. Dodge, manager.
TUESDAY, Jan. 15. Tour No.2. Sixth Day.- In Atlanta; carriage ride visiting the Capi-
TUESDAY, Jan. 29. Tour No. 4. tol, Grant Park, tl:. principal residence streets and other
points of interest in and about the city; leave Atlanta by the Southern Railway at 7.30 P. M.
WEDNESDAY, Jan. x6. Tour No. 2. Seventh Day. From Jesup southward by the Savannah,
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30. Tour No 4. Florida & Western Railway; arrive in Jacksonville at 8.25
A. M.; breakfast and dinner at the Union station dining rooms; carriage ride about the city; leave Jack-
sonville by the Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian River Railway at 12.45 P. M.; arrive in St. Augustine
,t 2.00 P. M.; omnibus transfer to The Ponce de Leon, C. B. Knott, manager.
THURSDY, Jan. r7. Tour No. Eighth Day.-At St. Augustine.
THURSDAY, Jan. 31. Tour No. 4.
FRIDAY, Jan. 18. Tour No. 2. Ninth Day.- At St. Augustine.
FRIDAY, Feb. x. Tour No. 2.
SATURDAY, Jan.rg. Tour No. 2. Tenth Day.- At St. Augustine.
SATURDAY, Feb. 2. Tour No. 4.
SUNDAY; Jan. 2o. Tour No. 2.
SUNDAY JanFeb. Tour No. IEleventh Day.- At St. Augustine.
SUNDAY, Feb. 3. Tour No. 4.






89
MONDAY, Jan. 2. Tour No. Twelfh Da.--At St. Augustine.
MONDAY, Feb. 4. Tour No. 4.
TUESDAY, Jan. 22. Tour No. 2. Thirteenth Day.-Transfer from The Ponce de Leon to
TUESDAY, Feb. 5. Tour No. 4. the Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian River station,
and leave St. Augustine at 9.20 A. M.; arrive in Palatka at 10.35 A. M.; go on board one of the steamers
of the Ocklawaha Navigation Company (Hart's Daily Line) for the trip up the Ocklawaha River to Silver
Spring and return; meals and stateroom berths furnished.
WEDNSDAY, Jan. 23. TourNo. Fourteenth Day.- On the Ocklawaha River.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6. Tour No. 4.
THURSDAY, Jan. 24. Tour No. 2. } Fifteenth Day.- Arrive in Palatka at an early hour; to
THURSDAY, Feb. 7. Tour No. 4. the Putnam House, Wm. Catto, manager. In the evening
go on board one of the steamres of Clyde's St. John's River line for the trip up the St. John's to San-
ford and return; meals and stateroom berths furnished.
FRIDAY, Jan. 25. Tour No. 2. Sixteenth Day.-On the St. John's River, returning to
FRIDAY, Feb. 8. Tour No. 4. Palatka in the evening; to the Putnam House.
SATURDAY, Jan. 26. Tour No. 2. Seventeenth Day.- Leave Palatka by the Jacksonville, St.
SATURDAY, Feb. 9. Tour No. 4. Augustine & Indian River Railway at 1o.oo A. M.; arrive
at Ormond at 11.50 A. M.; transfer to the Hotel Ormond, Anderson & Price, managers; carriage ride,
visiting the village of Ormond, the hammock forest with its old Spanish ruins, the principal orange groves,
the banks of the Halifax River, and the ocean beach.
SUNDAY, an. 27. Tour No. 2. Eighteenth Day.- At Ormond.
SUNDAY, Feb. io. Tour No. 4.
MONDAY, Jan. 28. Tour No. 2. Nineteenth Day.--Transfer to the station, and leave
MONDAY, Feb. 3s. Tour No. 4. Ormond by the Jacksonville, St.-Augustine & Indian
River Railway at *1.5o A. M.; from Orange City Junction southward by the Jacksonville, Tampa & Key
West Railway; dinner at Sanford; from Sanford southward by the South Florida Division of the
Savannah, Florida & Western Railway; arrive at 7.05 P. M. at Tampa Bay Hotel, Tampa, J. H. King,
manager.


.-:l.a+n~;: r. L
c I .SL~





90

TUESDAY, Jan. 29. Tour No. } Twentieth Day.-At Tampa Bay Hotel.
TUESDAY, Feb. x2. Tour No. 4.
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30. Tour No. 2. Tampa Bay Hotel.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3. Tour r. 4. Twenty-first Day -At Tampa Bay Hotel.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13. Tour No. 4.
THURSDAY, Jan. 31. Tour No. 2. Twenty-second Day.- Leave Tampa Bay Hotel in the
THURSDAY, Feb. 14. Tour No. 4. evening by the Savannah, Florida & Western Railway, and
at Port Tampa go on board one of the steamers of the Plant Steamship line; leave Port Tampa for
Havana at 8.oo P. M.
FRIDAY, Feb. i. Tour No. 2. Twenty-third Day.- On the voyage to Havana, including
FRIDAY, Feb. z5. Tour No. 4. a stop of several hours at Key West; carriage ride, visiting
Fort Taylor, the South Battery, Key West Light, etc.
SATURDAY, Feb. 2. Tour No. 2. } Twenty-fourth Day.-Arrive in Havana at 6.00 A. M.;
SATURDAY, Feb. x6. Tour No. 4. transfer to the Hotel Pasaje, F. Polvorosa y Ca., proprie-
tors, or the Hotel Roma, John Repko, proprietor; in the afternoon carriage ride, visiting the Captain-
General's Summer Palace, the Cemetery, the suburb of Vedado and the Prado.
SUNDAY, Feb. 3. Tour No. 2. Twenty-fifth Day.- In Havana.
SUNDAY, Feb. i7. Tour No. 4.
MONDAY, Feb. 4. Tour No. Twenty-sixth Day.- In Havana; excursion to Marianao,
MONDAY, Feb. i8. Tour No. 4. where a pineapple plantation will be visited.
NoTE.-This excursion may occur on a different day, to suit the convenience of the party.
TUESDAY, Feb. 5. Tour No. 2. Twenty-seventh Day.- In Havana.
TUESDAY, Feb. z9. Tour No. 4.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6. Tour No. 2. Twenty-eigth Day.- In Havana.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20. Tour No. 4.
THURSDAY, Feb. 7. Tour No. 2. Twenty-nithDay.-n Havana.
THURSDAY, Feb. 2a. Tour No. 4-
FRIDAY, Feb. 8. Tour No. 2. Thirtiet Day.- In Havana.
FRIDAY, Feb. 22. Tour No. 4. irti






91
SATURDAY, Feb. 9. Tour No. 2. Thirty-first Day.- In Havana. Transfer from the hotels
SATURDAY, Feb. 23. Tour No. 4. to one of the steamers of the Plant Steamship line, and
sail at 12.30 P. M.
SUNDAY, Feb. zo. Tour No. 2. Thirty-secondDay.-On the voyage from Havana; arrive
SUNDAY, Feb. 24. Tour No. 4. at Port Tampa in the evening; by the Savannah, Florida
& Western Railway to the Tampa Bay Hotel, Tampa, J. H. King, manager.
MONDAY, Feb. ix. Tour No. Thirty-third Day.- Leave Tampa Bay Hotel at 9.30
MONDAY, Feb. 25. Tour No. 4. A. M.; arrive at Winter Park at 12.45 P. M. ; to The
Seminole, D. P. Hathaway, manager.
TUESDAY, Feb. i2. Tour No. 2. t Thirty-fourth Day.- Leave Winter Park at 12.45 M. ;
TUESDAY, Feb. 26. Tour No. 4. J from Sanford eastward by the Jacksonville, Tampa & Key
West Railway to Titusville, and from Titusville southward by the Jacksonville, St. Augustine & Indian
River Railway; arrive at Rbckledge at 5.00 p. M. ; to the Hotel Indian River, Andrew S. Lee, proprietor.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13. Tour No. 2. Thirty-fifth Day.- Leave Rockledge at 2.00 P. M. and
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27. Tour No. 4. arrive at West Palm Beach at 7.00 P. M.; transfer across
Lake Worth to the Hotel Royal Poinciana, Palm Beach, Henry W. Merrill, manager.
THURSDAY, Feb. 14. Tour No. 2. Thirty-sixth Day.- At Lake Worth.
THURSDAY, Feb. 28. Tour No. 4.
FRIDAY, Feb. 15. Tour No. 2. Thirty-seventh Day.- At Lake Worth.
FRIDAY, March I. Tour No. 4.
SATURDAY, Feb. s6. Tour No. 2.
SATURDAY, March 2. Tour No. Thirty-eigkth Day.- At Lake Worth.
SUNDAY, Feb. M Tour No... Thirty-ninth Day.- At Lake Worth.
SUNDAY, March 3. Tour No. 4.
MONDAY, Feb. r8. Tour No. 2.
MONDAY, MFeb. 4. Tour No. 2. ortiet Day.- At Lake Worth.
MONDAY, March 4. Tour No. 4.
NOTE.- For the accommodation of persons who wish to prolong their stay in Florida, three addi-
tional parties will return North with personal escort. The returning itineraries are as follows: -






92 .

TUESDAY, Feb. x9. Tour No. Forty-first Day.- Transfer to the station of the Jackson-
TUESDAY, March 5. Tour No. 4. | ville, St. Augustine & Indian River Railway, West Palm
TUESDAY, March 19. Tour No. 5. 5 Beach, and leave at 8.oo A. M. in palace cars; dinner at the
TUESDAY, April 2. Tour No. 6. Hotel Indian River, Rockledge; arrive at St. Augustine at
TUESDAY, April 16. Tour No. 7. J 7.3o P. M.; omnibus transfer to The Alcazar, C. B. Knott,
manager.
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20. Tour No. 2.
WEDNESDAY, March 6. Tour No. 4.
WEDNESDAY, March 20. Tour No. 5. Forty-second Day.-At St. Augustine.
WEDNESDAY, April 3. Tour No. 6.
WEDNESDAY, April 17. Tour No. 7. J


THURSDAY, Feb. 21. Tour No. 2.
THURSDAY, March 7. Tour No. 4.
THURSDAY, March 21. Tour No. 5.
THURSDAY, April 4. Tour No. 6.
THURSDAY, April 18. Tour No. 7.
De Soto, Watson & Powers, managers.
FRIDAY, Feb. 22. Tour No. 2.
FRIDAY, March 8. Tour No. 4.
FRIDAY, March 22. Tour No. 5.
FRIDAY, April 5. Tour No. 6.
FRIDAY, April 19. Tour No. 7.


Forty-third Day.- Transfer from the hotel to the station,
and leave St. Augustine by the Jacksonville, St. Augustine
S& Indian River Railway at 1.30 P. M.; from Jacksonville
northward by the Florida Central & Peninsular Railroad;
arrive in Savannah at 7.30 P. M.; omnibus transfer to The

j Forty-fourth Day.- In Savannah; carriage ride, visiting
Sthe principal business and residence streets, Forsyth Park,
Bonaventure Cemetery, and Thunderbolt; transfer from
The De Soto to the Florida Central & Peninsular station,
and leave at 7.x5 P. M.


NOTE.-Railway time changes at Columbia, S. C., from Central standard, or goth meridian, to
Eastern standard, or 75th meridian one hour faster.
SATURDAY, Feb. 23. Tour No. 2. Forty-fifth Day.- From Columbia northward by the
SATURDAY, March 9. Tour No. 4. Southern Railway; breakfast at Danville; arrive in
SATURDAY, March 23. Tour No. 5* Washington at 2.55 P. M. ; omnibus transfer to the Ebbitt
SATURDAY, April 6. Tour No. 6. House, H. C. Burch manager.
SATURDAY, April 20. Tour No. 7.






93
SUNDAY, Feb. 24. Tour No. 2.
SUNDAY, March io. Tour No. 4.
SUNDAY, March 24. Tour No. 5. Forty-sixth Day.- In Washington.
SUNDAY, April 7. Tour No. 6.
SUNDAY, April 2z. Tour No. 7.
MONDAY, Feb. 25. Tour No. 2. Forty-seventh Day.-Omnibus transfer from the hotel to
MONDAY, March xI. Tour No. 4. the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad station, and at 8.00 A. M. take
MONDAY, March 25. Tour No. 5. Pullman palace cars for New York. Members of the par-
MONDAY, April 8. Tour No. 6. ties who do not wish to visit New York can proceed directly
MONDAY, April 22. Tour No. 7. through to Boston, arriving at the New York, New Haven
& Hartford Railroad station, Park Square, at 9.oo P. M.; arrive in Philadelphia (Reading Terminal
station, corner of Twelfth and Market streets), at 11.26 A. M.; lunch on the train; arrive in Jersey City
at x.43 P. M.; by ferry from Jersey City to Liberty street, New York, arriving at. .55 P. M. ; transfer
therefrom to the Park Avenue Hotel or The Brunswick.
TUESDAY, Feb. 26. Tour No. 2. 1 Forty-eighth Day.-Transfer from the hotel to the Grand
TUESDAY, March 12. Tour No. 4. Central station, Forty-second street; leave New York in
TUESDAY, March 26. Tour No. 5. drawing-room cars at o10.3 A. M., and proceed to Boston via
TUESDAY, April 9. Tour No. 6. the Shore line; lunch on the train; arrive at New Haven
TUESDAY, April23. Tour No. 7. J at 11.55 A. M., New London at 1.26 P. M., Providence at
3.15 P. M., and Boston (New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad station, Park square) at 4.30 P. M.
NoTE.-As these itineraries are made up in advance of the announcement of the winter time tables
of the various railroads, slight changes may be necessary.






FOUR TRIPS TO CUBA.


Crossing the Gulf of Mexico.
O UR first and third parties, arriving at Port Tampa from Ormond Thursday, Janu.
ary 24, and Thursday, February 7, respectively, and the second and fourth parties,
arriving from the Tampa Bay Hotel Thursday, January 31, and Thursday, Feb.
ruary 14, will have supper at The Inn. They will then go on board one of the Plant
Steamship Company's fine passenger steamers, the Mascotte or the Olivette, for the
voyage to Havana. During the night we sail down Tampa Bay, leaving the town of St.
Petersburg on the right, and passing the light on Egmont Key, and Friday morn.
ing finds us well out of sight of land on the Gulf of Mexico, following a course a
little east of south. It is about 30 miles from Port Tampa to Egmont Key, 230
miles from Egmont Key to Key West, and iox miles from Key West to Havana.
The trip affords all of the novel experience and keen interest of a transatlantic
voyage in miniature. Occasional sails cross the horizon during the forenoon, or
porpoises near at hand afford endless amusement, while soon after dinner eyes
begin to be strained for the first glimpse of the little islets that herald the approach
to Key West. Presently the city comes into view, with Fort Taylor, the Marine
Hospital, and the Custom House the most conspicuous buildings on the water
front. As the vessel draws near the wharf a dozen boys, black and white, appear in
the clear water, ready to dive for nickels," which they shout for vociferously. The
lads are most expert swimmers and -divers, fearless with regard to sharks, and the
coins thrown to them seldom reach the bottom, twenty feet below the surface. A





95
stop of several hours is made at Key West, and the members of our parties will
be given a carriage ride about the island.

Key West.
A chain of small rocky islands, several hundred in number, extends southwest
into the Gulf of Mexico from the extremity of the mainland of Florida. They are
of coral formation and are known as "keys." Between the line of keys and the
Cuban shore, about Ioo miles distant, is the Strait of Florida, through which flows
in a steady current the warm water of the Gulf Stream. Key West, although not
the largest, is the most important of these islands. The name is said to be derived
from the Spanish Cayo Hueso, or Bone Island. Key West is seven miles long by
from one to two miles wide. The soil is shallow and there are no springs, but
tropical fruits and trees grow in the disintegrated coral. The climate is dry and
frosts are unknown. The summer temperature is seldom above 90 degrees and
the mean winter temperature is 70 degrees. Cigar making, mostly in the hands of
Cubans, is the priftcipal industry. From 125,000,000 to I50,000,000 cigars have been
made annually, but a considerable part of the business has lately been transferred
to Tampa. Another important trade is the sponge fishery. Fort Taylor, at the
extreme south end of the island, is the most imposing building. This fortification
is of brick, was begun in 1847, prosecuted during the war, and never finished, and its
numerous antiquated, heavy guns, were never fired. It is now worthless except for
store room. There are likewise on the island two unfinished Martello towers. The
Marine Hospital, a three-story stuccoed affair, adjoins the entrance to Fort Taylor.
Modern armament is now being placed in the South Battery, across the island from
Fort Taylor. Two companies of artillery are stationed in the commodious Key West





96
Barracks. With two or three exceptions all the buildings in the city are of -:rood.
The Custom House is a fine modern brick edifice. A monument near by commem-
orates the soldiers and sailors who died on this station during the Civil War. Kev
West was in 1890 the largest city in Florida, having a population of 18,o8o.
Leaving Key West at night, we shall notice one peculiarity of these southern lati
tudes in the almost complete absence of twilight. Within twenty minutes after the
sun goes down into the Gulf, it will be dark. By night, Key West Light, standing in
the centre of the island, is conspicuous from every direction, while the light on Sand
Key, seven miles south-southwest of Key West, marks the southernmost point of the
United States. The hour of departure from Key West is so arranged that the steamer
enters the harbor of Havana with the sunrise of the following morning.

Entering Havana.
'No harbor in the world is more beautiful, more sheltered, or more defensible than
the harbor of Havana. A deep bay makes into the northern shore of the island. of
Cuba, a channel only one-fourth of a mile wide, and about half a mile long, connecting
it with the Gulf. The only access to the harbor lies through this passage. Entering the
bay, it is found to be perfectly land-locked, deep enough for the largest vessels, and
capacious enough for a navy. The city occupies a promontory not unlike that on
which the older part of Boston stands, having the bay on the east and the Gulf of
Mexico on the west. The entrance to the harbor is guarded by two formidable
defences, the Punta on the right, at the north end of the city, and the famous Morro
Castle, with its lighthouse, on the left. Beyond Morro Castle, forming with it a con-
tinuous fortification, is the still larger castle of La Cabafia, the strongest fortress of
Havana, crowning a high bluff on the water front. These works overlook the city.




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