• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Main
 Back Cover






Title: Pensacola (the Naples of America) and its surroundings illustrated
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/FS00000018/00001
 Material Information
Title: Pensacola (the Naples of America) and its surroundings illustrated
Series Title: Pensacola (the Naples of America) and its surroundings illustrated
Physical Description: Book
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: FS00000018
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltqf - AAA0125
ltuf - AAY6639

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Back Cover
        Page 41
        Page 42
Full Text
















&WD arm
', 7 -.;r----- ---r- 1-
ILr~n

Aa P d


Lg:-.2


Fla
F
319
P4
C5
1962
cop.


p~1
~~4




I

( .


I '


ZlV sO''IIT *Q~tfr w ma .,
;'-'~,t-ru CO.~AST;ic9


.tF ......


I i L -R: A 2 To..'FuSeB.


u3'^-w : ... ... . .


. .


; --










ROBERT MANNING STROZIER

tlBRARY
. . .: .. . . .
Florida State University

Tallahassee
Presented by

T. T. Wentworth, Jr.
Through

FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY







... ..... .







.. 1 __
-2,


1..2.T-T.. . .. ... ., W,


'.'% ,,".. : ;J -l:: ,.. "< "7 ... :-.. . .
& 4,,." ,:.: ..... .. .. ...
>" %. :..'. .r.".'." ". <" > "" "" ".' ..,,.., ,,..i".S ? ":L ,.:- ., . .. '<:" "-
.....
t .,.i-.
V t t .. .. ....V "i g : .- : H" .. . .. ...
W', -'. ':i" 4 .
.:.<.-. !;>.. .. .:. .. . ... Ri
;V. A Rau".. . -. .:,..:
IL X,-; ,.A:: .i-.( . ; .{ ....



.",. ', .l'. " ... . ,.). . . .__ .. .,
z!, R. : 7 : ;i
.'r:;!i..:;:7 : Z .!!'.: ..!::i~o . ... ........"
:, ., .p,
"-'! ., ". .. ,.:.:,b,, "-.. .... ... .: ,': :,O-r,









PENSACOLA

(THE NAPLES OF AMERICA.)

AND ITS


SURROUNDINGS


ILLUSTRATED


U. S. CUSTOM HOUSE AND POST-OFFICE, PENSACOLA.


NEW ORLEANS, MOBILE,
AND

THIE IRESOIRTS OF: THETE G-TTLI COAST.


COMPILED BY W. D. QJIIPLEY,
General Manager Pensacola R.
BY REQUEST OF THE CONVENTION OF APRIL EIGHTEENTH.


PUBLISHED FOR FREE DISTRIBUTION.
COURIER-JOURNAL PRESS, LOUISVILLE.


Historical Collection
T. T. Wentworth, Jr.


T 1








-301~~E~e
ttr3l M~


>c~l



ola 4r- eholO
nza cA!



r~ Cnton C~';ee~icc oint Grany~S
'scrzrns oill
0 krfl Id I~ryo~eltol v

CY Oranyo~~~ooo~~~:if~
_n ,"cek 0
r-I
CDP

C/3 PENSACOLA fy AVIS r

~c, \ r, q?12 T102vin


rn V vx 0 /
L_? M -IVIP OF


_.Ko
TEN SAC O-L
~ :U I Re ,
a nf/v Trct< :Err k,
N F,: NANDSURRUNDNGS
4 PPER-
-r .5.

















FLORIDA.



"THE AIR BREATHES UPON US HERE MOST SWEETLY."



HOW TO GET THERE.
0 FTEN with the tourist,
__J o l ima__ still more frequently
Switch the pleasure-seeker,
and always with the in-
,; valid or emigrant, the
question, "2Row shall I
get there," is of the first
importance, not being
secondary to the desti-
nation. It seems, then,
il "entirely appropriate to
a wit s ( give first the best route
Sto Florida. and tell after-
FORT BARRANCAS. wards of the soft, balmy
atmosphere, and the attractions for the sportsman
with rod or gun. Travelers from Pittsburg and
Cleveland, and west thereof, find their shortest line
to Jacksonville via Montgomery, Alabama.
Consider these figures:
Montgomery to Jacksonville, .... . . . . .... 425 miles.
Montgomery to Pensacola, ...... . . . . . 163 miles.
Difference in favor of Pensacola, ..... ...... .262 miles.
Travelers from all the great Middle and North-western States must go
to Montgomery to get to Jacksonville, if they are ticketed by the short
line. Arriving at Montgomery, they can reach the Land of Flowers, at
Pensacola, within seven (7) hours, against twenty-five (25) hours, the best
known time to Jacksonville.
At Pensacola, the resident of a colder and less genial clime will enjoy
the most perfect transformation. The senses are rapt by the novelty


I r










PENSACOLA AND I''S S. UROUNDINGS.


of the surroundings, the suddenness and entirety of the change. As will
be shown later, the traveler will experience, in addition to the charms of
climate, attractions and excitements unknown to other parts of Florida.
From the East, passengers will find the distance by the most direct
routes as follows:
New York to Jacksonville, . . . ..... . . 1262 miles.
New York to Pensacola, . . . . . . ..... ..1218 miles.
Difference in favor of Pensacola, .. .. . .. . .44 miles.
With the further difference that Pensacola can be reached by a number
of lines, all in perfect order, running double daily trains and long lines of
sleepers, giving fewer changes than are encountered in reaching any other
point in Florida.









................... .. ____ _- _









PALAFOX STREET WHARF. (ILLUSTRATIONS FROM PHOTOGRAPHS.)

PEN SACOLA.
The splendid Bay of Pensacola, unrivaled for its beauty, depth, and
security, was discovered by Panfilo-de-Narvaez, in 1525. Various adven-
turers gave it different names, as Port-de-Ancluse and St. Mary's Bay, but
that of Pensacola, which prevailed, was the true name among the Indians,
the natives of the country. The first settlement was made by the Span-
iards, in 1686. The first governor was Andre Arivola, who constructed a
small fort, called San Carlos, and erected a church upon the present site
of Fort Barrancas. The French took Pensacola in 1719; the Spanish
re-took it, and the French again took it in the same year and kept it until
1722, when it was restored to Spain. In the mean time, Pensacola had
r _---_ok it, ---- th Frnc ag i took it int esmyan et it=-- ti-













I'EZSACL(.'OL ..l ID 7 S SURA'ROUNDv)NGS.


been removed to
the west end of
Santa Rosa Island,
near the present
site of Ft. Pickens,
where the Spanish ~'
constructed a fort,
which afterwards
was improved by
the English General
Haldemand. 'I he J
settlement remain-
ed on the island un-
til 1754, when, the I'
town being partly *i
inundated, the site
was removed to the
magnificent loca-
tion which it now -
occupies. Pensaco- VIE"W OF BAY FROM CENTRAL AVENUE AND SHOT PARK, NAVY YARD.
la was ceded to the English in 763, by whom it was laid off in regular
form in 1765. The town surrendered to the Spanish arms in 1781. On
the 7th of November, 1814, (General Andrew Jackson, with the American
army, entered the town, when the English fleet in the bay destroyed the
..: forts, San Carlos (at
W*.. -Barrancas) and San-
IL X. ta Rosa. Spain rec-
ognized "manifest
7k destiny" in 1819,
and ceded to the
'United States the
entire territory of
Florida. She was
-- -admitted into the
I Union as a State in
1:845. During the
i war between the
J I, I' i States, a consider-
/ able portion of the
old Spanish build-
ings were destroyed
BARRACKS AT FORT BARRANCAS. (FROM PHOTOGRAPH.) but many still re-


_ __








6 PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.


main, and their quaint appearance strikes the stranger immediately. Since
the war Pensacola's advance has been marked. Its population has been
more than doubled, and its progress in architecture can be seen by the
illustrations in this book. Extensive docks have been constructed, and
other improvements accomplished, which stamp Pensacola as a growing
city.
.... .. .. .. -- -


THE CITY AND SANTA ROSA HOTELS. (ILLUSTRATIONS FROM PHOTOGRAPHS.)


PENSACOLA'S COMMERCIAL IMPORTANCE.
As this publication is for the eye of the pleasure-seeker, invalid, tourist
and sportsman, but brief mention will be made of Pensacola's commercial
importance. Pensacola Bay, spacious enough to accommodate the navies
of the world, and deep enough to load and discharge the largest vessel
alongside the railroad docks, renders Pensacola's position unrivaled. Its
easy access to and from the Gulf, its direct accessibility to and from the
Western, North-western, and Central Southern States, must furnish a very
large regular and rapidly increasing business in transportation to and from
its ports, not only of lumber, but also of cotton, grain, coal, iron, and all
the products of the West Indies and South America.
It is but necessary to add Pensacola's Annual Marine Statement for the
year ending July i, 1877, to astonish the uninformed.


Foreign vessels entered. . 270,
American . o,
Coasting . 210,

Total vessels . . 590,


tonnage 200,801,
35,560,
59,208,

295,569,


men in crew 4,273.
987.
(" 2,198.

7,458.


The value of Exports from Pensacola during the same year amounted to $2,291,822.








































































MARINE TERMINUS PENSACOLA RAILROAD.


(ILLUSTRATIONS FROM PHOTOGRAPHS.)









8 PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.

Consider 7,458 men coming to Pensacola each year from every quarter
of the Globe, the 1,200 stevedores and assistants who make Pensacola their
winter home, and its resident population of 6,ooo, and it can truly be said
that Pensacola offers more stir, variety, and reality of life than any city in
Florida. What port in the State, or in America, can show over 200 square
rigged vessels in its harbor at one time, as is often the case at Pensacola?
This attraction will steadily enhance, as arrangements are being perfected
to export iron and coal in increased quantities, via Pensacola; and cotton
and grain shippers have at last awakened to the remarkable facilities
that are offered by the port, and the exportation of both has been fairly
started.

CLIMATE, HEALTH, SOCIETY, CHURCHES, SCHOOLS.
Florida has been called the Italy of America, and the thousands who
have breathed its genial, healthy, life-giving atmosphere will cheerfully
testify that it is no misnomer. In summer the heat is tempered by a gulf
breeze of softness and purity unsurpassed, and the thermometer seldom
reaches 920. Dr. J. C. Whiting, from thermometrical observations at his
hospital, in Pensacola,
gives the following ta-
ble of mean tempera-
ture for 1876:
January ..... 54-71
February ..... 54-56
March ...... 64.98
April . . . 62.93
May . . . 75-40
June ....... 8I.oo
July . . . 84-55
August .. . . 84.10o
September . .. 81.44
October. . . 71.34
November..... 58.89
December. ..... 49.60
l ..The "Indian Sum-
mer" of the Middle
A,1.. and more Northern
States closely resem-
bles a Florida winter,
-._ and will convey a bet-
.. ter idea than can be
written of a season
which in Florida ad-
,, mits of life in the open
A. STODDARD S RESIDENCE. ( FOI PHOTOGRAPH.) air, while citizens of








PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS. 9

the North are hovering
over great fires or shiv-
ering in heavy wraps, as
the rude blasts of winter
cut to the bone. The
fact that the thermom-
eter rarely falls below
320 fits Pensacola as a
grand sanitarium for the
whole country. Three
times within twenty-five
years yellow fever has
scourged Pensacola, but
in every instance the ep-
idemic was traceable to
some ship from an infect- i
ed port. In no instance
has the disease ever orig-
inated in the city, nor
does it ever extend into RESIDENCE OF COMMANDANT AT NAVY YARD.
the country beyond the city limits. A proper quarantine always protects
the city, and in 1875 it kept Pensacola free from fever, even when it was
raging at the navy yard, where it was, carried by a, marine who surrepti-
tiously visited an infected vessel for the purpose of trading.
Liability to yellow fever being controlled, Pensacola's baths, boating,
and fishing are rapidly increasing its popularity as a summer resort. Winter
and summer its healthfulness is marvelous, except during epidemics. To
winter visitors the fever is of no concern, as it is gone before they come.
They luxuriate in a soft, salubrious atmosphere, with health in every
breath. All classes of chronic diseases, such as diarrhea, dysentery,
rheumatism, diseases of the kidneys, and incipient pulmonary cases are
benefited and relieved by a visit to Pensacola.
Invalids in the advanced stages of phthysis pulmonalis who have visited
St. Augustine have experienced the too stimulating effect of the salt air.
This class will find the same difficulty at Pensacola, with this difference
and advantage: They can remove into the interior, and among the piney
woods breathe the salt air of the gulf modified into gentle zephyrs, which
the invalid may safely inhale, and which never fail to re-animate and ben-
efit. At the same time the location is not out of the world, but within less
than twelve hours' journey from the cities of New Orleans, Mobile, Pensa-
cola, and Montgomery. Statistics testify to the healthfulness of Florida.
Notwithstanding the fact that so many thousands of consumptives resort








10 Pa MSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.

to the State for relief the proportion of deaths irom pulmonary complaints
in it is less than in any other State in the Union. The census of 1870
showed that these deaths
were as follows:
Massachusetts . one in 283

e mnt. ...... 463
New York ...... ,, 379
Pennsylvania. ,, 470
Ohio ..... 507
California ..... . 450
Virginia ..... . 585
Indiana ...... . 599
Illinois ...... . 698
Florida .... .. 1,433
The Presbyterian, Meth-
odist, Episcopal, Baptist,
and Catholic congregations
r vi t n of Itlli 1 s111 bs lini bIIlli y have comfortable church
buildings. The illustration
shows the Episcopal Church
EPISCOPAL CHURCH. the oldest house of worship
in the city, having been constructed more than half a cen-
tury ago. The system of public schools is liberal and
efficient, and in addition a number of private schools are well supported.
Principal among the charms of Pensacola is its society. The people are
pleasant, refined, and intelligent, and the stranger is surprised at the cor-
dial hospitality extended from every quarter.


HUNTING, FISHING, BOATING, BATHING.

By consulting the map of Pensacola and its surroundings, the reader will
observe the net-work of water-courses, bays, and bayous centering at that
city. The water is clear, bright, and beautiful. Surf bathing upon Santa
Rosa beach as enjoyable as language can express, the salt water bathing in
the bath-houses of the bay, and bathing in fresh water as clear as crystal,
can all be had within a distance of seven miles. One may weary of St. John
River, which at first impresses the beholder as grand, hut soon becomes
monotonous. How different the broad, beautiful Bay of Pensacola! On
its rolling waters one can never tire. For lovers of St. John scenery the
Santa Rosa Sound offers a magnificent substitute, with Live Oak Planta-
tion skirting its bank on one side, and only Santa Rosa Island, with its
narrow strip of soil, between it and the blue waters of the Gulf of Mexico
on the other. The Perdido Bay is one of the loveliest sheets of water in the









PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS. i I


State, rivaled by the Escambia Bay, with its bluffs and ever-movings fleets.
Any attempt to particularize becomes confusing, as the special beauties and
attractions of the different bays and bayous are remembered. Escambia'
River is the "Ocklawaha" of West Florida. The stranger who wishes to
enjoy a short trip will be pleased as the steamer plows through the broad,
placid waters of Escambia Bay, and then delighted with the luxuriance of
the tropical growth as the vessel winds its way up the narrow and tortuous
channel of Escambia River to Molino. At this point the excursionist can
take the train and return by rail to Pensacola.
The fresh water fishing is superb. The waters literally swarm with all
kinds of fish, notably trout, black bass, and pike. All varieties of perch
abound, including a special kind, a very game fish, called bream. It is
not unusual for a good angler to pull out fifty to sixty of these fish in an
hour, weighing from a half to one pound. Both in salt and fresh water
fishing is carried on with pleasure and profit the entire year. In the bay
and bayous every description of salt water fish abound, and in the season
fifty cents will purchase half a dozen Spanish mackerel of the size for
which the epicure pays seventy-five cents for one half in the restaurants
of New York City. These fish, and the salt water trout, give special
excitement to those who love a contest with a very game fish. No one
can claim to have seen what fishing is until they have visited the snapper
banks off Santa Rosa Island. There the famous red snapper can be
caught, two at a time,
weighing from five
pounds to sixty, as
S rapidly as the line is
."! thrown in. The limit
to the quantity catch-
able is commensurate
with the physical en-
durance of the catch-
er. An illustration is
here given (from a
photograph) of four
fish caught by a party
in Pensacola Bay.
One weighing 214
pounds was drawn
out after it was killed
by shooting, by Thos.
R. Hopkins, No.194
SPECIMEN OP PENSACOLA FISH. (FROM PHOTOGRAPH) Fulton st.,NewYork.












12 PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.

It is claimed that no one can know the flavor of fresh fish until he has
eaten a Pompano, at Pensacola. Pensacola's importance as a fishing point
is best described by
the true statement
that its dealers ship
all kinds of fish to
Mobile, New Orleans
Sand other points, by
the car load. An-
_ other very attractive
amusement is turtle
hunting, on Santa
Rosa Island. It is
not unusual to find
Sas many as 18o eggs
Sapao in one nest. From
Sthe Junction to Pen-
sacola, all around
the city, and oppo-
site it, in Live Oak
Plantation, every de-
..._...... scription of game
RUINS OF FORT M'RAE, WITH FORT PICKENS IN THE DISTANCE. can be found, in
large numbers, including deer, turkeys, and partridges, with an occasional
bear. It should impress every one that it is not necessary to exile one's
self, and endure all the imaginary pleasures of camp life, to secure the best
possible sport with rod and gun; both are within from one to three hours'
drive, sail, or walk of the hotels. The splendid duck shooting at the
mouths of the rivers, in season, should not be forgotten. Oysters of the
finest size and flavor are taken in any quantity wanted. Attention has
been turned to planting the bivalve, with fine results. Last winter, Mr
Alexander Stoddard, of No. 175 Broadway, set out 750,000 in Bayou
Texar along the water front of his fine estate.
This chapter would not be complete without mentioning the facilities
for reaching, via Pensacola, St. Andrews' Bay, St. Joseph, Apalachicola,
and other famous fishing grounds and hunting fields of the Florida coast.
Wild turkeys are seen between the rails of the Pensacola Railroad, and
. along its line partridges roam apparently without fear. From its coaches
the crack of the rifle can be heard as it brings down a deer. It is when
the sportsman tires of this game, and desires an encounter with a bear,
wild-cat or panther, that he needs tc seek St. Andrews and the contiguous
country.








PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS. 13


THE VICINITY OF PENSACOLA.
The pleasure of boating at Pensacola is not confined to fishing or idly
rolling on the mighty wave, or smoothly plowing the placid waters; but
added to these charms are the numerous places in the vicinity to go to.
The stranger who may visit it will not wonder at finding first on this list
Santa Rosa Island. Upon its beach, mid-day in its overflowing brilliancy,
makes the beholder feel as if, according to Milton, "Another morn had
risen on mid-ndon." The sunset comes with a splendor and glory un-
known to more Northern climes. As the ever-moving waves roll, with per-
meated and ever-varying colors, upon the snow-white sand, one feels the
awful supremacy of the Almighty, and the littleness of man, in a manner
conveyed by no other sight in nature. While on the island, very few
visitors fail to find an interest in collecting shells and sea-beans. Then
comes a visit to Fort Pickens; this grand and historic old edifice, though
denuded of a portion of the iron dogs of war that used to bay, not "deep
mouthed welcome home," but roars of defiance, still possesses a multitude
of pleasant and interesting sights and objects that make a visit there both
profitable and agreeable.
Across the bay is the Navy Yard, and just west of the Navy Yard is
Fort Barrancas. Both are beautiful and will interest the most indifferent.
Added to the novelties to be seen, is the delightful society enjoyed by
all who know the hos-
pitable and intelli-
gent officers of both
the garrisons. Below
Barrancas is the Pen-
sacola Light-house,
illustrated on the
cover of this book
from a photograph,
and said to be the
finest light on the
Gulf. Near by is
Fort McRae, once
familiar with all the
"pomp and circum-
stance of glorious
war," but where now
the solemn bat reigns
supreme, in a silence
only broken by the CENTRAL AVENUE, NAVY YARD.









14 PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.

never-ceasing roll of the mighty ocean, as the wild waves dash upon its


once proud walls. Years
as enduring as granite,
but the Gulf threatened,
and for a time its fall was
averted by the construc-
tion of an immense sea
wall. The rolling waters
could not be withstood,
and the illustrations will
show the condition of its
ruined battlements,case-
mates, ramparts, and
posterns, which are now
tumbling to decay. It
is at McRae that the
searcher after shells and
other marine treasures is
most successful. With
the old Spanish fort, the
pretty villages of Milton
and Bagdad,the LiveOak


ago it was built upon a foundation which seemed





S _--_--=-- ---- ... --


RUINS OF FORT M'RAE, WITH LIGHT HOUSE IN THE DISTANCE.


Plantation, bays, bayous, sounds, and rivers, this chapter might be extended
indefinitely. Suffice it to say that the visitor at Pensacola must tire of going,
seeing, enjoying, long before the list of attractive places to go to have been
exhausted.

WEST FLORIDA-ITS LOCATION AND PRODUCTIONS.
West Florida is in no respect an agricultural country at present, for the
reason that heretofore the timber interest has absorbed the entire energies
of the country. The timber wealth is on the surface, but under the surface
lies hidden wealth which is yet to be dug out of the soil. The climate, as
explained in a previous chapter, is semi-tropical and devoid of extremes in
heat and cold. The country is the best watered in the world, and its health-
fulness is as near perfect as that of any section of the Globe. It is only
necessary to let its attractions and advantages be known to see in a few
years the entire State dotted with happy homes, churches, schools, and
villages. Great fertility by virtue of soil the lands of West Florida do not
possess, nor can the combination of extreme fertility and health be found
in any new country. But vegetation here performs the prodigy once attrib-
uted to the chamelion, it lives on air. Let it but obtain a hold in the earth,
and an atmosphere which seldom knows a freeze seems to compel it to grow
















11i1


VI

*1 1 I II llII *III IIIII 111 Il ll



PRIVATE RESIDENCES, PENSACOLA. (FROM PHIOTOGRAPHS.)









16 PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.

and come to bloom and fruitage in the fine'yields of the country. Drouths
are not usual, but when they occur crops seem to stand them much better
than in higher lati-
tudes. The soil gives M
a generous return for
all applications of fer-
tilizers. Nothing is
grown in East Florida
north of Melonville,
that will not grow in
West Florida,with the
difference that eligible
land can be bought in
the latter section for
one tenth the prices
charged in the form-
er. The first settlers
in West Florida will
find a large and re-
a e BLACKWATER (FORMERLY BAGDAD). SIMPSON &.CO.'S MILL.
munerative market at
home for their truck and other products; articles now brought from the
up-country by the train-load to supply the resident and visiting population.
When the home supply has been met, the farmer will find the lines of trans-
portation cheap, quick, and reliable, leading to the great Middle and North-
western States, where the fruit shipper from Florida will not encounter the
disastrous island competition met with in the cities of the East, where East
Florida finds its principal markets. The nearer proximity of West Florida
to the interior markets, by nearly twenty-four hours express and over thirty-
six hours freight train travel, must create a steady and rapid advance in its
agricultural interests.
The new-comer will find lands on the railroads for sale, but should other
points be preferred it requires but a glance at the map to note how all the
rivers, bays, sounds, and bayous, from the Perdido to the Choctawhatchee
River, center in Pensacola Bay, making Pensacola their natural business
metropolis, to whose market crops can be floated safely and cheaply.
Every description of melon and vegetable, and all the cereals can be
grown, and of the latter suitable kinds can be used successfully for green
soiling or for winter pasturage, to assist the immense ranges during the
months when the grass and cane are least nutritious. It would astonish a
"down-country" planter to see the yield of rice upon these uplands; and
sugar cane also makes a remunerative return. It is when fruits are consid-
ered that the advantages of the country appear pre-eminent. Lands within








PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS. 7

a stone's throw of the railroad, worth from $2 to $3 per acre, make the
finest peach orchards in America, the yield being of superior size and flavor,
and the trees are remarkably long lived. Lands for oranges, lemons, and"
other semi-tropical fruits, unsurpassed by any in the State, can be had at
from $5 to $25 per acre, which with similar location in East Florida would
cost $50 to $ioo per acre, notwithstanding the advantage of transportation
is with the cheaper lands. It would be a grave oversight to omit mention-
ing the prolific pecan tree, the luscious pears and plums and very fair
apples which the soil produces.
West Florida seems to be nature's vineyard, so great is the yield of the
numerous varieties of grapes. First, the fruit can be sent to supply the
early markets of the North, and later, wine can be manufactured. For the
latter purpose the scuppernong, which grows to special perfection, is very
greatly prized. Lord Raleigh landed in North Carolina, near Newbern,
nearly two centuries ago; he there tasted the scuppernong for the first time,
from a vine still in existence, which three years ago, it is said, yielded
forty-two barrels of wine.
White, in his description of this grape, says: "We consider this very
peculiar grape one of the greatest boons to the South. It has very little
resemblance to any of the grapes of the other sorts. It is a rampant
grower and requires little, if any, cultivation. It blooms from the fifteenth
to the last of June, and ripens its fruit in West Florida about the latter part
of August. 'It has no disease in wood, leaf, or fruit, and rarely, if ever,
fails to produce a heavy crop. We have never known it to fail. Neither
birds nor insects ever attack the fruit. We are credibly informed that a
vine of this variety is growing near Mobile, which has produced two hun-
- dred and fifty bush-
_els of grapes in a
year, and we know
that vines ten years
old have given and
will give thirty bush-
els per vine. From
three to three and
a half gallons of
juice can be gotten
from a bushel of
these grapes, ac-
cording to ripeness.
It is the sweetest
and most luscious
BLUFF. SPRINGS MILL. (FROM PHOTOGRAPH.) of any grape we









18 PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.


have ever seen or tasted, makes a fine, heavy, high-flavored, fruity wine,
and is peculiarly adapted to making foaming wines."
It would run this theme through innumerable pages to dwell upon the
luscious strawberries and other delicacies, but, at the risk of being prosy,
the fig must not be overlooked. This fruit, so delightful when eaten ripe
from the tree, is the best dried fruit known, and is without a parallel as a
preserve or pickle. Mr. Alexander Stoddart, of 175 Broadway, New York,
has now every known variety (twenty-two) on his place, and in a few years
the pickling for market from his place alone will reach a large amount
annually. Mr. Stoddart added sixty acres last year to his orange and
pecan groves and orchards of peaches and figs. His vineyards and straw-




















BLUFFS, ESCAMBIA BAY. (ILLUSTRATIONS FROM PHOTOGRAPHS.)
berry beds have been more than doubled, and in another year he will
be running refrigerator cars to the various markets of the North.
The Escambia bluffs shown in illustration above are on the place of
the Yniestra Brothers. At this beautiful spot, a veritable Eden, can be
found all the products of Florida, including several thousand orange trees.
The buildings under the bluff are the sheds under which the bricks for the
Dry Tortugas forts were made. These bluffs extend for miles, offering the
most desirable location in all Florida for orange groves.
The land is slightly rolling, dry and arable, except occasional swamps
near the mouths of rivers and heads of some of the bayous and bays.
The rain fall is sufficient, and on the streams,with which the country is so
magnificently watered, can be found numerous and superior water-powers.











PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS. 19


TURTLE-EGG AND ALLIGATOR HUNTING ON SANTA ROSA.
Santa Rosa Island is a sand key of the Gulf, forty miles long, and
varying in breadth from a fifth of a mile to over a mile across; it is the
breakwater of Pensacola Harbor, and receives the shock of the rolling
seas of the Gulf of Mexico which often break against it in fury, while the
waters of the bay within are still as a mill-pond and scarce a ripple washes
the beach of the city front seven miles away, though the water at the city
is as salt as that in the center of the Gulf. The sea beach of the island is
a gently sloping expanse of white sand, back and forth on which the
advancing and receding waves will glide for hundreds of feet. You can
stand where no water is
one moment, and the
next be struggling waist
deep against a surging
wave that is climbing up
the strand. This beach
is the incubator of the
great turtles of the Gulf.
Its gradual incline, the
easily excavated sand
beyond, and the warm
southern exposure,adapt
it to their approach, the
making of nests, and
hatching of their eggs.
So they resort to it for -
this purpose, and in due
time the young turtles
are hatched, unless the RESIDENCE OF HON. C. W. JONES, U. 5. SENATOR.
eggs are captured by the various creatures, biped and quadruped, who seek
them in the season. From Pensacola over to the island is about seven miles,
and as the land breeze of the night sets fair across the bay, it is a pleasant
trip of moonlight nights to run over on a sail-boat, land on the bay shore,
walk across the island, which is not a third of a mile wide opposite the city,
and seek for "turtle crawls" on the Gulf beach, or bathe luxuriously in the
surf. The "crawl" shows on the sand where the under shell has been
dragged along, and following this up to a point above the wash of the
highest waves, the nest is found, usually about two and a half feet below
the surface. A single nest will contain from ioo to 300 eggs. At Sabine
Pass, on Santa Rosa Island, alligators are found by the ten thousand, and
are killed in large numbers by hunters who frequent the place.








20 PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.


PENSACOLA'S TIMBER TRADE.
The immense forests of
----- Tpitch pine tributary to Pen-
--. ssacola, notwithstanding the
large business annually trans-
acted, have as yet only been
a -d_-_ .a d w ---- worked on the edges lying
alongside the creeks, rivers,
lakes and bayous. Untold I
acres of virgin forests remain
to be stripped of the growth
of many centuries, to give
place to the farmer, whose
e labor will make the land smile
MUSCOGEE SOUTH MILL. with a luxuriant wealth of
vegetation. This transition must be gradual, and for years to come Pen-
sacola's superior supply, in connection with its absolutely secure harbor
and a depth of water which can load a vessel to twenty-three feet within
six feet of cars on the railroad docks, must continue it as the chief timber
port of the country. The busy whirr of the saw will be heard for at least
a quarter of a century before existing forests are gone, and as one growth
is cut away another will spring up where the plow of the farmer does not
prevent. On the line of the Pensacola Railroad are four mills, two belong-
ing to the Muscogee Lumber Company, the Molino and Bluff Springs, with
a cutting capacity of over sixty millions of superficial feet per annum. At
Millview, connected with Pensacola by the Pensacola & Perdido Railroad,
are six mills, with a capacity of sixty-five millions of superficial feet each
twelve months. Simpson's mills, Blackwater, Skinner's, Wright's, Bay Point,
Bayou, and others make the aggregate cutting capacity of mills contiguous
to Pensacola exceed two hundred million feet per annum. In addition to
this sawn stuff, thousands of pieces of hewn timber are floated down the
streams to market. Even the forests of the Tombigbee and Alabama rivers
have been made tributary to Pensacola, by an arrangement to float the
timber to Tensas Station, Alabama, and transport from that point by rail,
after it has been loaded by steam machinery. This timber will be dis-
charged at Pensacola into a boom whose capacity exceeds ten thousand
sticks. As it. is alongside the railroad docks, within the corporate limits of
the city, and not more than three hundred feet from water thirty feet deep,
the arrangement must give a wonderful impetus to Pensacola's timber trade.
It affords absolute security against blows, and avoids the expense and risk
of towage from Ferry Pass-in short, it is perfect.


























V


PERDIDO BAY LUMBER COMPANY'S MILL, MILLVIEW. (ILLUSTRATIONS FROM PHOTOGRAPHS.)


| m


lo o










22 PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.




--_ ---- - __:_-




















ESCAMBIA RIVER SCENERY.

SWEET FLORIDA, GOOD-BYE!

A SONG.

WRITTEN BY MR. DRAKE, CLERK OF MAJ. OGDEN, U. S. ENGINEERS, UPON HIS DEPARTURE FROM FLORIDA.
(Popular in Pensacola thirty years ago.)

Sweet Florida, good-bye to thee!
Thou land of song and flowers,
Where generous hearts and beauty dwell
Amid thy fragrant bowers.
The interest deep, the love I feel,
Bound by each genial tie,
Bloom like thy sweet magnolia.
Sweet Florida, good-bye!
Sweet Florida, good-bye!


I go to seek another clime,
But go where e'er I may,
The love I bear to thee and thine
No change can chase away.
Santa Rosa's snow-white sands
Are fading from my sight;
Farewell awhile to thee and thine.
Sweet Florida, good-night!
Sweet Florida, good-night!











PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS. 23


MOBILE, NEW ORLEANS, AND RESORTS OF THE GULF COAST.
MOBILE.
Mobile lies in latitude 300 41', at the head of the bay and mouth of the
river of the same name. The surrounding country, broken into beautiful
undulations, is covered with pine timber, the resinous exhalations from
which give such celebrity to this region as conducive to health. These
hills and valleys are carpeted all the year with green grass which grows
luxuriantly amid the tall pines of the forest.
Mobile possesses peculiar attractions to the seeker after pleasure, com-
fort, or health. Its climate is mild and salubrious; its inhabitants genial,
hospitable, and refined; its residences abound with evidences of a culti-
vated taste, and here may be
seen during the entire win-
ter flowers in full bloom and
trees loaded with oranges.
Here also the mere seeker
after ease may enjoy that com-
fort denied in a colder and
more inhospitable climate,and
the more robust may enjoy
field sports within easy reach
of the city. The bay swarms
with fish and ducks. Snipe
and woodcock frequent the
savannahs of the pine lands,
and the rolling hills, rising
hundreds of feet, are haunts
of the partridge and deer. WOOLSEY ENTRANCE TO NAVY YARD, PENSACOLA.
The water of all this pine region is peculiarly pure, and its streams are
clear and beautiful. The soil is sandy, and consequently, even in wettest
weather, there is practical freedom from mud. Fruits and vegetables are
grown during the entire year in the open air, while fresh and salt water
fish, and game, complete the attractions of the market.
No place affords more delightful drives or smoother roads. The visitor
is confined to no special one, though the loveliest of all is the shell road,
which leads through groves of magnificent magnolias along the margin
of the broad and lovely bay.
This bay lies between many points of interest to the student of history.
Near its outlet is Fort Morgan, occupying the site of old Fort Bowyer,











24 PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.

which once repelled a large British fleet, and where recently a yet more
famous strife took place. Near this and opposite is Fort Gaines, and
further on Fort Pow-
ell, while at the head --- -=-
of the bay is Spanish
Fort. Around all of
these many memories. -
cluster. At various
contiguous points are s
mounds erected by
an unknown people, i1
and in these mounds
are found the re- -
mains of these ex- _

Near the city, onI- 'el
the line of the Mobile .4
& Ohio Railroad, are
many healthful re-
sorts, chief among -
which is Citronelle, BIRD S-EYE VIEW OF NAVY YARD, PENSACOLA.
a village rapidly becoming famous for the salubritry of its atmosphere, so
peculiarly favorable to those suffering from pulmonary disease. This town
is reached by a special accommodation train in addition to the daily mail
service. And along the eastern shore of the bay are villages, with cheap
and comfortable accommodations for boarders, as far as Point Clear, where
there is a large, commo-
--- _-- -dious, and well-kept ho-
tel, all reached daily by
a pleasant trip on a fine
low-pressure steamer.
From Mobile to New Or-
leans, distant 140 miles,
the railroad skirts the
Gulf of Mexico, and all
along are villages and
cottages where may be
combined the peculiar
-attractions of this coast
and all the appliances of
civilization-daily mails,
RUINS OF OLD SPANISH FORT NEAR PENSACOLA. telegraphs, and rapid











PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS. 25


transit to near and great centers of population. All this region is expedi-
tiously and pleasantly reached by the Mobile & Ohio R. R., which stretches
out its arms 500 miles northward, and by the Montgomery & Mobile R'y,
extending to Montgomery, with connections to all points west and north,
inviting from colder climes the pleasure seeker, tired man of business, and
invalid, to enjoy themselves and recuperate in its balmy air.


---


YNIESTRA BLOCK, PEINSACOLA. (FROM PHOTOGRAPH.)
NEW ORLEANS.
New Orleans! How the mere sound comes freighted with visions of
pleasure, luxury and comfort. The Paris of America it certainly is, but
its delights are not confined to the g1) etick of life. Within its abundant
resources every taste and disposition find their full measure of pleasure
and ease. It would be a superfluity for these pages to dwell upon the
attractions of this glorious old city, for they would repeat things charming
enough in themselves, but as familiar all over the country as household
words.
The tourist would be well repaid by a visit to this grand old city, filled
with monuments of historic lore. Here are the famous plains of Chal-
mette, memorable by the rout of the British by Jackson. Here also Forts
St. Philip and Jackson defending the entrance to the city.


~g~855~s~-


- -ZL









26 PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.

The French Market is a unique feature of New Orleans, with its many
varied and attractive stalls laden with every luxury in the shape of game,
fruit, vegetables, fish, oranges, etc. One meets representatives of all the
nations of the earth, all talking at the same time in their respective tongues,
and making a perfect Babel of sounds. This market is-celebrated over the
entire country for its delightful coffee, and no visitor to the city fails to visit
the market for the purpose of trying it.
Numberless lines of city railway cars traverse the principal streets,
affording rapid transit from one point of interest to another. The Branch
Mint, on Esplanade Street, when in operation, is well worth a visit. A ride
on the levee, with its forests of masts and shipping, steamers, flat-boats,
and barges which line its side for miles, is novel and pleasant.
The Jockey Club Course, Fair Grounds, and the various cemeteries,
monuments, churches, and other public buildings, afford innumerable
points of attraction. In fact it would take too much time and space to begin
to enumerate the many points of interest or places of amusement, for their
name is legion. This city is noted for the hospitality of its people and the
beauty and elegance of its women.
Previous to the opening of the New Orleans & Mobile .Railroad the
attractions of the Gulf Coast of Mississippi, either as a summer or winter
resort, were of comparatively local celebrity. The only means of commu-
nication was a daily line of steamers, running between New Orleans and
Mobile, and stopping at the various points along the coast; and yet thou-
sands of families from
____ _-__- ^the interior of the states
,_ -- adjoining were regular
visitors, season after
season, while a great
many built residences
and occupied them per-
manently. But from
the date of the opening
of the railroad, and the
more r-apid, frequent,
and convenient con-
,M l munication thus estab-
lished, the advantages
of a sojourn on the
the coast became more
widely known, and peo-
ple from all parts of the
A PINEY WOODS HOME, FLORIDA. (FROM PHOTOGRAPH.) country came, both as


r








PENSA COLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS. 27


summer and winter -- --
visitors. Possessing
a remarkably mild, --
pleasant and healthy
climate, fanned by
the salt day breezes
from the Gulf, the
shade heat of sum-
mer rarely exceeds 1 1/
85 and the cold of
winter scarcely ever
reaches the freezing
point. The great
abundance of game, i
fish,and oysters, and
the fine sailing, row-
ing, and bathing, en-
tice the visitor to that
healthful out-door -
recreation which PENSACOLA & PERDIDO RAILROAD WHARF, PENSACOLA.
makes a sojourn at any of the points along the coast no less enjoyable than
beneficial to health.
Beginning at Waveland Station-about forty-five miles from New Or-
leans-a line of residences, almost unbroken except by the bays and inlets
of the coast, extends for nearly fifty miles. Clustering together here and
there, by the side of some broad and quiet bay, these seaside homes form
themselves into villages, at which the railroad company has established
stations, and where the visitor finds hotel or boarding-house accommo-
dations, churches, schools, and all facilities for healthful enjoyment.
A vast pine forest, seventy-five to one hundred miles wide, and reach-
ing almost the whole length of the coast, mingles its balsamic odors with
the salt breezes of the Gulf, bringing health to the feeble and pleasure to
all. Millions of wild fowl of all descriptions swarm about the bays and
marshes during the winter months, and the hunter never fails to bring back
abundance of game from his excursions among the neighboring islands.
Oranges of unsurpassed flavor are grown in abundance along the whole
coast. Not a residence or hotel that does not have its bearing orange
trees, and at various places extensive orchards of this most delicious fruit
are to be seen flourishing side by side with the peach, pear, apple, fig, and
olive tree. In addition to the attractions of a healthful, mild and equable
climate, fully equal in all respects to that of Florida, a short ride over one
of the finest and best equipped railroads in the country, takes the visitor








PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.


sojourning on this coast to New Orleans or Mobile, and thus combines all
the pleasures and comforts of city life with those of the winter resort. No
traveler, seeking either health or pleasure, will fail to appreciate the advan-
tage of this nearness to the unvarying round of winter amusements for
which New Orleans is so justly celebrated.


CONTINENTAL HOTEL, PENSACOLA. (FROM PHOTOGRAPH.,


WAVELAND STATION-47 Miles from New Orleans.
At this point the residences on the coast begin, and extend side by side,
to the bay of St. Louis. There are as yet no hotels, but several private
boarding-houses will accommodate visitors. The soil is well adapted to
the culture of almost all fruits and vegetables. Several extensive orange
orchards and scuppernong vineyards are now under successful cultivation.

BAY ST. LOUIS-52 Miles from New Orleans.
This thriving village is situated on the western shore of the Bay of St.
Louis, and extends around on the Gulf front. There are three very com-
fortable hotels and many private boarding-houses. Population about 2,000.
Episcopal, Presbyterian, Methodist, and Catholic congregations. Two
public and several excellent private schools for both sexes. One of the
loveliest views in the South is that presented to the traveler approaching
Bay St. Louis by the railroad from the east. The broad Bay on the right,
and the waters of the Gulf on the left, with the beautiful sweep of the












PENSACOLA AND ITS SURROUNDINGS. 29


shore, covered with verdure, and crowned with its line of neat white cot-
tages, form a picture of calm and lovely beauty which can not but charm
the senses of the traveler seeking rest or health. The railroad company
has erected a costly and handsome station-house at this point, where pas-
sengers breakfast and dine.
Commencing far up the shore of the Bay, a well kept shell road, eight
miles in length, runs along the top of the bluff around the point, and west-
ward on the Gulf shore for several miles, making one of the finest drives
in the country. Several large oak groves in the vicinity of the station are
being fitted up by the railroad company for picnic grounds.



















STREET SCENE, PENSACOLA, WITH RESIDENCE OF LATE HON. S R. MALLORY, EX-SEC'Y C. S. NAVY,
IN CENTER.
PASS CHRISTIAN-58 Miles from New Orleans.
Pass Christian has a permanent population of about 2,000. There are
three handsome church edifices: Episcopal, Presbyterian, and Catholic.
Three public schools, a fine school for young ladies, and a very excellent
private school for boys; also a Catholic institution for small children.
Several good hotels and private boarding-houses. Furnished houses can
be had at reasonable rates by the month or season. Pass Christian is justly
celebrated for the number of handsome residences it contains, and for its
fine shell road, extending along the entire water front of the village.

MISSISSIPPI CITY-70 Miles from New Orleans.
Mississippi City is the county seat of Harrison County. It has a per-
manent population of about 400. Two good hotels-the Tegarden Hotel,
situated near the station, and convenient to the water, and Barnes Hotel,
directly on the front. Excellent fishing and boating all the year around.










30 PENSACOLA A\D ITS S'URR (NL XD LYS.

BILOXI-80 Miles from New Orleans.
Biloxi has a permanent population of over 2, 1oo, and is one of the
most thriving towns on the coast. It is situated on a peninsula formed by
the Back Bay of Biloxi and the Gulf, being thus almost surrounded by fine
fishing and ducking ground. Deer Island, a narrow strip of land, a short
distance off the froiit of the town, is a favorite resort for both hunters and
fishermen. There are four churches: Methodist, Baptist, Episcopal, and
Catholic. Good public schools, and several fine private educational insti-
tutions. The Montross House and other fine hotels and boarding-houses
offer excellent accommodation to visitors.











i-- --









MOLINO MILLS, PENSACOLA RAILROAD.
OCEAN SPRINGS-85 Miles from New Orleans.
The situation of Ocean Springs differs from other towns along the coast,
in the fact that the land here rises to a greater altitude and is more broken
or rolling. On the west it faces the Bay of Biloxi, and on the south the
Gulf. At various points in the town and vicinity mineral springs, posses-
sing rare medicinal qualities, are found, the virtues of which were tradi-
tional with the Indians who formerly inhabited the coast. The population
of the town is about 1,900. There are four churches: Methodist, Baptist,
Episcopal, and Catholic. One public school and four private institutions
of learning. The Ocean Springs Hotel has been recently purchased by
Northern parties, and completely furnished, with a view to the entertain-
ment of Northern visitors. In addition to the fishing, hunting, and boat-
ing to be enjoyed at this point, the mineral springs are highly recommended
by the medical faculty for the relief of many chronic diseases.
_- ----- .





OCEAN SPRINGS--85 Miles from New Orleans.



























If /
iA\


SI


I/


) IK I
.- 2. r
'sty,


-H- x ...- L
-. r - l l ,f t1 .') 1 ' .* ,* _
- ll ] ^ .,';.,- Z .
.-- ; 7 ^ '1 : \ ., -, s -_- . _.^


:- "\ I- ,- - ." - -
.-- r -', -


\L
Sr' ,-/.:_ ...


-1 -_ ,
1 -::-


b,, ,K, 'H


VerYCruf / - ._ J . ; - J.\- C. -,. .

- f" ". - -. \ - "*
I---- / '-. i Y ry "- Y\ r.. f-





MAP OF THE '




]RAILWAY &MARINE r
I m 17 1
-:- -' :_. -,, - "- -
,-! ------ .-- "-----.'J v i. I ., '---- -- ^t : /
-t1 -,, \ t "'\'' '" :- --





S_- PENSACOLA.._ -"./_ .-, ' _
MAP OF THE _--- _-. -, .. .-- -
-RA I L WA Y .- M A , I .- I I" -- 1 : y ...


.P -N S -,,_ ^ ,- L.,,.., ........ ,',. ,_ ^ ^, V^ ^ U 7 ,_**


'I
.;"t 1*


.-
!I


' -


' ,I I, "*








FROM ALL PQNlXrTS


NORTH, EAST AND WEST

THE DIRECT I=NE


To Pensacola, Fla.
IS

o VIA LOVISVIZLEL. (-


TWO DAILY EXPRESS TRAIN'S
RUNNING

tunllman alace gfars through

LEAVE LOUISVILLE, MAKING CLOSE AND DIRECT CONNECTIONS
ALL THE WAY THROUGH.

THEBE ARE HO DETENTIONSI
NO UNPLEASANT CHANGES I

The Route Through is composed of A No. I RAIL LINES, unsurpassed
by any Route in the South.


TRY TUE
LoaPlsvill.e aad Great ndotthern Linen
C. P. ATMORE, Gen'l Passenger and Ticket Agent.


~~;~ ~ ~










MOBILE & OHIO RAILROAD
THE POPULAR LINE BETWEEN

New Orleans, Mobile, Pensaool,

AND ALL POINTS SOUTH AND SOUTHWEST,
AND

CHICAGO

V-IA- IIIOBILE -AJITD ST. LOTTIS.

.THE ONLY LINE RUNNING

PULLMAN PALACE AND SLEEPING CARS
betweenn t. 4ouis and Xew zleans,

-'VW IT I-I O T- T C EI A NT G- E_ )
CONNECTIONS.
At COLUMBUS, KY., with St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern Railway.
At UNION CITY, with Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway.
At RIVES, with Paducah & Memphis Railroad.
At HUMBOLDT, with Louisville & Nashville & Great Southern Railroad.
At JACKSON, TENN., with Mississippi Central Railroad.
At CORINTH, with Memphis & Charleston Railroad.
At MERIDIAN, with Ala. & Chat., Ala. Cent., and Vicks. & Meridian R. R'ds.
At MOBILE, with New Orleans & Mobile Railroad.
At MOBILE, with Mobile & Montgomery Railway for PENSACOLA.
PASSENGER TRAINS ARE FULLY EQUIPPED WITH
Westinhlouse Air Brake and Miller's Safety Platform and Conller.
Tickets can be obtained via this Route at all
PRINCIPAL TICKET OFFICES IN THE U. S. AND CANADA.
BATES ALWAYS AS LOW AS VIA ANY OTHER LINE.
A. L. RIVES, C. FLEMING, CHAS. L. FITCH,
Gen'l Manager. Ass't Gen'l Sup't. Gen'l Pass. Agent.
Aw'For a Copy of this Book Free send your address to W. D. CHIPLEY, Gen'l Manager P.RR., Pensacola, Fla,


i ---- ~s~sU ;.iix :I;u'*~wsrrxnril.-~p;;-sxr*rurans~j~.~pa ,i:"- ~-~i~i~W










FLjOI:IDA..
The wonderful salubrity of the climate of Florida is destined to make it the refuge
of those who seek to escape the rigor of a Northern winter, so that the choice of a route
is, of course, the first and most important consideration to those who intend going there.
We would, therefore, invite the attention of our friends and patrons to the splendid
facilities afforded by the
ST. LOUIS & SOUTHEASTERN RAILWAY.
Being the SHORT LINE between St. Louis and the Southeast, the traveler saves many
miles by purchasing his tickets'via this popular route.





RAILWAY,

cHTHE SHORT LINED
And positively the Best Route from

ST LOUIS TO NASHVILLE, TENN.,
Where it connects for all points

SOTJTI- A'T3D SOTTTIHEAST.
INCLUDING
Chattanooga, Atlanta, Augusta, Macon, Brunswick Savannah, Jacksonville,
Fla., Charleston, Decatur, Huntsville, Montgomery, Pensacola,
Mobile, New Orleans, Bristol, Knoxville, Lynchburg,
Petersburg, Norfolk, and Richmond,
THUS FORMING THE
Great Trunk Route between these Points, St. Louis and the Great West,
Travelers, remember this is the PASSENGER AND MAIL ROUTE.
It affords you the advantage of

pullman palace cleeping(ars on all fight (rains
Arrangements have been made whereby we are enabled to furnish Tourists with

ROUND-TRIP TICKETS TO PENSACOLA, FLORIDA
AT GREATLY REDUCED RATES.
Also, EMIGRANT TICKETS have been placed on sale by this Line, and special
inducements are offered to Colonists and Emigrants.
J. H. WILSON, Gen'l Manager. JNO. W. MASS, Gen'l Pass. & Ticket Agent.
W 'For a Copy of this Book Free send your address to W. D. CHIPLEY, Gen'l Manager P.R.R., Pensacola, Fla,


C


- -- ---












I



NEW ORLEANS
-) AND (-

A-AE1LIL :POINTrS IN J TEXSJLAS
VIA THE






Washington, Richmond, or Lynchburg and Atlanta.
THROUGH PULLMAN CARS PHILADELPHIA to NEW ORLEANS WITHOUT CHANGE,

1NTEW OIT; LEAi21TS, VIA


Through Pullman Cars NeB York to Cincinnati-Through Pilllman Cars Cincinnati to New Orleans,

Passengers via Montgomery can take Pensacola en route, or passengers via Mobile
can diverge at that point for a visit to the Bay City.
As an additional feature for the accommodation of Western Travel going South,
attention is called to the
THROUGH PULLMAN SLEEPING CAR
Leaving St. Louis daily, at Io P. M. on the
St. ;ouis 4 Jron Mountain, Mobile 4 ghio and New rleans 4 Mobile Road
Arriving at Naw Orleans at II.25 A. M. the second morning.
Connection with this car is made from Eastern Cities, via Chicago or Indianapolis
by either of the Great Trunk Lines Westward, without change of Cars.
aWALL THE ADVANTAGES OF MODERN TRAVEL
Are thus given to every section of the country over
i THIE MOBILEE LII3TE!
The equipment of this line "has no equal south of the Ohio River."
The engines are of the first class, and always in perfect order.
The Day Parlor Cars are models of elegance, fully equipped with the Automatic
Air Brake, and all conveniences for the toilet.
Elegant Eating-Houses, smooth track, beautiful views and fast time.
S. E. CARE Y, F. P. MARSH, D. B. ROBINSON,
G. P. & T. A. New Orleans. E. P. Agent, New York. Sup't, New Orleans.
iW-For a Copy of this Book Free send your address to W. D. CHIPLEY, Gen'l Manager P.R.R., Pensacola, Fla.


-- --------;m. -~jL~~,- -.I,....-.~.-







-- TH- -


$ t.f(trnis Vrn litam & $rnittin

RAILWAY
OFFERS THE BEST PROTTTE



AND ALL POINTS WEST AND NORTHWEST,
TO -


SENSACOLA

6 jNobile and gew orleans.

EXPITEQSS TEIrA.TITS
WITH

PULLMAN SLEEPING CARS
TO PRINCIPAL POINTS
Tbwrogh Withouvt Qhange.

For Particulars call upon or address E. A. FORD, Gen'l Passenger Agent,
St. Louis, Mo.; or
H. H. MARLEY, Northern Pass. Agent, 04 Clark St., Chicago, III.
AwFor a Copy of this Book Free send your address to W. D, CHIPLEY, Gen'l Manager P.R.R., Pensacola, Fla.


I








-rTE -


K^ 4t c rt & '/ f r1aw


AILAGREAT THORO



GREAT THOROUGHFARE


TO TI-E-

G-1JTLF POINTS

AND THE

Cities in Southern and Central Texas.



The longest continuous lines of Sleeping Cars in the world are run over this line,
which, on account of its

Natural Position, Bapid Transit and Sre Connections,

Has been awarded the Fast Southern Mail. This line is equipped with all the modern
appliances-Westinghouse Automatic Air-Brakes, Miller Platforms, etc.
Consult the latest official Time Tables, AND COMPARE THEM WITH ALL OTHER
ROUTES, and see the advantages gained in points of time and seasonable hours of
arrival and departure at all principal cities


EDMUND L.TYLER, Vice-Pres't and Sup't,
MONTGOMERY, ALA.


GEO. NASON, Gen. Pass. and Fr't Ag't,
MOBILE, ALA.


IAFor a Copy of this Book Free send your address to W D. CHIPLEY, Gen'l Manager P.R.R., Pensacola, Fla,










EXCURSION RATES
TO -


3 FLORIIDA _

THE


Pensacola Railroad

IS THE ONLY LINE
BY WHICH


a taU 4t rtatlt 1 W14 Xosi an tirfl t$
INQUIRE OF TICKET AGENTS EVERYWHERE.



CHEAP HOMES
ON LONG CREDIT.
THE PENSACOLA RAILROAD WILL SELL 80,000 ACRES OF LAND
UPON THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS:
EVERY ALTERNATE QUARTER SECTION (160 Acres),
OR EVERY ALTERNATE HALF SECTION (320 Acres),
Will be sold to actual settlers who will make improvements, at
] 0 Cents per Acre Cash;
25 Cents per Acre in one year, no interest;
25 Cents per Acre in two years, no interest;
25 Cents per Acre in three years, no interest;
25 Cents per Acre in four years, no interest;
$3 for Cost of Deed.
Let the many who are looking to Florida as their future home prospect in the
West, as well as the South and East, before they determine on localities. The Western
portion of Florida can well afford to risk the comparison.
For further information, or a copy of this Book Free, address
W. D. CHIPLEY, Gen'l Manager, Pensacola, Fla.


~


L-









S TITHIE PEOPLE'S FAVORITE "






(-- .---------- ---------- ---------- ----
SHORT LINE

t RAL 0 OAJD.

THE QUICKEST, BEST AND -ONLY LINE
With which Passengers from the South make direct connection at Louisville with

PULLMAN PALACE SLEEPING CARS
Running through to
tittsburg, garrsburg, (Philadelphia, few York and other (astem cities
WITIrHOTJT CIAT.TG- E.

This is the Only Line by which Pullman Southern Sleepers are run from New
Orleans, Mobile, Jackson, Miss., Montgomery, Grenada, Decatur, Jack-
son, Tenn., and Nashville to Cincinnati, and from Cincinnati to same
points without change.
The Only Line by which Pullman Palace Sleepers are run between Louisville
New York and other Eastern Cities without change. Passengers en route
to or from Pensacola have no change of cars via this line between Cin-
cinnati and Pensacola (Junction.)
Through Sleepers from Atlanta, Chattanooga, Little Rock, Memphis and
Vicksburg make direct connection at Short Line Junction with Through
Sleepers to New York and other Eastern Cities.
This is the only line running its entire trains from Louisville to Cincinnati and
vice versa thereby causing no delay to Passengers (incident to other
lines) by having to wait at Junctional Stations for delayed trains from
other points in order to proceed to their destination.
It is Stone Ballasted, has a smooth track, and is entirely free from dust.
Tickets can be purchased via this line at all Ticket Offices in the North,
East and South. Ask for Tickets via the Louisville and Cincinnati Short
Line., (L., C. & L. R. R.)
S. S. PARKER, Gen'l P. & T. A. JOHN MAC LEOD, Gen'l Sup't.
JOHN KILKENY, Gen'l Traveling Passenger Agent.
rFor a Copy of this Book Free send your address to W. D. CHIPLEY, Gen'l Manager P.R.R., Pensacola, Fla.


i










4BEE LIN E

The B-est Lamte to Fleia.
The Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati & Indianapolis Railway (Bee Line) is
the only Direct and Commodious Route from Ontario,Western
New York, Northern Pennsylvania, and Ohio,

To Pensacola, New Orleans, Mobile,
BILOXI, MISSISSIPPI CITY, PASS CHRISTIAN,
And all Pleasure Resorts of the Gulf Coast.
ONLYTj O2NTE CIAN-WGE OF CARS.
THREE TRAINS DAILY VIA INDIANAPOLIS.
TWO TRAINS DAILY VIA CINCINNATI.
(Morning Trains from Cleveland do not run Sunday.)
For particular information inquire of your nearest ticket agent, or address the under-
signet..
S. F. PIERSON, Gen'l Ticket Agent.


B. W. M REDIZR & cQ>, PjrqpriFtgro S



ENGRAVERS, LITHOGRAPHERS,


BIANK QBOOK MAKERS




CORRESPOND DENCE SOLICITED.
ESTIMATES FURNISHED.
This pamphlet was issued from our Establishment.
For a Copy Free send your address to W. D. CHIPLEY, General Manager Pensacola
Railroad, Pensacola, Fla.








fr:.4.. ..'. .
. ..


!i!: ;: 7.-
;:': .:,.,:'.: ...





*4.4.


... ..." ... ........
:,: ": :."";... ', : :': :

.. ...".. .
. .. ,
: ".. ; !. .: : '..


'.......


e,4:







rx;
-N: ' .0i








Mrr

i~a:1
"* "4.





A V;v



~~~~:4444



gas.. t1: :;:


,: .. .:.-... : ...


FuO::DA STATE UNIVERSITYM.''. .
; I 1l 111111 1111111 liii III III 111111ll l 111111 1111 11


I
i:



; ;


3 1254 02604 5423 : :. .


" :. ", .. : ,. 4 **










,." .. ..."" ... ... .. ": .::* ..............

:.. ":- 4...:
..... :, ," : ,* :, :'; ,, c ,,-,,












S ". "" ".- ", -." ,."" :. : ". : ",.. ::," ". "d
..* ., * ".. ,::.* . : :
















: . .... ... .. . "..... ...:..
'' ' :" .' : ..;.. .' :. ,' " ,:' "" "::F i

", ....::": ; ."




S :* .. .. .. .: .. .- :. : ::;:. . ; :.: : .;.: ^^..::,% :...
:*. : : .. * . i I : :

. ... .. . :. *:.* i : .:. ;'.: : :.. ":
:**' ^' : ^ :: :, ,:. :: ;,.: '.^*:,


















:, : .. ... : ~ ., ;.<, .:l l~i: ...." ,. ,. ;


.


.- -







7, 7 4 F ', 1117T
-kf
Q'I
IYT







VA,
gt v,
I I An114 lil













































IFT A 11,
""T' N, I




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs