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Title: Argo
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Title: Argo
Series Title: Argo
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Front Cover 4
        Front Cover 5
        Page 4
    Main
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        Main 4
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        Main 109
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        Main 126
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    Back Cover
        Page 109
        Page 110
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LIBRARY
FLORIDA STATE COU-'- FO WOM.I
TALLAHASUE, rA.








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GEORGE LEWIS
AS A RECOGNITION OF HIS UNFALTERING
FIDELITY TO THE INTERESTS OF THE
STUDENTS, HIS CONSTANT SYMPATHY WITH
THEIR ASPIRATIONS, AND AS A FEEBLE
EXPRESSION OF THEIR APPRECIATION OF
HIS SERVICES TO THE FLORIDA STATE
COLLEGE, THESE PAGES ARE DEDICATED.


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...1n1trobuction.,.


SHE ARGO this year needs no introduction to the students of the Florida State College-it is an
established factor, and we hope that it will never lose the interest of the students that it has
hitherto had. The two previous volumes have amply filled the sphere which this publication is intended
to fill, and it will be our endeavor merely to follow in their footsteps, giving to the students a glimpse
of their college life and a book which, we hope, will not only be a souvenir and pleasant reminder of
the college year 1902-3, but will instruct them as well that the Florida State College is making rapid
t strides toward the attainment of her highest desire, to be not only the foremost school of this State,
but to be classes: in the front rank of the colleges of the South.

















..Ebitorial taff..

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF :
Benjamin Andrews Meginniss, K. A.


BUSINESS MANAGER
William Parish Byrd, K. A.


ASSOCIATE EDITORS:
Walter Harrison Provence, K. A.
George Alan Stephens, K. A,
Guy Louis Winthrop,


LITERARY EDITOR;
Asa Bushnell Clark, K. A.


Julian Thomas Howard.
Francis Bayard Winthrop,


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...faculty anb Officers...


A. A. A. Mi l.:l.P I. A. ., L. I.


L. \W Huii ni.,i t/.
N.rmunl SI/h .... I .-hrmaniy.




A. A. MriHPHREI. A. 1- L. 1 ,
P.';il...I v N.rin a l ('.ll.,L'.-, Ilniv. r-ity .I N ;i-lvill-,
/I7,,..,, . l H I;,, .. ,11., l,. .,,, ;,.- ..,,,1 .. I >/, .,........ ,.

H. EI .[MFIr: IRiEi., A B
Prin'i-t n : it n ar'- iralu:it: SI t y at 'ri,.. -
ti.l. Hi- va rd id [;.-t,.u Iziv-r.-iti. :
Siiiniii, r (' i'.r-.s. ('hirl: iil ('i hi-
C ig.lii nl r-lt .-.. N
I;;l..i, ,.. 1 1, ,,, .' +,-,, 1 .r/ "; ... ., il l'. ,, l,,,, ',., ,.
.l-,IN C C(AI.IIUNL. S (.'.E.. M.A
\Xashi,,l ,,i, i a \d I.+ l'i iv,-rsi y. II.-il II,,rt"'.
Herlinii,. Lnausani-. St'ln- Il ir n.. ., v, ;.t?


L. W. BUCHHOLZ,
Graduate Public Schools of Germany and of
Normal School Pr. Friedland.
Philosophy, History, Theory and Art of Education.
ARTHUR WILLIAMS, A.M.,
Cambridge University, England; Graduate Cook
County Normal College, Chicago.
History, Polilical Economy and .,,, ;,,',,>r ,
HENRY L. HARGROVE, A.M., Ph.D.,
A.M., University of Nashuille; Ph.D., Yale
University.
Rhetoric. English Larnguoge and Literature
W. W. HUGHES, A.B.,
Vanderbilt University, Post-Graduate Courses,
Vanderbilt.
Latin, LInyunge od Lite,-atre
VIRGINIA JOOST,
Studied under Profs. Bach and Heninges, of Ger-
many; Misses Brown and Hansbrough, of
Boston Conservatory; Miss Jackson, of
Baele's School of Music, and Courses
at Conservatory of Music,
Cincinnati.
InstrumentIa and Vocal Music









ROBT. M. RAY,
Clinton College, Kentucky,
Assistant t in Teachers' Training School
MARY W. APTHORP, A.B.,
A.B., Florida State College; A.B., Boston
University.
Assistant in English and Latin.
MRS. H. L. HARGROVE,
Directress 'of Music.
F. A. HATHAWAY, A.B.,
Florida State College,
Assistant in Mathematics.

GASTON DAY, B.Sc., and MARY SHUTAN, *B.Sc.,
Florida State College.
Assistants in Chemistry and Biology.


R. M. EVANS, Ph. B.,
Emorv College, Georgia.
Assistant in English and l'P,, ;'.

MRS. W. H. REYNOLDS,
Matron Women's Hall.

L. W. BUCHHOLZ,
Preceptor Men's Hall.

ARTHUR WILLIAMS,
Secretary and Treasurer of Boarding Holls.

GEORGE B. DAVIS,
Assistant to Secretary.

JOSEPH EDWARDS,
Steward.


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Bbvice to school Gettino Out College Annuals.


P -'T everything off till the last minute.
Elect men on the staff that won't work.
V Make your editor-in-chief a man who is in love with one of the girls and has an
:,! ,\ -n .i':,gement every time the staff meets.
~ Depend entirely upon the magninimity of the students of the college for the
S~~I sill,)ort of the annuals.
S Have at least twice as many copies printed as you have scholars enrolled and de-
I" ml1 on the people in the town to buy the rest.
'lI on't allow any one to contribute articles to the publication, but leave everything
t. t lie staff to do. That's what they are honored for.
D on't by any manner of means retain your temper if the annual is a few days late
ii **.miing .iut. r;-in.-iiber that your editors have had all the work to do, and fly off the handle accord-
ingly.
I;i.t hJi,_l\- 11,ujlt,-l1 when the business manager comes around to you for your dollar and a half for
\.,r *'"'*y. R.*irn. niil.r that the entire staff are worth exactly $12.17, and demand that they pay out of
1 I. Ir .,n\ 1 Ik.-t.l t.* r the publishing and await your convenience for your share of the money.
\\V li ti.- IuHni n. .- manager goes to your father and asks his firm for a large advertisement you step
i-li. a t-Il tll tli.i mi.-,rs of the company that the business manager is a notorious liar and that the
**itir.- i. l\. -it i-il. sla;. in the entire blooming annual is not worth thirty cents.
It y.iu I'..lw t Ilr--. methods we guarantee that you will get out a first-class college booklet.












1o3

..senior Class,.

Toloro. f I o ,r.
Light Blue and White. Peach Bhlssomn

Pell.
Razzle Dazzle, Hobble Gobble, Sis 1 Boom Bahll
1'iii r SeniorI Rah! Rah! Rah!

(tficers.
HENRIETTA ORD AMs President.
ALICE F. APTHORP -- Historian.
GuY Louis WINTHROP Treasurer.
BENJAMIN A. MEGINNIS Pet.
PRANCTs, B. WINTHROP Orator.


I


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.,,,be five little seniors,,,
JiC


Five little Seniors
Make the Senior Class,
Five little ponies
Help the Seniors pass.

Five little Seniors,
In a Greek exam., you see,
Two failed to pass,
And then there were three.


" What to learn?" her daily cry
Mounted shrilly to the sky;
She had books galore,
But she sighed and cried for more,
For she'd tried all those she owned;
"Give me new ideas," she moaned.
Some one heard her bitter weeping,
And with eager haste went, leaping,


One little extra
Allowed these to pass,
And once again five
Made up the Senior Class.

Said one Senior to another,
As the two strolled down the hall,
"When we are gone, how will this college
Get along at all?"
Five little Seniors,
One night in June,
Got their diplomas,
And there were none.


XXX


' To a book store on the street;
Said, "Give me an Argo Sheet."
At the magazine she took
Just a single careful look,
Then with joy her voice rose stern,
"I at last know what to learn."
No more groans the ears do greet,
She's content with an Argo Sheet.











..3unior Class,.


( d Blor c.
Orange and Black.


tcll.
Boom-er-lacker, Boom-er-lacker, Bow-wow-wowl
('li11r -, r-l:,,-1, r. ( 'hll g-,- .- l:. r, ('l,,. -,.l],, -chow l
Boom-er-lacker, C'liIg- r-l:,il:. r, Rip! Rah! Ro!
Junior! Junior! 19011


QOfficers.


E. P. WATSON
H. G. HAYS -
WILLIAM P. BYRD -
Miss ROSA HERRING
G. A. STEPHENS -
W. H. PROVENCE -


President.
Vice-President.
Historian.
Treasurer.
Poet.
Orator.


f lo0 er.
Thistle.




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.Cbe l1bave Our Zympatbv...


THEY had strolled half way across the campus at a meandering pace, and
she now sank on the projecting roots of a mammoth pine tree; he gallantly
took his place beside her. They were entirely alone except for the scientific
professor occupying a like position unknown to them on the other side of the
tree. Unfortunately he was immersed in the pages of a book and did not
make his presence known-immediately. Their agitated conversation con-
tinued:
''Oh, it is too dreadful I she shuddered, covering her delicately pale face
with her lily-white hands, as if to shut from her eyes some horrible and un-
bearable sight.
Fearful I" he agreed, also deeply moved, mopping the profuse perspira-
tion front his manly brow.
"Fearful echoed the girl. r cannot bear to think of it. The loss of
S hope, happiness, perhaps even life itself-"
Hush," he interrupted, gently placing his manly arm around her comely
waist. "Let us endeavor to think of it no more or it may grow to prey
upon our minds."
"Pardon me," insinuated the professor, who for some time past had been dimly conscious that
some horrible spectacle had escaped his keen eyes, which were at this time peering around the tree at the
young couple; has there been some awful disaster? Have you been compelled to look upon some
terrible tragedy?"
The young couple regarded each other in some confusion. Blushingly the youth answered: No,
sir. You see, we have just become engaged, and we were talking of what a calamity it would have been
had we never met."


El


El-III I










5opbomore Class,


Miolors.
Crimson and White.


Osky wow-wow,
Skinny wow-wow,
Wow-wow,


QOfficers.

ss


DAVID M. COOK
BERSHE ARCHER MEGINNI
FRANCIS FLAGG RAWLS
SARAH LUCILE SAXOX
RUBY PEARL DIAMOND


flower.
PaInsy.


President.
Historian.
Treasurer.
Poet.
Orator.








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Whose eyes are always fiery red,
And slick's a billiard ball his head?
Who spends his leisure time in bed?
Who? Who?
Who takes the time we shoulC recite
To "blow us up" to regions quite
Beneath the zenith-"out o' sight? "
Who? Who?


Ullbo ?

Who quarrels in his very sleep?
Who makes the Freshman almost weep?
Whose voice would make the dead to creep?
Who? Who?
Who sneaks around from floor to top
To find the noise he cannot stop?
Who is it loves his leetle drop?'
Who? Who?
Junior Poet.
X XX' ^ :


B, A. M.
Oh, Love, thy ambient flame has scorched his heart
And burned its hard enamel. Accents low
And soft do now succeed the tender glow '
That spreads his cheek. Thy shaft, thy fiery dart,
Have oft' o'ercome the tricks of every art,
And left their doer prostrate lying. No
Exception has this Senior proved, although
He is a man ii every manly part.
A lighting eye; and loving, tender smile
That wreaths a face with roses there in bloom;
A merry glance; and sweet, coquettish ways;
These would suffice a Stoic to beguile
In Love's sweet thrall. Sure, all the world's agloom
With her dear face obscured frrm his gaze.


II


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fresbman Class,
f T


Molore.
White and Black.


flower.
Pumpkin Blossom.


I ell.
Boom-ter-rah-rah-boom,
Boom-ter-rah-rah-boom,
- Boom-ter-rah-rat -boom-ter-
Rah-rah, boom, boom, boom,
Freshman Freshman! Give us room!


M ffirerr


C. W. PETERS -
A. C. EVANS -
W. E. VAN BRUNT
PERES MCDOUGALL
J. T. HOWARD


9.
- P- resident.
Historian.
Treasurer.
Poet.
Orator.


I -

























































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Cbirb Jear Class,
\ \


Colors,
Blue and Crimson.


Yell.
Rah! Rah! Rah! Third Year Class!


Officers,
GEORGE H. SKERMER
CARRIE THOMPSON -
SAMUEL SANBORN -
ALMA ARGIE CATES
THOMAS HANCOCK


- President.
- Historian.
- Treasurer.
Poet.
Orator.


Flower.
Japonica.










Second 1ear Class.
(P ffP


Colors,
Blue and Pink.


Yell,
Rah! Rahl Rah
Hoop! Hi! He!
Second Year Class 1
F. S. C.


Officers
CLIFTON BYRD -
MALCOLM N. HERNDON
GEORGE B. AMES
BERT DRR -
ABRAM B. MCDoUGALL


President.
Historian.
rr-easurer.
Poet.
Orator.


Flower.
Rose.






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first rear Clazz.
T M9


Yell
Hoorah! Hirah! Biml Boom! Buff!
First Year Class! Is Hot Stuff!


WALLACE QUARTERMAN
EVERETT LEWIS
LINWOOD EVANS
BERT DURR
BOLIVER MCMLULLEN


Officers
President.
Historian.
Treasurer.
Poet.
Orator.


Colors
Any old colors.


Flower
Any old flower.















lRormal Class.
f0 !P


Colors
Gold and White.


Yell
Astra, Castra, Numen, Tumon !
We are the Normals of the F. S. C.!
Ninetcee:, Ninmteen,
Nineteen-three!


J. S. PETERS -
G. H. SKERMER -
SUSIE C. MIMS -
IRENE BREWER -
H. B. FLETCHERI
G. W. GEIGER -


Officers
PresideLt.
Vice-President.
Secretary and Treasurer.
SHistorian.
Orator.
Poet..


Flower
Daisy.


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Normal lbistory.


THREE years ago, seeing the sad condition of our public schools, the fa,-ulty of the Florida State
College organized a normal class for the benefit of our Florida teachers. And truly it may be said that
they have accomplished a work that will live throughout ages to come. For what teacher has gone from
the halls of the college without a firm determination to attain success in his or her work?
At the time of the organization of this class about eighty teachers were in attendance, and each suc-
cessive year it has become larger. Last year eighty-seven members were enr lled, and about the same
number attended the Central School last summer. At present more than ninety students constitute
this class, and Ioir.nl this number almost every county in the S.ii,.. is represented.
The normal department of this college is fast gaining wide renown, and let us hope that ere another
year elapses every teacher ii our State who aspires to fit himself for the duties of the school-room will
enroll his name in the Florida State College. Tnen shall we have more teachers, not keepers merely,
but men and women energetic and enthusiastic in their work.
We also desire to express our thanks to these excellent educators who have taught us that there is
music, yes, blossoms of pleasure in the school-room.


1 -----r~----- --------~-------- ----------.-.-


M










ie tale of e twain lovers,


WHEN that ye shades of ye dqrkenige night were faste _:l,.-ry', around ye com-
Sicile of ye maydenes faire, a certain bold young man with a face which e'en would
make to st,-p ye terrible speed of a locomotive engine, came slipping around from
tree t,. tree with ve agilitie of one who was used to d-dginge ye wylie professors of ye
school upon ye hille. Gazing around to see that no one observed his movements, ye
young man'aforesaid emitted fr. m his throate ye whistel of ye whipporwill. Scarce
hadde he thus done when a window of one of ye rooms that lye above ye dining-room
were thrown open and ye head of a taire hayred damsel was thruste out, and a voice
which seemed to ye young manne like as ye voice of ye syren said, in agents sweete,
Morris, deare, ere that you upon your heale can lurc, y "ur charmer will be with
you prepared to journey hence to ye hamlet which lyes beyond yon hille"
So saying a ropen ladder was flung from ye window to ye I reeze or ye summer
night, and ye damsel of ye fire haire set foot upon it and for one briefe second of
tyme hung suspended between ye heavene and ye eaith, and then, from'some cause,
unknown to ye author of this tale- ye ladder parted, and ye younger manne saw, with grievouse heart,
the forme of ye young mayden of hys choice hurled, as from an catapault, to ye earth beneath. Scarce
darynge to breathe forth from his lungs, oure young manne hurried to her side, in tyme to see her to
rise and utter these words: Morris, my dearest one, feare not, I am all right; for you're sake would
I falle twice ye height of yon window from which I so ingloriously came."
Ye young manne, who hadde feared that he would see his lassye to rise no more, was overjoyed, and
forth they strolled to ye hamlet to blowe in his (?) dough and see ye sircusse, which was e'en then per-
forming on ye greene some rods beyond ye school. Arriving at ye Wightes' tavern, he, with a lavish
display and her money, sette up to ye drinks in thys lamous retreat of lounge couples. Then anon,
journying hence by ye highway yclept Monroe, they with the boldness of adepts pass ye house of ye
President, and wend their way to ye pageantry which showeth beneath ye hille.


i.--













They proceed through ye tente of ye animals, where they gaze with wonder for yo first tyme upon1
that species of animal yclopt elephauntus, into ye tent beyond, where while waiting for ye perform-
ance to begin, they, with ye remaining parte of ye damsel's monie, buy and drink red. lemonade, the
like of which is scene only in ye paegeantes. In a short while ye ringe is occupied by an score of horses
ye like of which they have never seene before, and they gaze with wonder upon ye antics of ye frolic-
some coltes. Likewise, albeit they have made the starlinge discovery that ye Presidente is there, they
with ye enjoyment characteristic of young childer, are enraptured with ye tricks which follow. In ye
midst of ye rendition of ye olde and charmynge ballade-
"Wont you come home, Willie Baylie,"
he, ye young manne of ye terrible countenance aforesaid, perceives that ye Presidente is hunnmynge ye
tune along with ye band, and that he has paraphrased it so as to singe-
Won't you go home, young Givenes,"
whereupon ye young manner takes ye hint and starts, but ye Presidento seeing that ye young manne is
about to take unto himself his departure, says: "'Let not you're heart be troubled, young sirrah, and
be not afeared of me, for lo, I was once a boye and would not for worldes destroy you're joye, believing
as I do that you have ye permission of ye olde 1p.-1_....-i who rules over ye domicile for studentss" So
saying he turned again his back and ye young ladde continued to enjoy ye show in ye ringe belowe,
laughing with particular glee at ye antics of ye monkeys, his cousins.
When that ye show was over he, in company with ye young damsel, wended his way homeward to
ye school upon ye hille. Arriving at thys place, to ye dismay of ye twain, they found that ye door
was locked, and that, ye ropen ladder havynge broken, they were locked without ye house. Some littel
useless tyme spent they in trying to find a method by which they might enter into ye house aforesaid.
Then it was that first ye maydene saw where she had tran-'r. -- .1 ye law of hei superiors, and ye
strayne, being too much for her, she broke down, and melted ye rosie young cheekes with vaine and
saltie tears. Ye young manne, seeing her to weep, sought to console her with ardent and burning
tales of ye love which he bore her, but ye maydene, being very obtuse, could not believe ye old and
famous saying, Love will always find a way," and could not perceive how thys was g-oinge to gained
for her admittance within ye house.













Finally ye young lover saw a weak window, and going up to it he smote it
with his huge and brawney fist, and then with ye pryde of a konkeror said: My
darlinge, see what your lover has done, albeit we were locked without ye house;
enter, my own tootsye-wootsye."
Thus they returned, and contrary to ye general run of cases, they were not
found oute.. Tnat Buche, ye mightie terror, knew this escapade has since become
S known to the students of ye college. So it ended; how easy for even a professor
to be blind when that ye partees are especial favourytes of ye prof.
[YE FINIS.]






A PHENOMENON,
The Florida State College has always taken pride in the uniqueness of the phenomena which she is
capable of producing, but she goes herself one better when she exhibits a dignified Senior who flunks"
because of the fact that he has too much ': Gray matter" on the brain.










Waiting.


One midday as I started home,
Right at the college gate
Isaw a sweet-faced, fair-haired girl,
Who seemed inclined to wait.
I glanced around to see what caused
The waiting at this place,
When through the door the Goverr or came,
With red and sheepy face.
Not knowing just exactly what
The nature of this game,
I kept my eyes and ears wide
And heard him breathe her name.


And, Hun," said he, "'you then did wait,
In answer to my demand?
Then do you give to me those books,"
He said, and stretched his hand.
Then forth they strolled, this couple gay
To dinner at her home;
" No harm," say you, why i ot permit
Them forth in bliss to roam? "
But the story as I've heard it since,
Was something in this way:
The Governor there a message sent,
And here's what he did say:


" To leave this school before I go,
You surely must not dare;"
Of the messenger who carried this
The school is now aware.
And she, the simple-minded maid,
Right truly then did wait,
And hang, 'or full three periods long,
Upon the college gate.
You've heard the adage old and true,
" Things come to him that waits;"
But that such things should come to me,
Forbid it, O ye Fates!


Ui










nHave Qou Ever learb
Greek sing tenor? The "Doctor" ask "Hun to wait for him?
Drummond tell yarns? Murphree spit fire at the Freshman algebra
Watson say Histe o molicus torpedicus hell- class?
go venimous-"? Buch tell the dear boys" how much he loves
Morris say good-night? them?
The Kid ask Buch to let the boys go into the Lucile say anything silly?
girls' reception room? Murray sing The Nightengale?"
Miss Porter say Phew!"? Davis use big words?
Miss Agnes say "Oh, hush?" Miss Register talk about Don?
Dickey laugh? Bert Buchholz say he was sick?
Steve talk about himself ?


1bave 2ou Ever Seen


Irving Belcher talking to a certain wee Fresh-
man?
Bob Bradford make love?
Morris Givens and a certain fair-haired girl
get away by themselves when they wanted to talk?
That ardent look on Foxy's" face when
saying good-night?
Buch play tennis?
"Go At" cut wood?


A better looking man than Pem?"
A more affectionate couple than Sammy"
and Pemberton?
That girl they call "Jonnny Sweet?"
A more interesting conversationalist than
"Dick?"
Anybody that knows more about any and
everything than Burt Belcher?


Lr*r~_-Y_.




r"


-- .--r-L---;r----rn--~L- -I-*i~iY"YI--L~ -




i













Quotations.


Let me play the fool."-Provence.
"Lord! Lord! How this world is given to
lying.' -Howard.
"Give me liberty or give me death "-Burr.
"His studied was but litel on the bible."-
Mook.
No creature smarts so little as the fool."
Stephens.
A foste:-child of Silence and Slow Time."
-Byrd.
For you and I are past our dancing days."
-Buchholz and Calhoun.
And with necessity, the Tyrant's plea, ex-
cused his devilish deeds."-Murphree.
That man that has a tongue, I say, is no
man if with his tongue he cannot win a woman."
-Bierly.
Is he not passing fair?"--Hughes.
"Deep versed in books and shallow in him-
self. "-Hargrove.
His best thoughts always come a little too
late.''-Williams-


"Eternal smiles his emptiness betray."-
Dickey.
"Who shall call me ungentle, unfair?-Brad-
ford.
"A damsel has ensnared me with her
glances.' '-Meginniss.
Was ever loving to his rivals. "-Givens.
"Lend me a shilling; I'll be damned if I
do. "-Peters.
Ma, may I be a dude?"-Gammon.
Is this a man? God keep him if it is."-
Pemberton.
Thou art too wild, too rude, too bold of
voice."-Watson.
In truth he is but an infant wearing
trousers.' -Hays.
'I'm but a stranger here below; Heaven is
my home,"-Davis.
"Pray God he proves not as small as he
looks.'"-G. Winthrop.
I've gone through college."-Clark.
Thou hast damnable iterations."-F. Win-
throp.













0lb 1begekiab.


I'll give to the school board a twelvemonth or twain
To search through the U. S. from Georgia to Maine,
But ne'er would they find, should they search till they die,
So lazy a man as '.d Hezekiah.
The students each morning go promptly to school
And are sent home at even-song much more a fcol
For he teaches in haste, for their parents desire
No soft snap on earth like old Hezekiah.
The President, Gad! Many a one has been known
To soak all his good for a cap and a gown,
But I'm indeed, should I ever desire
To be any one else save old Hezekiah.
When first I came down from my far Northern home,
The trustees and Murphree at once did I bone,
And they tumbled at once to my every desire
And gave a soft job to old Hezekiah.
I'm expected to loaf and to butcher up frogs,
Tadpoles and pigeons and tomcats and dogs;
And Murphr(e would see the whole school in h-- fire
'Fore once he'd think of bouncing his dear Hezekiah.
Long flourish the trustees, the best to be found;
I work like the mischief when they are around,
But when they are absent, to loaf by the fire
Takes up all the time of old Hezekiah.


_~_)1_I__


I


~--~I*-PJ~















Literary,,
,Societies
IT TI9
















X Platonic Debating Society X



SSFIRST TERM.
SF. W. BucHHOz . . . . President.
I. BELCHER ........ Vice-President.
U. C. PEMBERTON . . . . Secretary.
Sw. P. BYRD . . . . Treasurer.
S. F. GAMMON . .. . . Sergeant-at-Armns.




SECOND TERM.,
W. P. BYRD . . . President.
B. E. BELCHER . . . Vice-President.
S. F. GAMMON . . . -.l'-.. ,' y.
B. A. MEGINNISS . . Treasurer.
E. P. WATrON . . . Iglt-t\ri-l.






48






- ,. ,,.., r--. .. .. .. .. .


i__

























































C _~ ____






















State InterCollegiate
X Oratorical Association
FRANCIS B. WINTHROP Contestant.
BENJAMIN A. MEGINNISS Representative





P^


















Anaxagorean Literary Society

-9% M.


OFFICERS FIRST TERM


G. A. STEPHENS
G. B. DAVIS
S. A. SANBORN
R. R. FELKEL
J. R. EVANS
A. C. EVANS


President.
Vice-President.
Secretary.
Treasurer.
Sergeant-at-Arms.
Critic.


OFFICERS SECOND TERM


G. P. McCoRD
D. M. COOK
H. S. WOODBERRY
H. R. FELKED
S. A. SANBORN
G. B. DAVIS
G. A. STEPHENS


President.
Vice-President.
Secretary.
Treasurer.
Sergeant-at-Arms.
Parlimentary Critic.
Literary Critic.






























~1~9~U- . _r--LI-.r _.._r---- -r~L
















'Twas a bright day in September when Dolly arrived to enter c(,llege: the
evening sun was just setting behind the western hills in a blaze of glory as she
drove past John's house on her way to the dormitory. To a fellow of John's
blase disposition, the arrival of one girl more or less was usually a matter of
small consequence, but on this occasion something in the girl's appearance at-
Stracted and held his attention. What it was he was unable to determine but, af-
Ster thinking of her for quite a while, he determined to meet her. Accordingly
the following morning after chapel, John got one of the girls to introduce him;
and he and Dolly immediately entered upon a friendship, which gradually grew
as the first term slipped by, in John's case at least into an all consuming
and ardent passion.
For months things went well, John became a regular visitor to the dormitory
and although Dolly had admirers beyond number he felt reasonably sure of
his ground. There was however one disturbing element in John's wooing. Down at the boys dormitory
a formidable rival had arisen in the shape of the Kid, the red-headed left end of the Varsity eleven; and
iii him John found a foeman worthy of his steel. At first he paid little attention to his rival; but as
the days came and went and the young football player became more attentive, there arose in his heart
a fear lest the Kid should cut him out. John was no fool and knowing as he did the partiality with
which the sex are wont to look upon an athlete with red hair, he endeavored in every way imaginable to
rid himself of this annoying rival.
As for Dolly she was as fickle and changeable as a summers day, and with a generalship born of
long practice; kept both men on her string. First one and then the other were in favor. If the Kid
played a very brilliant game of ball against a contending team, for the time being he had things all his
own way; and on such occasions John usually sought revenge by rushing Dolly's chum. On the other
hand if John distinguished himself in a debate, the Kid was ostracised; and thus the balance of power
was maintained.









There was however one thing that the tactful Dolly could not do and that was
to keep her two beaux on friendly terms, and so it was that there grew between the
two men an intense and bitter rivalry which was watched with interest by the whole
school.
Affairs were in this unsettled state when one evening John received a note from
Dolly breaking an engagement to go to the opera; and assigning as an excuse a ter-
rific headache. Usually such a note would have made little difference to John, but
on this occasion he decided that as his girl was laid up, he would also remain at
home and work up some Greek.
Now if John's knowledge of the sex had been somewhat more extended and his
conceit somewhat less, he would not have been surprised when on the following
evening he met Dolly and the Kid returning from the show. As it was he at once flew into an uncon-
trollable rage and told her that she would never see him again. To this the haughty Dolly replied by
telling him that if she ever wanted to see him, which was extremely doubtful, she would send for him,
and she added looking back at him as she strolled off "you'll come."
Weeks had rolled by and Commencment was at hand, to John however it was a Commencement so
totally different from the one he had imagined, that he found little pleasure in attending the exercises.
In fact since that eventful night when he and Dolly had quarreled, nothing of interest hod happened for
him except when Dolly jilted the Kid. This had for a time afforded him infinite pleasure and some
hope, but as Dolly remained obdurate and sent back the note he wrote her at one time. he lapsed into a
deeper despondency than ever.
It was therefore in no very pleasant frame of mind that John attended the undergraduate exercises.
Dolly of course was there, but so far as he was concerned she was as inaccessible as the stars. He
watched her talking to a smart young Freshman, and at last unable to stand it any longer he seized his
hat and was about to leave when Dolly's chum handed him the following note, hastily scribbled on
the back of a program: John: I will not be at the debate tonight. You may call at eight. Dolly.
For a moment after reading the note John was stupefied, but then as he thought how shamefully
Dolly had treated him, his heart'swelled with anger; and remarking that Dolly could wait for ever if
she wanted to he turned on his heel and left.


i












After the exercises Dolly received John's message, but that night she waited. And John came.


A PRODIGY.
Behold yon proud individual-Grand Mogul of the Kappa Alpha, Ex-President of his Debating So-
ciety, Poet of his Class, Editor-in-Chief of the Argo, critic in his literary society, in love with the
prettiest girl in the dormitory, and conditionedd" in Greek.


dllRililW"r+-~rC~1;-3*b












Ebe fresbman at Commencement.


If you wish to feel your weakness
And to grow in humble meekness,
As is suited and is fitted to your station,
And to fret and fume and swcer,
Prance around and pull your hair,
Just try to learn "by heart" a forty-page
oration.

You get up at four o'mornings,
And, in spite of friendly warnings,
You awake the people far and near with shout-
ing;
Some one passing hears the noise,
Says, The old man's early at the boys,"
And it's only William practicing at "si out-
ing."

Out behind the barn or stable,
Or in room on chair or table,
May be seen a crazy pantomime at "speak-
ing ;"
Swinging arms enforce the phrases,
Hammering fists, the changing phases
Wrath and vengeance now on all opposed is
wreaking.


Oh, the sweetness of his smiling!
He-with accents smooth, beguiling
Friend and foe alike to view as he the matter
Of his discourse-rolls the thunder;
Cleaves the air and roofs asunder;
Seeming to admire his own poor, senseless
chatter.


Thus he learns it. thus he talks ii;
And around his room he walks it;
And you'd think it to be perfectly bewitching.
Yet, when on the stage he rises,
Bumps of all known kinds and sizes
Set our orator at once to hopeless hitching.


" Fellow citizens, ah-ah-;h-ah,
He begins; the crowd, hah I hah hah i"
Up and down his spine the chill sensations
crawling;
Trembling knees tell all his story;
Tell the knell of all his glory,
As he stumbles to his seat amidst the hawl-
ing.





















(I il'lf I i' ",


Athletics


,Cr i













Football Team

W. W. HUGHES Coach
F. B. WINTHROP Manager
A. B. CLARK Captain
C. W. Peters, C., W. Mullin, R. G.,
G. P. McCord, L. G., W. W. Dickey, R. T.,
E. P. Watson, L. T., J. T. Howard, R E.,
L. M. Murray, L. E., A. B. Clari, Q. B.
W. H. Provence, R. H. B., Williams, L. H. B.,
F. W. Buchholz, F. B.


SUBSTITUTES.
I J. Belcher, W. S. McLin,
R. F. Bradfird, Jr., F. F. Rawls,
T. H. Hancock, J. H. Sheats,
Wm. Van Brunt.


SCHEDULE.
F. S. C. vs. Bainbridge, Nov. 21 ..........At Tallahassee .........5-0
F. n. C. vs. F. A. C...................... At Tallahassee..........6--0
F. S. C. vs. F. A. C.. .... ......... ...... At Lake City.......... .0- 6


__


90"qr !-,0, I I F I ! -11 IV .-








i~~~1. :'"P: 4 -iI i, i
i




i




















Baseball Team


E. E. McLIN
F. B. WINTHRO
W. S. McLIIN
D. Baker, C.,
G. P. MeCord, 1st B.,
W. S. McLin, 8rd B.,
W. Van Brunt, I.. F..
E.


F. F. Rawls,
A. Mann,


- Cach
p Manager
S Captain
J. H Sheats, P.,
J. T. Howard, 2nd B.,
E. B. Bowen, S. S.,
J. Milton, L. F.,
P. Watson, C. F.
SUBSTITUTES.
I. Belcher,
A. McMullen.






















Track Team


I. J. BELCHER'
J. MILTON
E. P. Watson,
I. J. Belcher,
J. Milton,
A. Mann,
L. M. Murray.


- Captain

G. L. Winthrop,
F. B. Winthrop,
B. A. Meginniss,
R. F. Bradford, Jr.,
J. Bowen.











C


b:


S


Officers
WALTER H. PROVENCE -
BENJAMIN A. MEGINNISS -
FRANCIS B. WINTHROP


Irving J. Belcher,
Laurence M. Murray, J


Members
Fritz W. Buchholz,
r., Guy L. Winthrop.


President.
Treasurer.


--


-.~ -- --- --, ----











Basket Ball Team
FANNIE MANNING Captain.
BERSHE MEGINNISS Manager.
Sarah Spears, R. G., Mary Reynolds, L. G.,
Louise McIntosh, F., Bershe Meginniss, F.,
Fannie Manning, C.




Second Team


FANNIE COOKS)
-, ADA HODGE
Ada Hodge, R. G.,
Annie Brownell, F.,


Captain.
Manager.
Monette Brownell, L. G.,
Lieland Davis, F.,
Fannie Cooksy, C.





_I













6 ,is


1J Uo


Officers
I'ERES BROKAW MDOUGALL -
FRANCIS FLAGG RAWI.S
G(}Y LOUIs WINTHROP


I. J. Belcher,
E. B. Bowein,
F. W. Buchholz,-
R. F. Bradford, Jr.,
J. K. Johnston,


President.
- Vice-Presideut.
- Treasurer.


Members
B. A. Meginniss,
L. M. Murray, Jr.,
W. H. Provence,
J. H ,sIh:,t.-,
F. B. Winthrop.
69



















Faculty Tennnis Club
Officers


L. W. BUCHHOLZ
A. WILLIAMS


H. E. Bierly,
J. C. Calhoun,


President.
Sec. and Treas.


Members
H. L. Hargrove,
W. W. Hughes,
A. A. Murphree.

















iur first Game.

TO say that we were excited the day of the game would but feebly express the feeling
which raln yiot in every breast. We were excited; and what's more, if the truth be told,
we were scared. Our team was lighter than that of our opponents, and besides the
whole world, at least the whole college world knew, that there was in the Bainbridge line-
up several old University of Georgia veterans, men old and tried in the game, and bear-
ing on their muscular bodies the scars of many hard-fought battles of the gridiron.
The (lay was an ideal one, not a cloud to be s en, and at 3 o'clock the field was
crowded to its utmost capacity with an excited mob awaiting with interest the coming
struggle. Along the side lines they stretched; on the left in the center the college contingent was
grouped in a body, with colors flying and determined to see the boys through to the last. On both sides
and opposite to these was a seething mass of people eager and anxious for the fray. As a football
writer has it, It was a Roman mob-Roman in its desire for the fray and doubly Roman in consider-
ing the struggle free to all."
Promptly at 3:30 the college team trotted on ths field and was immediately followed by the Bain-
bridge boys, who came in with a rush. Georgia won the toss, and with the ball in her possession the
two teams lined up; there was a moment of anxious waiting, and then Thomas, the Georgia full-back,
sent the spheroid hurtling through the air to Florida's thirty-yard line, where Williams received it and
returned it fifteen yerds. By a rapid succession of downs the ball was advanced to tho middle of the
field, where Bradford and Murray rounded Georgia's ends in quick succession and moved the ball to her
thirty-yard line. Then followed a succession of line bucks by Provence, Williams and Buchholz; again
71


Ills[ll9~i~lStrrrrr ~_ _


- - I ; ~.------_C-------I*~---i~-rrlrCL-~~ r-~. ~-~









and again did they hit the Georgia line until the ball was within six inches of her goal. Here, however,
their line held; twice were the Florida backs hurled against their line, and as many times were they re-
pulsed. For the third time the teams faced each other not six inches from the coveted goal. There was
a moment of suspense as the signals rang forth, then with a rush Buchholz burst through the Georgia
tackle for a touchdown after just sixteen minutes' play.
It would be hard to imagine the scene which followed. Cheer after cheer rent the air as Provence
made his unsuccessful try for goal. Buch, Williams, Murphree and Hargrve were there yelling like
demons and doing a cakewalk to the college "Boola" that would have made Billy Kersands green with
envy. The ball was now kicked from the middle of the field, but before either side could advance it the
whistle blew for the end of the fir-t iiilf,
In the second half McCord sent the rubber flying through the air to U ....ri,'" twenty-yard line,
where Jacques received it and recovered twenty-five yards of the distance. Georgia's three downs f,;1. -
to net the necessary five yards, and the ball was given to Florida's center. Florida attempted a repeti-
tion of her first half, line bucks, and succeeded in pushing the ball to within twenty yards of the
Georgia goal, where it went over on downs.
After two unsuccessful downs, Thomas. the Georgia full-back, kicked, and Clark, who was guarding
the goal for Florida, got the ball, which went out of bounds on the forty-five-yard' line. Georgia held
the college team for three successive downs, and the ball was again turned over to her. Thomas again
punted splendidly, and Clark succeeded in rushing the ball back twenty yards before he was tackled.
Florida made a few gains, and when the ball- was given to Georgia she succeeded in making her only long
gain of the game. Jacques was given the ball for an end run, and made a gain of twenty yards before
he was stopped by Clark. Georgia now succeeded, by quick plays, in carrying the ball to Florida's fif-
teen-yard line, and things began to look' dark for the college team. Here, ln.,. r, the Florida line
held, and after an unsuccessful effort to make an opening, Hunter tried a goal from the field, which was
foiled by the quick work of Murray. Florida immediately braced up and carried the ball to the middle
of the field, when the whistle was blown for the end of the game, the score standing 5 to 0 in Florida's
favor.
Thus it was that F. S. C. played and won her first game, and great was the rejoicing therefore. Until


- -1. -.-NEW











the wee small hours the wcods rang with her victorious songs, and staid old people, awakened from placid
dreams by the wailing of the "Boola," were glad, no doubt, that football comes but once a year.


There is evidently more than one kind of greenback, for, although the College is not noted for its
wealth, it has in the Freshman class a pretty good specimen of the long green."


II -~---- wn



















ci tlS irtetmo of

francis flagg 1Rawls.

Qi~sb psrit 20, 1903.

ioeloon eb btU all is. selloxv
s~tubannts.


--~--~- -I I


I _,,,_





L I




mm












1. anb $.


If you had been a-walking 'round the c..ll. on
the hill,
As I trust and hope that in a day or two perhaps
you will,
Right there,
On the stair,
With winr ing air,
Could be seen a tiny Freshman and a Soph so very
bold,
Telling to his little lassie that story sweet and
old.



You can tell when honeyed accents from his ar-
dent lips do spring,
For she leans and drinks them in like a flower the
dew of spring.
Oh, ye fates!
How he pirates!
And she waits,
While that gentle, love-lit story from his warm
and soft heart flows;
Then they part until that evening, when to town
he boldly goes,


Then at some convenient corner he and she by
chance (?) do meet;
Off they stroll, the two together, he so manly,
she so sweet.
My! imy!
The moments fly;
Both sigh,
And both try
To tell the love that's overflowing in their you.l,;
and tender hearts;
Then a shadow falls across the path-the maiden
looks anl,] starts.

There stands Buch, the mighty terror, in a rage,
which is his glory,
How he came 'round there upon them is an oft'
rl,. at.-d story;
How he stared!
How he glared!
How he roared
And declared
That this nonsense he would end or in th' attempt
would die a-trying;
This was too much for the maiden, so she started
then to crying.


I :' I


i ~ ~ ~ ~ M.R _--- I I M M---IM g IIIIII~---lb-rI _~__~_I.PFII--IIQ~T~l~












Very wild and woolly looked Buch as his eyes
began to rove,
And the fire that shot from them was as lightning
flash of Jove;
And his beard,
That all feared,
As he n,.ared
This endeared
Couple, seemed to make him look'much fiercer as
he towered there,
With sputtering lips, stamping feet, and wild,
disheveled hair.


And the young man turned quite pale as old Buch
began to roar,
While the maiden fainted dead away, as the earth
around he tore;
What a stew
For the two !
So blue,
They did rue
That the, had been so careless as to let Buch
catch them then,
For he said, A month's confinement, sir, you
suffer in the pen."


For the moral of this story is easy to construe;
But it's only for true lovers, aid if such a one are you,
Be slow,
Don't go
Till you know
Our common foe
Is playing tennis on the court, where he and the Profs. will play till night;
Then, dear boy, get your girl and keep her for your own delight.


rasr anr












Ebe Ballab of the senior.
TI T


It was a tall, grave Senior lived by the college
side,
His home was ju-t across the road, the road not
very wide;
There was a fair young Freshman, that was so
sweet and slim,
Lived at the dormitory, right opposite to him.


It was the pensive Senior that saw this lovely
maid,
Upon a moonlight evening, a-sitting in the shade;
He saw her wave her handkerchief, as much as if
to say,
I'm wide awake, young Senor,and all the Profs.
away. '


Then up arose the Senior, and to himself said he,
" I guess I'll cut this Latin out, that Freshman I
must see.
I read it in a story book, that for to see his dear
Leander crossed the Hellespont; I'll cross the
road right here."


And he has quickly left his home and crossed the
moonlit street,
And he has clambered o'er the fence and drops
down at her feet;
Oh there were words as sweet as dew, and looks
as soft as rain,
But now they hear approaching Profs. and home
he starts again.
Out spoke the ancient pedagogue, "Oh, what was
that, my daughter?"
'Twas Lothing but a thirsty pup on nightly search
for ater."
" And what is that, pray tell me, love, that climbs
the fence so fast?"
"It's nothing but the puppy I've scared away at
last."
Out spoke the ancient pedagogue, "Now bring to
me my gun I
I'll shoot that puppy full of peas and see the
rascal run."
Down fell the pretty innocent, the Freshman
sweet and calm,
Her hair drooped round her pallid cheek, like sea-
weed on a clam.


Alas! for those two loving ones, she waked not from her trance,
And when he tried to jump the fence the wire it caught his pants;
Though fate was quite unkind to them, they now have better sense,
And now they hold their tete-a-tete across the college fence.


____ ---- -- a -- -- __




E- --1


kappa Blpba Orber
,f' :


Colors
Crimson and Gold.


g flower
Magnolia and Red Rose


craterr in Iticnltatc
A. A. MIJRPHREE.


W. H. Provence,
R. B. McCord,
I. J. Belcher,
F. F. Rawls,
B. A. Meginniss,.
F. W. Buchholz.
W. P. Byrd,
John Milton, III.,


2tctinc $Uembers
B. E. Belcher,
E. P. Watson,
L. M. Murray,:
H. G. Hays,
G. A. Stephens,
C. W. Peters,
H. S. Woodberry,
S. F. Gammon,
A. B. Clark.


I ~-------~e



































L











Glee Club


HENRY LEE HARGROVE -


FIRST TENORS.
W. H. Provence,
U. C. Pemberton,
FIRST BASSES.
S. F. Gammon,
G. H. Skermer,


SECOND TENORS.
G. B. Davis,
S. J. McMullen
SECOND BASSES.
C W. Peters,
B. E. Belcher.


83


Director.


_ I -~"'-' _________ __~ ~_ __ ~__~~~~



























I


6/ 7'.. irn~


JULIAN THOMAS HOWARD
FRANCIS BAYARD WINTHR
ALBERT A MURPHREE

Ames. Miss Henrietta Or
Belcher, Burton,
Bowen, Miss Nettle Clare
Davis, George Beauregar
Drummond, J. S.,
Howard, Julian Thomas,
Lewis, Miss Minna,
Marcus Miss Marie Ruth
Meginniss, Miss Bershe A
Meginniss, Benjamin An'
Stephens, George Alap,


Officers.


oOP


IDk ra,m




















President.
Sec. and Treas.
Manager.


Members.
d, McMullen, Swinson,
M inis, Miss Susie,
,Pemberton, Uz.,
d, Peters, Columbus,
Provence, Walter Harry,
Rawls, Miss Eunice,
Saxon, Miss Sarah Lucile,
i, Shutan, Joseph,
Archer, Skermer, G. H.,
drews, Watson, E. P.,
Winthrop, Guy Louis,
Winthrop, Francis Bayard.
84


A1


I- I II- I ~ __-----LAP~P-~a~bal I '













The Stag Lead
Commencement Night
Beware!





85












uBlue 1Ribbon Dininin Club.
.-.-


Officers.
GuY Louis WINTHROP
FRANCIS BAYARD WINTHROP -
BENJAMIN ANDREW MEGINNISS -


F. B. Winthrop,
G. L. Winthrop,
E. G. Johnston,


President.
- Sec. and Treas.
Toastmaster.


Members,
J. T. Howard,
B. A. Meginniss,
F. F. Coles,
A. B. Clark.


~f$IiJ;~











STUDENTS' CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION.
Meets Every Sunday Afternoon in the College Chapel,
OFFICERS.


Abney, Annibelle,
Baker, D. H.,
Baker, Ethel,
Belcher, B. E.,
Belcher, I. J.,
Bradford, R. F., Jr.,
Brown, Thomas,
Brownell, Annie Leigh,
Brownell, Monette,
Buchholz, Prof. L. W.,
Buchholz, A. W.,
Buchholz, F. W.,
Byrd, Wm. P.,
Chandler, Bessie,
Clay, W. R.,
Cox, Edyth,
Davis, G. B.,
Davis, Leiland,
Davis, Perry F.,
Eville, Alice,
Eville, Mamie,
Farnbach. Charlotte,
Fletcher, H. B.,
Fletcher, Jessie,
Froscher, May,
Furen, Bessie,
Gammon, S. F.,
Geiger, G.W.,
Gilbourn, Annie,
Givens, M. M.,


SUSIE C. MIMS -
WILDON MULLIN -
I. J. BELCHER -
ROLL.
Gillette, Dovenia,
Hargrove, Dr. H. L.,
Hargrove, Mrs. H. L.,
Harvey Carrie,
Henderson, Otto,
Herndon, M. N.,
Hinsonr, Ruth,
Hodge, Ada,
Hodge, J, E.,
Kelley, R. F.,
Lancaster, Robt.,
Lynn, J. W., Jr.,
Mansfield, E. J.,
Mahning, Andrew,
3M ilii!iL', Fannie,
May, Helen,
May, Oscar,
Maxwell, L. E.,
McCaskill, Maggie,
McCord, R. B.,
McIntosh, Louise,
McMullen, Angus,
McMullen, B. H.
McMullen, Swinton,
McPherson, Nettie,
Meginniss, B. A.,
Miller, Louis W.,
Mim,s, Susie C.,
Mook Doddridge,
Mullin, Wildon,
Woodbery, Hunter S.
87


President.
Vice-President.
Secretary and Treasurer.

Nixon, Eugene,
Nixon, James,
Yearce, Harry,
Pemberton, U..C.,
Perryman, W. I.,
Peters, C. W.,
Peters, J. S.,
Ph'ilput, Ada,
Philput, J. M.,
Powell, Elia,
Price, C. T.,
Provence, W. H.,
Register, Mattie,
Roberts, Roy G.
Sanborn, Samuel A.,
Sigmon, Carrie,
Smith, Lilla,
Sneller, Jane,
Spear, Emory,
Stock, J. W.,
Strictland, J. L.,
Swindal, J. F.,
Thompson, Corrie,
Warren, E. C.,
Warren, Henderson,
Walker, Bessie,
Wallace, Beatrice,
Watson, E. P.,
Willmott, Winnie,
Williams, Daniel,


_ _~


-- __ II


---- --------- --













tbe Zwosing Club.

M.


Song.
Darling, Be Mine.


L. W. BUCHHOLz


High Mucky Muck.


Members,


Maurice,
Ben,
Wat.,
Web.,
Pem.,
Fritz,
Guy,
Doe.


The club holds nightly meetings on the dormitory steps, or at any old place, provided it is dark and
secure from the incursions of the High Mucky Muck. Any student is eligible for membership who can
prove to the satisfaction of the members that he or she is a devoted follower of Cupid.


f!iowr.
Tulips.


L. E.,
Dolly,
Tilda,
Nan,
Sammy,
Reggie,
Bert,
Hun.,




--L-ilPIIU-C -- -


C ---------














Commencement Exercises.


SUNDAY EVENING, 8:30 O'CLOCK.
Baccalaureate Sermon-Rev. S. L. Walker, Presbyterian Church, Pensacola, Fla.
MONDAY EVENING, 8:30 o'CLOCK. i
Platonic Debating Society-Annual debate for Winthrop medal; P.,1. rt. Bryan
McCrd, medalist for 1901, presiding. Question: "Resolved, That the United States
Should Reaffirm and Maintain the Doctrine That Governments Derive. Their Jnst Powers
From the Consent of the Governed." Affirmative, Messrs. Fritz Buchhtolz and Irving
Belcher. Negative, Messrs. William P. Byrd and J. P. Stoner.
Annual Address-John L. Neeley.
Decision of Judges in favor of the affirmative, and Mr. Fritz Buchholz as medalist.
Judges, Geo. P. Ranev, E. C. Maxwell and J. F. Glenn.
TUESDAY MORNING, 10:30 O'CLOCK.


Reading contest for prize.
Prize awarded to Mr. B. A. Meginniss.
TUESDAY EVENING, 8:30 O'CLOCK.
Anaxagorean Literary Society Annual Debate for Crawford Medal; Asa B. Clark, medali-t for 1901,
presiding. Question: "Resolved, That Universal Free Trade Would Be Beneficial to Mankind."
Affirmative, Lucius P. Farmer and A. C. Evans. Negative, David M. (ook and Guyte P. McCord.
Address, presenting "Argo" 1902 to Hon. W. B. Lamar, B. A. Meginniss.
Decision of judges in favor of affirmative and Mr. A. C. Evans as medalist.
Awarding of medal by Mr. W. B. Crawford.
WEDNESDAY MORNING, 10 O'CLOCK.
Oratioins for Fleming Oratorical Medal, by undergraduates.
91


II


i;
7










WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, 4 O'CLOCK.
Annual meeting of Alumli-te Association.
WEDNESDAY EVENING, 8:80 O'CLOCK.
Graduating exercises.
Orations by graduates.
Annual address by President.
Annual address by Chairman of Board of Trustees
Awarding of Diplomas.
Aw\arding of Meoials.
THURSDAY EVENING, 8 O'CLOCK.
Annual Alumni-re Ranquet in honor of Graduatin'g Class.
Annual Banquet by the Blue Ribbon Dining Club.
Close of fifty-fifth annual session of the Florida State College.


~Y I I I I I I I





I


ALBERT ALEXANDER MNURPRREE,
President Florida State College







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