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 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Main
 Back Cover






Title: Old St. Augustine
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/FS00000021/00001
 Material Information
Title: Old St. Augustine
Series Title: Old St. Augustine
Physical Description: Book
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: FS00000021
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0248
ltuf - AAQ0065

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Front Cover 4
        Front Cover 5
        Front Cover 6
        Front Cover 7
        Front Cover 8
        Front Cover 9
        Front Cover 10
        Front Cover 11
    Title Page
        Page 4
    Front Matter
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Front Matter 3
    Main
        Page 7
        Main 2
        Page 8
        Main 4
        Main 5
        Page 9
        Main 7
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Main 10
        Main 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Main 14
        Main 15
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Main 18
        Main 19
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Main 22
        Main 23
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Main 26
        Main 27
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Main 30
        Main 31
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Main 34
        Main 35
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Main 38
        Main 39
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Main 42
        Main 43
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Main 46
        Main 47
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Main 50
    Back Cover
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
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NOLD


ST. AUGUSTINE


BY
MONTGOMERY FOLSOM


FLOMIDA


LIBRARY
ITATI COLLIG ClFO WOMEN
TALIAEtAMB. PLA.


ILLUSTRATED BY
MISS ROWENA GRIFFIN






ATLANTA, GA.
The Franklin Printing and Publishing Company
Geo. W. Harrison, Manager
1905


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COPYRIGHTED 1905 4
BY MISS ROWENA GRIFFIN
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LIBRARY
FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN
OLD ST. AUGUSTINE. TALAHAMI LA.


LD ST. AUGUSTINE has behind it a longer stretch of authentic history than any other city
within the limits of the United States. It is the oldest European settlement in our country,
having been founded by the Spaniards under Mendez in 1565, forty-two years before the settlement at
famestown, Va., and fifty-five years before the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock.
A quaint, old, dead-alive Spanish town of the middle ages, the history of St. Augustine has been
checkered and romantic in the highest degree. The very streets of the old city are romantic and char-
icteristic. They are crooked and narrow-seldom more than ten or twenty feet in width-and all paved
zith shells.
The oldest houses are built mostly of coquina, or shell-stone, quarried on St. Anastasia island, and
:he prevailing style of architecture is very quaint and old, the verandas frequently hanging out over the
streets and almost touching each other across the narrow way.
The site of St. Augustine is a flat, sandy, narrow peninsula formed by the Matanzas river on the
!ast and the St. Sebastian on the south and west. It is separated from the Atlantic ocean by St. Anastasia
Island, which lies directly in front of the harbor, and for miles around it is encompassed by a tangled
undergrowth of palmetto scrub and other bushes.


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A fine sea-wall, built of coquina and with a granite coping four feet wide, protects the entire ocean
front of the city, and furnishes a delightful promenade of a moonlight evening. In full view of this is
the old lighthouse on St. Anastasia island, built more than a century ago and now surmounted with a
fine revolving lantern.
Near the center of the city is the Plaza de la Constitucion comprising about one acre of ground. In
the center of the Plaza stands a monument erected in 1812 to commemorate the adoption of the Spanish
Liberal Constitution. On the eastern side is a soldiers' monument erected in 1892 by the Ladies' Memorial
Association In memory of our loved ones who gave up their lives in defense of the Confederate States."
Farther east is the Old Slave Market-perhaps the most interesting spot on the Plaza to the present
generation.
At the south end of the old city are the United States Barracks occupying a building which was
formerly a Franciscan Monastery. At its north end, commanding the sea front, is old Fort Marion,
formerly Ft. San Marco. It is doubtless the most picturesque structure in America. Like the sea-wall and
other edifices of St. Augustine it is built of coquina quarried on St. Anastasia island. Its construction
required one hundred and sixty-four years. It was commenced in 1592 and completed in 1756. The
labor of building it was performed by negro slaves, Indians and prisoners of war, Every stone of it was
cemented with the sweat of toiling sufferers. With its esplanade, moats, barbicans, draw-bridge, massive
arched entrances, dark passages, vaulted rooms and mysterious dungeons (in which were found in 1835
two skeletons in cages), it is a strangely attractive spot.




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ST. AGUSTINE.


A city built upon the sands
St. Augustine, the Ancient, stands.
Eastward, the black Mantanza's wave;
Westward, Sebastian's waters lave
The marshes stretching toward the main.
Landward a waste of barren plain.
So grim, so gray, and old, it seems
A realm of half-remembered dreams.


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Where rose her walls there's scarce a clod,
Aspires above the levelled sod;
Where trails and clambers, wild and free,
The fragrant rose of Cherokee;
And clumps of stunted cedars grow;
Gnarled willows in the moat below
Whose depth now measures scarce a span,
Shallow as the vaunt of boasting man!









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And clumps of stunted cedars grow;
Gnarled willonw in the moat helow-




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Twin shafts of crumbling brick and stone,
The Ancient gateway stands alone;
Around those once commanding towers;
Now cling the golden jasmine flowers;
While through yon great breach yawning wide,
Oozes a stream whose listless tide,
Emboldened by the sad decay,
Unchallenged winds its sluggish way.


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Twin shafts of crumbling brick and stone,
The ancient gateway stands alone.




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Fair even in age the Plaza gay,
Where fountains shower their crystal spray,
And wreathes of odorous orange bloom
SBurden the air with rich perfume,

And whispering south winds sway and toss
C The long festoons of sombre moss,
In shaded nooks where sunbeams play
At hide-and-seek, the livelong day.


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Fair even in age the Plaza gay,
Where fountains shower their crystal spray.


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But blackened ruins mark the spot-
On this fair scene the only blot-
Where once the old slave market stood
When trafficked men in human blood,
And Afric's sons were bought and sold
Like sheep and swine for Spanish gold;
And rude Oppression forced apart
The tenderest ties that bind the heart!













And Afric's sons were bought and sold,
Like sheep and swine, for Spanish gold.


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Down by the placid river's marge,

Where sloop and schooner, bark and barge,
And gilded yacht at anchor lie,
And white-winged gulls are circling high;

Seaward the current sets, and fast

The ebbing tide goes rushing past;

The waves along the old sea-wall,

In rythmic cadence, rise and fall.


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The waves along the old sea-wall
In rhythmic cadence, rise and fQIl.




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With awe and reverence strong and deep,
I mount the castellated steep.
Beneath whose portals, roughly arched,
The mail-clad Spaniard proudly marched,
While boom of thunderous cannon rolled,
And storms of martial music told
That Spain's broad banner still unfurled
Its conquering folds o'er half the world!




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Beneath whose portals, roughly arched,
The mail-clad Spaniard proudly marched.


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The mitred abbot chanted here
The glad Te Deum, loud and clear,
And St. Iago's name was praised
While trumpets rang and bonfires blazed.
Within this court yard's ample space
Proud Valor paid to Beauty's grace,
On bended knee, the homage due
From loyal knight to lady true.








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The mitred abbot chanted here
The glad Te Deum, loud and clear.


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Above yon rugged arch I trace
Lines that all time can ne'er efface-
Deep graven in the dark-grey stone-
The royal seal of Arragon!
And just below the graver wrote
A name that like a bugle note
Stirred many a heart, nerved many a hand,
The kingly name of Ferdinand!


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Deep graven in the dark-grey stone
The royal Feal of Arragon!


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Deserted now each vaulted room
And voiceless is the donjon's gloom,
My footsteps in the lonely keep
Disturb the hermit echoes' sleep.
Th'Alerta of the sentinel
Is heard no more; the castle bell
Is hushed; and neathh the turret's crest
A brooding screech owl builds her nest.


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Deserted now each vaulted room
And voicelt~ss is the dlonjon's glooml




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Within that tower I sit and gaze
Toward the dull bank of purple haze
Where earth and sky and ocean meet,
And wild Atlantic billows beat
Upon the bar, where ghastly white
The sand dunes glisten in the light,
Like some dead isle's gaunt skeleton
Left bleaching, crumbling in the sun.


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Within that tower I sit and gaze
To'ard the dull bank of purple haze.


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But day is dying! Swift and fleet
f The twilight speeds with flying feet,
While Anastasia's shores grow dim
Old Ocean chants his Vesper hymn.
A widowed seabird sadly croons

Her dismal lay among the dunes,
A thousand stars in silvery sheen
Look down on old St. Augustine.


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A thousand stars in silvey sheen
Look down on old St. Augustine.


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