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'aMURAMI FtIL.
Ai









- -- ---




















1. J









CALENDAR



OF THE





FLORIDA UNIVERSITY.



FOR




1884-5.


TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA:
1884.


~I



















FLORIDA UNIVERSITY,



BOARD OF REGENTS.

REV. JOHN KOST, M. D., LL. D.
Chancellor of the University, and Dean of Medical Faculty.
Tallahassee.

(Gov.) W. D. BLOXHAM, TallahAssee.

(Ex-Gov.) D. S. WALKER, Tallahassee.

(Comp. of State) GEN. W. D. BARNES, Tallahassee.

JUDGE J. T. BERNARD, Tallahassee.

JUDGE W. P. BYRD, Tallahassee.

REV. CHARLES BEECEIER, D. D., Newport, Fla.


PROF. II. N. FELKEL,
Corresponding Secretary for the University,
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.


__











MEMBERS OF FACULTIES. 3'



MEMBERS OF FACULTIES.


INSTRUCTORS AND OFFICERS.

REV. J. KOST, A. M., M. D., LL. D.
Chancellor of University, and Dean of Medical Faculty.

COL. E. R. RIVERS, A. M., C. E.
Pres. Literary Dept. and Professor Mathematics, Engineering and
Military Tactics.

REV. W. H. CARTER, D. D., LL. D., Ph. D.
Professor Latin and Greek.

REV. A. H. LOWRIE. A. M., Ph. D.
Professor Political Economy and English Literature.

REV. J. J. SMITH, A. M., D. D.
Professor Oriental and General History, and Rhetoric.

JOHN KOST, A.'M., M. D.
Professor of Geology, Mineralogy and Paleontology.

J. J. BROWN, A. M, M. D.,
Professor Chemistry and Botany.

REV. W. F. DICKERMAN, A. M.
Professor of Natural Philosophy.

F. WESPY, M. D., Ph. D.
Professor of Modern Languages.

C. T. BATEMAN, A. M.
Professor Science and Principles of Teaching.

H. N. FELKEL, A. B.
Professor Pedagogy and Institutes.

V. A. BAKER, M. D.
Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine, and Medical Clinics.

H. G. GRIFFITH, M. D.
Professor of Anatomy and Physiology.


7-










*4 FLORIDA UNIVERSITY.

H. S. GREEN, M. D.
Professor of Surgery-Operative, Orthopedic and Clinical.

J. E. CUMMINS, M. D.
Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children.

J. H. HAND, M. D.
Professor of Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Pathology.

J. E. CHANCELLOR, M. D.
Professor of Gynaecology and Histology.

HORACE KLINE, M. D.
Professor Natural History and Comparative Physiology.


Demonstrator of Anatomy.*

WM. STONEMAN, A. M.
Professor Mechanics and Civil Engineering.


Professor Commercial Science, Book-Keeping and Banking.*


Professor of Stenography and Chirography.*

E. G. KIEF,
Instructor in Taxidermy and Embalming.

E. H. BATEMAN.
Professor of Fine Arts.

MIss E. L. BYTHEWOOD.
Teacher in Modern History and Physical Geography.
Provided for.


' .J









ORGANIZATION.


ORGANIZATION.

Congress, in March 23, 1833, appropriated two entire Town-
ships of land for Seminary purposes to the State of Florida ; and,
in March 3, 1845, when Florida was admitted as a State into the
Union, Congress appropriated two additional Townships of land
for Seminary purposes, with very liberal provisions for public
schools. The act of July 2, 1862, for endowment of an agricul-
tural college, afforded to Florida very ample means for such
enterprise ; and all these acts have been made available.
The Constitution of the State of Florida, Article VIII., Sec.
2, provides as follows : "The Legislature shall provide a uniform
system of Common Schools, and a University, and shall provide
for the liberal maintenance of the same," This mandatory con-
stitutional provision was afterwards complemented by act of the
Legislature, and provision made for maintenance; but not to an
extent to have afforded, as yet, all that is desired. It is believed
that the Legislature at its next session will make appropriations
that will afford a more complete endowment.
In February, 1883, FLORIDA UNIVERSITY was organized un-
der a liberal Charter and two Colleges have been in operation
-the Literary and the Medical. The former contains a Military
school, and is the outgrowth of what has been "West Florida
Seminary," whose separate Charter and special organization, as to
Trustees and Endowments, are still thaintained.
The Colleges recognized by the University Charter are five,
as follows: TALLAHASSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY;
LITERARY COLLEGE; LAW COLLEGE; THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE;
POLYTECHNIC AND NORMAL INSTITUTE.









FLORIDA UhnVERSITY.


COLLEGE BUILDINGS, GROUNDS, AND APPLI-
ANCES.


There is held by perfect title, free of debt, Ten Acres of most
charming grounds, adjoining the city, on which is a commodious
brick College building, of two stories, containing two large lecture
halls and eight additional rooms devoted to the Museum of Natural
History; Museum of Anatomy and Pathological Anatomy; Chem-
ical and Philosophical apparatus, and Normal appliances. Among
the latter, besides Globes, Telescopes, Microscopes and Charts, is
WYTHE's Papier Mache Model of the City and Suburbs of Jeru-
salem, scrupulously exact with the English topographical survey,
on a scale of one inch to the ioo feet. (Two other Colleges, or
Universities, possess this appliance, which cost'several thousand
dollars,) and, with other such means, are of great use in teaching
History.
A commodious frame building on very eligible ground, with
ample availments, is occupied by the Literary College. To this
structure a VERY FINE addition is now being constructed and will
be ready for occupancy by fall term.
The brick Library building is newly constructed and is the
gift of Gov. Walker, of Tallahassee. The Library is already re-
spectable and is receiving large additions.
Another brick building is leased by the University, and, with
the others, suffices for the present necessities. But it is believed
the generous citizens of Tallahassee will not long suffer a rented
building to be in use by the institution, but will erect a new addi-
tional building on the College campus soon.
The Library building contains a fine lecture hall and two ad-
ditional rooms, all very elegantly furnished.










LITERARY DEPARTMENT.


LITERARY DEPARTMENT.
(WEST FLORIDA SEMINARY.)


BOARD OF EDUCATION.

CAPT. P. HOUSTON, PRESIDENT, Tallahassee.

JUDGE J. T. BERNARD, SECRETARY, Tallahassee.

R. A. SHINE, ESQ., Tallahassee.

B. S. LIDDON, ESQ., Mariana.

J. L. CLARK, ESQ., Monticello.

A. PATERSON, ESQ., Madison.

CAPT. C. E. L. ALLISON, Quincy.


COMMITTEES.

On Buildings and Grounds:
CAPT. P. HOUSTON.
R. A. SHINE.

On Finance:
JUDGE J. T. BERNARD.
J. L. CLARK.

On Text-Books and Examinations:
A. PATERSON.
B. S. LIDDON.
C. E. L. ALLISON.

Board of Visitors:
REV. S. L. HUGON.
REV. A. F. ALLISON.
REV. H. H. KENEDY.
Tallahassee.









8 FLORIDA UNIVERSITY.
FACULTY.

COL. E. R. RIVERS, A. M., C. E., PRESIDENT AND COMMANDANT.
Professor of Mathematics, Engineering and Military Tactics.

REV. W. H. CARTER, D. D., LL.D., Ph. D.
Professor Intellectual Science and Moral Philosophy.

A. H. LOWRIE, A. M., Ph. D.
Professor of Political Economy and English Literature.

W. F. DICKERMAN, A. M.
Professor of Natural Philosophy.

J. J. BROWN, A. M., M. D.
Professor of Chemistry and Botany.

F. WESPY, Ph. D., M. D.
Professor of Modem Languages.

Miss E. L. BYTHEWOOD.
Professor of Modern History and Physical Geography.

ED. MEEK.
Professor of Instrumental Music.



LITERARY CURRICULUM.

NOTE.-In the literary department of Florida University it is
required that the grand purposes of Congress in the appropriation
of land for its endowment, and the object of the State Legislature
in chartering the institution shall be fully maintained. Therefore
its officers and functionaries, are not alone distinctly maintained,
but in the continued curriculum of instruction, which comes so hap-
pily in accord with what a Literary College requires, all the
"schools" heretofore organized are still maintained ; although
some of the services of Professors in other departments of the Uni-
versity are necessarily brought into requisition.
In the divisions of labor in teaching, as here' adopted, and
which accords with those of various of the best institutions of the
highest grade in our country, a full equivalent of the four yearly









LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 9
classes of freshman, sophomore, junior and senior is maintained.
And in addition to the effectiveness of these old forms of organiz-
ing the labor of teaching, it is believed better results are obtained
in the present method.
We have here "schools" or departments of instruction, and
the student that receives the certificate of proficiency, in the requi-
site schools, becomes eligible for graduation in the college. Thus
on completing the course of study prescribed for any school, and
passing a satisfactory examination, a certificate of proficiency will
be given the student, which certificate will be signed by the faculty
and board of education. Regular diplomas will be conferred on
students that shall have certificates from four or more of the schools.
Thus, the degree of A. B. will be conferred on graduates of the
schools of Ancient Languages, Mathematics, English Literature
History and Natural Science. The degree of B. S. on the grad-
nates of the schools of English Literature and History, Mathe-
matics, Natural Science and Modern Languages. The degree
B. E. on graduates in the schools of English Literature and His-
tory and Mathematics, Modem Languages and Civil Engineering.
Graduating with distinction in all the schools excepting Commer-
cial and Military, will entitle the student to the degree of A. M.





SCHOOL OF ANCIENT LANGUAGES AND META-
PHYSICS.

In this school the object aimed at is to cultivate the habit of
exact and critical analysis of phrases and the discovery of the true
roots of words. A thorough drilling in the accidence and syntax of
of utterances is sought to be given in the early part of the course,
accompanied by easy translations, and with written exercises. Hence
the student proceeds with facility to the translation of the usual
authors in the order of their aptitudes. Special pains are taken to
insure fidelity to the original and to give the fullest expression in
the English.










10 TLORIDA UNIVERSITY.

What has just been said of the Latin will apply also to the
Greek. But here still nicer discrimination are made practical,
just in proportion as the Greek is more remote in use, and the dif-
ficulties of the inflections and tenses obtain.
Dr. Carter is a man of more than common ability in Met-
aphysics; added to his experience in teaching are the avails of
other labors of literary character, that bring more than ordinary
effectiveness to his instruction. Moral Science and Intellectual Phi-
losophy constituted the field for life-long labors, and many evidences
of his superior success are found in various portions of our land. It is,
hence, a matter of special satisfaction to the literary board, that
in our age of notable controversy in the domain of moral and intel-
lectual philosophy, that a teacher so competent is in service here.
Nor is the course of instruction m this branch to comprise sim-
ply the forms of didactic teaching and noting of studies, since the
most earnest endeavors are constantly made for the intellectual de-
velopment of the student. The consciousness that the mental
development determines the extent of availment of all other studies
is, perhaps, the secret of the success of the labors of this chair.

COURSE IN LATIN.
FIFTH CLAss.-Bingham's Latin Grammar and Exercises.
FOURTH CLAss.--Cesar, Grammar and Exercises.
THIRD CLAss.-Cicero's Orations; Virgil, Grammar, Mythology.
SECOND CLASS.-Livy, Grammar and Latin Composition.
FIRST CLAss.-Horace, Tacitus, Juvenal, Latin Literature.

GREEK.
FIFTH CLAss.-Grammar and Lessons.
FOURTH CLASS.-Grammar, Exercises, Xenophon's Anabasis.
THIRD CLAss.-Grammar, Herodotus, Mythology.
SECOND CLAss.-Grammar, Composition, Homer.
FIRST CLAss.-Grammar, Composition, Euripides.

COURSE 1N FRENCH.
THIRD CLASS.-Otto's Grammar, Norman's First French Book, Petites
Causeries.
SECOND CLASS.-Otto's Grammar, 2d part; Causeries Avec Mes. Eleves.
FIRST CLASS.-Corneille, Racine, Moliere, Conversation and Composi-
tion.









LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 11

GERMAN.
THIRD CLAss.-Norman's First German Book, Second German Book,
Synopsis of German Grammar.
SECOND CLAss.-Grammar, Reader.
FIRST CLAss.-Whitney's Grammar, with selected Exercises; Schiller,
Gcethe, Lessing.



SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS.

In this school the students hereafter not only have the course'
Formerly pursued by Prof. Rivers in the pure mathematics, but
have the option to pass over into the Polytechnic Department to
take Astronomy and the higher Mathematics applied.

COURSE IN PURE MATHEMATICS.
FIFTH CLAss.-Practical Arithmetic, Elementary Algebra.
FOURTH CLAss.-University Algebra, Davies' Legeudre.
THIRD CLASS.-Trigonometry, Davies' Surveying.
SECOND CLAss.-Analytical Geometry, Descriptive Geometry.
FIRST CLAss.-Differential and Integral Calculus.


SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCE.

The University now affords to this school far more availments
than were heretofore in our power. The interchange of the services
of the chairs of departments supplies this school of the Natural
Sciences more than is usually attained in simply literary colleges.
Prof. Brown in Chemistry and Botany, is an old teacher of great
ability; Prof. Dickerman, in Natural Philosophy, will bring into
service a genius that has enriched the cabinets of various institu-
tions by his new inventions and construction of new appliances and
apparatus he has made. Several of his manipulations will be con-
ducted by his own apparatus.
Not a small advantage will be had by the students in this school
of the natural sciences in the practical skill evinced, and experiences
made available in case of breakages or lack of immediate working









12 FLORIDA UNIVERSITY.

of appliances. All know that this is ever a great desideratum in
the department of physics.
Geology, Zoology, Entomology and Astronomy are in service
in this school by our association in the University. The fine mu-
seums afford superior facilities.


SCHOOL OF ENGLISH BRANCHES AND HISTORY.

This is to serve in this College as a Preparatory Department
to qualify the students to enter the higher classes. The efficiency
of our reliable teacher, Miss E. L. Bythewood, in this institution for
years past, in fitting students for advanced studies is a guarantee
for continued satisfaction. Students that are found, on examina-
tion, to be unfitted for college classes will have here the availments
they need. All the English branches are attended to by the
various teachers here employed.
The object of this school is to give students a thorough drilling
in the English language-its etymology and syntax; to render
them practically familiar with the laws of composition, the elements
and qualities of style; to bring them, by a course of critical reading,
to the treasures to be found in the English classics, and to give
them a knowledge of the leading facts of History, especially of the
United States and England.

FIFTH CLAss.-Spelling, Reading, Grammar, Geography.
FOURTH CLASS.-Word Analysis. Grammar, History, U. S.; Compo-
sition.
THIRD CLAss.-Rhetoric, Composition, History of England, Elocution.
SECOND CLASS.-English and American Literature, Composition.
FIRST CLAss.-Logic, Mental Science, Critical Reading of English
Classics.









MILITARY DEPARTMENT.


THE MILITARY DEPARTMENT.




This very popular branch of our teaching is still in practice,
since the new relations are achieved. A battalion known as the
College Cadets is formed for all eligible students. The Institution
is provided by the State with breach-loading cadet rifles and
accoutrements. A very neat and serviceable dress suit of cadet
gray has been prescribed, which costs only $I5.50 including cap.
This is less expensive than the usual clothing, and is sufficient, with
proper care, for one year's service. Cadets are required to wear
this uniform at all times during the term. In attendance upon drills
and guard, students lose no time from academic duties.
The drills are short, and the military duty involves no hard-
ship. The military drill is health-giving exercise, and its good
effect in the development of the physique and improvement of the
carriage of the cadet is manifest.
The corps of cadets is divided into companies. The officers
are selected for proficiency in drill and deportment. Each Com-
pany is officered by one Captain, one First Lieutenant, one Second
Lieutenant, with a proper number of Sergeants and Corporals.
The officers and non-commissioned officers are distinguished by
appropriate insignia of rank. Promotions will take place in the
order of original appointment only when efficiency, fidelity, progress
in studies, conduct and other qualifications warrant them.
Every Cadet to whom arms and accoutrements are issued will
be held strictly accountable, not only for their preservation, but for
their perfect good order at all times.

SCHOOL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING.

The requirements of the students in the Literary department
are supplied in such portion of this part of the work in the Poly-
technic department as the literary students require.









FLORIDA UNIVERSITY.


STATE STUDENTS.

The obligations of the institution to the State will be carefully
observed. Each county west of the Suwannee river is entitled to
send double the number of students that it has representatives in the
House of.the General Assembly of Florida. These are free of
charge for tuition, but are subject, as heretofore, to the contingent
and incidental expenses. Such students must come in regular
manner as the law provides. Information can be obtained from
Judge J. T. Bernard, Secretary, by letter or otherwise at Talla-
hassee.



SPECIAL INFORMATION.

TERMS OF ADMISSION,-GOOD MORAL CHARACTER.

Candidates for admission into the fifth class must be twelve
years of age, and a proportionate increase of age will be required
for admission into the higher classes. Applicants for admission
into the fourth class of any school will be required to pass an ap-
proved examination on the studies of the fifth class in that school.
If, upon examination, an applicant should be found deficient
in any of the required studies, he shall be assigned to a course of
preliminary training in those branches; provided, that in no case
will any applicant be admitted whose attainments in the English
branches are not such that he may, with one year's training, be
prepared for the studies of the Fourth class in any school.
Before matriculation each applicant must file a certificate of
appointment by the County Commissioners as State student, or a
receipt from the Treasurer of the Board of Education for one quar-
ter's tuition fee. Military students must be five feet in height and
not physically disqualified for military duty, must file a statement
from the proper authority that he has ordered the prescribed uni-
form. Apply to Judge J. T. Bernard for information, Tallahassee.









MILITARY DEPARTMENT.


EXPENSES.
For tuition per quarter of nine weeks:
In English classes $ 500
In Classical department 7 50
No deduction for absence.
MUSIC.
Piano and vocal Lessons, per quarter, $10 00
Organ Lessons, per quarter, 15 00
ART
Painting in oil or pastel, per quarter, - 10 00
Painting in water colors,
drawing in Pencil or cray- each per quarter, - 7 50
on; decorative art.
MODERN LANGUAGES.
For each language taught, per quarter, - -6 00

New students who are late in entering will be charged from
the beginning of the quarter in which they enter, unless for good
reasons their entrance has been delayed beyond the middle of a
quarter, when a reduction of fifty per cent. will be niade.


LITERARY SOCIETIES.

Former accommodations of room for the several literary socie-
Sties were moderate; but our new addition to the literary building
will afford advanced facilities. The University library accomoda-
Stions for the members of these societies are superior. Literary
Societies ever afford a very considerable portion of the attrac-
tions of colleges. None should attend without securing these
advantages.
The Literary Department, in common with the others of the
University, has all the regulation privileges of the Library, and
these now constitute a very material accession to the Institution.
The Library building is commodious and conveniently situated for
access from the most of the boarding houses and places of residence
in the city. The Reading Hall is finely lighted by day and night,
and the Librarian is in constant service. The Library is not only
large, but is of very excellent selections for literary students, and
a very copious current periodical literature is constantly on the
tables.









16 'FLOaIDA TUNIERSITY.

GENERAL RULES.

The strictest attention to study and the most exact punctuality
in attendance on recitations, and all other duties, will be made the
conditions of every student's continuance in the College.
Students are prohibited, under penalty of dismission, from
having in their possession ammunition, weapons or arms not issued
for the performance of military duty; nor shall these be kept
loaded in quarters under any pretext.
Students are prohibited from entering into combinations under
any pretext. One who shall begin, excite, cause or join in any
boisterous or riotous conduct, or who becomes party to any agree-
ment to avoid or violate any regulation, to hold no intercourse with
a comrade, or to do any act to the prejudice of good order and
military discipline, shall be dismissed.
No student shall have in his possession, or play at, cards or
games of chance, engage in a raffle, or in any manner wager
money or other things, on penalty of dismission.
No student will be granted a leave of absence more than four
times during a term of eighteen weeks. No student will be
granted a leave of absence which interfere with attendance on rec-
itations, except on the application of the parent or guardian
addressed directly to the President, and not through the student.
Students who shall drink or bring, or cause to be brought
within the limits, or have or allow in their room, or otherwise in
their possession, fermented or intoxicating liquor, or fruits or
viands preserved in intoxicating liquor, shall be dismissed.
A student who shall cut, mark or otherwise injure or deface
the buildings, furniture or appurtenances; or who shall lose, injure,
destroy or improperly dispose of the arms, accoutrements, or other
property of the College, shall make good all damage and be dis-
missed or otherwise punished, according to the nature of the
offense.
Students who shall overstay a leave of absence must produce
satisfactory evidence of having been detained by sickness, by par-
ent or guardian, or by some unavoidable cause, otherwise they
will be dismissed or punished.
Day scholars detained at home from any cause must render
written excuse, approved by parent, guardian or physician, setting









MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 17

forth substantial reasons, satisfactory to the President, for the de-
tention, otherwise their reports will not be excused.
To each recorded delinquency a number of from one to ten,
proportional to the degree of the offense in a moral and military
view, is assigned to express demerit.
If any student receives 150 demerits for the whole or any part
of the academic year, or 250 for a greater period, he shall be de-
clared deficient and be dismissed.
Such other regulations as may be necessary for the govern-
ment of the students will be published "in orders" before the
corps of Cadets.

RELIGIOUS SERVICES.

Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. The
students are required to attend these exercises, and are also iecom-
mended to attend the church of their choice, severally, at least once
on Sunday. Opportunities are also afforded for attending Bible
Classes every Sunday.

REPORTS.

A report of the standing of each student is made to the parent
or guardian at the end of every month during the session, in all
cases of wards.

ACADEMIC YEAR.

The academic year, which is divided into two equal terms,
commences on the first Monday in October, and ends on the sec-
ond Wednesday in June following, which is Commencement day.
The second term begins on the second Wednesday in February.
There will be a short intermission at Christmas, from December
25th to January ist.

CALISTHENICS.

Sufficient exercise is considered of very great importance,
therefore the young ladies will be practiced in the graceful exercises
of calisthenics, while the cadets are performing military evolutions.










FLORIDA UNIVERSITY.


DEPARTMENTS OF SCIENCE, LITERATURE

AND ARTS CATALOGUE.
i


LIST OF LITERARY AND MEDICAL STUDENTS, 1883-4.

Abbreviations.-A. L. for Ancient Languages; M. L for Modern Languages; M. for
Mathematics; Med., for Medicine: N.S. for Natural Science; E. and H. for English and
History; C. E. for Civil Engineering; C. D. for Commercial Department.

Names. Courses. Residence.
ALLEN, WM. B.........M.; A.L.; M. L; N S; C.D..Kentucky.
ALLEN, LAFORE. .......M. L.......... ...... "
ALEXANDER, ANNIE...M.; N. S.; M. L.; A. L.......Illinois.
ANDFSON,FLORENCE.M.; E. and H.; M. L..........Leon County.
BASSETT, LENA........ M.; E. and H................. "
BASSETT, NELLIE.......M.; E. and H.; C. D ..........
BECKER, CORNELIUS...Med.; (Graduated)............Michigan.
BETTON, WILLIAM L...M.; E. and H.; A. L.; N. S...Leon County.
BAILY, WILLIAM....... M.; E. and H.; A. L ; N. S... "
BRYAN, E. A...........M.; E. and H.; N. S.; C. D...
BRYAN, MILTON.......M.; A. L....................Hamilton County.
BLOCKER, LOUIS D.... M.; N. S; E. and H.; C. D....Leon County.
BYRD, FANNIE.........M.; N.S.; E.and H.; A.L.; C.D.
BYRD, LINA ............M.; N.S.; E. and H.; A.L.; C.D. "
BREVARD, ALICE..... M.; N. S.; E. and H..........
BREVARD, JENNIE.....M.; N. S.; E. and H.........
BURROUGHS,HARRY C..M.; A. L.; E. and H..........
CHAIRES, CARRIE......M.; A. L.; E. and H ..........
CLARKE, JANIE........M.; E. and LI.; C. D..........
CoBB, LIZZIE W........M.; E. and H.................
COHEN, JESSIE.........M. L.........................
CARTER, J. H..........A. L.; M.; N. S.; E. and H...Jackson County.
COCHRANE, I. FRANK..M.; E. and H.; N. S.; C. D...Madison County.
CRAWFORD, CHAS. T...M.; E. and H.; N. S.; C. D...Wakulla County.










LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 19

CRAFTS, C. B...........M.; A. L.....................New York.
COLLINS, J. C..........M.; E. and H................Leon County.
CONNER, LAURIE F... ..; E. and H.; C. D.......... "
COTNER, HENRY.......M.; E. and H................ "
DUNCAN, H. A.........M.; E. and H.; N. S.; C. D...Hamilton County.
DERBY, ROBT..........M.; E. and H................Leon County.
FISHER, I. H., Jr.......M.; E. and H.................
GAMBLE, EDWARD.....M.; E. and H.................
GAMBLE, CAREY.......M.; E. and H................
GORNTO, JNO. M........M.; C. D.....................Taylor County.
GIBBS, C. B............M.; E. and H.; N. S..........Leon County.
GIBBONS, FANNIE......M.; E. and H.; N. S.......... "
HAND, Jos. H......... Med.; (Graduated) ............Leary,CalhounCo.,Ga
HOUSTON, ED. A.......M.; E. and H.; N. S.; C. D...Leon County.
HOUSTON, MATTIE.....M.; E. and H.; N. S..........
HOPKINS, CHAS. A.....M.; E. and H.; A. L..........
HOPKINS, RICHARD... .M.; E. and H................
HAYS, HUNTER........M.; E. and H.; C. D..........Madison County.
JOHNSON, R. G.........M.; A. L.; E. and H.; C. D...Leon County.
KENNEDY, VIRGIE W..M.; N. S.; E. and H.......... "
LINN, GEORGIE F......M.; N. S.; A. L.............. "
LINN, BESSIE...........M.; N. S.; A. L..........
LEVY, HARRIS.........C. D ......................
LEVY, ANNIE..........M.; N. S.; E. and H.; M. L...
MAGBEE, ARCHIE D....M.; N. S.; E. and H.; C. D...Hillsborough County.
McMAHON, A..........M.; E. and H.; C. D..........Leon County.
MONTAGU, R. C........Med.. ......................Michigan.
MORGAN, EDW. G......Med.; (Graduated)........ ..Kalkaska, Mich.
MOSELEY, W. D., JR...M.; E. and HI.................Leon County.
NATHAN, LILLIE.......M.; E. and H................ "
OAKLEY, FREDERICA..M.; A. L.; N. S.; E. and H...Jefferson County.
PORTER, M............M.; E. and H.; M. L..........Leon County.
PADRICK, EVA.........M.; E. and H.................
PACE, A. RAIFORD.....M.; E. and H.; N. S.; A. L...


~ ____











20 FLORIDA UNIVERSITY.

PATERSON, DONALD F.M.; E. and H.; C. D..........Madison County.
PAUL, M. G............Med..........................Kalkaska, Mich.
PAUL, JEF.............. Med........................ "
PLUMMER, J. W. V. R..Med.; (Graduated)............Key West.
ROBERTS, W. J.........M.; E. and H.; C. D..........Leon County.
SHINE, HENRY R......M.; N. S.; E. and H.; C. D... "
SHINE, HUGH R........M.; N. S.; E. and H..........
SHINE, R. A., Jn.......C. D....................
SNIPES, W. T...........Med.; (Past Graduate)........ Centerville.
SVLLIVAN, MARTHA...M.; E. and H................. Leon County.
SAULS, JAMES L........M.; E. and H................
THOMPSON, ANNIE.....M.; N.S.; E. andH.; A.L.; M.L. "
THOMPSON, CHRISTINE.M.; N.S.; E.and H.; A.L.; M.L.
VASON, AGNES.........M.; N. S.; E. and H..........
VASON, LILLA .........M.; N. S.; E. and H......... "
WILLIAMS, SADIE......M.; N. S.; E. and H.........
WILLIAMS, MINA.......M.; N. S.; E. and H.; M. L...
WILT, FLORENCE......M.; E. and H.; M. L..........
WHITFIELD, BRYAN C..M.; N. S.; E. and H.; C. D...
WILLIAMS, G. M........M.; E. and H.; C. D..........Hamilton County.
WILLIS, GEO. W........M.; E. and H................ Leon County.
Leon County sends............................... 57 students.
Hamilton County sends........................... 3 "
Jefferson ........................... 1 student.
Jackson ... ....................... 1 "
M onroe ............................ 1
Wakulla ". ............................ 1 "
Taylor .......................... 1 "
Hillsborough" ............................ 1
Madison ...................... 3 students.
The State of Michigan sends...................... 5 "
Kentucky ..................... 2 "
S" New York ..................... 1 student.
Illinois ..... ................ 1


.__














TALLAHASSEE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY.



The facilities possessed by this College for affording thorough
instruction in all branches' of Medicine are exceeded by very few
in this country. Besides a very full Faculty of men experienced
not only in teaching, but also (every one of them) in long medical
and surgical practice, there are also the most ample material appli-
ances. Large
MUSEUMS
Of PATHOLOGICAL ANATOMY, NATURAL HISTORY and COMPAR-
ATIVE ANATOMY are possessed. Among the first are several
Manikins and Injected and Dissected Human Preparations, pre-
pared in Paris and New York.
The MUSEUM OF PATHOLOGY exhibits, in wax, papier-mache
and plaster full suits of skin diseases, of syphilitic diseases in all
stages, and a large number of morbid growths of all structures;
of fractures and dislocations. Among the
WET PREPARATIONS
are many surgical specimens that have been taken from patients
in the clinics of this College and others, by our own surgeons.
Two extensive CLINICS-Surgical and Medical-are con-
ducted during the entire terms, and from 40 to 50 cases come thus
into the presence of the classes every week. These are examined
and prescribed for in the presence of all. PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS is
thus made very practical. As students advance there are afforded
opportunities for their personal experience in these examinations
and prescriptions.
DISSECTING
material is abundant, and first-class Demonstrators are in service.
MODELS AND CHARTS
are numerous, and specimens of










22 FLORIDA UNIVERSITY.

MATERIAL MEDICAL
are no less so. In the Laboratory are found suits of very fine

CHEMICAL APPARATUS,

and these are in most capable hands.

BOTANY

has special attractions in Florida, and in no city more than in
Tallahassee. Medical Botany receives special attention.


MEDICAL FACULTY.

J. KOST, M. D., LL. D.
Dean of the Faculty.

V. A. BAKER, M. D.
Professor of Theory and Practice and Medical Clinics.

H. S. GREEN, M. D.
Professor of Surgery,-Operative and Orthopedic,-and of Surgical
Clinics.

H. G. GRIFFITH, M. D.
Professor of Anatomy.

J. E. CUMMINS, M. D.
Professor of Obstetrics, and Diseases of Women and Children.

J. H. HAND, M. D.
Professor of Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Pharmacy.

J. J. BROWN, M. D.
Professor of Chemistry and Botany.

J. E. CHANCELLOR, M. D.
Professor of Gyncecology, Histology and Medical Jurisprudence.

(Provided for,) M. D.
Demonstrator of Anatomy.









COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY.


ADMISSION TO LECTURES.

Both sexes, of suitable age and of good morals, are eligible for
the attendance of lectures by payment of the Matriculation and
Lecture fees. A partial course, or special branches, may be
taken separately; this does not, however, make the attendant
eligible for graduation. Medical lectures are useful to all persons;
and on this principle all may attend. Graduation in this Institution
depends entirely on merit.

GRADUATION AND DIPLOMAS.

Candidates for graduation must afford evidence of good moral
character, possess a good English education (Latin, Greek, Ger-
man and French being also desirable), as well as a competent
knowledge of the Natural Sciences. The Medichl requirements
are such as may be attained by three years reading, on the several
medical branches, under a competent preceptor; and the attendance
of two full courses of lectures; the latter should be in this College.
An examination by the members of the entire faculty, on all
the branches'of medicine and their collaterals, will be made during
the last week of the lecture course, and candidates giving full satis-
faction of thoroughness of instruction, however obtained, will
receive a diploma. But it must not be understood that this College
will ever afford "easy" graduation, or allow anything to be done
to lower the proper grade of the physician. It is a matter of real
satisfaction that medical colleges are evincing a tendency to elongate
the courses of study, and encourage past-graduate attendance at
college. This Institution will receive past-graduates, from any re-
spectable medical college, by payment simply of the matriculation
fee, and the contingents arising from expenses of material for dis-
section, and for chemicals in laboratory.
Tallahassee College of Medicine and Surgery is authorized by
its charter to confer the regular medical degrees. But the institu-
tion has adopted the precedent of subjecting their decisions to a
vote of the Regents, and securing to all successful candidates the
University Medical Degrees.










FLORIDA UNIVERSITY.


EXPENSES.

Cost of all Professor's tickets, - $60 00
Matriculation, 500
Demonstrator's charges, 10 00
Examinations for Degrees, 2500
(This fee is returned to unsuccessful candidates.)
Dentistry (optional), 10 00
Diplomas,-no charge:
Clinics,-no charge.

All charges must be paid in advance, or satisfactorily arranged
for.
Good board, with lodging, for students, can be had for $15
per month. By clubbing, the expense is less.
One annual term only: Opens on the last Wednesday of Oc-
tober and closes on the first Wednesday of March of each year.
For information and catalogue address Prof. H. N. Felkel,
Tallahassee, Fla.

TEXT BOOKS.

ANATOMY.-Gray, Wilson.
PHYSIOLOGY.-Foster's Text-book, Carpenter.
HISTOLOGY.-Stonewell's Manual.
CHEMISTRY.-Miller, Elliot and Storer, Prescott (for Analysis), Lloyd
(Medical), Rose (Toxicology).
MATERIAL MEDICAL AND THERAPEUTICS.-Kost, U. S. Dispensary.
PATHOLOGY AND PATH. ANAT.-Green, Wagner.
OBSTETRICS.-Lusk, Playfair, Kost, Beach, Curtis.
DISEASES OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN.-Thomas, Smith, Kost.
PRACTICE OF MEDICINE.-Palmer, Kost, Rosse, Scudder.
SURGERY.-Erichsen, Hamilton, Dewitt, Sayre (Orthopedic).
BOTANY.-Wood, Gray.
MED. JURISPRUDENCE.r-Kost, Taylor, Beck.

Text-books can be procured at the College. But students
may as well bring what are convenient. No confinement is made
to the above list.














POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE.


No collegiate enterprise is so much needed in the South at
this time as an institution that brings the sciences practically into
the service of the common industries of life, and this very thing is
the object of this department of Florida University.
The South has immense resources, and needs only the appli-
ances for development. Now, therefore, may it not be hoped that
at least this portion of the University work will secure the atten-
tion of the Southern people and received due patronage?
The plan of this Institute is projected in like order as is now
so popular in several of the prominent institutions of learning,in
this country. It is that of organization into schools.

SCHOOL OF CIVIL ENGINEERING.

Our present availments comprise good service by efficient
teachers and instructors in all branches. The out-door proceed-
ings come into the most common employment in human industry.
Our plan embraces full instruction in regard to the construction of
common roads, pikes, railroads, bridges, canals, etc. In aid of the
practical studies of the College, and as a means of familiarizing
students with the actual details of work, the Senior Class of the
Engineering Course is organized as an Engineering Corps, and
goes through all the necessary operations for the construction of a
railroad from Tallahassee to some selected terminus, comprising:
Preliminary study of maps.
Reconnoissance.
Running preliminary lines.
Maps and memoirs of same.
Final location of road; grades and curves.
Final maps, showing longitudinal and cross sections, excava-
tions, etc.









FLORIDA UNIVERSITY.


The Course in Drawing extends through four years. During
the first year the students practice linear and freehand drawing.
In the second year the elementary principles of instrument draw-
ing are taught, embracing a course of orthographic and isometri-
cal projection, shades and shadows. In the third year the system
of instruction embraces orthographic projections, isometric draw-
ing, shades and shadows, tinting in India ink and colors, the prac-
tice of drawing in sketches of tools, the finished work of machines,
bridges and other structures. In the last, or fourth, year of the
Course in Engineering, the students are taught perspective and
topographical delineation. Plans, profiles and sections of railroad
surveys complete the course.
FOURTH CLAss.-Linear and freehand drawing.
THIRD CLASS.-Projection and Model Drawing (Davidson), Davies'
Plane Surveying.
SECOND CLASS.-" The Railway Builder," Henck's Field Book, Line
Surveying, Roads, Railroads, Staking Out for Construction, Bridge
Drawing, Simms on Leveling.
FIRST CLAss.-Building Materials, Mortars and Cements, Masonry,
Strength of Materials, Arches, Topographical Drawing, Plans, Pro-
files and Sections of Railroad Surveys.

Field Surveying for State, Municipal and private necessity
will receive appropriate practical instruction by use of the appli-
ances in actual practice; thus, plats for cities, towns, parks, gardens,
parades, cemeteries, etc., will be laid out in practical forms.
Superstructural Engineering, as for foundations for state
buildings, monuments, factories, churches, bridges, aqueducts, via-
ducts, etc., will be practically taught.
Military Engineering must receive proper attention in this de-
partment of the University, and plans for forts, arsenals, transports
and ordinance will be made as among the regular practices of this
division of instruction.
The indoor proceedings come into the Hall of Mechanics, in
part, and comprise the instructions necessary for the construction
of machinery. The steam engine, hydraulic ram, wind-mill, water
wheels, force pumps, elevators, over-shot, turbine and paddle
wheels. Also other Dynamical appliances, as Hydraulic and Pneu-
matic processes.









POLYTECtINIO iSTretTTE.


SCHOOL OF MINING AND METALLURGY.

Although the State of Florida is far in the rear of other States
in matter of development of material sources of wealth to the State,
and although the common view of the physical facts concerning
the Geology of Florida is by no means encouraging, yet this in-
stitution is ready to come to the front in way of inaugurating a new
order of things.-If the people are not educated to it, and if thus
all is left to chance, it may be that vast deposits of mineral wealth
may be neglected and the best fertilizers in the world may lie
quietly in the shallow beds of our coast until, as in California, some
private individual may construct some mill-race and by accident
throw to Ahe surface the boundless treasures of the earth. Nor
yet only this, for who can tell of the, possibly immense, other min-
eral treasures for the industrial arts, Florida may develop.
Apropos then it is for the Polytechnic Institute of Florida Uni-
versity to set an example of public spirit. It may cost a sacrifice
at the outset, but it must proceed. Who will come to help ? Will
the public patronize this public enterprise ?
PRACTICAL MINING.-Possibly it may be found in the present
order of things that field-work, may not for a time, be a kind of
practice that will be well sustained. No facilities in reach of the
college classes are practically accessible; but while this is the case
there are nevertheless existing all needed facilities for giving solid
instructing in the science of mining, without going to Cornwall or
Pottsville.
We have maps, charts, models and other appliances besides
the black-board, crayon and books. We have competent and intelli-
gent teachers and shall do good work; so no student or prospec-
tive miner need hesitate to come to this institute for an education
in this line.
THEORY AND PRACTICE.-The first lessons of the student in
a school of Mining is to become familiarized with the preliminary
appliances and theories of mining. To get at buried treasures we
have to excavate, and the appliances are very numerous, from the
use of the spade to that of giant powder or dynamite.
Among the forms of excavation we have surface excavation,
drifting, shaftiug and boring. To bring these methods into use









28 PLORIDA t NIVERBtTY.

one must know either by experience or by tuition how to proceed.
It is by the latter we propose to afford the requirements.
The after part; that is, the teaching how to lift out the min-
eral treasures, will not involve any inconvenience in the absence of
an open mine. And the precautional and contingent necessities
will receive equally good service.
Drainage, ventilation, lighting, protection from explosions,
etc., are particulars that will be fully taught and illustrated.

METALLURGY.

Analyzing, essaying and smelting will be a portion of the
labors of the Institute that will receive alike good attention. In
this part the labors are supplied from the chairs to which are
assigned Metallurgy, Mineralogy and Chemistry, in another de-
partment of the University. But as soon as the classes demand
it, a separate school of Metallurgy and its correlative sciences will
be made distinct.

SCHOOL OF MECHANICS AND BUILDING.

In Florida heretofore the Mechanicial Arts and Building have
not been formally studied as sciences, except by individuals pri-
vately, and now, at this more hopeful day, it will doubtless prove
an up-hill business to sustain a school that is devoted to these in-
dustries as sciences. Still they are such, and will not long hence
afford ample remuneration to teachers of them as sciences.
It is emphatically in the plan of this Institution to have all the
several schools of the Polytechnic Department of the University
not only fully organized, but in complete running condition as sep-
arate schools. But in the present early stage of this department
we may do no more than form classes adjunctive to other
branches.
The Chair of Natural Philosophy in the School of the Natu-
ral Sciences is occupied by a most competent instructor in Physics,
and having an assistant who is a practical builder, can do most
ample justice to a class in Mechanics and Building, until this school
shall be fully inaugurated. Thus house building, stair building,









POLYTECmHIC INSTITUTE. 29

and all forms of structure usually treated of in this class of institu-
tions will receive attention when the classes formed demand it.


SCHOOL OF THE NATURAL SCIENCES.

The scope of the work of this school is immense and much is
expected to be done even now in the beginning. We possess a
large variety of appliances necessary in teaching all the prominent
natural sciences, such as physics, chemistry, geology, astronomy,
zoology, botany, mineralogy, paleontology, optics, etc., and we
have a competent corps of Professors. We shall, therefore, be
ready to organize classes in all the branches called for. The assur-
ance that prompts the undertaking places eight competent men in
the Polytechnic Institute, and although the endowments of the in-
stitution are not yet a basis to be relied on, still the work will go on.
No one need hesitate about coming here for an education in any of
the branches proposed to be taught.
The chairs of chemistry, botany, natural philosophy, geology,
zoology, civil engineering, mechanics and astronomy, are fully es-
tablished and filled by competent men.


SCHOOL OF ARTS.

PAINTING.
A distinguished Artist has been elected and has accepted the
position, as head of the Art School of this Institute. It is A. E.
SBateman, of Toledo, Ohio. What has been necessary to effect
this is the relinquishment of a patronage that requires several ea-
sels constantly, by one whose pencil commands high remuneration.
But it is in this case, as in the case of a large number of professors
in the University, the climate,-li-,, .... .-. :..l'Tallahassee
that has done it.
Thus, it is by no means personal effort that has afforded the
chief elements of the great success that has marked the establish-
ment of Florida University.
Persons desirous of acquiring the great art of painting, in all









30 FLORIDA UNIVERSITY.

its branches of higher art, can now be assured the desideratum can
be realized in the School of Arts in the Polytechnic Institute.

MUSIC.
A Conservatory of Music is established in the School of Arts
here. The authorities have not yet definitely arranged with a
principal for this school, but several are in view, and there is assur-
ance that there will be no failure for completeness in all particulars,
so that the present shall be a full complement to all the other excel-
lent appointments in the institute. The provisions will be complete
for vocal, piano and organ instruction. None need hesitate to come.
The expenses of the Art School are higher than those of
others, but the extent of engagement, except in view of gradua-
tion, is entirely optional.
For painting it may be stated that the rate is one dollar per
lesson of two hours. The lessons are one, or two per week.
For music the following is a grade of pricesthat will be mainly
adhered to.
Tuition and Incidental Expenses, per term, $ 9 00
Instruction on the Piano Forte, Cabinet Organ, or Melodeon, for the
term of 28 lessons, 16 00
Instruction on the Piano Forte, Cabinet Organ, or Melodeon, for the
second and third term, per course of twenty lessons, 12 00
Use of Piano Forte, Cabinet Organ, or Melodeon two hours per day,
per week, 50
Instruction on the Pipe organ, per course of 20 lessons 20 00
Voice Culture, per course of 20 lessons - 10 00
Musical Composition, per course of 20 lessons - 5 00
Vocal Music, class instruction - 200
Diploma Fee, 5 00
All these studies may be taken separately; that is, a student
can take one or more as may be desired.
PHOTOGRAPHY, TELEPHONING, STENOGRAPHY, PRINTING,
LITHOGRAPHING, ENGRAVING and the various other differentiated
and useful arts will be provided for, and the Polytechnic Institute
will be complete in all its departments and working at no distant
time. Some of those will be in operation this next term. By cor-
respondence any person may know just what among these arts
just enumerated will be embraced in either of the terms of the
Institute.
On completing courses and passing the final examination
diplomas will be given in the regular way to the successful
candidates.









POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 31

COMMERCIAL SCHOOL.

This branch of the Institute is a very important one, coming,
as it does, into so large a part of business life. There are several
departments of the work done in teaching, consisting of Penman-
skip, Book-keeping, Banking, Board of Trade, '.., i' . or
Short-hand, and Insurance.
PENMANSHIP.-In this department the principles of Chiro-
graphy are fully taught-business hand, copy hand, ornamental
style and flourishes and picture writing. These severally receive
proper attention, and the appliances are good.
BooK-KEEPING.-The best modern styles of the art are put
in practic-single and double entries, with check-books, and every
other method of accounting will be fully taught.
BANKING.-A bank is fully organized, with its stockholders,
Directors, President, Teller, Clerk, Cashier and Accountant.
Notes for Circulation (money), Bills of Exchange, Drafts, Bonds,
Mortgages, etc., in proper printed forms, beautifully executed, are
in constant practical use.
MERCHANDISING and SIOP-KEEPING will be taught in a prac-
tical manner, thus fitting the student for store-keeping or other
similar business.
BOARD OF TRADE.-This modern system of business enter-
prise, in which stocks are handled and commerce receives its more
colossal orders of procedure; where the element of auctioneering
is made a practical form of trade, must now be regarded as an in-
dispensable feature of business education. A Board of Trade will
assemble at stated hours in this school, and will do business in
stocks, merchandise, etc.
STENOGRAPHY.-Few things are more important in a course
of business education than the marvelous improvements that are
now in practice for quick writing and accurate reporting. Jour-
nalism, court reporting, to say nothing of the numberless advan-
tages in almost all conditions of business and social life that may
be secured by this availment, makes short-hand writing of great
importance. A good teacher of this art is in service in this
branch.
On completing the course in this school proper diplomas are
given.









FLORIDA UNIVERSITY.


NORMAL INSTITU IE.




The authorities of the University have now effected what has
long been a very great desideratum in our State, and that is the
establishment of an institution complete in all its appliances and
appointments for affording a complete education of TEACHERS.
Assurance is now given that in nothing necessary for doing first-
class work in this line is now lacking. In the first place, ample
room for the accommodation of all that are likely to attend is pos-
sessed. Secondly, the appliances in matter of apparatus and in-
struments are complete. A full suit of Chemical and Philosophi-
cal apparatus is possessed. Also those for teaching Geography,
as globes, maps, charts, etc., on large projections. For Music
various of the usual instruments are either owned or rented. For
Astronomy a fine planetarium telescope, models and charts are
possessed. For instance, in Sacred History, Wythe's papier-
mache Model of Jerusalem is possessed. For Natural History an
extensive Museum of Natural History is accessible and arranged
for in the University. The University Library is also subject to
its use. There are five chairs definitely arranged for, namely,
those of Pedagogy, or Art of Teaching, Natural Philosophy,
Natural History, Geology, Mineralogy and Mathematics. But
these appointments by no means cover all the provisions that are
made for teachers, as an arrangement is made with several
departments of the University for supplies. Therefore the friends
of the Institute congratulate themselves with the assurance that the
Normal Institute of Florida University has not a superior in this
country.
It is contemplated' that State students shall attend free of
charge except for contingents. But more special particulars can
be learned by addressing Prof. H. N. Felkel, of Tallahassee.









NORMAL INSTITUT. 33

Tuition for other thanfree students is $io the long, or winter,
term of 3 months, beginning December 3; and $5 for the short
term, of 6 weeks, beginning the second Wednesday in June.






LAW COLLEGE.

A Law Department is provided for in the Charter of the Uni-
versity, and this is now in course of organization; but as there is
doubt resting on the minds of those best informed as to the proba-
bility of a good attendance, or at least, since it is uncertain whether
a term this year is advisable, there has been the following plan
adopted:-
I. To secure a lecture hall.
2. To arrange definitely for a full and competent faculty.
3. Then invite correspondence from all that desire to attend
the session next winter, with Judge J. T. Bernard, and if a respect-
able sized class is assured, then an announcement of the opening of
the college on the 3d of December, 1884, shall be made by circulars
and newspapers.
The cost for all the tickets to the law course is $5o, and diploma
$Io.





GENERAL INFORMATION.

COMPREHENSIVE CATALOGUE.

LITERARY.-Terms of the LITERARY DEPARTMENT: First
term begins October ist and ends February 6th. Second term be-
gins second Wednesday in February and ends second Wednesday
in June. (There is a vacation during the holidays).








34 FLORIDA UNIVERSITY.

MEDICAL.-The term of the MEDICAL DEPARTMENT opens
on the 3oth day of October, 1884, and ends on March 3d, 1885.
POLYTECHNIC.--In this institution persons can enter in either
of the schools alone or attend all. The tuition is $5 a term for
each of the schools except for the Art School and Commercial
School, which are higher. (See page and -.)
NORMAL.-The long term opens December 3d and closes
March 3d; short term opens June 9th and continues six weeks.
LAw.-If the Law College has a term this year, there will be
a special circular issued. (See what is said of it under Law Col-
lege). The term will begin December 3d and end March 3d.
Boarding accommodations are ample and prices reasonable,
ranging from $15 to $30 per month, all included. Good board
and lodging can be had for $15 per month in the boarding-houses
adapted for the accommodation of the students. (Send for cata-
logues, which are given away free for two cent stamp).
For particulars in all matters concerning the practical affairs
of the University, address Prof. H. N. FELKEL, Tallahassee, Fla.
For information concerning matters of government, division
of labor, professorships, degrees, etc., address the Chancellor, at :;
Tallahassee, Fla.














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