Title: Florida's east coast, the winter resort section of America
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
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 Material Information
Title: Florida's east coast, the winter resort section of America
Series Title: Florida's east coast, the winter resort section of America
Physical Description: Book
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Bibliographic ID: FS00000054
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
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Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA1004

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r:~ %' FLorIDn.r

*' ---- *-"' EAST CoC.iS'm'



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IPI.OUXDA

EAST (20.iST R v

and Coninections.

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FLORIDA'S

I East Coast





The Winter Resort Section
of America


ILLUSTRATED





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List of Hotels and General
Information


SEASON 1902-1903
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PUBLISHED BY THE

Florida East Coast Railway

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* fl . a 1' LOe r orlCa year as a
whole, particularly on the East
Coast, there are in it -more abso-
lutely perfect days--days when it
is a positive delight to live, to
merely .breathe; more nights serene, com-
Sfortable and beautiful-than in any other por-
tion of the world, bar none.


The tourist in search of sunshine, when gray
skies ahd wintry winds have settled down upon
the North, will, if he be wise, travel directly
to St. Augustine, as sleeping and parlor car
lines centralize at this, the fashionable winter
rendezvous.


' What & charm, a mystery, it must be to the
uninitiated to leave a land of piercing cold,
drifting show and terrible blizzards, and after
a few hours' ride on one of the handsome pas-
senger trains which are now in the Florida
service, to find oneself beneath a most perfect
sky, where the sun sheds his bleesing o'er his
S subjects always with a kindlyspirit. No snow;
no ice; no piercing winds to chill the blood;
no leafless, lifeless trees; no drooping flowers;
no aching hearts. Nothing but joy and sun-
shine and gladness greets the winter visitor to
Florida's East Coast.



























































PONCE -E LEON. ST. AUGUSTINE.
01wns January 14tb, 19UJ-i Closes ApriJ.llJit. 19W.
R.nwnRT MAIIRuB V. MaTlsger. Raieq S5.00 jer tRyS o-dnp.


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O LI) Spanish landmarks, marvel-
37 Miles from Jacksonville. ius, tr.1aures of ar.-hitectiral
Fare, one war . $1.50-
Round trip . 02.o0 Ibeint, Tu aic .-'~*nry, and h..t,.I
arcrumnlodatio-.of il'h, hii.hebt or.rlt
make'St. Aliig gl.t.- thi: pI.er of an y vinterwater placeon ll eLrl
Year after VEar the attractit.. i l' f .t. Angiguine have drawn
incr.-ii .:-. nnlILiler- ..f pilea'ur'.--c. ie r i' nnl invalid,., lunIil now il, ii
the winter hnne ofi th-uinsnndi:. N.., lore benlitiil n-ndl-Azvois can
lie founil, iandi while many of our Northern friends are clad in seal-
-kin, and ul-.rr, urir isitini yaehtsti-en a.re retl. 1 in in the dci:k
,if their beaunrifil yalicht, hba.kinl... in th i._n-hr :. St. Au'i'uJtinLl
has excellent golf links and tennis ecurtr of the finc-st, naphal't
pavecments and .hell ro-ad on wihiclh -drivingr anrl I-icvyliin are a
luxury; in li.lt, it Ius-t:ssio ajl thing. dea;ral.le an a place o.t re.-ort
and resilent.ie. To adelquiate>ly iec'or;i..- thle g.ralie.mr of the h.,tetl
is uterly imnpo.sihbl-, libt wie hl.q r-uldcrs will Ile .ufliriently in-
tere.ted to visit thi, re-irt and 6c for thlimselve-.
HOTEl. P,.NiCE lE LEON.
From no point if view :ire Irhe external form, and coinrs of this
hotel other thali pl.-ainig. It th iis tirue of the gfnerr.il impres-
S ion, whin i ne Icl.:l tuproi, it trrnm thie .Alanii., i, or fri.m tlie wert
tllrough the green J,,liage of oleander and .ak, mich r ...r, i-, it ntre
uheu l cirje ro,.i trdy tlhe detail; of constrtition and deco.ratior-
tvithin. The :ihiurI t..f tli pl ijn. ctir of this palatial itructilre did
nol, end withi a riv hly app.:.inltd ia id Ii.':iirio ri..htel; his pl rl..-
reached beyond thi-, and d,-mandild lint, ns the .hr-ll inartrial of
the wall- ,.a fi.uund., hn-r.,, ,n An.ast:.ia I-a anil, and the hotel war.
in its v\' y tru..tire ti... 1.i of i t' Au ,t; n., s-. in their decoration
the walk should pe'tik .:.f Sp'ini-h st. .\AgiaUtinn anrI ir ;t.,rieil past,
The historic .vyniholisim of the decoraii.in is tI. h.:- ohber-ed at
the vhry e t court. The Ettrancii, in the center of the
,nae-tr..,r p. ari ., ,, ti-. Alam d-.La, i dh:-.i''atl hy two independ-
ent gatepost-, on e-ich one of ii; i. h, carved in i;hI rei ', i. a
lion's nima-'ue. It i.- thel heral'lic lion '.f Leon. that -turdy Spani-li
town whiv h -:,i hn, and so i'ra.-ijy wiihb-tudl the Moor,; it is an
emblem, r:.... cof thi: di:ughty i nrriur, Ju~jjn I'onie cel Leon, pr..-
Sclaimed-in Iis epitaph "a lion in name. a lio:n in hr-art "' Above
the lull centered arch in tlh gateway, repeated in the spandrtls o-i
the panel ar.che-, is the irag's head, which was th t sacred t..tel of
Sely,. tile Indialln illnr'e C.-i l hoe sile St. Auguistine 'n%.s built.
From the ga y o hhe gat. o th c thie ti.:wer are -ern fur the fir- time.
in their full proportions. El:i.h qiide of the square tower i- pii-rced














hear the muuezzin's call to prayer. Crossing the- ctirt; past; the
fountain, we approach the grand entrance. This is a full centered :
arch twenty fret wide. Around the l'.ce of the arch, in a 'broad
band, c rved in relief on a row of shields, a litter to a shield, runs
the legend, Ponce de Leon. Garlauds depend from the shields, ,
which ar- lupp.:.rted I'y m. rnallda. This is another bsnli stion of
the sea, :a- the source whence c ima thI she-ll cotmposito of the hotel
wall, an.d al-o of the s-.a a, t!h- fell tf Pon,.e de L:,-n's achieve-
rmenis., TIhoe u-ge.iion is furtlh.r emplhasizedl in the- shell-l..itern ,
in the -pandrelsJ of the arch, and yet again in the marine dld-ices
if the '.'~it3 of arns on the ivt. ashieldl. The other entranc.i, on
the eatt and went, should have attention before we 1,-are the court.
In the wall, on each side of the doorw:iy, is a deep firuntain niche.
Tihe water isisuit frorn the i.niuth i:o a dolphin. Al.,ve the door,'' .'
in the key of the arch, is a shell device, and miiedllion- with
Spanish provfrbs occupy the spandrels. The dolphins of the .
mountain niche have special approlpri.aenes-,; they are not oily
Iypical of the sea, but have.a local significance as we-ll, for the bay
of St. A\Iustine once I,.-re the name "P'iver of Dolphins," given
it. -y Lanid.nniere, the Huguenot captain, i lho anchored lii ships
here in 1564. The allusion the sa the in'the dolphins and the
lshells, is a motive repeit .l a-:Ain and aga;n throuhuiiut the hotel;
i ,en the doujr knobs are modeled after shells.
The dccoratio:ns of the rotunrda are true tn the Spanih Renais-
,auce style. Painted on the p.-ndent-'ifv c-f the cove ceiling of the
_-econd -tory are female figurtn. tyVpic:l of Adventure, Discovery,
C...n,1uet, Civilizatinn. Four other ti-.rures rcpl.reentl the elements,
Earth, Air, Fire and Watt r. The decoration, in the penetrations
are lyres, with swans on Either side. The lyres are sa-mounted'
Ial ernat':ly by a ulni-le fti thlle Sun ~- d of the Fl..ridr Iidian'-.
A hr,ad stairway c-f marl-le -and Mexican onyu lh:ds to a land-
ing, fr-ai nhich is -eitt-red the dining hail. In delightfully
.'itiqu.- Ittier',, ct in ni.,sli e in th.,- d...r of th. laud;ttg is the aptly
. hi-j-n vere of welcome, taken from Slihnstone:
Whi.)'i-rhas tr i'.-rl' 4l ll r1 iu.l . ,.
W it'rr. -r hi, -I t :-.-s r i hr i l an. *''-
Ifay si-'L t:. t'V ik he Estill hb.I Ia,,uI d nd
Thi 'warmil l wAIl.,'-nu- an irm. l.
On h ach en, north and ,nllth, of the c,-ntral dining hall is a 'I!
panel of dancing Cul'ids-, with rrtgnish fa.,-;s and .outst-retched .
han.l-, repr-ce-ieming the fea-t: somne exitend.l clu.ts-- tof li-' ic'u -C
grapes, and bread andl L'ips ..f nine in welcome to the guest, while
other- ladle ste.mlainu- ,lla' from erelt S. panish caldrous. On the






















































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gracefully waiving str-an',>:r Nn..l p,-nnant,:; tit-iy ire thle lhih
po,.'pEd Spalnirdh caravlI. on the sixteenth century, juiii t ih \u.e-l-
as that in whiIch Pone ide L.in c.iue lt Fl.'.Tida in his -'arch for
ithe f'.untain. Oi the I.Eulritiv,- betwir -n [li, tain-Il gIass win-
'lon', allego.ritril 1i'iiinn.. r.eprie..-tint the F.ri. S.a,:a.nt-. TLhegrand
Ip- rlr le-:orali..na-re in, i -..ry white an'd gol', wtith frescie.; h\
Tojetti of Cupii.i .n. garlaind.- :ind.1 ilmny diapery iimii loud it,
ihe corner ceilings.
nHE .\Li. AZ.\P.
On the -.,i ll -ide. King -treti, ,Li,,,-,i e the I',..i.L di Leon.
i- tie Al.az ir, in ail.hit.:turk, a flihi,5 impinient I... thie P...n.
li- Lt ..n. 'Thi- Al,:anzr i- i.f S.1 nni-h F:n.i- nnh .i- e ,tyhl-. Within
is zi <:..urt .t fl,:,wer-., -bl'rt...iii-r:y .ri..l vi-nt., f> ith 1 l,,n t.l.in ].!.iLyin..

l .i- ...f th:- A\l.aazr- i n S -ain-- u'r.:.und,l- 1.y an ;irTeade, upon
whi lh ,p.,-ii [...p0 s a1,,- n .-111.:e- .
One i.pr... ,:La tie A.. ,izr thrrl in 'liwh midi walk l:. ..iicredi
with lhedi .1. 4 a l ;i.- h I l.... uuin- rl.,wer.r-. T l.- Iii.li,. i[ I,: llt rik.-
in a whlo], -jia'r [ or ot.:.riks high, ail thie t:ntr:i. .. ALll;-.l
'tn e-ither .-ie with t..i r. Tl- rii.h -r.y 4 tl:. c t'. i in. i c
<.r,.l in i .iny p.,la: wilth viil.-, wMi..h .1l.1 t1., th pi.i.:l r, i .lieu e-e.

ti-n,. (in i mn iy -; t in tll i. ]iiti...tit dimni.- i.:,:in, w lnetre i-
Srrt-l inu a -ril a .rlh iln I 1;. .i i v -1 le apll,.i tu, i Int, ...t til. hA l i ,_
t '-:r'. hhl ; thi ,,t Ch. ni te lupt tl, lil.t,., lh -r,- t: ',:r'," w-.t t L- :n[;t :i-
lat-.l, u .l l;-te tI, e [ i .i.i t thle :r,: .-tri, while th- :, . n azi
nl,..n the l..-ai: n'ti,:. .. t' .li lt. Tli';- i .- ia ima: I I .haIu a n iim -
ninhi. sttrv'ii, .LN r.il 1iy a r.-.L I.rii.-.., whi h itl--l' i hlii dd IIlin
ith t'll p ,i,- ,l ,h......in-, .lull- thl,- -i -.--s t.. V,- 61. w;th thl m .irn ,i lin.
, lF it- rll ini wv.it-er- :.i, the ..-!t -p l i-Iin. f tile t.. .niiji( .,
-.hii. Ii .i k it ..n -' ithi i I.'. _A t ni.ht l ri.. ,t' cl,-'tric li; lht-
o ri,.hi r,-1, r ,ni ai i .il.n i- i.,t tli.-h P ,,I11 <-i il._ i ini. .*'-cer tinh -I ei ,
mniL truly o1ic nuny altlino.t bnll k iiiu.-i-t in lIiylau.I.
ALt.AiZ LE. ANNI.-
rlite g-roup %.l .tnnireete h -.ilel-. n tie Al.min-.l.i i-. v.-,mrplete'd by
the Al.:az'ur A nnex, l,.,rii, ily the ('...rdl,,t-... In tyile it ,*\: n,:, l..l-
lit ow thel 'atlm-.iin Pi-ii-.arn..e ar,.hlti:-tir'e: the -ui__te-ti'',in i,.r il,
Lhcary n -il- .iii an I.titiini-i-ito'l il,.w r -f !i:r- t',.,n ,l in tli'he str.:i.g
.'.ih:.> nn I t..w n il et >' Slaiia ; it tcLC ll tlhu e itii.hite,..tilal
ii'~u ,Iu.-'Titt .,f' the ti0 i ri;l :-,:< >-t the i...ri-l-va t pil,-_ -t uwl.-nri'y,
hilich gra:w with tilte iJnr:inerit-.s i.t lni'ired i .t year, aidin tih.
Uonutlici o P..uarin .oiiin' t...ih and Mlo..r indl I 'lij-tiar. Tihu tueII
ari.hway un the nurtLh adliide, urmuerln y a law.i ti.]y, O1Wi.ke-id by



















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mas-ive lower-, rind :,and .,uare, waU1: a"n lapti. ot h P.i.rIT
del S.ol, o.r G...: .-f thie S,.i, ..f T,..l.do, ,.,ne ot the taut..,ni reiii.ii-
.,f the Mi.:.ri-h ,l..Iini..ii in Spain. TiLe- I.al...nIu. ..fI the (i e rti
range of \id hl..ws :irrt- the-* kl, WlitL, halijlli.- ,.'f S.-' ille, -H i called
I.-tdi.aue the prll.tuling b,,lt. as d.tiI-.-l I., Mh li. lair A.tel to
permit the faithlli, t.i kn,- l at ith~ie l.i-4ni ..It relii-ii- l.-ivll-k.
i TFIE ,.'_ I ,.
The Et;j-ian aind Tiikid-l hladll in tll Ca-ino .'re as well
ril"il'li.td a aal y ill th.: _i. itd Stitc.. To tnes- hl.i-e I.,-:l uddJit
Nalieihn, .lii:[ri>. u.iIl h.ul.lhor Ilthli., nil ilnl.l. r tilh dirT,;li.,un .f a.n
emllinent ilh;, -.of hi.-. r'..,t':-
ic.ni. Tile .,ilphur ii.iter pi.- url ihere i- Ii-ril thli.- driven w,.ll.,
and in anAlysis i-. situilir to thatl :.f the h.t spring f..f _\rkani;a-
and .i.tli..r' Io.... lili ..rillt!i iof F lu.i, .I.a ll. t ari,: i.el l.ul t....l f.I r th.-ir
rI-.t i li. ni.l lt-..lirti-, pjrtir:ula'rl;. a a cu.re tj.r rhlcI aniinil-ln,
.t.ii. li r:i. i.I ki.l. -.; c i. l I;..ati:l -. Tl ih Fl.ll llr n ll thi t -iil-
i.Ii,, lle ->.v:ril ,Ip.irturnvi ;n thn I. -in.i l1.i- ,, tr.'in la p:lth :t
ahm..it 02.!lil 1l.-'l, ;iind ri-e to th>e .irf.n.- a.t a hlim, -'p.,tirt" ,,1 mil...,.ut
7S J,- r.-t-. It is lii,,t lh,:.,til tlil ti .r C-;I he-r drinkll ;n or lI.lthii,_I
0ii l,,.i.i-.i-, tll' ti ..l- rl. i It!-i .,ire~ n:.t > .. i[ jli it :l.. eiiIr n! -r-
:itel. Patt .nlt' tl.ki!,r tl, rt nl.e r a...ur-, ..,t l.,llh, are >,%n-..tl ti,
,iiiler lh> ,:.tr .-. l tlL' pl.,hy-icl.in iri thar e. T Le a,.itll- ,h:[_.artml .iit
in thl C -'.i-hi ,, i- rt . ntt in ....n-tr i.ti..t1 ar.l a |.p .iitnt e:ii.t, r.i,,l tin att,.ilant i, lth
i,.?n ;n1l % ..,ili, ., ar- tr..iu tllh in_, it _,l,-l- r t-.t-l l.th- ill tlhee...uniltryv.


TIe ,li i .i iv it,.n'iv a l : id j.ii i :.i ,i iii, a .ll. are, l -l : -vJI ti. an e-
.tt- Fort Mari..n. Bith formod-l a l.irt :.f thl dJilei-n.-cot1 the tity


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Block houses, coquina walls and hedges of Spanish bayonet
hemmed in the city on all sides, and in its day St. Augustine was
one of the most fortified cities in the possession of Spain.
POET MARION.
Work on the old fort was begun more than three centuries ago. -
't is constructed of blocks of coquina, and is divided into numerous
casemates, parapets, bastions, terreplein and towers. But what is
most interesting is a series of dungeons behind the casemates. The
latter open into a large court enclosed by the four wallsof the fort,
but the dungeons are far back and down in the massive structure
where the light of day never penetrates. Ordnance Sergeant
Brown, U. & A., who has been in charge of the fort for many
years, has made a careful study of the fort, resulting in not a few
important and interesting discoveries, such as secret passages,wells,
quicksand traps for the disposition of bodies secretly executed,
torture racks and remains of iron crosses and cages, on and in
which prisoners were confined, all the evidences of Spanish cruelty.
A day devoted to an exploration of Fort Marion is well spent.
THE SEA WALL
On account of the prominence of this protection from the in-
roads of the Atlantic, St. Augustine has been facetiously termed
the "City by the Sea Wall." It was built by the United States
Government, runs around the fort and along the entire bay front of
the city to St. Francis Barracks. From this popular promenade
the visitor can see many things of interest, including the old
museum, the narrowest street in the city,.the old cathedral, the
slave market, the plaza and many other old landmarks.
St. Augustine has excellent livery service. A representative of
tlie St. Augustine Transfer Company boards all incoming trains
before arrival and courteously arranges for transfer of passengers
and baggage. providing accommodations in 'bus or carriages.
Transfer from station to any part of town 25 cents, and 25 cents
for each piece of baggage.
Following is a list of hotels and boarding houses, with illustra-
-tions of such if them as have furnished necessary photographs:
THE NELIGAN.
Mrs. H. Neligan, proprietor
Accommodates 20. Rates, $1.50 to
2.00 per day; $8.00 to $10.00 per
week. A select family boarding
house, located on South St. George
street, a few minutes' walk from
Sbe plaza, postoffice and all points
vf interest.
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HOTEL MA(.NOLIA.

'Opl'- D-.r:emn r 1.t f.. ~Ily 1-t. P..lihrr & M:Dowell, ir.:-prie-
tor .. A.:connmi .:.iJat. n :;.. a .-: t .3.11j t.. I.I*.II per day; 'P:1,.tji
to .$'31i.00 per -eek. Tl;i hi.:.tel is plalta.-tly and centrally l.wated
on S. e icuree street, Iut one block frmui the postotfice, plliza ant
Ponce- de Leon, and only five minutes' ri;ll- t'r-i the dtpot. U as
pulllic baths and toilet- on enlch flori. :irnl lifty rooms with private
bath-. First-cla; orc..n:l-tiri which tiirin-li;es imui twiic- daily
Lnui.iilr ill c.:.nnetti.e i ti h..j


TIN' H-.TLL GR.LANAD A.

Il. W. \Va.-lhu-nh,-r., proprietor. Open DeceLiberto May LUth.
Acc.'runl.dateis l.i gi..-t-. Rate,, $2.r,i) anid upwards per day.
Special weekly and monthly rates. Located at the corner of King


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and Granada streets, facing the Aknaeda. The appointments
are all Ihat could be desired, rooms light, airy and cheerful, with
or without private bath.
























SPEAR MANSION.
Mrs. A. R. Spencer, proprietor; J. 0. Lumsden, manager.
Open all the year. Rates, $2.00 to $3.00 per day; $10.00 and up
per week. .One block from Ponce de Leon and postoffice. Con-
venient to all points of interest. Home cooking a specialty.
Large grounds beautified by lawn, flowers and shrubbery. Every-
thing in thorough sanitary condition.

THE TEAHAN HOUSe. .:- -:..
W. M. Teahan, pro-
prietor. Open all the
year. Rate-s, ~1.50 per

and utip. Accomuimodatt L
30. Plea'antly located
at the corner ofSt.
George and St. Franeis
streets, in a most desir-
able part of the city,
two blocks from pust-
office. Large, sunny rooms, suitable rur families. \'egetablV@
from own garden.









S-- VILLA COQUoIA.
S. Mr. D. E. Thompson,
proprietor. Apatrtments.
Accommodate' 20. Rates,
per week. $5.01) and up.
Special monthly and season
rates. A 'luaiut old
coquina building with
large roonmv and spacious
S grounds, situated in the
bs heart of the city ou St.
George street, ),htweeu the Plaza and City G'ate_ ,liretl y opposite
the Magnolia and o1nly, two minute,' w l k to the C'ilvy .ateY Plaza,
po4.toffiHe, hotels Ponce de Leon and Alcazar.


rHIY VALENCIA.
Mr.. Mary Fr2a- '.. "+ -
zier. Aq'onmo1-
dates 75. Open
November 1st to
May 30th. Rates,
$2.,5') ... *:3. '0 per
day; '15.00 t1
$20.0 pl-r week.
Delightfully situ-
ated on St. George
st reet uh u of A
plaza. Private E .
bath,, steam heat
and nmolern convenient, Special atterntion, paid to table.


: f: THE _MON'N HOUSE.
._k. X. Monson, proprietor
i.iOpenr all the -ear. Rates, $1.511
.per ulay and up ; $8 to $S1 per
wA.-k. )elightfully 'ituated, over-
l,..king bI-y anr ..,can. Fort,
te,:t fr,,in sea wall. Two minutes'
walk from old Spanish fort.
G-uest Ilnve free use of row boats.
Fihl;ngground, within a distanct-
M.f lftv yards to tLou miles. Hot
antd -old1 haths Perfect sanitary arrauntgements.
I.











TInE




Tr. p Dcll -
Sln,. KIN'., HI A31.I




h.-r t Apr I. .t-


tat :' I' 2.i. aind
up pjer Jay; ,pl-
I ,L.1 I the w'tk
.- ..... .... . i T It i l i t ia n 'r -

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J;...-iii--i- .-lii- with l.iihi .

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':T br,.i l ver.i',l, ;a nl -p i.. lawi, nnikil, ii .t i.,, ..,il.,lrt-
Jiblo anu h..iun like place:


~tin 'A. i
SAW,f '1
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i II. 1i.t i.,ElI I* I. -L.

.1. S. ..ntlev, *r..-
priiet.-r. pi,,u .l1 the
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bhy, ; .. i li b.yv the
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'wverl.ikln.. I..- lni
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rnr I Lu.| A0
F. C. flap.len, rmana.ei A.\ _...tni .l,.ii:., .'iii. I -'.t e-, 52.i 1.i
and 3.1.111 ..r S ,,:,.i l i,.,-kly a i,,l ii..nithl rit-,. The
rouri.--' and traveler,' favorite. I '..nvenienili l:.. atiel aiiid ..ne ol










tnll .air 1 '-t l Ul -ll.l .l l i
In -l iii Irv p "iiit "il"'v! -







It.


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- ri r Iij t'. i D1:11-
*inii l. *tabe. m-


LYNN'- .kr .I*' li- i i.
T .1. L Y i' l, 1IJI II1.1 '. I.' n ti! i '.='r. _. .'ir', *' I ti -
7.';. A_ ,_-ri,.,jn ,[ E ,;'. I .:.| i, 1.1 1 E u ,..t.[ plia .I ,..- t- t,,
$1.nII p.-r .l.y. Fi -tI -;i --. Ile n ..: r ll.-. r,. (.'- trall.y lu:.Uct Jd,
on St. ..'e.. .n -tr, ,.| l,,,;t + thI- Fl.ti.l. H .i-[,



P alatka, Florida ",-

0S Miles Irom Jackstnn ille. 2 Mliles irom St. .Auglstmne.
Fare. one- a. ... .2.20 Fare. one ay .. . I.40l
Round trip .. . ...30 Round trip . .. .2.30
F I; n tr. A -.,-in. I.. P .I ta k.. tl.- Fl..li EI i- le-l .- lt- ...... it l. 'Lim- in :. .nL,-t -t' .l -' iri.11;..n t uvnty-
eitLlr it],"-- t,) tlin, 1 rem I.it" ,ti ti n \-, .t,-. n h mn k ..1' the ,i- t. ..:,hn-
R i,.. 'r -i.. j- tli- railr..li. i .rlir. .-.-.l tH e S'i it. h t,n u.,.i .al..l-
:.tr,..lt -v. thi I-... l:. ; n : hl'. l .;- T1 l itl 1 .. t HlI iv;ir g Ind
i -. l *,. -r . i,- ty i- ,,v.: I I :1 I.. i .ittl :.,li s l t li .';, -* i ini :r : r ,- ,.J't.
U r.an-.: r ,, tv .,: ri .l .l. and th, ..by a ,l ,irr. ...n.ir, ._.; .m try;
w .1' th i,-l.1 i. liill t,..l 'b il. .. '.. t dl....l b lI, -iu .--" I1.1 ; .nr-
t'r...m l' l.Itl.1, th :.. ity ,-.. ir n I l :lmA Ltr. i>: i '- : r _... t t.i t.. l.. i-s ;,
the 1. -,,. lh. i...I h. i- 1, N ti ,: Pli im I I [Ini-e.
HIi- in-. l r. i. nit it t.il-' i. .- i-. lly a.r d1, :a ,I there
i ud in at ,i ,..' .1. 1 It M .,,y i th i .- t.. n .n l -. I r r; "ltII,"!
-.,'ttl.:ii..l t- ;>r_ in Ohe- Vi,:h ity, .- I II .. I nr,' ...I. I.) kl.w.alh. R i ,rL
fil. w l.nt .1 hi neiI -,*l i-, nt.
H[,.r [L- ..Ni, E',,.,I-,iN,:- il,-I -F-.
T E "ll ..<, H ...l--.- M r-. \illiLe M ,l. : l..,, ,r..|.-i'..r..*. A. .:.,_, -
modate.- 2.:, Rates, I1.2 ._,- r daY; 1-,-:.. i. | r we,-k.









THE GRAtA.M-J. Walkins Lee, proprietor. Accommodates
100. Rates, $2.50 per day and up. The hotel overlooks the St.
Johns River and is conveniently located to all boat landings.


Mas. H. A. GREY-Boarding honse.
-pecial by the week.


THE ARLINGTON.
L. Falk, proprietor.
Rates, $2.00 per da y
and up; special by the
week.





Rates, $1.50 per day;


MRS. Jo0. HAUGHTOrN-Boarding house. Rates, $1.00 per day:
special by the week.

THE 6ARATOGA.
Mrs. M. B. Jacobson,
proprietor. Accommodates
150. Rates, $1.50 per day
and upwards; special by
the week. Rooms large
and airy.


KIMBALL HOUSE-John Uranger, proprietor. Rates, $1.25 per
day; special by the week.

DrNN HoUrE-MrN L. Tarel, proprietor. Rates, $1..50 per
day; special by the week.

DEVERuL'X HOME-Mrs. M. Devereux. Furnished apart-
Iments witli facilities ftr light housekeeping. Scrupulously neat
and centrally located.

CHA.aLrE's PLAcE---Restaurant and rooms. Room accommoda-
tions for 20 at 50 cents to 75 cents per day. dMeals, 25 cents each.



























































1 I IF 'Np. -.r, 'I[, IN 1 'N I tj f li N 1.1 k\

A N 1 .1 x T I. F
III I! i 1 0 I'm I i 'I ....












San Mateo, Florida. *~


hO Miles irom Jackson% ilMc. 3J) liles Irom St. \uguslnte.
Fare, one vwa . 2. .o5 Fare, one va. . '1.20
Round trip . .. . 3.55 Round trip . .. t. 95
I
P LEASANs T ll ,.: ..n St. J...hn, i :i ies. i ,in ,- ... u ,. iui r
,, one .h .. ,,V'..... ,.,I.....2 r e,- onl t' l,_ ;1a [h. . .$




I un ... I ..L .- I lll .11... . I: .- u !llr l i .. ... i I .. l.l, -.





i _' _\. I:t i t- -lv b.,' irj htl.:r I'..,l--Ir. .1. f'ir ,lr ': tr '
Ii- \i'inity nm i lin i in lh S1 J..]i4 T'i '. r ri. I ..l I

[ .1 O rmond.- ..ridL-







hl .1 t ir m JaI ,.i. n .. il. ii .1 ilS i roi l. Au1 uin '.
I.-r \i -i-k.









Ormond, Florida, *

105 Miles iromInt Jaiksi n ile. Fare, one way . $4.20 F'are. nea.. e . . 2.70
Round trip . . .30 Round trip . . 4.35

A F I E [' i. i* l r it- , .'= i . I'I la lt k ,, l ,- l .. i.,l Ei -t '.'...i -t
T- ,il y l '..... .|." ii i ., -..,litl. -.lt rl. ,i h t; i..,- i .. ... '..i 1i l i. _\ t-
1 i .1 ..,i -t a : i1,. t1 u ,i n _.< thrli ,,,. h i l i t- t i ,; i- ... ,l- .-..inite r ni
>i h i. lh a re -. ttr., rl ni_.,i..r... u Ii, ll l-, t,.ir ..:ii ;i, t;! i ll oi,,l n t'1. **
r irmj .. It i -..n1 .V rui t.'L t V :il-- tr.iul P il tk t tu 1'rl h...ii .1,
lwh.r, .',, u ,I t ,- ]].:,-1 l .0l in c....'...- .., t E..-t -'.,.i t 1.-,_;ni .
.ir u,..t l,. ,.. ,.ti l-..n-l ith, t litfix, i t... t l r- -..nt h .r hal.i
II. rr' l-.] itl -r.' .l..u' n tl :- E t-t 0'. ..,-t, ; ru,, 1. .nijii t, w itl.. It
i the- 1i ,ll'-lJ. hi -," ill th,- Ijt,, l,._: .--il ,..i l ,..i 1 a ".in1 t
.. ItI an', w .,ri f v i-i d.h i ,,l. H -ir th, .... '] t .,.in -... l l ah r.l,
bciri iiii:n4 with % ll1 w..,% l,-rll r -i' t- h1 1' le.-n- ;,c ,i l, l.,-1intly
.,,i.t i, ,,'.-,:r th ..- l.: .[i, l,-, ii,..- t- t l,..i ri- i i l, *.. l Li,? '
olir't,'ll..n, v i, i Wi.. hitn, i ,--. .]| ., :,:i.ivn :. It i .., .11, ,I in-
ti re.,- t, O rn ...ndl-.. lth>:-HI ali!',x, l.,it -.. r.'-ij \'1-i? It Ild ini r, habi:l-
i at.1 l tli.1 it- t''..i i p:il t ,,- ,iii i ... et: r>',,-,,. i/.,- it in it., Ilril-
li.ilit lt i ,lr.--. -,r 1 hl- l..i]'-t I l l. [='" -ll' --J t Ii c l ]I I.- t :'f
th i.- :it>.-r' a ill railLil.k in ir..-t 1- l:t 1 ,:,r <:X.* i-ijnl ti :'. 1:,.1lh ?
..,..I.,r'd- ,ull at 11r,.,m i .-. T hel ...-. i t,-,, i- ilihinl r,-.. lh, withll
.all it' att udiant .|, p'.:.rttaniti,:- t.,r ,ii..yLi. ht. ..liiir.dAjly -ituatile
..n the Halifax River i- the H-tel Orm,,nd, another ,t th- imannu-




w -w w w S U


shrns of public entertainment maintained nt the e se standard of
-xellence aIs i.it si(te-rs up and id..w the ea.,l. From the wide
%erandas ..f this hotel a view mary obtained which would satisfy
the devritet of almost any form of scenery.
A careful record of the temperature kept at Ormond during
April goes to prove the asiertir.n that is often made by those who
live in Florida, that April is a cool and delightful month. The
occasional hot days that sometimes occur during the Florida winter
are almost never known in April.
The average temperature taken at 5 a. m., April 1Nt to 9th in-
clusive, at Ormond, for the past three year, waH, in Is'4, .59; in
lWn'i, 1.0S'.0, and in 1901, 56.1-0. In 19(IA tlhe temperatures were
not taken after the 9th, but in 1S99 and 190f1 the average each
year up to the 15th was .56.730, and in the present year the average
temperature up to the 22nd inclusive was 54.0(9', and fr the seven
days ending the 22nd, the average was 5-4.57., the third week in
April heing the coldest.
April in the North being almost invariably s'-ihi an execrable
month, it would seem de-irable for tourists whim are already in the
South, and who have little else to do hut secure their own comfort,
if not the safety of their own lives, to tarry longer and enjoy the
finest month of the Florida year.
A bridge spans the Halifax River from the mainland to the
beach sid-, and horte cars run at regular intervaLs frnm the rail-
way station, meetingall trains. Fare between station and hotel I,
cents and 25 cents f..r each piece of baggage.
The attraction- of Ormond, as provided by the managers .of the
Hotel Ormond, are:
ToMOKA RIVER-The Ocklawaha of the East Coast. New 12-
lkot Daimler launch, capacity 150 passengers, making trip daily
between 10:01) A. M. and 4:00 P. M. Wonderful scenery. Hot
luncheon served at Tomoka Cabin.
HOTEL ScoL---Competent instruction in kindergarten and
the higher branches.
MrL.K-The Florida East Coast Hotel Company has arrange-
ments by which guests and children in its hotels and cottages may
be supplied with milk equal to the best obtainable in the North.
LAU'NC.HE, CAINTO AND SAIL BOATS-The Halifax river and
its connecting creeks and lagoons funiish ideal boating of any and
all kinds. The fishing in Thompson'o, Balow and Haulover
creeks is great sport.
ORANGE AND TROPICAL PRESERtVE.--Ormond oranges and Or-
mond guava jelly have a national reputation. Fifty-five tons of
guava jelly were shipped from Ormond last year by James Carnell.
DarvS--Livery enlarged and improved. Number of drives
20










increased. The most beautiful and typical Florida drives in the
South, through the palms and palmettos, moss and dense foliage,
and for twenty miles on the beach.
NINE-HoLE GOLF LINKS-Good surface and fine distance.
'MOBILING AND CYCLING-New paths laid out. Old paths ex-
tended and put in fine condition. The 20-mile stretch of hard.
beach is the grandest speedway in the world and is peculiarly
adapted to speeding automobiles. Mr. J. F. Hathaway says in
Locomrob;l: "We liought. our N.,. 2 Locomobile here and
are having excellent sport with it on Ormond beach, which I he-
lieve is the best place in the world for automobile., and where all
world's records are going to be made in future. We ran our Lo.o-
mobile thirty miles on the beach iu one hour and fifteen minutes,
and were not out for fast time either.
Other automobile records on Ormond beach:
1 mile 1 minute, 40 seconds.
5 miles- 8 minutes, 45 seconds.
10 miles-22 minutes.
43 miles- 2 hours.
Surf bathing, golfing, cycling and driving are popular amuse-
ments for the visitors at Ormond. Attractive outings are the daily
excursions and picni s up the Tomoka River. Launches run fron,
the Hotel Ormond up to the head of navigation, making the round
trip in half a day. The trip can also be made in sail or row boats
and an enjoyable variation is to meet the tally-ho at Tomoka Cabin
where luncheon is served, and return to the hotel over one of the
most picturesque roads in Florida.
Beach pavilion is provided with dresing rooms for Iumrn linth-
ing.
Other hotels and boarding houses at (Orinmnl are as follow- :
.1I)T El.
S;"'OQ tTIN..
o 'n l e situated on
S:;a a high bluff
directly over-
looking the
ocean. While
it offers all
the delights
Wof the sea-
shore, it i.
only ten minutes' walk, or five minutes by hrse car, from the
orange groves and pahin-shaded walks on the banks or the Halifax.
It i. two miles from the Florida East Coast Railway station on
horse car line. Opeu all the year. Rates, $ .50O per day; $12.U0
21










to $17.51 per week; special by the month. For further informal.
Lion address, Manager Hotel (Coquinn.

ROSE VILLA.
Mrs. Frank Ma- .'r
son. Open Novem-
her Ist to May Ist. .m ;
Accommodates 20.
Rates, $2.00 per day;
$10.00, $12.00 and
$15.00 per week.
Conveniently locat-
ed on Granada Ave-
Due, near postofice. '
Horse cars pass the door from depot to beach. Large, airy, spa-
cious and well-lighted rooms; broad verandas. A pleasant and
comfortable home for winter guests.
THE GRANADA HorsEL-F. R Moore, proprietor. Rates, $2.00
per day; $10.00 per week. Newly furnished. Table unsurpassed.
Free 'bus to and from trains.

THE RIVER VIEW.
Mrs. E. Lee, proprietor.


to $12.00 per week. A first-
class family house, centrally
located on Granada Avenue
on the river front, opposite
postoflice, on horse car line
from depot to beach.




Daytona, Florida ,

I10 Miles from JacksonvilUe. 74 Miles from St. Augustine.
Pare, one way . . 54.40 Fare, one way . .. $2.95
Round trip .... 6.60 Round trip ..... 4.70
D AYYTONA is situated upon the west bank of the Halifax river
at its fairest expanse and midway between its source at
Bulow Bay and its outlet at Mosquito Inlet. It is in latitude 29,
Reventy-four miles from St. Augustine and one mile from the At-
lantic ocean, and is acknowledged to be without a rival for beauty
among the villages of the South. Its site is upon what is known
22










as high hammock land that was crowned by nature with a Iolt
royal growth of majestic forest trees, and among these trees is the
town of today, with its beautiful cottages and well-graded walks
and streets The result is that all along the wide avenues that in-
tersect the town are lordly live and wateroaks and hickories, many
of them draped with graceful festoons of the gray Spanish mou-,
that overarch the streets and walks, and among these are inter-
spersed tall tropical palmettob, glossy-leaved magnolia, fragrant
hays and coral-berried holly, and many other varieties, while in
many places the wild grape, the trumpet vine and the uampelopsis
climb and cling among the branches forming Ahadv bowers and
adding grace and heauty.
The town lies parallel with the Halifax river, and extends fur
nearly two miles along the shore. This river ik the delight of the
angler and the yachtsman and forms one 4f, the town's greatest
attractions.
THE ROUNDER OF DAYTuNA
was a large-hearted, educated man with broad-rinded views, andi
his best monument when he is gone will be in the lovely town that
lie planned upon the banks of the Halifax. The main avenues
that run parallel with or intersect the river are all I10 feet wide,
except Beach street, which is about 65 feet, but has a half-mile of
open, beautiful water abutting upon its eastern side, where the salt
waves ebb and flow, and along and across which comes the cooling,
invigorating and health-giving breezes from off the wide Atlantic,
which temper and render the Halifax climate one of the most per-
fect in the world. Daytona has many miles of well-graded, marled
aud shelled roads anid streets, rendering it the

WHEELM3AN'S P.LRADI k,
and added to these, hut a mile away, are thirty mile- of smooth,
hard heath, that olTords an unrivalled coutme f'r long-distance
cycling and driving. No town of equal size, Nrth or South, num-
Ier-s ,.- many wheelmen, and cycling is a favorite pastime with the
tourists sunnner and winter.

THE BEAUTULT-IL ( 'Tr.AubE
that have been erected during the past years and are being built
are rendering Daytona aq famous for its fine houses and homes am
for its beautiful river, treee and avenues, and they are adding
yearly tl its attractions.
N.t, the least of these attractions to those securing hnme, in the
South, and ranking -econd only ti healthfulne's and perfection of
climate, is the fact that its population is chietly el'rmposed of culti-
vated and intelligent people, acctustunmed t. the retinem-ents f horut
I-










and ar.eial life. Added to the.e features are ge:xd churches, good
public and private schools, stores, hotels, laundry, meat mrn-kets,
novelty works, an opera house, electric lights for street and house
illumination, a good telephone system, ire factory, Lily Water
Werks, antd lht and rild baths, etc., antd everything lse can be
procured that is nece.-arv to make life lunfortahle. An inipu-rtunt
feature in the healthfulness of re town is the
WATER SPPI'LY
whith is derived froi.. numerous flowing wells, of ,.hieh here are
probably 300 in the crl.orate limits. This flow i. seenired by Itor-
ing wells to the depth of frion 8i to 1211 feet, pnsinig through scv-
eral strata oif rock an-1 this depth assures purity from aill Enrface
contamination. The water is slilghtly inipregnaied with magnesia
and iron, and holds sulphur in the shape of a gn.-, which ,,.'n
pas-es away.
TIl: PIlPUt.AnION OF DAYT('ONA
proper is about 1,80'0. Added ti., this ii a suburban population ujn
main shore and lpenin.ula of al-ic.io l,l."t at Kingston, Blake, Oli
Seabreeze or <:Goodall, Seahreeee and Silver Bean:h, which ar- prnp-
erly a part of thie town and population.
IA)YTONA REACH
lies one mile ea.-t of the Ltown. It is approached Iby three good
bride'as over the river and well-graded avenues, and is the prin-
cipal summer re.irt sni~th'l f St. Augu[tine. It ha more ltouri-ts,
during the hummnnr months than all the other places tsouh tf that
city combined, and is also bectinming a favorite winter re-ort. The
beach i widr, firm and smiroth, lhv many consitlered tlhe tine-t in
the world, and the -.urf bathint i. s.lafe and excellent summer and
winter. People who have tritil N.'-rthern and Weitern suntmer
resorts dl.eclare that there are none s h perfect in1 ctifurt as DIaytion
beach.
(rHr PENINSI'LA
lying between river and ocean i one-half ruile, widlr, anti is being
rapidly improved, and there are manly filln ctitaies and several
good hotel,; an opera huiise, two ocean piers, heath pavilion antd a
larca- eainn.
A HEMARKAB.E TFELTURE
St I 'aytknia lhai, heen the- Nearly improvementt in the style and
value <,f the buildings that are being cr,-lc'l f.r homnies. Men of
capital of the North and West have hteclme awakened to its ad-
varulnies for winter re-idenrce,, and valuable lots, are being pur-
chased and co-tly hijum-e, h-eantiful in dieign and finish, are being
erected, and beautiful homes, the ali,,le.t if wealth and cullure are
multiplying.










A line of automobile is operated between the railway station
and the settlements on the east side. Charge for transfer, passen-
gers, 25 cents, and 2.5 cents for each piece of baggage.
Amusements and pastimes are the same as at OrmoniL Places
of interest are: Old Spanish Mill, No. 9, Tomoka Cabin, Big
Tree, Mr. Ararat and Spruce Creek.
Hunting and fishing good. Experienced guides and do s may
be had at reasonable prices.




















THE CLWONNADES (City Beautiful)--C. C. Post, proprietor;
Ja. P. Vining, manager. Open all the year. Accommodates 160.
Rates, $3.50 to $5.00 per day; special by the week and month. A
modernhotel, with electric lights, steam heat and private baths.
The dining room is large, with three sides of plate glass, and
guests' rooms are commodious and arranged in desirable suites.

TROLI HI-UTSE
(Daytona)
Mrs. Mary Troy,
proprietor. Open
October 1st to May
15th. Accommo-
dates 50. Rates,
$2.00 and up per
day; $7.00 to
$10.00 jlr week.
locatedd one block
from depot and
postoflice.
































THE RIDOEWOOD (Daytona)-Rose & Langworthy, proprie-
tors. Open December lt to May 1st. Accommodates 150. Rates,
$3.00 per day and upwards; special by week or month. An at-
tractive house with a bright airy office, pleasant sleeping rooms, in
a perfect sanitary condition. pleasant feature of "The Ridge-
wood" is the "Solarium" built on the southeast corner of the
house and entirely enclosed in glass. Another attraction is the
roof garden situated in the centerof the house and one story higher
than the main part where a grand view of the surrounding country
and the ocean is secured. Hot and rold sulphur baths on each
floor.

TF. BH EAB KR-
1Y-THE-SEA
AID COTAG Eb.
(Seabreeze)
W. L. Bain,
manager. Open
all the year.
A ccommodates
250. Rates,
$2.50 per day;
$12.00to$15.00
per week. A
new, modern,
seaside hotel, located 200 feet north of the ocean pier. Lrge.
well-ventilated nrorns ind sun parlor facing the ocear. Twr ity-
go











eight ocean bath houses and fresh water shower baths in aon-
nection with the hotel. The long line of cottages on the beach,
connected with The Breakers, have all been renovated, repainted
and refurnished throughout.


SCHfMIDTr's VILLA (Daytona)--Henry Schmidt, proprietor.
Open all the year. Accommudates 60. R.tes, $2.50 per day;
,$10.00 to $15.00 per week. located on the river, commanding a
most attractive view in every direction. Rooms single or en
suite. Baths and lavatories, sanitary plumbing. The cuisine is
in charge of a competent chef. New dining room with sunny ex-
posure.

BENNETT HOUSE.
Daytona)
Albert Bennett.
proprietor. Accom-
modates 50. Open
December to May.
Rates, $2.50 per
day; $10.00 to
$18.00 per week.
New house, with all
modern improve-
ments. including
furnace heat, hot and cold Iath, mnid le,'tri, light-. Rooms
tingle or en suite.
THE CITY HOTEL (Daytona)---ieu. II. Matthews, proprietor.
Open all the year. A\ccommodatee 20. Rates, $2.00 per day;
$10.00 per week.





























THE CLARENDON INN (Seabreeze ---C. C. Post, manager. Open
all the year. Accommodates 12.5. Rares, $2.50 per day and up;
special by week and month. 'Bus between train and hotel. Doubled
in size, and a fine new dining room looking out directly on the sea
has been added.


S THE PALMETTO
HOUSE
.(Daytona)
C.- O. Chamber-
lain, proprietor.
Open 'November 15
to May 1st. Rates,
$2.00 to $3.00 per
day; $12.00 to
~$21.00 per week


THE OAK4.
I Daytona.)
Mrs. M. E. Silvernail,
proprietor. Open November
Ist to June 1st. Accommo-
dates 40. Rates, $1.50 to
$2.00 per day ; $8.00 to
$12.50 per week. All mod-
ern improvements. Hou.,e
heated by hot air. Newly furnishtl.









EUROPEAN HursE (Daytona) -A. (.sborn, proprietor. Open
all the year. Rates, $1.25 per day ; $7.01 per week. Located on
Orange avenue. Everything new and convenient.

HOTEL DreSPLAN I ) Daytona)--Leonard Despland, proprietor.
Open all the year. Rate., $2.. 'I per day; $17.0.1 per week single;
$2.7..00 per week doullc. A new hotel uf fifty rooms, two blocks
frum depot and one block from the river and bridge.




Port Orange. Florida. '


115 niles from Jackson, ill. 79 Miles from St. Augustine.
Fare, one way ... $4.60 Fare, one wa) . . $3.15
Round trip ... .6.80 Round trip .... .5.00

PORT ORANGE, a cozy village on the banks of the Halifax, is
very p.ipular with a certain few, on account of the abun-
dance of fi-h and game in the vicinity. The peninsula opposite
is one-fourth mile wide, with a good roadway lu the ocean beach.
c.'yling, boating, surf bathing and driving are among the pastimes
indulged in, but fishing and hunting seem to attract the majority
of the sojourners at Port Orange. The usual varieties of fish and
game are fund here. Experienced guides, with dogs, may be had
at reasonable rates.


r- rS PORT ORANGE HtII BE.
'.V..' Brohm, proprie-
S' : :. tor. Open December
Sto May. Accommo-
dates 45. Rates, $2.00
per day; $9.00 per week
and upward. A two-
story house, located on
the river front, with
wide verandas facing
east and west, and a sunning porch on the south side. Comfort-
able rooms, sanitary plumbing and good looking. Fresh fish and
oysters, and vegetables from the hotel garden, are specialties. Sail
and row boats free to guests.

Hao-anvsN HOUSE-Mrs. Hardyman, proprietor. Accom-
modates 12. Rates, $1.NJ per day; $5.00 to $6.00 per week.
14










New Smyrna, Florida. L*


128 Miles from Jacksonville. N9 Miles from t5. Augustine.
Fare, one way ... $5.00 Fare, one way . .. $3.55
Round trip . . 6.80 Round trip . 5.60

NEW SMYRNA wa settled in 176l. by Ajdrew Turbull, who
has left, in the many curiutt and interesting relics, still in
:A good state of preservation, in and around New Smyrna, remind-
ers of the former Spanibh grandeur and glory. The tourist in
search uf old Spanish tradition and folk lore, and the historian
will find here'mu h to interest him in the contemplation of the
days and peoples long since departed. The ruins of what is known
as Columhus' Chapel, and the Old Rock House, t which overlooks
the Inlet and uf which we have no history, with the old Turnbull
C(ual, are the principal object. -f interest. The well-known Cor-
jnada Bench is accessible by bridge and shell road, is less than
thirty minutes from the railway station. It is noted for its hard,
smooth surface, and extend, for miles north and south.
Fishing here is not excelled by any place for variety and
quantity available and the ea r and facility with which they are
landed. Not infrequently one person has caught more than one
hundred pounds of sheepheadl ,r bass in one day.
To lhose who are in search of health, pleasure and rest; the
sportsman looking for "big game" and the baherman who wants
lidh, New Smyrna ofers peculiar and advantageon, facilities.



. .. . . . .

''... .. ,'
: ..,. ,,. .. ., . . .. . ., -. .. , .
.. . ;r)~; -' ; ... ., ', ::.,'.r


OCEAN HOUl'E -F. W. SAMS, PROPRIETOR.
30









OrEAN HouSE'. -Open December In M.aI .\Aommodatea
10). Rates, $3.00 per day; $15.(.1 per week; $610.01. pIr month.
Located on the banks of the famous Indian River, north, and
offers many attractions to the tourist, pleasure-seeker and sporta-
man. It is modern and comtnmoious, supplied with sanitary
plumbing, baths, etc. In addition, a large sulphur pnrol has been
constructed for those who are afflicted with rheuimatism and
kindred troubles, and who will find its peculiar medicinal proper-
ties well adapted to their needs. Special advantages to those in
search of pleasure, recreation and sport.


Lake Helen, Florida .

146 Miles from Jacksonville. 109 Miles from St. Augustine.
Fare, one way ... $4.60 Fare, one way . . $4.60
Round trip . . 6.80 Round trip ..... . 5.60
LESS than a mile south of the station at Lake Helen, situated
on high pine bluff.s and overlnokin, a number of elqar and
beautiful lakes, is located the Southern C.As-adaga, or Spiritualists'
assembly ground. This association was formed f',r two objects-to
establish a winter resort ftr spiritualist; and those interested in the
investigation uf the science, and to provide a place fur all those
who desire a quiet spot. The air irs laden with the fragrance
of the resinous pine There are no disagreeable insects, for the
reason that there are no swamps in the neighborhood.
It is also clairied by
them that there isa nat-
Sral pyc.lhiv adaptation
Sto a spliritual work, and
that the selection of the
location was made by
Epirits w li understood
the earh's magnetic and
psychic currents, and
that this prartilar splt is highly r,,nducie to spiritual and
ulelliurmitie developm-.nt, and a. veritable Mec(ca for the iestora-
tion of spiritual health and strength. This place is fist growing
into importance, and each year tinds many persons assembled
upon its grounds, impelled thither by variou- motives. Many are
seeking a quiet, restful home for the winter months. Others are
desirous of investigating the phenomenon of Spiritualism and
studying its philosophy. Some are impelled by curiosity, together
with many devoted adherents of the faith.
THE HARLAN HOTEL--Mis S. Kempe, proprietor. open



5.









December to May. Accommodates 150. Rates, $2.50 to $3.00 per
day; $12.00 to $20.00 per week. The house is modern, comfort-
ably furnished, has electric bells, baths, and the appointments are
all that could be desired. The water supply is from artesian wells.
The house is located in a pine tree park of twenty acres, overlook-
ing Lake Helen. Ample amusements, such as tennis, croquet,
billiards, bowling and boating.

HOTEL WEBSTER AND,
HEALTHFUL REST.
O. B. rWebster and
M. I. Webster, man-
agers. Open Novem-
ber to May. Accom-
modates 70. Rates,
$1.75 to $2.25 per day:
$8.00 to $12.00 per
week. House enlarged.
New dining-room, parlor, office and baths. Located on a knoll
overlooking two beautiful lakes; one-half mile from Lake Helen
depot and five minutes' walk from Camp Cassadaga. Building
heated throughout by the hot water system. Golf, tennis, croquet
and boating free to guests.




Orange City. Florida 5

Ist Miles from Jacksonville. 114 Miles from St. Augustine.
Fare, one way. . $4.60 Fare, one way . . $4.60
Round trip .... .. 6.80 Round trip .... ..60

ORANGE CITY is an inland village beautifully situated and
surrounded by gently undulating hills. Many persons find-
ing the coast climate rather strong hare sought. more interior
points, and are at once attracted to Orange City by the home atmos-
phere which seems to surround the place; the home circle is at
once enlarged to receive the new-comer, who soon feels like one to
the manor born.
Orange City has a health record superior to most places in the
State, owing not only to its situation, but very largely to the re-
markable purity of the water, which should always be one of the
first things to copaider in going to a new locality. A careful
analysis of the miheral spring water here shows that it contains no
organic matter or vegetable deposit. Orange City Mineral Water
a









is rapidly becoming known in other partsof the State, and i being
Shipped to a number of places.
There are many attractions in the near vicinity, and daily win
ter picnics and excursions are enjoyed hy the visitor and guest.
Opportunity for pleasant daily and evening gatherings all that can
be desired. An excellent library and reading ronm open to the
public every day.
Cottages can be rented at reasonable rates, and good boarding
and hotel accommodations for the tourist.
For information address Mrs. E. A. Hill, Orange City.


EAST LAWN.
Chas. N. St. John, proprie-
tor. Open November Ist to
May 1Ith. rates $2.00, per
day; $8.01, t)o $10.00 per week.
The house is situated 6tJu leer
from Twin Oaks station, and
passengers leaving train there
have to jay no charges for
transportation of baggage. (range City Mineral Springs and
Deerfoot Mineral Spring water used on table. Ruonm newly re-
fitted. Baths with hmt and cold water, large closet. and fireplaces.


1 VIN iJAMR 'OE'OTTAi E.
J. L. True, pro-

vem ber to May. -
Rates, $2.10 per day; 't
$7.00 .and up per
week; $24.00 and up
per month. Pleasant-
ly lct-ate-d on high,
rolling piue land, two
blocks from railroad
station. No charge for transfer of passengers and baggage. With
such as desire a quiet winter home atn._ng pleasant sPlrroundings,
correspondence is invited.
FREEMrAN HIiOTls--D. Freeman, proprietor. Rate,. $2.010 per
day; $6.00 per week.
PALETrTO CorTTAGE--J. M. White, proprietor. Rates, $1.50
to $2.00 per day; apeci:l weekly. Large shade trees, broad
verandas and good table. A good, cmrufortable. homelike place

: .,, : ,.. 3.









'RTIE TNDIAN1 RIVER
HOTEL
J. C. Baut, lessee
and manager. Open
all the year. Accom-
modates 75. Rates,
$2.50 per day; $10.00
to $15.00 per week.
Pleasantly located,
overlooking the broad
sweep ,f the river,
and three blocks frm the station. Rooms ingle or en suite. Bathb.
Baggage transfer, 25 cents. A good table, comfortable beds and
careful attention to the welfare of the guests.


E enterprise, Florida '
02t Miles from Jacksonville. 158 Miles from St. Angustlne.
Pare, one way . $8.05 Fare, one way . $6.55
SROCK HOUSE-A. 8. Denison, proprietor. Rates, $2.50 to
A$3.50 per clay; special weekly. Open December to May. A
select hotel, charmingly situated on Lake Monrne, in a large
orange grove. Excellent fishing and hunting near the hotel.
THE AtRCADE-Catherine Krullar, manager. Open all the year.
Accommodates 40. Rates, $1.00 per day; $25.00 per month.
Located on the banks of the lake and only a short distance from
the railway station. Large dining-room, parlor and dancing hall.
Table supplied with vegetables and fruit from house gardens.


Sanford, Florida '
202 Miles from Jacksonville. 166 Miles from St. Augustine.
Fare, one way. . $8.40 FPare, one way .... $6.90

SANFORD is the terminus of the Sanford branch of the Florida
East Coa t Railway, and the terminus of the regular line of
StI. Johns River steamers. The town is the outgrowth of the settle-
rient made here by General IH. S. Sanford soon after the Civil War.
The black bass fishing here is said to be the best in the State,
one rod last season frequently bringing in 120 pounds in one day.
Other fresh water fish are plentiful.
Small game plentiful three miles from town. Guides and boats
always ready for hunting or fishing trips.
THE NEw S vFoaRn Hous.--Inglehard & Ackerman, proprie-
tors. Open January to April. Rates, $2.50 to $4.00 per day;
$17.50 to $28.00 per week. Accommodates 300, Only one block
36









Hawks Park. Florida 9

128 Miles from Jacksevlle. 91 Miles from St. Augustiae.
Par, ne way . U.0 Fre, one way . .3.65
Road trip .. . 7.0 Rnd trip . . .70
ASPLENDID point for hunting and fishing. Ducks very plen-
tiful. Frequently, during the past season, twenty-five to
Mifty ducks were brought in as the remlt of a day's hunting.
BaY Vzrw HousE-H. W. Dunklee, proprietor. Rates, $2.50
per day; special by the week. A homelike, comfortable place.
Furnished shore cottages to let by D. R. Marshall, Room 1, No.
24 Park Place, New York.



Oak Hill. Florida 3

137 MleS frm J.knvllo. 100 Miles from St. Augustlne.
Pae. ne way . .S. Pare, one way. $4.00
Round trip ..... 8.M2 Roud trip .. 6.28
H S. BAKER, boarding house. Open a.d the year. Rates,
$1.00 per day; $5.00 per week. One mile fram aLbs .ration
and one-fourth mile from the river. No charge for transferof p is-
sengers and baggage. Communicate with H. S. Baker in advance.




Tituville, Florida 9

18 Miles from Jacksonville. 118 Mile from St. Augultime.
Pare, one way . .$6.20 Pare one way. . $4.70
aRund trip .... 9.30 IRound trip . .. .7.38
TITUSVILLE, county seat of Brevard county; junction of the
Sanford branch with main line; on the banks of the famous
Indian River, which at this point is seven miles wide. Canaveral
Club is on the beach opposite Titusville. Hunting consists of
duck, snipe and various kinds of water fowl; larger game a few
miles in the interior. The lagoons and bayous lose by afford the
rarest of wild duck shooting. Boats and boatmen, who will pro-
vide decoys and blinds and attend the shooters in all their wants,
can be obtained at reasonable rates. Fishing is also very fine.
The streets of Titusville are shelled, making good bicycle riding.
Pleasant drives along the banks of the river and through the ham-
mocks and orange groves adjacent to the town.








from the railway station and overlooking Lake Monroe. Free 'bus
for transfer of guests. Large sulphur bathing pool, sun parlorand
launches for the use of guests. Orchestra music mornings and
for dancing evenings.


Cocoa, Florida.
174 Milel fro Jacksonvlle. 137 MHle from SL AuaUtifte.
fre, on way. . $ 6.95 Pare, oneway . . $.0
Rod trip . ... 10.45 Roend trip . . 8.41
OCOA is a busy town on the Indian River, with a long wharf
where railway traffic with the many towns and small settle-
ments on Merritts Island is conducted.
Oranges, grapefruit or pomelo, and other citrus fruits, are
abundant. Hunting and fishing good. Excellent boating facili-
ties, and good roads invite driving and cycling.
THOMAS COT IAGE
Mrs. M. A. Thomas, pro-
prietor. Open all the year.
Accommodations for 15. Rates,
$1.60 per day; special by week
or month., The cortage has been
enlarged to doubJe the size since
last season. New bath rooms.
Centrally located.

Indianola. Florida. R-il.way se..ton Cooa)
LOCATED on Merritts Island, opposite Cocoa. It is claimed
that the temperature on Merritts Island is several degrees
warmer than the mainland, owing to its being surrounded by
water, and for that reason the citrus fruit trees on the island were
not damaged by the freeze of several years ago-1894-5.
THE WDIANOLA

G. W. Schuyler,
proprietor. Open No-
vembqr let to May ist.
Accommodates 20.
Rates, $1.50 per day;
$8.00 per week. A
boarding house with
the freedom and com-
forts of a hotel.
Large rooms, all look-
ing on the river. Hot
36


i :. " ' .
5 .],::; .,, ., :.".. -,: ... .,: . .. . ... ;








and cold sulphur baths. By notifying the proprietor visitors will
be met at Cocoa Station and transferred to the house in our own
launch without charge.

M erritts, Florida '
THE WIGWAM--On Merritts Island, opposite Cocoa, is a
hunting lodge and winter resort run by Northern people.
Open all the year round. Rate, $8.00 to $10.00.per week. Upon
notification private boat will meet train at Cocoa. Address Mrs.
E. J. Blair.
NEVIN's Rl'ERvrLEw-J. J. Wilkinsori, proprietor. Rates on
application.


Rockledge, Florida 3
176 niles from Jacksonville. 139 Miles from St Augustine.
Fare, one way . .. 7.05 Fare, one way ... $5.5
Round trip . 10.55 Round trip ... 8.60
FROM a broad, sand-beach stream at Titusville and vicinity
the Indian River changes rapidly until eighteen miles below,
in the neighborhood of Rockledge, it becomes a narrow sheet of
water, softly washing against the perpendicular sides of a rock
ledge that continues for miles up and down the river. This ledge
is of coquina, and large shade trees grow along the edge of this
hard, but fertile, soil, and the entire waterway is shaded, as well
as the charming tropical road that runs alongside. There are
many interesting places to visit in the vicinity of Rockledge,
the lower end of Merritts island being but a short distance away.
Fairyland, the home of Dr. Whitfield, is within a short ride, and
the best of fishing can be had from the rock ledges all along the
river front from Rockledge down through the Narrows. Several
modern and well-managed hotels are located at Rockledge.












Further down are the beautifully situnted and thriving towns
of Eai Gallie and Melbourne, along the Indian River Narrows.
37.


:.....,:,... :.~~~~ ..s.,. ,.' ..',.':
~ :. .,:. . ;,. .. . I.. .. . ;. ': "'









These places are in the heart of the famous Indian River orange
belt. After a rest of several years, caused by the freeze of 1894-5,
these grove are again in bearing, and hundreds of groves further
south, planted out since 1894, are bearing plentifully. The
Banana River, which runs along the east side of Merritts Island,
merges into the Indian River a short distance above Ean Gallie.
This is an interesting stream, and the country on either side is full
of game. The land is rich, and beyond the reach, of severe
weather. In consequence, orange groves have never ceased to
bear, and the most luscious pineapples are harvested season after
season. There are hotels and boarding houses at all the small
towns along this part of the coast.
HoTEL INDIAr Rrvn--Open January to April. Accommo-
dates 300 guests. Rooms single or en suite, with or without private
baths. Rates, $3.00 and upwards per day; $17.50 and up per
'week. No transfer charges from trains. Baggage transfer, 25
cents The hotel is situated fifty yards from the station, and the
walk to the house leads through part of the 100-acre orange grove
by which the hotel is surrounded. Steam heat, elevator, electric
lights, telegraph office, tennis court, billiard and pool tables, etc.
Norm--At time of going to press we have no positive informa-
tion that this house will be opened for the season 1903.



















THE PLAZA-8. H. Peck, manager. O)penl J-cember Lu Alay
Accommodates 200 guests. Rates, $2.b0 to $4.50 per day A
large, handsome, modern hotel, new and strictly first-class. Every
room heated by steam, and rooms with or without private bath.
Located in the midst of an 80-acre bearing orange grove-on the
banks of the Indian River.


4 1.




























TnH NEW ROCKLmEDO HOTEL AlND COTTrAoE-H. P. Shars &
Son, proprietors. Open December to April. Accommodates 12.
Rates, 12.50 and upward per day; $15.00 to $25.00 per week; spe-
cial rates until January 20. Located on the banks of the river
300 yards from station. Rooms with or without private bath.
House heated by steam. Billiard room, bowling alley and other
indoor amusements. A Daimler launch and boak owned by the
house constantly in use by th guests.


RWHITE' COTTAG ---J. White, proprietor. Open December
1st to May 1st. Accommodates 30. Rates, $1.60 to $2.00 per
a9


h









day; $8.00 to $10.00 per week. A select family boarding house,
one-eighth mile from station. Special attention paid to fisher.
men. Boats and guides furnished when desired.


Eau Gallie, Florida '
190 Miles from Jacksonville. 184 Miles from St. Augustine.
are, one way . . 7.60 are, oneway. . $6.15
Round trip . .. .11.40 Round trip . . 9.80

HOTEL GRANADA. >
W. it H. Gles a
non, manager. Open M
November to May.
Accommodates 50.
Rates, t$.50 per
day and up; special i
by thWe week or
month. A good,
homelike hotel at
reasonable rates in a matchless climate and a healthful loca-
tion. Supplied with both soft and sulphur water. Free baths.
Within five minutes' )alk of the station. A fleet of launches in
connection with the house.
INMDN ERrER INN--P. A. McMillan, proprietor. Open all
the year. Rates, $2.00 to $2.50 per day; special weekly and
monthly rates. Table supplied with fish, oysters and game in
season.


Melbourne, Florida 3
198 fliles trom Jacksonville. 158 Miles from St. Augustine.
Fare, one way. . $ 7.80 Fare, one way . . $6.30
Round trip ... .I 1.70 Round trip .... . 9.75

HOTEL BELLEVIEW-W. R. Campbell, proprietor Mrs. E.
M. Campbell, manager. Hates, $2.50 and $3.00 per day;
$12.00 per week and upwards. Located near station, postoffice,
schools and churches, overlooking the river. Tennis lawn and
rowboats free to guests. Baths and good sanitary arrangements.
Fish, game, oysters, Northern meats, fresh fruits and vegetables.
HOTEL CARLETON-F. Robertson, proprietor. Open October 1
to June 1. Accommodates 441. Rates, $2.00 per day; $9.00 to
$12.00 per week. Beautifully situated on a high bluff, overlooking
the river. Five minutes' walk from the station or steamboat land.
ing. Bowling alley, tennis, trap shooting, etc.









Sebastian. Florida ',

211 Miles from Jacksonville. 179 Miles from St. Augustine.
Pare, oneway . .$ 8.60 Pare, oneway. . .S .15
Round trip . . 12.90 Round trip .. . 11.00
PRIVATE BOARD-Mrs. James Morrow. Open all the year.
Accommodates 25. Rates, $1.50 per day; $8.00 per week;
$30.00 per month. Table supplied with fresh milk and butter
from Jersey cows, and vegetables and fruits from the house garden.


F ort Pierce, Florida tV.
242 lles from Jacksonville. l 06 tls from St. Augustlae.
Pare, e way '. . $ 9.70 Pam, one way . 5 8.2
Round trip ... . 14.80 Round trip . .. 12.60
FORT PIERCE is located on the East Coast of Florida, in the
pineapple belt, and opposite the famous Indian River Inlet.
Here the first tarpon ever killed in Florida was taken. Since then
this place has become the most famous tarpon fishing point in the
State. Other fish taken hereare Spanish mackerel (160,000 pounds
were taken in March, 1902, with hook and line), king fish, blue
fish, black and channel bass, red snapper, mangrove snapper, mut-
ton fish, sheepshead, grouper, lady fish, bone fish, dog fish, grunts,
sailors' choice, chum fish, jew fish, shark, saw fish, sea trout, etc.
Guests of the Fort Pierce Hotel killed with\hook and line, in
January and February, 1902, 9,815 pounds of game fish.
Wild ducks, quail, snipe, plover and water fowl are found in
large numbers along the river. In the lat woods will be found
deer, wildcats and turkeys, also the alligator.
Competent guides with horses and dogs, as well as rqw and sail
boats and naphtha launches, at reasonable rates.
Fine shell roads along the. river banks, north and south, for
driving and wheeling.

FORT PIErBCs HOTEL
F. M. Tyler, man-
ager. Open all the
.4 y e a r. Accommodates
75. Rates, $2.50 per
day and upwards; spe-
cial weekly and month-
ly rates. The hotel is
the only house in town
situated on an. eleva-
tion directly on the river, with an attractive and unobstructed view





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DIANrFRrH'W-.,N-THE-ST. LuCIo--H. W. Bessey, proprietor.
Open all the tyar. Accommodate? 25. Rates, *2.1.0 per day;
special hy the week. Five mintie-' walk from the station. No
Shbarge folr transfer r.f latiagr:.



PHIVATE BOARD.
B. Kirchin2. Open all the year. Ac-
coummodates 10. Rates, $1.50 per day;
$7.00 per week.





W est Jupiter, Florida 15

283 Miles from Jacksonville. 247 Miles from St. Augustine.
Fare, one way .. . $11.30 Fare, one way . .. 9.00
Round trip . . 17.00 Round trip .. 15.05
ANOTHER interesting stop in thin Ltion is Webt Jupiter. The
station is directly opplbite Jupiter Lighthouse, located on
a peninsula just across Jupiter Inlet, the terminus of the famous.
Indian River, along whose borders and banks the train has been
traveling for 125 miles. There is al&o a life-saving station on the
beach, and it is but a ,hort distance south to the head of famous
Lake Worth. The country throughout here abounds in fish and
game, and the friendly Seminole i4 always in eridtnce.
CASLIN HOTEL--M. M. Caslin, proprietor. Open all the year.
Accommodate 2t0. Rates in application.


West Palm Beach. Florida. s

300 Miles from Jacksonville. 264 Miles from St. Augustine.
Fare, one way .. $12.00 Fare, one way .. $10.55
Round trip ... 19.00 Round trip ... .17.00
THE run from Jupiter to West Palm Beach, where the train
crosses Lake Worth to Palm Beach proper, is but seventeen
miles. On crossing the famous lake to Palm Beach, where the
Hotel Royal Poinciana, The Breakers and scores of handsome cot-
tages are located, the tourist feels that the most expressive adjective
in his vocabulary is too insignificant to even suggest his delight at
the matchless and majestic view that greets his eyes before he
leaves the platform of the train.









TnH BMI8 l LE-Open November to May. Accommodates 75
late, $2.00 to $3.00 per day; $10.00 to $20.00 per week; $40.00
to $75.00 per month. Located on the west shore of Lake Worth,
commanding an unobstructed view of' the lake. Everything first-
class White cooks and white waitresses. Billiard room freeto
guests. Livery in connection with house. Transfer charges, 2
cents.



THE PALMS.
J. C. Stowers,
proprietor. Open
November to May.
Accommodates 7 5.
Bates, $2.00 to$S 00
per day; special by
the :week.. A first-
class, homelike
hotel on Lake
Wort h, near rail-
road station and
points of interest. Special feature: Courteous attention, superior
table and service, reasonable rates. Experienced white waitses
in charge o dining room. Electric lights and bells. Transfer
charges, 25 cents.


PARK CoTTA o--Mrs. Fred E. Pinkham, proprietor. Open
November to May. Accommodates 20. Rates, $2.50 to 33.00 per
day; $15.00 to $25.00 per week. A select boarding house of high
standard. Everything first-class. Persons desiring a quiet, home-
like place will do well to correspond with the proprietres.



TIE HOLLAND.
L. D. Lockwood, pro-
prietor. Open Novmber
to May. Accommodates N. .2
'20. Fates, $2.00 per
day; $10.00 to $12.00 per
week. A charming win-
ter home fronting on the
lake. All modern con-
reniences.
45



























































OIN4.c7IANA, PALM BEACH. FRED SFT.iY, Manag.r.
us Janloary l4h. I,*)l. Cl-meze.April Ilth.1 03.


T:i~r ~P;- ~~.~
: i, .*~ rrr;
"'i .. ~.,'''"'"
':i ;;
'::L;t'. - 6 ~L_' r ~~.*.I~. .; *:~~r;
(t
~.

C;1.







E
-,; ,-









Phalm Beach, Florida %
aJO n t res ran Jcksodavl. 236 Mls frem I. Agusttoie.
Fft. e way. . .812.2 F Paren. wr. ... .sO1.8
Ruaal trip . . 19.00 R d trip ... 700
pALM BEACH is easily the queen of the winter report world.
The grounds, favored by Nature with a great variety of trop-
leal growth, bordered on the west by Lake Worth and on the
eat by the Atlantic Ocean, have -been greatly enhanced in
beauty by the lavish expenditure of money. The shore of the
lake for miles are fringed with stately coanut palm, always in
bearing. In the Royal Poinlana grounds these coooant grovem
extend to the specious verandas of the hotel The walks around
' aqd connecting these two hotels, which are about a quarter of a
mile apart, are of asphalt, shaded on all aides by a variety of rare
and Interesting tropical growth, while the borders ae a solid
bloom of sweetscented flowers. The lawns, of which there are
Scream upon acres, are planted in Santa Lucia gra, green the entire
year through. It is a carpet, and there ae noeusky signs "Keep
of the gram" to heed. Branching out in every direction are'the
moet picturesque bicycle paths imaginable. They run for miles
north and south into deep jungle, through groves of stately palms
and tropical trees, by handsome villas and artistic grounds, nearly
always with placid Lake Worth in view, and within hearing dis-
uano of the waves of the ocean washing in upon the beach.


















THE BEACH AT PALM BEACH.
Surrounding the Hotels Royal Poinciana and The Bresker are
located the most popular golf links in Florida. The fist teeing
ground sl just opposite the southern entrance to the Royal Poin-
47

: . ,. .: I











qi~yp~_i
"P: -"aYe
; p :r. ~
~f~f~j
Pa .,~ r I;:
'' ""P: ; :. ;~.
~. ~ *-:' ~ :'-:: ;~~bl
.Irr ,c. ;
r- -J. I' '.~'-$ ~~' -r.
- ; a;~ -r:--?*
.~- J' c, *.
t ;L
t
:
...

e7. ~;i i''' ' r


BREAKERS. PALM BEA'"H. FRLD STEERRY. Manager.
Operne DPepnimbr ?4, 190l Clo* h April 2. 19IW.








*:.." .
ciana, beside which stands the comfortable club house. The course
Slices down towards The Breakers, which is as near to the ocean
beach as the Royal Poinciana is to the lake, over a carpet of the
most perfect lawn grasses.
As a winter resort for fishermen, Palm Beach has no equal. Joe
Jefferson and other persons of note, who have the means to go
anywhere that fancy dictates and enjoyment may allure, find the
beet fishing for winter to be in Lake Worth and off the ocean pier,
or from craft out at sea.. The catches of kingfish, taken every day
throughout the season in the past, have been extraordinary.
In addition to its perfect climate, its grand hotels, charming
landscape and comfortable travel, Palm Beach has attractions
galore for young and old. The Casino, located near The Breakers,
is the daily rendezvous of hundreds of guests The combined or-
chestras of the Royal Poinciana and The Breakers play in the
pavilion at noon each day, the popular hours for bathing being
between 11 and 1. The immense pool is supplied with salt water,
pumped in continually from the ocean. It is not enclosed, save by
the rows of dressing rooms on all sides. Those who prefer bathing
in the surf have but a short distance to go. No day during the
winter is too cold for a dip either in the surf or the pooL After a
morning at gtlf or a bicycle ride through the woods, nothing is
more delightful lhan a dip in the pool of the Casino.














. ..".. .. . .





AVENUE TO THE OCEAN, PALM BEAC FOB Woa EL CHAZE AND BICYCLEs.
The only land conveyances at Palm Beach are bicycles and
wheel-chairs, the latter propelled by liveried colored men. There
is not a horse across the lake, and the only mule is constantly en-








gaged in hauling a light summer car between the Hotel Royal
Poinciana, The Breakers and the Csino. This has the reputation
of being the best patronised and most profitable road in existence.


BOTUNDA OF "THE PALM BDRAO."
THu PALz BxacH--Ratesj, 3.00 per day and upward.
HoTEL Hmscus-Ratea, $3.00 per day and up; special by the
week. Alfred E Johnson, proprietor.


L. :









i', Lantan ,. Florida '*-
:'. 300 Miles from Jacksonvlle. 272 files from St. Augustine.
Fare, oneway. . 512.3 Pare, ope way. . .$10.90
S Road trip . . 19.00 Round trip . . 17.00
N EAR the foot of Lake Worth, at the beginning of the vege-
table farms. There are also several growers of fancy pine-
': apples in this vicinity. Good hunting and fishing.
I' LAmTANA Hous--M. B. Lyman, proprietor. Open all the
S year. Accommodates 10. Rates, $2.00 per day; $12.00 per week.


B oynton, Florida s*
31 Miles from Jacksovl lle. 276 Miles fm St. Augustine.
ure, oe way . . 12.0 Pre, one way . .. 1S .0
.! found trip ... 19,00 Round trip ...... 17.00

L. OCATED on the ocean beach at the foot of Lake Worth and
in the heart of the farming lands of Dade County. Nearly
S the whole list of garden vegetables and various tropical and semi-
tropical fruits do well in the moist muck lands in this section.
Vegetables are planted from October to February, and are mar-
keted from December to June. Hunting and fishing are equal to
i that at any point along the coast.
HoTEL BOYNTON AND COTTAzaEB-Major N. S. Boynton, pro-
prietor. Open January 1st to May let. Accommodates 100.
Z Rates, $2.50 to $3.00 per day; $16.00 to $18.00 per week; $60.00
to $65.00 per month. A cottage hotel, with large, well-furnished
i sleeping rooms, large dining room, wide halls and verandas.
Lighted with gas, and with all modern improvements. Only fifty
S feet from the ocean beach. Surrounded by cocoanut palms, trop-
S ical shrubbery and velvet lawns. If guests prefer the quiet of a
cottage, they can be accommodated at same rates.

SFoErt Lauderdale. Florida 4,
341 Miles from Jacksonvile. 308 Miles from St. Augustine.
Pare. one way.. . .13.6" Fare, one way. . 12.20
Round trip .... 20.80 Round trip .. .. 18.88
O named from an old fort of Seminole War times. Seminole
Indians come here to do their trading. Numerous vegetable
farms and groves of citrus fruits surround bhe town. Plenty of
good hunting and fishing.
S TH WALLACE HouSE-A. J. Wallace, proprietor. Open all
: the year. Accommodates 25. Rates, $1.50 per day; $9.00 per
S week.
S51
WOOL




















-4.7




,TxI


ix:



















BOEAL PALM, MLIAMI
H. W. MlesrRLL. MIteneg6.










Lemon City. Florida 4-
362 Miles from Jacksonville. 326 liles from St. Augustine.
Fare, one way . . $14.50 Fare, one way .. . $13.05
Round trip . . 21.70 Round trip . . 19.80
A THRIFTY stetlement on Bist ayne Bay, wherr the people are
chiefly engaged in the niltivation of citrus groves and vege-
table gardens. Good fitising at Norri.' Cut, and hunting in imme-
diate vicinity.
CAREY HutI-E-J. T. Carey, proprietor. Open all the year.
Accommodates 20. Rates, $2.00 per day: $10.00 per week.


Miami, Florida %
366 files from Jacksonville. 330 Miles from St. Augustine.
Fare, one way .. . $14.65 Fare, one way . .$13.20
Round trip .... . .21.95 Round trip ... 20.05
' /'NE ca nscarce realize the great strides that lMiami, the ter-
Sminutlof the Florida Ea.t Coast Railway, and its several
steamboat couneetlins, ha-, made during the five years of its trans-
formation fr,m a sleepy little village, whose sole attractions were
beautiful scenery and an old fort, to a modern and up-to-date city
and tourist resort.
The construction of that magnificent hotel, the Royal Palm,
Swas simlt.ineous with the completion of the railway to Miami.
Nestling on the bank, of the Miami River and that superb body
of water, Biscayne Bay, it became popular immediately as a tour-
ists' resort.

















INDIANS ON THE MIAMI RIVER.
Miami has bome-, and churches and streets which would delight
the champion of better municipal conditions. The streets are








lighted by electricity, anld ih town has a complete water-works ,
system. Encircling her on every side are cocoanut groves, pine-
apple plantations and the.most beautiful truck gardens in the
world, where the winter visitor may eat strawberries and fresh veg-
etables while his friends at home are struggling through huge
snowdrifts. The man who has never sailed a boat in his life will
be tempted to essay the task at Miami. The sight of the gently
rippling water and the smoothly-gliding, white-winged craft have
here a fascination more potent than that exerted elsewhere, and
one which few persons who have remained for any length of time
in this magic city have been able to resist.


The livery service at Miami is all that could be desired, and
the charges are reasonable. Transfer from railway station to hotel
25 cents and 25 cents for each piece of baggage.


FROUT EtTIA bIU MUTEL UIYALi YAii.
HOTErL ROYAL PALM--Open during January, February,' March
and April. H. W. Merrill, manager. Rates, $5.00 per day and
up. Tropical gardens enlarged and improved. Special bachelor
accommodations, with shower bath, etc., added.































4rwaIlNUG PooL-Salt watWr, open air swimming pool, and hot
and cold water bath tubs. -


GoLF-Finest links in thv South, cnveriug seventy acres of
tropical prairie. (lub honll-, lui keir, professical. in-tructor.
Regular boats will be run half-hourly from the Hotel Royal Palm
pavilion to the club house on the golf links and everglades, land-
ing within a abort distance of the new water works.










Hot-.E Bor TS ANDt FI-HING--Speridil wlocaed for hone andi
tarpon fishing. Fined f.:r lish dinners und luncheon parties.
MILK-The Florida East Coast Hotel Company bha. eiompleled
arrangements so that the guests and children in its hotels and c't-
tages may he supplied with milk equal tn tle het obtainable in
the North.
rIuvF.-, AND BICYCrLE PA'lF--Many nmileo of new limcAtone-
raa-k, inacadariized roads and paths.
L.,r-Nctn AND P.LEaSvRE BOAT--Many new bhatsi and
launches added. 1Iauncihes will rill rpgularlv to tie Imicre bouit-
anld tilhing grnuuds.
,Si.'olits-,ea:commodations for children, with competent in-
-trutltort in kindergarten a.s well as higher branches.
The other ihatels at Mianmi arte -
HOTEL E L-:CAYNE-S. t rahain, prqiirietor. O.lpen Noveniher
Itl to May 1st. A\roraimodaite- 150 guests. Rates, .:3.fJ per day
and toward ; $20.1.10 and up pt-rweek. The Biscayne is a modern-
built strneture, providcI with nal ithe- convniente.-. Furnishings,
,in lie. -et., unsurpassed. Rooma en suite, m ith bath.








$1.50 per day and up.










N. Gautier, proprietor.
a on. mulate 4 R a..t v.



$2.51 ".vr da.5 %. deial Aek lv

and monthly rate,. Centrally
located; convenient to all
points; two al-icks from Bis-
enane Bay. E I t r i e lights,
iaths large reading room.












P-AIM I.0Tl"[ < E.
Gum A. Muller, proprietor. .
Accornrnodationn tulr 5J) guri. s.
Rates, $2.00 and $2.01) per day;
special weekly. Pleasantly lo-
cated at the corner of Avtinus. B
and Eleventh street. Large
dining room, wMite v.,randas,
electric liehls and bath-.




Key West, Florida 3

497 tiles from Jacksonville. 460 Liles from St. Augustine.
By steamship trom aiami. By steamship irom liami
Fare,oneway . g.90 Fore, onewa) . . 18.65
Round trip...... 3.20 Round trip . 33.20

F PCtIM MIiami. the tourist may take -teanier for Key ,ltt--that
stranc-, )-osiiLinOtlian i ittl tmurntmity, which has the hbliur
of being ith: .louthcrnm,-ot ity .., th. IUnited States. It i, a Et range,
picturesque rn,.ok. You can anliost inalint, ynRrltI' srt down in
another inrd. The im .st
Kikd im ga allirineg t 'riar factories in
the wnrld are here, and
St athe ;it,.r uiay watch
dut.kv sk nts andt st-norita-
reftly shalin the eele-
bIrated llaanna lerfiet -,.
which sell f,,r tmore than a
Dollar taih; or b mniay
take a pte'-p at the heand-
SPON'.FE V WiFF. t'arttr ...f the turtle trade
and see-, pre[parcil fr ,hilpmient north, t.rmne. .I the Inrcint lurtlh-
in the world, .ir, tinallh, the si _ljti er. vell,-i fr f .i w i -tv en-a.ions,
nmary slland n the wha rf or jiournmy forth in a boar and at.i
.m. ,, the bIranchs -..f p,.n.- t fishing-the most t uni-ue ind,1U ,t- it
;ii the Unil.I Stale-, an,[ nt-e which lie ro.t y r iprnleth -d on slt h
a .eale n.whure tni v i in tile republic.
Thf- ronte I;-v betweet;c the Florida Key tand the Florida Reels.
practically a Iand-locke-d cc.ne-. Tile c.n0.ry atlongj tbe Florid-a
K,is is grant, something itirrcl y nel-w L) the ordinary traveler.
The sti-nnmr pa---s within a chrt iI,-tan e 1f e ...f thle Keyts
and on thoe whi-ih are inh. ih.- pelpl .an be se;in be ant work in
the;r vegetable gurdtnti andi fruit groves. The water is transparent
57











in the Reel Chanulil, and from the d-cck ol the steamer all sorts of
ich can be seei in the -h.Ill.iw places.
Key West, the southernmost city in the United States, has a

made tp of Americans and
Cubans. It ia combination
of Ameriesa and Cuba, not
only in pupitlation, but in
architecture and. u s t o s.
The heads of most of the Cu-
bau familit-s are employed in
the many cigar factories,
while the Americans are en-
OUSTOM BOUSE AND POSTOFFIOE. gaged in every branch of
business. The Island City is a prosperous place: It is the seat
of government of Monroe County, which embraces all of the Flor-
ida Keys. The Govurnment makes the harbor its southernmost
headquarters, and sliis of the navy are always to he seen. Dur-
ing the war with Spain it
was the nrndezvonus .f Ad- IFe c
miral Samj;ron', squadron, .
the newspaper fleet, and gov-
erniment d i patch boats.
Spanish prizes Awere all
brought to Key West, and,
uosiug to its Close proximity
to Cuba and Porto Rico, the
place is bound to grow in
importance. The climiateof LA BBISA (DANCINO PAVILION.)
Key Wet des not vary vi) degrees in the course of a year. The
temperature is usually about 81 Sin thesnimmerand 710 in the winter.
It has been known tI, gou luwn as low aq .A'3, but that was the wonder
o)f the decade. There is much to see if interest in the city. The
foliage i, purely tropical--cocuantit-, all tonrts of palms and brilliant
flowers growing in profusion in private gardens and public grounds
the yeag round.


WIt










Abroad in Twelve Hours "-
NASSAV, N. P.
Bahama Islands
Prom Jacksonville. From St. Augustine.
Onewayfare . .27.15 One may fare . .25.70
Round trip .. . 41.95 Round trip . . 40.05
T HE distance from Miami to Na'-su ih hut 173 niJle. The
steanmship leaves M iami in theafternoon and arrivesat Nascau,
the next morning in time for breakfast, the service during the
season being tri-weekly.
The trip is usually an enjoyable one, the weather during the
winter months being quiet and
delightful. The ship i" fitted out
with every modern convenience.
The staterooms are large and
wi magnificently furnished.
Every passenger is on deck
when the steamship rounds the
bar and enters the harbor of Nas-
sau. To the right lies the city of
Nassau, nestling at the foot of a
chain of hills on New Providente
Island. To the left is Hog Isl-
and, and between the two bodies
of land is the channel and harbor.
The water here is perfectly trans-
parent, the bottom being of cora-
line rock. As soon as the boat i,
NASSAU LIHT HOUS-E. within the quiet waters of the bay
a dozen rowboats will Ihoot ciit from the %aharvrs, laden with
scores of little negroes, who crowd around the bunt and dive for
pennie;, nickles and
dimes that the interested .
passengers th r," w over-
board to watch the divers ', "
scramble for under the
water. Owing to thI- ..
remarkable clearness of Fr .
the waters the divers can
be seen moving from the... .
-urface to the bott,-,m,
twenty feet below, in their .
lts.le for the coins. They
never fail to reap their VIEW Fr Ori COLONTAL.
reward, although the money .Xttle- t,, the bottom before they get Ln










N'V .4


Y9a kI

:"""; I90




4

ICic~


COLONIAL. NASSAU. H. E. BERIS. Manager.
Opens December 24ll. 193J. Cluses April 2nd, 1903. Rats. J1.00 per day and up.


'II,

























it. While engaged in watching this novel entertainment the steam-
ship has reached the dock. A hasty inspection of baggage follows,
and the foreigners on British soil are carried to the hotels in com-
fortable carriages, drawn by small, but spry, native ponies, to the
Hotel Colonial, or wherever they may wish to be taken.


a ; .. ". "...
: i I ." : ."


BSOUTER'S CHURCH. COLORED.
There is much to do and see in and around Nassau, and tourists
can roam about either day or night without the least fear of inter-





















































ROYAL VICTORIA. NASSAU. N. P B. E. BKci8. MBIR*g.r








ference. Like all British possessions, the city is thoroughly
policed by constabulary, always polite and ready to give all sorts
of information. This force is composed of colored native& There
is no drunkenness or
boisterous conduct.
The colored popula-
tion, which is large, is
composed of the most
courteous and polite of
their kind. The streets
and roads throughout
the city and the entire
island are of coraline
rock, and are kept in
the best of order, mak-
BAY STREET. ing carriage d ri v i n g
and cycling a delight. Interest in enhanced lby the many strange
and novel sights. The architecture of the buildings is interesting,
the flower gardens and
the great number or
rare tropical flowers,
shrubs and trees grow-
ing and blooming on all
sides make the scene
enchanting. Among
the numerous places of
interest is old Fort
Charlotte, situated to
the west of the city on
the bay frout. This ANOTHER VIEW OF BAY STREET.
structure is larger and much more novel than any of the old Span-
ish forts to be seen in other parts of the world. On the grounds
surrounding this fort are
the golf links of the Flor-
ida East Coast Golf Club,
"and they are sporty all
over the course. In an-
other part of the city
there is Fort Montague,
also Fort Fincastle, near
which will be found the
famous Queen's Staircase,
a series of steps chiseled
through'solid rock down
MARKET BUILDING. a distance of more than
sixty feet into a passageway through rock several hundred feet long







- ,. . 1.

and about fifty feet wide. Native guides give an.interetipg his-
lory of this peculiar construction. '
A curiosity that is keenly enjoyed by all tourists Isthe "Lake
of Fire," located !bout two miles east of the city. After tea, on a .
dark night, is the proper time to visit this wonderful freak of na-
ture. The lake is a small body of water located but a short dis-
ftnce from the sea. On arriving at its banks tourists embark in
boats, and the oasmen
push off from the wharL
The passengers are aoan-
ished to see drops of
molten silver drip from
the oar blades with every
stroke as the y emerge
from the water. Bud-
denly a negro buy will
plunge into the lake, and
his body is immediately
outlined by a bright,
TWO iarTrVn r aASsAU. phesphorseeent light,
casting a halo around his body, arms and legs as he glides through
the water. As he comes to the surface his kinky hair is full of
luminous globules, and as he plunges again fish of all sizea
can be seen clearly outlined by the strange illuminant as they
swim out of harm's way. Capeful of the heavily charged water
thrown into the air actually create an illumination, and drop back
into the lake, again producing soft flashes of light. One can spend
half an hour on the surface of this remarkable lake in the study of
a moat interesting phenomenon.
For interesting and handsomely illustrated pamphlet giving
geographical, historical, geological, descriptive and characteristic
information of this quaintest of winter resorts write to H. E.
Bemis, manager of the Hotel Colonial, Nassau, or to J. D. Rahier,
A. G. P. A. of the Florida East Coast Railway, at St. Augustine,
Florida











I-6













Down at Nas asu s


Say, it's awful fine 'n gay.
Sun a-shinin' ev'ry day,
Down at quaint old Nassau.
Ain't no frost nor bitin' air.
Sweepin' through a feller's hair,
'Till he's cussin' in despair,
Down at quaint old Nassau.
0, the sky's ser soft 'n blue,
'N the water's ev'ry hue,
Down at quaint old Nassau.
Folks they come 'n look 'n smile,
Golf, 'n fish, 'n spend their pile,
Swear they'll all their days beguile,
SDown at quaint old Nassau.
How the roses flame 'n glow,
Seem to say, "we only grow
Down at quaint old Nassau."
Wavin' over you the palm,
Climate just a healin' balm,
O!'your heart's soaked full er calm,
Down at quaint old Nassau.
'F I sh'd hear Death's trumpet, dear,
Callin' for me loud 'n clear,
bown at quaint old Nassau.
Seems to me I'd hide and say,
"Angel, I'm in bliss today,
You keep heaven 'n let me stay
Down in quaint old Nassau."
-From Ike Florida Taller.










Hesvena and the Islend of Cubs f.

Prnm Jackonv lle. Prom St. Augustine.
Pare, one way. . 31.40 Fare, one way. . I1.1S
Round trip ... .84.20 Round trip . . .20
HE trip from Miami to Havana is similar to the trip to Naemu.
The distance from port to port is only 240 miles, most of the
run being along the Florida Keys. The distance from Key West
to the capital of Cuba being but 91 miles. The ship reaches the
narrow entrance to Havana harbor between Mono Castle and Fort
Cabanas, and glides swiftly to its anchorage in the bay. Passengers
and baggage are soon examined and conveyed to the city front in
transfer steamer.
Outside of the prominent part played by Havana as the seat of
the late unpleasantness the city and surrounding country is full of
interest to visitors. At once one is impressed with the solidity of
the city buildings and the extent of its limits. All the structures,
from the humble cottages to the grand palaces, are of stone. Every-
thing is massiveand substantial. Modern American improvements
are fast appearing, however, but old Havana can never be erased.
It is there to stay. The Prado, a wide and beautifully-shaded boule-
vard, with handsome structures on either side of the thoroughfare,
broken here and there with beautiful parks and gardens, runs
through the center of the city. Along the water front are the
wholesale business houses, shipping offices, stock and produce ex-
change, custom house and other large enterprises. Between the
water front and the Prado are streets lined with stores of all kinds.
Around the Prado are the theaters, clubs, residences, hotels and
other large structures. As a rule, sleeping apartments are over the
stores, the inmates generally going to the nearest cafe for their
meals.
Cuban hotels have been very much Americanized, but they cling
to the delightful Spanish custom of serving breakfast between 11
and 1 o'clock. On arising in the morning the breakfast consists
only of fruit, coffee, nice bread and butter, and the tourist is sur-
prised at the rapidity with which he becomes accustomed to this
mode of living, and soon ascertains that it agrees with him, in a
tropical climate, perfectly. After this light repast one is ready
for a tour of inspection, that is usually made in one of the small,
but convenient carriages drawn by small but fast ponies. There
is Obispo and O'Reilly streets, where the curio stores are located;
then a drive along the busy water front, around by the harbor en-
trance to the bay and the Prado back to the hotel. After breakfast
one is ready for a three-hours' drive through another part a the
city, out to the Cristobal Colon cemetery and other points of inter-













country is 10 be olnained, bowing the beautiful, rolling lands cor-
S ered with a growth of deep green, indicating the richness and fer-
tility of the black, loamy soil that lies along the ridge near the
!? coast.
S From Havana one can go by water and by rail to any part of
the island. Steamers leave the harbor nearly every day for such
ports as MIntanzas, Cardenas, Sagun a a rande, Neuvita-, Banes,
Baracoa, Cienfuegos, Eatabano, (4uantanamu, Santiago and many
other points located on the shores of the island.. The rail connec-
tions between points in the interior are fairly good, but are rapidly
being improved.
The railroads pass through an ever-changing scene of cane fields,
sugar mills, tobacco plantations and natural scenery of a tropical
nature, whose beauty is beyond description.



Atlantic Beach s


T HE latest acquisition to the system of hotel of the Florida
1 East C'oast Hotel Company is "The Continental," at Atlan-
tic Beach, twenty,.one miles east from Jack.onville.
The shore line at this point was originally a huge bank of sand
rising twenty or thirty feet abo'e the Rater and sloping away
toward the hammock of cabbage palmetto and live oaks, a quarter
( of a Anile distant. This bank has been utilized to level oil forty
acres or more, upon which the hotel is located, and a bulkhead, or
breakwater, of heavy plank and limber, about ten feet high and a
large part of a mile in length, hats been erected above high tide r..
keep back any encroachment of the sea now or in future.
The Continental," being the latest of The great Florida hotels,
possesses some attractions over nil others. In architectural design
it is well balanced and pleasing to the eye; in fac it is pro-
nounced, by those well iualitied tn express an opinion, as nearly
perfect as possible.
Extending along the entire front, around the south end and in
the rear df the hotel, are covered verandas, detached from the
main building, though ccminected by pa'rgeways at all the main
entrances. These verandas are charming to the lait degree. Fur-
nished with large, ea.s, gaily-colured rockers, they constitute thi.
general lounging plaLe of tile guests, and truly no more enticing
place can he found.
67


I .




















n:n








TH CNINNAIATATI EAH
Deihflylcae nteAlatcO en it ras o)tgnl lpig adb ah




















n:n








TH CNINNAIATATI EAH
Deihflylcae nteAlatcO en it ras o)tgnl lpig adb ah








BY ,.htt4 and Ifuntifg .
on the tEatCost .
-. Of. h f ]a
Oi United S aes Fsh Commission Report of 1899 ms SB.ft W
Siveremann and W. C. Kendall have a "Check List of the '
of iloida," which contains 76 species a very large pro- '
orf bich they locate on the East Coast. Mr. Win. .
Ong Sr., of S. Lonis, Mo., in his recent work, locates 138 in '..
Mirmesayne Bay and the adjacent outside reefs alone, not counting
Iamy of the varietal and unimportant species. Probably 450 out
4 the .576 speciess are inhabitants of the East Coast, from the
A'o: mout of St. Johns River to Key West.
', .Dr. Evermann, in a paper read at the Fishery Congress held at
Shmpa, Fla., January 19th, 1898, said:
."There is no State in the Union whose fishes have attracted
6o6oe general attention than those of Florida. The interest in the
thee of this State is shared by the commercial fisherman, the
4a.ng.ler spd the ichthyologist The number of species that are
C*ight because of their commercial value is far greater than in any
:F-oter section 9f America. Those that are of interest to the angler
9, mapre numerous than any other State can boast, while the rich-
.'.es and peculiaties of the fsh fauna of Florida have made this *
rState' slkcinating field to the Ichthyologist and student of geo-
saphbe distribution. The total number of fihes known from
'edrdinf iLtemr is about 600, or about one-fifth of the entire
aun~ o America north of Panama.'! The warm waters of the
'.y smve.asa more or less effective barrier to the passage of
Sr.livring in colder water. As a result, many species are found
h4fiA East Coast.of Florida which do not occur on the Gulf Coast.
r .vice vera.. There are so many species found on the West
that are not known on the East Coast that the two coasts may
bre d as having separate fauna.
e is no other place in the United Stateswhere one can
e ~Ls Jyto ai&shes so aptisftetorily as Key West.
,. t.BiO for kingfih, jacks, crevalle, bluefsh, Spanish mc k-
ia~d d spotted sea trout at Indian River, Lake Worth, .Key West
'l eyi i e .Bay 'urnishes sport of the most exciting kind, while 2
i g foir sheepahead and mangrove snappers at Indian River
'at ; fqr chubs, porgies, porkish, yellowtail, snappers and
'ppO at Key West; or for red snappers, red groupers and others '
Satheni kin.on the snapper banks furnishes sufficient variety to "
K$ "al'. angler,' in whatever mo d be may chance to be. .
Lh t Lae fishbe in every State end Territory in the Union but
aiad from Siberisand Behring Sea to the Gulf of Clifornal

.t, .. .
. _. ., ... .. . . . ' .









SFishing. Yachting and Hunting 9
On the Eat Coast
off lorida
N the United States Fish Commission Report of 1899 Dra. 1. W.
Evermann and W. C. Kendall have a "Check List of the
Fishes of Florida," which contains 576 species, a very large pro-
portion of which they locate on the East Coast. Mr. Wm. H.
Gregg, Sr., of St. Louis, Mo., in his recent work, locates 133 in
Biscayne Bay and the adjacent outside reefs alone, not counting
many of the varietal and unimportant species. Probably 450 out
of the 676 species are inhabitants of the East Coast, from the
mouth of St. Johns River to Key West.
Dr. Evermann, in a paper read at the Fishery Congress held at
Tampa, Fla., January 19th, 1898, said:
"There is no State in the Union whose fishes have attracted
more general attention than those of Florida. The interest in the
fishes of this State is shared by the commercial fisherman, the
angler and the ichthyologist. The number of species that are
sought because of their commercial value is far greater than in any
other section of America. Those that are of interest to the angler
are more numerous than any other State can boast, while the rich-
ness and peculiarities of the fish fauna of Florida have made this
State a fascinating field to the ichthyologist and student of geo-
graphic distribution. The total number of fishes known from
Floridian waters is about 600, or about one-fifth of the entire
fauna of America north of Panama.'! The warm waters of the
SKeys serve as a more or less effective barrier to the passage of
fishes living in colder water. As a result, many species are found
on the East Coast of Florida which do not occur on the Gulf Coast
and vice versa. There are so many species found on the West
Coast that are not known on the East Coast that the two coasts may
be regarded as having separate fauna.
"There is no other place in the United States where one can
study live fishes so satisfactorily as Key West.
"Trolling for kingfish, jacks, crevalle, bluefish, Spanish mack-
erel and spotted sea trout at Indian River, Lake Worth, Key West
or Biscayne Bay furnishes sport of the most exciting kind, while
still fishing for sheepshead and mangrove snappers at Indian River
Inlet; for chubs, porgies, porkfish, yellowtails, snappers and
grunts at Key West; or for red snappers, red groupers and others
of their kin on the snapper banks furnishes sufficient variety to
please any angler, in whatever mocd he may chance to be.
I have fished in every State end Territory in the Union but
three, and from Siberiaand Behring Fea to the Gulfs of California




A S









and Mexico, and, all things considered, regard Florida as un-
equaled in the richness and variety of its attractions for all sort of
sport with rod and reel."
As Dr. Evermann is the ichthyologist of the United States
Commission of Fish and Fisheries, and a versatile and accom-
plished angler of wide experience, the above account can be con-
sidered "Praise from Sir Rupert."
Mr. Wm. H. Gregg, Sr., referred to above, in his book entitled
"Where, When and How to Catch Fish on the East Coast of Flor-
ida," mentions 187, describes 125, has engravings of 100, and
plates in natural colors of 12 species. He gives a list of appro-
priate baits, natural and artificial; description and illustrations of
necessary tackle and methods of using the same for each species of
fish, as also his opinion of their edible qualities.
He then gives a full account of all the fishing localities of im-
portance on the coast, including the inside and outside waters and






















reefs, from Mayport (mouth of SL Johns River) to Key West, a
distance of 626 statute miles, he having repeatedly visited all the
localities. The book also contains a list of the many hotels and
boarding houses on the coast, and a complete map of Florida, es-
pecially treating the East Coast.
The book is thus a complete anglers' guide (although not called
by that name) for the territory treated, and, as Mr. Kirk lunroe
says, Will be of inestimable service in answering a myriad of
questions."









and Mexico, and, all things considered, regard Florida as un-
equaled in the richness and variety of its attractions for all sort of
sport with rod and reel."
As Dr. Evermann is the ichthyologist of the United States
Commission of Fish and Fisheries, and a versatile and accom-
plished angler of wide experience, the above account can be con-
sidered "Praise from Sir Rupert."
Mr. Wm. H. Gregg, Sr., referred to above, in his book entitled
"Where, When and How to Catch Fish on the East Coast of Flor-
ida," mentions 187, describes 125, has engravings of 100, and
plates in natural colors of 12 species. He gives a list of appro-
priate baits, natural and artificial; description and illustrations of
necessary tackle and methods of using the same for each species of
fish, as also his opinion of their edible qualities.
He then gives a full account of all the fishing localities of im-
portance on the coast, including the inside and outside waters and






















reefs, from Mayport (mouth of SL Johns River) to Key West, a
distance of 626 statute miles, he having repeatedly visited all the
localities. The book also contains a list of the many hotels and
boarding houses on the coast, and a complete map of Florida, es-
pecially treating the East Coast.
The book is thus a complete anglers' guide (although not called
by that name) for the territory treated, and, as Mr. Kirk lunroe
says, Will be of inestimable service in answering a myriad of
questions."





S; :. -',-e .- "
.YA, .


Yachtsof light draught-that is, those drawing up to two feet,
e a usually armlse all inside, if desirable, from Ormond, Iear the
~i.'head of Halifax River, to Key West, a distance of 421 statute
; lem. The Florida East Coast Canal Company have made this
I toible by cutting the Haulover Canal" through from Mosquito
leaoon into the head of Indian River, a distance of one mile;
Scatting a canal from the southern end of Indian River at Jupiter
into Lake Worth, about eleven miles, and from the latter lake to
the northern end of Biscayne Bay, about fifty miles.
From Biscayne Bay to Key West is plain sailing with proper
guide or pilot. As therc is fair fihjng all along the route, the
raise is certainly a very pleasant and interesting one.
S Yachts drawing up to ten feet m st, of course, sail outside, but
they can go up to Jacksonville from St Johns Bar; to St. Augus-
ne at St. Augustine Inlet; can run jus' inside usually at Mos-
'' quito Inlet, after which are next Cape Florida Pass up to Miami,
and Bahia Honda, where there is plenty of water some distance
Inside. Hawkes Channel, on the Great Florida Reef, carries 15 to
80 feet from Cape Florida to Key West. These larger yachts are
S not desirable for parties desiring to fish, as they can not readily or
conveniently reach *many of the passes, creeks, inlets, etc., *here
the fish are. In connection with fishing, hunting and yachting,
we quote from the late Lieutenant William Henn, of the British
Navy, a well-known yachtsman and 'sportsman, in an article oon-
: tribute to the Century Magazine, June, 1893, entitled "Caught
n. a Lee Shore:"
,. "The coasts of Florida, from the head of Indian River on the
east to Tampa Bay or Cedar Keys on the west, are about the best
r rising grounds for a small or medium-sized yacht I am acquainted
with. As for the fishing, for variety, gameness, size and quantity
of the fish, I believe it to be the best in the world. And game,
both fin and feather, is more or less abundant as the country is
more or less settled."
,, This is also "Praise from Sir Rupert."
A few small yachts and launches can usually be chartered for
tng or short bruises, or for a day, at Daytona, New Smyrna,
S Thtsville, Palm Beach, and a larger number, some of which have
auxiliary power, at Miami, Cocoanut Grove and Key West.


HUNTING.


S There are bear, deer,, wildcat, alligators, 'possums, coons tur-
S keys, quails, ducks, snipe in variety, as well as many other unde-
liable birds from an edible standpoint, all the way from St. Augus-
du te to Key West on the mainland as far as it extends to the south,
'i '' '. ,. "1


% 'r .









YACHS.
Yachts of light draught-that is, those drawing up to two feet,
can usually cruise all inside, if desirable, from Ormond, near the
S head of Halifax River, to Key West, a distance of 421 statute
miles. The Florida East Coast Canal Company have made this
possible by cutting the Haulover Canal" through from Mosquito
Lagoon into the head of Indian River, a distance of one mile;
cutting a canal from the southern end of Indian River at Jupiter
into Lake Worth, about eleven miles, and from the latter lake to
the northern end of Biscayne Bay, about fifty miles.
From Biscayne Bay to Key West is plain sailing with proper
guide or pilot. As there is fair fishing all along the route, the
cruise is certainly a very pleasant and interesting one.
Yachts drawing up to ten feet naost, of course, sail outside, but
they can go up to Jacksonville from St. Johns Bar; to St. Augus-
tine at St. Augustine Inlet; can run jus' inside usually at Mos-
quito Inlet, after which are next Cap9 Florida Pass up to Miami,
and Bahia Honda, where there is plenty of water aome distance
inside. Hawkes Channel, on the Great Florida Reef, carries 15 to
30 feet from Cape Florida to Key West. These larger yachts are
not desirable for parties desiring to fish, as they can not readily or
conveniently reach many of the passes, creeks, inlets, etc., where
the fish are. In connection with fishing, hunting and yachting,
we quote from the late Lieutenant William Henn, of the British
Navy, a well-known yachtsman and sportsman, in an article con-
tributed to the Century Magazine, June, 1893, entitled "Caught
on a Lee Shore:"
"The coasts of Florida, from the head of Indian River on the
east to Tampa Bay or Cedar Keys on the west, are about the best
cruising grounds for a small or medium-sized yacht I am acquainted
with. As for the fishing, for variety, gameness, size and quantity
of the fish, I believe it to be the best in the world. And game,
both fin and feather, is more or less abundant as the country is
more or less settled."
This is also "Praise from Sir Rupert."
A few small yachts and launches can usually be chartered for
long or short bruises, or for a day, at Daytona, New Smyrna,
Titusville, Palm Beach, and a larger number, some of which have
auxiliary power, at Miami, Cocoanut Grove and Key West.
HUTITGO.
There are bear, deer, wildcats, alligators, 'poasuma, coons, tur-
keys, quails, ducks, snipe in variety, as well as many other unde-
sirable birds from an edible standpoint, all the way from St. Augus-
tine to Key West on the mainland as far as it extends to the south,




.i .. ..








d on orear the' Keys ad the toe I
I. -,; side waters below Outl r. "- *
Within the part few year quite' i& _
brae been liled a' the mahinlad aPdeainela ser
tine, Dayton, Ponce Park and New iSrnpa.
Mosquito Lagoon, 137 miles ouanth of Jacksonville station
Hill, from November 1st to March 15th, probably contaiai"D
S duckha, of all the American varieties, than any othw-teren ':. .
e qaal dimensions in theZUnitedSi. s.
Theflight 'from the North usually commeits late in Octobr '
and the return flight begins about March r1t to 15th. There are
many the entire length of Indian River alllinter, a few ba '
Worth, and still lem on Siecayne Bay-in fact, only a few "it' g.
glers."
Quail and de. are quite plentim during the opera pnh ';p
the mainland, and a few on the peni la, all the way $ t y
Smyrna to Cutler and further south, may to thirt i l o '. 'l .
Miami.
.There are no quail on the Keys below Miamliu, but o0 -om f. "T
the uninhabited cmes there ae said to be some deer.


To the Homesbeker '

The company owns large tra6te of desrable land hidt e oat
for sale to actual settlers on easy terms. These lands e located
S mostly in Southern Brevard,Countyand along the entireemstn
I coast of Dade County. This territory is not a wildrnem, but'-
abounds in thrifty Aettlements, with good roads, clientt pue-i.'1
schools, churches and growing village and cities, where
are found for many of the products of the farm, aupd supplietsph^7
chased for the home.
The climatic conditions of this portion of.the State permiond :'*
routine of crops being grown throughout the entire yer, thee ie. .
4. ing no less than three staple cash crops at different seag "yppuii., .o ..
citrus fruits, vegetables and pineapples, these being equally m .,
keted in the fill, winter and summer respectively. .
STHa FLOIDn EATr COAST HOMXuZuma is devoted to t~I ,,.
terests of the East Coast. Published at Miami, Fla. Subicripdt .'
price, 25 cents per annum. Sample copies sent on applicatisem
For further information address MrE.J. E Ingrah Third 'Viqt. ..
Preoient Florida Fst Coat Bailway, SL Augausine, F .




,,., A -
L'- : .








and on or near the Keys, and the tiue crocodile among-some of the
inside waters below Cutler.
Within the past few years quite a number of bear and deer
have been killed on the mainland and peninsula near St Aungw-
tine, Daytona, Ponce Park and New Smyrna.
Mosquito Lagoon, 137 miles south of Jacksonville, station Oak
Hill, from November 1st to March 15th, probably contains more
ducks, of all the American varieties, than any other territory of
equal dimensions in the United States.
The flight from the North usually commences late in October,
and the return flight begins about March 1st to 15th. There are
many the entire length of Indian River all winter, a few on lake
Worth, and still less on Biscayne Bay-in fact, only a few "strag-
glers."
Quail and deer are quite plentiful during the proper season on
the mainland, and a few on the peninsula, all the way from New
SSmyrna to Cutler and further south, my to thirty miles south of
Miami.
There are no quail on the Keys below Miami, but on some of
the uninhabited ones there are said to be some deer.



To the Homeseeker 9

The company owns large tracts of desirable land which it oferm
for sale to actual settlers on easy terms These lands are located
mostly in Southern Brevard County and along the entire eastern
coast of Dade County. This territory is not a wilderness, but
abounds in thrifty settlements, with good roads, excellent public
schools, churches and growing villages and cities, where markets
are found for many of the products of the farm, and supplies pur-
chased for the home.
The climatic conditions of this portion of. the State permit of a
routine of crops being grown throughout the entire year, there be-
ing no less than three staple cash crops at different seasons, vi.,
citrus fruits, vegetables and pineapples, these being usually mar-
keted in the fall, winter and summer respectively.
Ths FLORIDA EASr CoasT HOMMSEEzER is devoted to the in*
terests of the East Coast. Published at Miami, Fla. Subscription,
price, 25 cents per annum. Sample copies sent on application.
For further information address Mr. J. E. Ingraham, Third Vleop
President Florida East Coast Railway, St. Augustine, Flt.





















Jacksonvllle. The metropolis of Florida, is the northern
terminus of the line. From here the rail road, extends southeast-
ward through pine lands with here and there the cabbage palmetto
in its stately beauty, or the dense growth of the Florida hammock,
to
St. Augustine, With its magnificent hotels, the Ponce
de Leon, Alcazar and Alcazar Annex, and all-year-round homes;
the Matanzas river on the east and the San Sebastian on tho west;
driving and bicycling on good roads and on the beach. Near St.
Augustine and within sailing, driving or wheeling distance is
Moultrie, with its grape vineyards, and wine cellar and tobacco
plantations; and Matanzab, with its old iort. From St Augustine
the road takes a southwesterly direction to

E a t Palatkia, On the St. Johns river, which is here
spanned by a steel bridge to Palstka. Connection is made at East
Palatka with shuttle trains for Palatka and

San Mateoo With its homes, also on the east bank of the
St. Johns river, and surrounded by orange groves and tobacco
plantations. Thence to the

Tomoka River The road-bed is through a noted timber
- section. Here the landscape changes suddenly to the sub-tropical.
S Palmetto trees line each side of the road and are called "Gulli-
ver's Dusters," because of their likeness to enormous feather
S dusters with their handles stuck in the ground. The next station is
Ormond, Where is located the Hotel Ormond, noted for
its picturesque drives and bicycle trails and hard, smooth beach.
Just the place.for automobiling, driving and wheeling. A splen-
did road and bicycle trail connects Ormond with
Daytona. The city of winter cottage life; miles of beau-
tiful roads and boating on the Halifax river.
73


S.


FEATURES

Along the Florida
East Coast Railway





















Jacksonvllle. The metropolis of Florida, is the northern
terminus of the line. From here the rail road, extends southeast-
ward through pine lands with here and there the cabbage palmetto
in its stately beauty, or the dense growth of the Florida hammock,
to
St. Augustine, With its magnificent hotels, the Ponce
de Leon, Alcazar and Alcazar Annex, and all-year-round homes;
the Matanzas river on the east and the San Sebastian on tho west;
driving and bicycling on good roads and on the beach. Near St.
Augustine and within sailing, driving or wheeling distance is
Moultrie, with its grape vineyards, and wine cellar and tobacco
plantations; and Matanzab, with its old iort. From St Augustine
the road takes a southwesterly direction to

E a t Palatkia, On the St. Johns river, which is here
spanned by a steel bridge to Palstka. Connection is made at East
Palatka with shuttle trains for Palatka and

San Mateoo With its homes, also on the east bank of the
St. Johns river, and surrounded by orange groves and tobacco
plantations. Thence to the

Tomoka River The road-bed is through a noted timber
- section. Here the landscape changes suddenly to the sub-tropical.
S Palmetto trees line each side of the road and are called "Gulli-
ver's Dusters," because of their likeness to enormous feather
S dusters with their handles stuck in the ground. The next station is
Ormond, Where is located the Hotel Ormond, noted for
its picturesque drives and bicycle trails and hard, smooth beach.
Just the place.for automobiling, driving and wheeling. A splen-
did road and bicycle trail connects Ormond with
Daytona. The city of winter cottage life; miles of beau-
tiful roads and boating on the Halifax river.
73


S.


FEATURES

Along the Florida
East Coast Railway








S- brought fm Hoa Traip. cI4e ctj''. lnAk'4:.
S iter hoae. the pii taiaOHtu, oran9 a o ,ge aty4
tween To&ioa and Tu; mfl say, looking t4owa7r9'*1
S stnt viess of the .
," uagiteadx Rdiver o k44te ther ba cy of Uile .eur i
tlat point is seen the Udgthoumse ant New smyrns UIle t
.of the F aita ivier. o. after leriadif mrew Sm aiht
M llaborb Ailver Adds its picureniquhw to tbe
ca pe, and before realizing it pd Just afterpagman
the rustic bridge over the head waters of the faiou!q
S Indan IOer a IspwmA, and the .t a..nd be
-.- an riveropB-ads ot to thee o w4 *
Mer. rt*e I lahqc It* eabank, ,i.a,
ious and world famous Indin B'er Oin.geiAo gi t
the ndian river is.the home of the craae, W~ite e.i t ,.Mi
dooks and other shore birds. Watch for thead t e eWar
S dom tntil
Tituvile I'reaphedL Here trains oo nneiitor if
other pOnpte on that branch of the F. CE By. ait
county seat of Brevad county and steamers meet therafli
forthe .
CaQtavderal OIub. Between TidSia '.'' a
A'u 3 Oalle Are a number of fi.e orange ros, ...
|toplklesd Quantities of orangeflbaye dat j
At B GOallie the UIdian and
Banwtia River Join. This is the n
* uaesI "open air' pineapple growing. The
shbre of the Indian river for one hundred and
Sand oftase creeks and rivers, the picturesqueness
m;ch tothbe already beantital scenery. From
Melboturne A thriving New England yl.e I...A'
r Port Pleoro, The eaerneshd of th ain fat
ades stretched acrom the State during the sundinoo IMr
apple plwatatin aare noticeable. After leaving .
v., ; ev r, roadextends thtTughh Onlesan4 mile qt P

S. ala. A I :'
'IA^







New Smyrna, The site of the early English settlement
of Florida; ruins of ancient sugar mills, bricks for which were
brought from Holland. Trains connect here for Lake Helen, the
winter home of the spiritualists, Orange City and Deland. Be-
tween Tohoka and Turnbull Bay, looking toward the east, co-
stant views of the
Halifax River ,Add to the beauty of the scenery and at
this point is seen the lighthouse at New Smyrna Inlet, the month
if the Halifax river. Soon after leaving New Smyrna the
Hillaboro River Adds its picturesqueness to the land-
scape, and before realizing it and just after passing West Shiloh,
the rustic bridge over the head waters of the famous
Indian River Is passed, and the broad and beautiful In-
dian river spreads out to the eastward, with
M erritt's Island Its east bank, wherein grown the deli-
cious and world famous Indian River Oranges. Along thebanks of
the Indian river is dte home of the cane, white and blue herons,
ducks and other shore birds. Watch for them from the car win-
dows until

Tltuaville Is reached. Here trains connect for Banford and.
other points on that branch of the F. E C. Ry. Titusville is the
county eat of Brevard county and steamers meet the trains here
for the
Canaveral Club. Between Titnsville and

Eau OaIlle Aye a number of fine orange groves, and at

o klledge Quantities of oranges may be seen on the tmr
At Ean Gallie the Indian and
Banana RIvera Join. This is the northern limit of
successful "open air" pineapple growing. The railway skirts the
shore of the Indian river for one hundred and twenty-five miles
and crosses creeks and rivers, the picturesqeness of which adds
much to the already beautiful scenery. From
Melbourne, A thriving New England village, to

Fort Pierce* The eastern end of the line of fort and stock-
ades stretched across the State during the Seminole war, pine-
apple plantations are noticeable. After leaving Ft. Piemco, how-
ever, the road extends through miles and miles of pineapple plants,
paying at





.. ... A


,ll'iThe plantation and home of the pioneer pineapple
iter Capt Richards. At

-L.,ucle, Four miles north of FL. Pierce and visible from
lti, is the winter home of Senator Matt Quay, frequently
of as Florida's third Senator. Two miles below Eden is

.4naen, A thriving Swedish settlement, also in the midst
thpineapple belt. On

olobe Sound, A part of the Indian river, is a settlement
:' 0'young Englishmen engaged in pineapple culture. On the bankL
o f the sound are some beautiful home sites.

; Ve..et Jupiter Lighthouse, At Jupiter Inlet.
vible from the train; view of the ocean. Southern end of Indian
ji,:ver and junction of that river with the Loxahatchie and Lake
W!. Worth Creek. Scene of the romance "East Angels." End of the
;Nasata cable and point at which the Oregon made first report upon
driving g in home waters after her famous trip from the Pacific dur-
ing the Spanish-American war.
'vW est Palm Beach, On the west bank of Lake Worth,
headquarters for the faqsous Lake Worth pineapple plantations.
jr is opposite to

m Beach. Here the train passes over Lake Worth
idgp to the noted hotels Royal Poinciana and Breakers, both re-
P tl. y esaied and improved and have a combined capacity of
L4^'^people, Some of the attractions at Palm Beach are: Im-
ii#NuWlt water swimming. pool, surf bathing 365 days of each
the original Indian trails now bicycle paths, the ocean pier
j iing out into the Atlantic one-third of a mile, from which
.;~shibngis excellent. One never returns empty-handed.

ftotarp, At the southern end of Lake Worth.. The heart
Sts oel ebrgted "Morning Glory Muck Lands" on which quan-
'oF vegetables are raised.

rynton and Linton, Colonies from Michigan and
~iewtYolk. Large acreage under cultivation in tomatoes, beans,
ip6amhers, celery and other vegetables. Also newly planted citrus
'1t groves.
r-ft, Lauderdale. Old Indian Fort. Here the arrival
e train is usually an object of interest to Seminole boys and
ij.b"f.rmer in their native dress or rather undress.
_'^ 1 ... .. "16 ,.









SE.lden The plantation and home of the pioneer pineapple
Spla ter, Capt. Richards. At

St. Lucle, Four miles north of Ft. Pierce and visible from
the train, is the winter home of Senator Matt Quay, frequently
Spoken of as Florida's third Senator. Two miles below Eden is

Jensen, A thriving Swedish setteomeni, also in the midst
of the pineapple belt. On

Hobe Sound, A part of the Indian river, is a settlement
of young Englishmen engaged in pineapple culture. On the bankL
of the sound are some beautiful home sites.

W est Jupiter Lighthouse, At Jupiter Inlet,
visible from the train; view of the ocean. S nthern end of Indian
river and junction of that river with the Loxahalchie and Lake
Worth Creek. Scene of the romance "East Angels." End of the
Nassau cable and point at which theOregon made first report upon
arriving in home waters after her famous trip front the Pacific dur-
ing the Spanish-American war.

W est Palm Beach, On the west bank of Lake Worth,
headquarters for the fampou" Lake Worth pineapple plantations.
It is opposite to

Palm Beach. Here the train passes over Lake Worth
bridge to the noted hotels Royal Poinciana and Breakers, both re-
cently enlarged and improved and have a combined capacity of
2100 people. Some of the attractions at Palm Beach are: Im-
mense salt water swimming pool, surf bathing 365 days of each
year, the original Indian trails now bicycle paths, the ocean pier
extending out into the Atlantic one-third of a mile, from which
the fishing is excellent. One never returns empty-handed.

Lantana, At the southern end of Lake Worth. The heart
of the celebrated "Morning Glory Muck Lands" on which quan-
tities of vegetables are raised.

yntton and Linton, Colonies from Michigan and
New York. Large acreage under cultivation in tomatoes, beans,
cucumbers, celery and other vegetables. Also newly planted citrns
fruit groves.

.Port Lauderdale. Old Indian fort. Here the arrival
of the train is usually an object of interest to Seminole boys and
girlar the former in their native dress or rather undress.
t "76









New River. Flowing direct from the heart of the

Everglades, the home of the remains of the Seminole
tribe of Indians in Florida. To this day they have negro slaves,
deserters to the swamp during slavery lime and captured by the
Indians, who have retained them and their descendants.

M odelo, A fluurishing coluny of thrifty Danes, settled in
pine lands. Beginning of drains fur reclaiming the great New
River rar-h.

-iallandale. A Swedish Lutheran colony from New York
.sttled fur the purpo-. of growing vegetables on the fertile New
River marsh lands.

Arch Creek. A natural rck bridge givee the name to
this outlet of the Everglades.

L remon City. Residents principally enrgaed in citrus
fruit cultivation. Here we get the first view of

Bay Blscayne, On which is located

Iliaami, The future metropolis of Florida. Hotel Royal
Palm. Paved streets, water works, ewwage system, southern termi-
nus of the Florida East Coast Railway. Port of entry and depar-
ture for Nassau, Key W'es and Havana. Cape Florida, Fowey
Rocks Light, Florida Keys, Norris Cut, Cocoanut Grove, the home
of Kirk Munroe. In thLs vicinity are laid the scenes of Mr. Mun-
roe'b stories, "The Flamingo Feather," "Wakulla," etc.




At Miami take the
Steamers of the
P. & O. Steamship Co.
KEY WEST
HAVANA
NASSAU









New River. Flowing direct from the heart of the

Everglades, the home of the remains of the Seminole
tribe of Indians in Florida. To this day they have negro slaves,
deserters to the swamp during slavery lime and captured by the
Indians, who have retained them and their descendants.

M odelo, A fluurishing coluny of thrifty Danes, settled in
pine lands. Beginning of drains fur reclaiming the great New
River rar-h.

-iallandale. A Swedish Lutheran colony from New York
.sttled fur the purpo-. of growing vegetables on the fertile New
River marsh lands.

Arch Creek. A natural rck bridge givee the name to
this outlet of the Everglades.

L remon City. Residents principally enrgaed in citrus
fruit cultivation. Here we get the first view of

Bay Blscayne, On which is located

Iliaami, The future metropolis of Florida. Hotel Royal
Palm. Paved streets, water works, ewwage system, southern termi-
nus of the Florida East Coast Railway. Port of entry and depar-
ture for Nassau, Key W'es and Havana. Cape Florida, Fowey
Rocks Light, Florida Keys, Norris Cut, Cocoanut Grove, the home
of Kirk Munroe. In thLs vicinity are laid the scenes of Mr. Mun-
roe'b stories, "The Flamingo Feather," "Wakulla," etc.




At Miami take the
Steamers of the
P. & O. Steamship Co.
KEY WEST
HAVANA
NASSAU


















TICKET OFFICES
Are conveniently located in the hotels at St. Augustine, Palm
SBeach, Miami and Nassau, in addition to the station offices, and
*through tickets may be purchased to all important points in
the united States and Canada. Purchasers of such tickets must
Designate the route by which they desire to travel, as agents are
instructed to remain perfectly neutral on this point. Always make
a. memorandum of the form and number of tickets when purchasing,
with date and points between which same are good for transpor-
tation.

TICKETS
Passengers are respectfully requested to purchase tickets before
boarding trains. Always procure tickets of regularly authorized
agents of transportation lines. Frequently counterfeit and out-
lawed tickets areaold by persons known as "Ticket Brokers" with
annoying results to the purchasers, as no responsibility attaches to
a transportation line which refuses to accept such tickets for pas-
sage Conductors are instructed to take them up and collect fare.

DIFFERENCES
Agents and Conductors are governed by the rules of the'Com-
pany and, in case of differences, it is best to pay as may be re-
Squested by them, taking receipts, and refer the matter to the
Asdstait General Passenger Agent, who will promptly investigate
and adjust.
REDEMPTION OF TICKETS
Unused tickets valid for transportation over the Florida East
Coast Railway will be promptly redeemed at proper value under
the provisions of the ticket contract, provided they are sent in by
original purchaser, with statement a to why they were not used.

BAGGAGE
Baggage Agents are instructed to examine tickets before check-
ing baggage. One hundred and fifty pounds will be checked free
Son each whole ticket and seventy-five pounds on each half-ticket.
Travelers should have each piece of baggage plainly marked with
F..


















TICKET OFFICES
Are conveniently located in the hotels at St. Augustine, Palm
SBeach, Miami and Nassau, in addition to the station offices, and
*through tickets may be purchased to all important points in
the united States and Canada. Purchasers of such tickets must
Designate the route by which they desire to travel, as agents are
instructed to remain perfectly neutral on this point. Always make
a. memorandum of the form and number of tickets when purchasing,
with date and points between which same are good for transpor-
tation.

TICKETS
Passengers are respectfully requested to purchase tickets before
boarding trains. Always procure tickets of regularly authorized
agents of transportation lines. Frequently counterfeit and out-
lawed tickets areaold by persons known as "Ticket Brokers" with
annoying results to the purchasers, as no responsibility attaches to
a transportation line which refuses to accept such tickets for pas-
sage Conductors are instructed to take them up and collect fare.

DIFFERENCES
Agents and Conductors are governed by the rules of the'Com-
pany and, in case of differences, it is best to pay as may be re-
Squested by them, taking receipts, and refer the matter to the
Asdstait General Passenger Agent, who will promptly investigate
and adjust.
REDEMPTION OF TICKETS
Unused tickets valid for transportation over the Florida East
Coast Railway will be promptly redeemed at proper value under
the provisions of the ticket contract, provided they are sent in by
original purchaser, with statement a to why they were not used.

BAGGAGE
Baggage Agents are instructed to examine tickets before check-
ing baggage. One hundred and fifty pounds will be checked free
Son each whole ticket and seventy-five pounds on each half-ticket.
Travelers should have each piece of baggage plainly marked with
F..













ift. or 41 -am* M
uI~ 2~~, tlVD ken4Pi4 3

Beore boIdipg tralam pmun uioulhd s .

. .. ..
By. c wma Ai p taow ilud,* 4
iamA ohw t~i% ohich wpadr aetpi Vo k
4dtii tO ,~gn~ fa a.~Y.a6e~~ ~ie'to`;oe tra~lbg do~ *6~
W, Q L aeq -oxemd'" aI euh"d

iatMF.Vm -b VW
Touk*7 I xtv ---
-tpof wifl be aflowed41wlin ak AN&it
iMit, at "&aida on FloridgkXaaQtw on
.3 ~~~ i~~puwiided'i the t Lan mmnerionI rwt
Ikpr 'ft


*600 ioa which utbp-over is desiried.- of

STAMINGRETUJRN TICKETS
T4hlftaur p Eojii Winter toudittCet ii&aI
.Ain -t from tiw points ;. th* An ord ernth~t
A o o r th ci t i el d w th e r o = tr i pn r n .
qI rare~iahrbpaeae. Wenato~bve 1Pis~oIdsd~
ge~ Ast tic&be viuldaed at

Lrr1KZT *'* '
st~ wu line it piay' rei I.uar a"Y oW


ma~po-i~ of ticket It loog oir deeIroys&
.1-~fii~ ixo~t1Sod medts th*tin whi~ch hhabisi




IsWOilhanddpe& .-,vid t~he1iUwat**lm .

.oi &z~& t*IdTQ onei 60i i
-k. w h v
r%
.IM








GENERAL INFORMATION
(oo'wrnruo)

name and address and take a memorandum of check numbers,
dates and points from and to which checked. It is also a good
plan to know exactly the contents of each piece. Single pieces of -
baggage weighing more than two hundred and fifty pounds will
not be checked.
TRAINS
Before boarding trains passengers should make inquiry of sta-
tion employee or Conductor and be sure it is the proper one. Some
F. E. C. By. trains are composed exclusively of Parlor Cart or
Sleeping Cars, on which parlor or sleeping car fare must be paid,
in addition to regular fare also some trains do not stop at local
stations.

STOP-OVER PRIVILEGES ON WINTER
TOURIST TICKETS
Stop-off will be allowed'within final limit, regardless of transit
limit, at stations on Florida East Coast Railway south of Jackson-
ville, provided the train passenger is on is scheduled to stop at
station at which stop-over i desired. Notify conductors at time of
examining ticket.
STAMPING RETURN TICKETS
The return portion'of winter tourist tickets may be validated
at St. Augustine or Jacksonville, thus allowing the full return
transit limit from those points; this, in order that persons desiring.
to stop over at these cities on the return trip may do so without in-l
convenience. When stop-over is not desired on the return trip, it
is suggested that tickets he validated at destination and baggage
checked through.
LOST TICKETS
Neither the railway company issuing a ticket nor any railway.
Over whose line it may read is under any obligation to replace all
or any portion of a ticket if lost or destroyed. When sueh low oc-
curs while on the line of the F. E. C. Ry. the nearest ticketagent
should be notified and the form which he has for thepurpose.shoud
be carefully filled in and signed. The railway will render all rea-
sonable assistance in recovering lost tickets, and should new tickets.
be purchased or fares paid to Conductor for any transportation
covered by lost ticket, receipts showing amounts paid out and
points between which eame was paid should be taken.
Considerable annoyance may be avoided if, at time of purchase,
a memorandum is kept of form and number of ticket, with date
T8
.~v . .. ,"." ,....::

, : '.~ ; ',.. .
























nce is'150 pounds on each whole ticket, and 75 pounds on each
half ticket.

.TRANSPORTATION OF DOGS
Dogs iin crates or securely tied or chained, will be transported
free in baggage cars of regular passenger trains when accompanied
by caretaker or owner, one dog per passenger. Dogs in crate may
be checked, but owner will be required to sign release.


SLEEPING-CAR RATES-F. E. C. Ry.
SUpper Berth ...............................................2.50
Lower Berth................................................ 3.00
Section...... .............. .............. ........... ..50
S Drawing Roonm..................................... ... 9.
S Pasengers.occupying BEATr in sleeping car.t will be charged
aene rate as foi parlor cars; no sAnn to be sold in sleeping car
a' ifter 10 o'clock at night, nor to destinations at which the sehed-.
,d.. .:'iedartival is after 10 o'clock at night.

04AIR-CAR RATES-F. C. Ry.
...' -. . I .
heas rates apply I -
-In 0 s ,":
Setiber.direoilon. -

f.91c 4 blle 7 ....... .......... 0.50 $0.75 i S 1 1 2. 2 '
'.. WAuguuatIne................ .. 50 50 1 I 1 25 1 75 2 00 :.l
EraB Pala:tka ................. .50 .... .75 .l) 1 1 76 1
OrInon d.::d................... .50 .50 ... .S i 15 01
M B y a........................ .. 0 .23 3 ..5 1 Ia 1.00 2'
Naew. Sil7ra .................. 1.00 .76 .23 .25 .10 I I J.5 .u2
a .. ii l ..................... 10 .95 .6i2 .25 .50 .as ..0
acP* kled e.......5 ....l........... .76 S . 50 1 00 7.
.' Pit. Pierce .................... 1.75 1.0 1 25 50 .U .... 50 1.2
i'" '. llt B achl................ 2.00 1.75 1 50 1 25 1.00 .50 .
ii:WJ ..... ........ ........... 2o a 1 5 1 25 .75 ...


79 ..-,. .
w . ,
FS.
























nce is'150 pounds on each whole ticket, and 75 pounds on each
half ticket.

.TRANSPORTATION OF DOGS
Dogs iin crates or securely tied or chained, will be transported
free in baggage cars of regular passenger trains when accompanied
by caretaker or owner, one dog per passenger. Dogs in crate may
be checked, but owner will be required to sign release.


SLEEPING-CAR RATES-F. E. C. Ry.
SUpper Berth ...............................................2.50
Lower Berth................................................ 3.00
Section...... .............. .............. ........... ..50
S Drawing Roonm..................................... ... 9.
S Pasengers.occupying BEATr in sleeping car.t will be charged
aene rate as foi parlor cars; no sAnn to be sold in sleeping car
a' ifter 10 o'clock at night, nor to destinations at which the sehed-.
,d.. .:'iedartival is after 10 o'clock at night.

04AIR-CAR RATES-F. C. Ry.
...' -. . I .
heas rates apply I -
-In 0 s ,":
Setiber.direoilon. -

f.91c 4 blle 7 ....... .......... 0.50 $0.75 i S 1 1 2. 2 '
'.. WAuguuatIne................ .. 50 50 1 I 1 25 1 75 2 00 :.l
EraB Pala:tka ................. .50 .... .75 .l) 1 1 76 1
OrInon d.::d................... .50 .50 ... .S i 15 01
M B y a........................ .. 0 .23 3 ..5 1 Ia 1.00 2'
Naew. Sil7ra .................. 1.00 .76 .23 .25 .10 I I J.5 .u2
a .. ii l ..................... 10 .95 .6i2 .25 .50 .as ..0
acP* kled e.......5 ....l........... .76 S . 50 1 00 7.
.' Pit. Pierce .................... 1.75 1.0 1 25 50 .U .... 50 1.2
i'" '. llt B achl................ 2.00 1.75 1 50 1 25 1.00 .50 .
ii:WJ ..... ........ ........... 2o a 1 5 1 25 .75 ...


79 ..-,. .
w . ,
FS.




V*
t4


t, tj



00A
4w V,14

7K
ilkYej"farA'O", tesjw,,
YWp Co.' opemtas, the, sW6Wvr*,N-I

an(I.HAYmA and Miiiw
A. r r v A T'I
mimmi vnii beoo xrft4d,
nect witi tb "ORnger
OoMa East Coast Itailway.
Me ftr 40 ]Key Vest Im year, r6unc' tim t'LiF6 -11"'
wek jn summer and, tri-weekly i# rl tot
Nason..
160 service to Havana is yftr rouu j mepm,r" Y- or,
ia-g the- -SU-10 r months and tAweekly i* PT'
February, March and April.
Tb Xuss,' S lii-wi;AO rated',,oly JD7
usteamer, 4e,
tary to April. Duringthmonth of Ja-n ,,Ag#'Wfll
be twiomeach week UftiAng Fetniaryajid ILLreh 91JU-1-
will bethree Uines 1pef we*, and during:Aprij,"
I o -the businais slacking up about. this time, tho
f '77 1
be wi-w,,k

Exer A e

At everyWney"awtion of the FltirMa Fk8t C*"
way, is: s46 jm aventof: the Southern XPMM COEM$On,*
tb, .&t Psse.L
wMich foewar& express matter.on 0 ger WnLk,'
of thig Oompwny in ebargle of.sl _, me&wngm
conmectiou with otbe'r rN -ble EX W&P414 0 911
Points "IDIOM-ble i-6 eprem
OQJA to ^h,,
kmm'y- Orders I;OiMfttW
i vip Vnitod. S*ateo. and, C*


`4




V*
t4


t, tj



00A
4w V,14

7K
ilkYej"farA'O", tesjw,,
YWp Co.' opemtas, the, sW6Wvr*,N-I

an(I.HAYmA and Miiiw
A. r r v A T'I
mimmi vnii beoo xrft4d,
nect witi tb "ORnger
OoMa East Coast Itailway.
Me ftr 40 ]Key Vest Im year, r6unc' tim t'LiF6 -11"'
wek jn summer and, tri-weekly i# rl tot
Nason..
160 service to Havana is yftr rouu j mepm,r" Y- or,
ia-g the- -SU-10 r months and tAweekly i* PT'
February, March and April.
Tb Xuss,' S lii-wi;AO rated',,oly JD7
usteamer, 4e,
tary to April. Duringthmonth of Ja-n ,,Ag#'Wfll
be twiomeach week UftiAng Fetniaryajid ILLreh 91JU-1-
will bethree Uines 1pef we*, and during:Aprij,"
I o -the businais slacking up about. this time, tho
f '77 1
be wi-w,,k

Exer A e

At everyWney"awtion of the FltirMa Fk8t C*"
way, is: s46 jm aventof: the Southern XPMM COEM$On,*
tb, .&t Psse.L
wMich foewar& express matter.on 0 ger WnLk,'
of thig Oompwny in ebargle of.sl _, me&wngm
conmectiou with otbe'r rN -ble EX W&P414 0 911
Points "IDIOM-ble i-6 eprem
OQJA to ^h,,
kmm'y- Orders I;OiMfttW
i vip Vnitod. S*ateo. and, C*


`4








s"
M





flou

ST, -COAST 404'r

r7T

:'v



I er I 6i



4W im. P.6reaves ...... $4.00 Up Rp(:cLW
.......... 2 go
w ........ .......
701i. ;16 '-, 4
2,00 tu 2.50 SP,5da
'75' Eve m',tt L. Mathl&*on,., 2.W e
'A4 75,Mrs. J, F- Craddock-- 2.OD
"r" C. llcvydoll ............ ... 2.00 to sloo
Imm. IV. -Wtvhanbji"n._ 2 50 ifp
eZ_,, &I Mra. Iftmandox ....... 1.50 up
't-j UP
2.00.
50
5715
.. .............
3.01) to ri. APP4141
A, 1.50 to 2.00,
It to 0o:
a gim
pinkham Noonis Gnl
8. )outiok .. ...... .. A fipocial
K4n,:b+,!v OD4"
&)!)nL D. .. ...........
ilrrav..'........... 5.%Up Bl*.Ial
50 Ws. A. R. 8 poncer-.._ .2.OD to 3.DD
SOW, M. T..h.1k ............... I.Aoup.
75 Mrs )Tnxy $Q
Mm
If L%
Mm %
10 MrA. L.'Tavi L.. 1.60' PeeitLj
106J. watijus JAN. UP
20 m'H.A. fireyy
....... 1, 2UND
-:lZ M14.4')J. Ra u .. 1.50
T" r''
...... X-X:X&Coboh.... 2.00 to %M
A., 13ime'y .... : ....... L ro, 600
6:
.,.I 2.4i WjlllamkL .... 1m OD
4()'D. 7qa* on .... .. '2-90. 2.06,to' 17j:
go
& i'm Up
2.00: inwi-112.1i"
lut.do w .tKk







'4"








s"
M





flou

ST, -COAST 404'r

r7T

:'v



I er I 6i



4W im. P.6reaves ...... $4.00 Up Rp(:cLW
.......... 2 go
w ........ .......
701i. ;16 '-, 4
2,00 tu 2.50 SP,5da
'75' Eve m',tt L. Mathl&*on,., 2.W e
'A4 75,Mrs. J, F- Craddock-- 2.OD
"r" C. llcvydoll ............ ... 2.00 to sloo
Imm. IV. -Wtvhanbji"n._ 2 50 ifp
eZ_,, &I Mra. Iftmandox ....... 1.50 up
't-j UP
2.00.
50
5715
.. .............
3.01) to ri. APP4141
A, 1.50 to 2.00,
It to 0o:
a gim
pinkham Noonis Gnl
8. )outiok .. ...... .. A fipocial
K4n,:b+,!v OD4"
&)!)nL D. .. ...........
ilrrav..'........... 5.%Up Bl*.Ial
50 Ws. A. R. 8 poncer-.._ .2.OD to 3.DD
SOW, M. T..h.1k ............... I.Aoup.
75 Mrs )Tnxy $Q
Mm
If L%
Mm %
10 MrA. L.'Tavi L.. 1.60' PeeitLj
106J. watijus JAN. UP
20 m'H.A. fireyy
....... 1, 2UND
-:lZ M14.4')J. Ra u .. 1.50
T" r''
...... X-X:X&Coboh.... 2.00 to %M
A., 13ime'y .... : ....... L ro, 600
6:
.,.I 2.4i WjlllamkL .... 1m OD
4()'D. 7qa* on .... .. '2-90. 2.06,to' 17j:
go
& i'm Up
2.00: inwi-112.1i"
lut.do w .tKk







'4"




Fla
TX
909
F64




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