The Spectrum : Student Voice of The College of The Bahamas ( March 2009 )

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Title:
The Spectrum : Student Voice of The College of The Bahamas
Uniform Title:
The Spectrum : Student Voice of The College of The Bahamas
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Newspaper
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English
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The Spectrum
Publisher:
The Spectrum
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Nassau, Bahamas
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )

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Digital Library of the Caribbean
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College of the Bahamas, Nassau
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CA03399630:00009


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4 The Spectrum

Db~ VilnrmncE 14 d Iuu MiaclO09 O V u 'ruA (du l


INSIDE


BIGGEST TURNOUT


Jamaal


Knowles


/ Wins


COBUS


I Election


In the biggest turnout in student election
history at The College of The Bahamas over
3 i- -, .. I h ,:; . ,: .if .1. . d
T Ih .l.. if b i' 1...1 ,' 1 1. itj-
cers for the 2009-2010 COBUS. President
Elect Jamaal Knowles, a Science &
Technology major received 568 votes com-
pared to 478 for Renbert Mortimer and 204
for Delvano McIntosh, the other candidates
for president.
Election was organized by the present
COBUS headed by Perry Newton who said
the big turnout was "due to hard campaign-
ing by the candidates, on the ground visible
support and the fact that some candidates
brought voters to the poll."
Vice Present elect Antonio Butler
received 599 votes compared to other VP
candidates Brooke Sherman who received
510 votes and Uranda Curtis who got 121
votes. Seepage 14 to see the breakdown on
this well-organized election.


STILL ON SCHEDULE
President Says COB Is Ready for University


* by Kendra Chlmer
Editor
In February the Nassau Guardian report-
ed that Minister of Education Carl Bethel
said COB may have to wait two or more
years to become a university but President
Janyne Hodder told The Spectrum, "We are
ready now."
Minister Bethel is reported to have said
that The College of The Bahamas' transition
to university status could take "two years or
it could be 10" and that the Bahamas
Cabinet would soon decide on whether to
"expedite The College's move to university
status or place it on a slower track."
President Hodder said that while she is
not aware of the context in which the
Minister made his statement, it still doesn't
change The ( .II:,. ; c : r i I,,, i,, l.11 11
ing university, .i i i ,: :.'. ', ,,. :
offer the degrees; we have the faculty. We
have improved online registration," she
emphasized.
Asked what was needed before COB
would be able to achieve university status,


the President said, "The government has to
adopt charter legislation to make COB a
university and that's what we're waiting
for" She explained that university status
does not involve internal action by COB but
is an Act of Parliament. "As it stands now,
we can operate as a perfectly fine universi-
ty offering primarily undergraduate
degrees."
Obviously the Presidents position is sup
ported by her administration but many stu-
dents agreed with Minister Bethel's
remarks. Many said it could be years before
COB is a university and cited a host of rea-
sons for this opinion -- from problems with
registration, to computer printers not work-
ing in the library and labs, lack of class
availability, lack of faculty and resources.
One student summed up his point of view
by saying, "COB is disorganized, lacks
resources and is just not up to university
standards."
But there are others who are eager for
The College to be recognized as a universi-
ty preferring to focus on the quality of edu-
cation received here. "I feel as though this is
the best tertiary institution in our country


and that the education we receive here is
comparable to other universities in the
region," said one Business major who
echoed the view of many students. Many
students acknowledged that progress has
been made, noting the opening of the
Wellness Center, the addition of more com-
puters around campus and the construction
of the new library. President Hodder said
that this new library should be completed
by Fall 2010. Also on the agenda for
improvements is a campus-wide wireless
network which should be up and running by
Fall 2009. These are all part of The
College's agenda to become a university
that supports national development, she
said.
COB also has large support for universe
ty status in the wider community. Former
Education MinisterAlfred Sears who wrote
in a letter to the editor of The Guardian said
The College had completed virtually all the
requirements for the move to university sta-
tus and that the only other steps to be taken
were for government to amend laws that
established the institution.






U The Spectrum March L' ', *.


M *v *


* Reviewed by Nikera Cartwright

WATCHMEN
Comic books are not my thing but after
seeing the preview for Watchmen I was a
bit intrigued. I went in as green as grass
anticipating the plot that would explain
what these less than ordinary superheroes
were all about. World peace and fights
against global threats are recurring themes
in most of today's films but a clever thing it
was to incorporate superheroes in the mix!
Set in the 1980's, Watchmen offers an intri-
cate look at how a league of masked men
and women served and protected through-
out American history and how their brash
way of saving the day caused them to lose
favor with their once adoring public. When
one of the masked crew is murdered, it
forces the league out of retirement and into
an investigation.
The special effects, narration and dia-
logue are just as entertaining as the action
scenes. This movie has a little bit of every-
thing. The gore and grime is offset by
romance, history, politics and the plot to
save the world. The film is graphic which
adds to its authenticity. I loved that this
movie is far from typical, with real unique


kY/il!i IV'Il 1
characters that each get a time to shine. If
I had to pick a favorite character it would
be "Rorschach" mainly because he is dark
and seemed to be most dedicated to keep-
ing the Watchmen alive. I'm thinking it
might not be so bad to explore the world of
comic books after all.
If you're looking for a movie that keeps
you guessing and anticipating what comes
next, then Watchmen is the one. You'll
think you know how it's going to end but
guess again! It's definitely one of those
films that you have to watch more than
once!


Galleria Cinemas




Monsters Vs. Aliens New 1:30 3:45 N/A 6:15 8:30 10:35
12 Rounds New 1:05 3:30 4:30 6:05 8:25 10:50
The Haunting In Connecticut New 1:10 3:40 N/A 6:10 8:35 10:45
Knowing T 1:25 3:25 N/A 6:00 8:20 10:40
I Love You Man C 1:30 N/A 4:30 7:30 N/A 10:35
Race To Witch Mountain B 1:10 3:35 4:00 6:10 8:35 10:45
Last House On The Left C 1:05 3:20 N/A 6:05 8:20 10:40
Watchmen C 1:00 N/A 4:00 7:00 N/A 10:00
Street Fighter T 1:10 3:35 N/A 6:10 8:35 10:45
Tyler Perry's Madea Goes To Jail T 1:05 3:40 N/A 6:05 8:30 10:55
Taken C 1:15 3:30 N/A 6:15 8:30 10:55



Monsters Vs. Aliens New 1:00 3:30 N/A 6:10 8:35 10:30
The Haunting New 1:25 3:40 N/A 6:20 8:40 10:35
Knowing T 1:05 3:30 N/A 6:10 8:35 10:40
I Love You Man C 1:20 3:45 N/A 6:15 8:30 10:45
Race To Witch Mountain B 1:10 3:35 N/A 6:05 8:25 10:35
Tyler Perry's Madea Goes To Jail T 1:15 3:40 N/A 6:10 8:30 10:40


by Patrick Deveaux



ri vor

WHAT MAKES A MAN

Ever felt like you were too good for
your friends? Well hopefully they find out
how you really feel about them and never
speak to you again you self righteous cre-
dent.
However this is for all those who feel
their friend's are light-years ahead of them
in every aspect of existence. Let's hear it for
the misunderstood and the unappreciated.
You are the ones who decide to mess with
society's preconceived notions. Who boldly
go against the norm and challenge expecta-
tions, even though it's sometimes not even
on purpose.
We're talking about the pressures of
adulthood, the turmoils of growing up and
the heavy burden of wearing the title of
"man" and or i..In.II." Seeing that those
of the female persuasion basically have a
free passage to womanhood called "puber-
ty" we'll just focus on the guys for this one.
So what makes a man? Surely the world
has gotten over the cliched car obsessed,
sports addicted and aimlessly aggressive
image of the "real man." So what if your
knowledge of cars doesn't extend beyond
the passenger seat. So what if you'd rather
read the second installation of the Twilight
series instead of watching basketball play-
offs. So what if you can't tell the difference
between a wrench and a pair of pliers (lots
of people can't actually). Does all the crap
really make you less of a man? One may be
quick to disagree claiming that in these
modern times just as women have broke out
of the traditional mold, it is also okay for
men to use more brain than brawn.
Subconsciously though we all still think
with gender biases and our opinions are still
somewhat guided by the influence of
socially assigned gender roles.
It becomes really difficult when a guy
sees everyone around him excelling. By
nature men are competitive creatures so
even if they could care less about walking
around looking like a giant ball of macho
cheese that's what appears as real manhood.
As a result a man begins to think something
is wrong with him, thinking that he should
act more like the manufactured idea of
"man" despite himself. Slowly he spirals
into low self esteem and feels inadequate
amongst his peers. Poor borderline homo-
sexual guy, why can't he see that it is alright
that he doesn't fit the mold? Tsk tsk.
Take this scenario for example. A cou-


pie is driving to any of the two beaches
that are still suitable for locals to use on
this island, and their car runs hot. So the
Woman gets out and goes to look under
the hood while the guy sits in the car. It
just feels wrong, right? Automatically you
begin to think it should be the other way
around. Conversely there could be a million
reasons for this ever so strange occurrence.
Perhaps, the woman could have been a for-
mer lesbian. Maybe the guy could have had
an embarrassing accident in his pants and
did not want to leave the vehicle. Of course
there is still the chance that he may in fact
know nothing about cars and his girl friend
does. Who knows if that is even a realistic
thought? Though that lady can accept her
man as he is, society is laughing at him
behind his back.
And so are we just kidding.
Guys, women no longer want to be seen


.,

-7// i


Darius -- Ready to challenge expectations of
what makes a man.

as fragile, feeble and subpar. So it's okay to
keep that "S" on your chest covered more
than you're used to. A man can still exist as
a man even if he prefers the pen over the
sword.
Now this isn't an excuse to be a pansy.
Nobody likes pansies. They despise compe-
tition (very unlike men of course). So you
can be a man and be who you are. No mat-
ter if you don't like sports, or suck at handy
work. Although it's a plus to at least have an
inkling of knowledge about something
another than useless computer garble.
Surprisingly, what makes a real man will
always have more to do with a mature men-
tal state than with physical prowess. Hard to
believe right?






The Spectrum March 2009


COB Signs Branding Contract

One of the many things that engage The decisions that will eventually produce a
College as it prepares for transition to um- new brand identity and a more smarter or
versity is the creation of a Brand Identity modern image to the University
Branding refers to the establishment of According to President Janyne Hodder
physical symbols of The University of The at the time of the contract signing with


i..u EL


* Branding Identity Contract -- President Janyne Hodder discusses the features of the new
branding identity contract with the College signed in January with Karma Design Group. Seen
here at the press conference are; Partner and Creative Director Eva Pyfrom, Karma Design;
Partner and Account Director Brian Goudie, Karma Design; President, The College of The
Bahamas, Janyne Hodder; and Creative Director, Karma Design Nicky Saddleton.


Bahamas such as, school colours, logo,
mascot, short (abbreviated) name
(e g COB) and other marketing tools
All this is a creative process that takes
time to achieve so recently The College
announced that it had contracted the firm of
Karma Design to collaborate with the insti
tution on a new brand identity for the soon
to be University of The Bahamas
Karma Design, one of several compa
nies that competed for the contract, was
awarded nearly $50,000 to help define what
this 35-year old institution new Brand
should be So far a number of focus groups
compnsing a cross section of COB com-
mumty students, faculty, staff, alumnu-
have provide research maternal to help
guide the design company in its creative


Karma Design m February, "Creation of a
new brand for the anticipated University of
The Bahamas is a pivotal step in the transit
tion process for The College "
The new brand identity is expected to

* embody the institution's mission and
strategic pnnciples,
* convey a comprehensive and corn
polling identity that distinguishes the
university from any other,
* create an effective visual identity and
* enhance recognition and credibility

Karma's job include working with the van
ous focus groups, assessing responses of
these participants as well as those who
n Continued on page 14


SLmndsay Braynen


SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE,
LIVES UP TO THE HYPE
Very rarely does a movie truly deserve
the enormous amounts of praise it receives
For Slumdog Millonaire-a movie that pretty
much swept all the award shows, even
receiving the coveted Oscar for Best Picture
such praise is a massive understatement I
was completely blown away by this literal
'rags-to-nches' story of young Jamal Mahk
[played by Dev Patel], a 'slumdog' who has
amazingly found himself one question away
from winning 20 million rupees [or one mil-
lion dollars] on India's "Who Wants To Be A
Millionaire?"
Due to a tip off from the wary host, Jamal
is arrested on suspicion of cheating before he
can return to answer the final question As he
is being questioned as to how an uneducated
street boy can somehow answer twelve ran
dom questions correctly without cheating,
Jamal allows the officer and the viewing
audience a look into his past, and how his
tragic life has helped him answer each of the
questions correctly
Flashbacks show his turbulent childhood
with well-meaning, but misguided older
brother Sallm [Madhur Mittal], their unmnten
tonal involvement with local gangsters, and
Jamal's devotion to find fellow orphan Latka
[Frieda Pinto] as they are separated and
reunited time and time again His story takes
you through the unflinchng poverty and bru
tality of the slums of Mumbal, and the deep
est depths of loss, betrayal, survival, redemp
tion and unwavenng love You find yourself
rooting for Jamal as he takes on one penlous


million-dollar question everyone is anxious
to have answered
Director Danny Boyle was bnlliant in his
juxtaposition of the flashback scenes in rela
tion to Jamal's interrogation and explanation,
as well as portraying the game show as the
'ultimate escape' and lifeline for Jamal and
Latka The music was refreshingly authen
tic and entertaining [everyone's favonte preg
nant Grammy/Oscar-nominated rapper
M IA contributed an original song as well as
her hit 'Paper Planes" to the soundtrack], and
the actors especially the children portraying
Jamal, Sahm and Latika, did an excellent job
at remaining believable Overall, an enjoy
able film deserving of its praises and then
some, so see it while it's still here I can't wait
for the DVDI


I Intervie 6ithCO1 *- S -Pra Candidate-


* Nikera Cartwright
Staff Writer

Campaigning for the new COBUS got
started a little earlier than usual although
not early enough for some campus com-
mentators Its also seemed that the cam
paigning was more energeticand better
organized this time around
From the start of March there were rallies,
debates, signs, banners and even websites
all pointing to the fact that COBUS elec
tions would be held March 25th and 26th
Its also seemed that the teams were better
know than the individual candidates
"Team Success" was headed by Renbert
Mortimer and his running mate Uranda
Curtis under the slogan, "Bringing the
'US' back in COBUS." They were known


for chanting the words "Fired up! Ready
to go!" Mortimer's motivation for running
was to create a unique COBUS which
would not compare itself to past student
governments The outlined platform for
Team Success was (1) Connection -con
necting COBUS, students and the adminis-
tration (2) Commitment -partnership and
(3) Service background work
Mortimer's goal was to revamp the
presidency by raising questions such as
whether or not two students should sit in on
College Council meetings He also hoped
to create opportunities and incentives for
students and student representatives
Another team dubbed themselves as
"Team Student Power" under the slogan
"The Current That Unites" Jamaal


Knowles and Brooke Sherman led this
team with a long list of senators Knowles'
reason for running included a wish to see
change on COB's campus and his passion
to empower students to stand up for their
beliefs He onginally ran for Vice President
but switch his candidacy for COBUS to
President
Despite having to change positions,
some of the goals of Team Student Power
were to make sure each student's voice is
heard, to ensure student safety, increase vis
ability of campus secunty and fix COB's
infrastructure Student awareness was high
on the list of pnorities and Knowles
planned to revise the Constitution and pub
hsh it on a future COBUS website which he
hoped to create Team Student Power also


said that COB students should be involved
in national issues and hoped that together
they can be the voice of change and trans
formation
Presidential candidate Delvano
Mcmtosh ran under the theme "Restoring
Truth, Trust and Student Power."
McIntosh position was that students have
lost trust in student leadership based on the
shortcomings of the current administration
He hoped to restore this trust by promoting
student awareness He said COBUS should
make students aware of their nghts and
responsibilities via emails as well as
through a "COBUS speaks" page on COB's
website His major goals are to implement
a new Constitution void of inconsistencies,
* Continued on page 14






I The Spectrum Marh 2009



Campus Characters


.ette The Edi


Sby Joanna Lomus


* GET YOUR PHONE CARD--Banygh
"The phone card guy" shows off his best
side and his five and ten dollar phone
cards BTC couldn't do it better

COB campus is like a pepper pot, an
eclectic stew that makes this tertiary inst-
tutlon different and invariably unique
There is a rhythm and a flow to the campus
that menically, by the time one catches on
to it, it's time to graduate And in this
rhythm there are perons who march to the
beat of their own drums, bells or whistles
These are the colorful COB 'characters '
Whether staff or students, they are
"characters" that are recognized across
schools or matriculation levels because
they add something special to campus life
One of the most notable campus charac
tears is Teddy Charlton, known affectionate
ly for the most part, by the student body
and staff as "PLF
Charlton who has been working at The
College for over 20 yean as a security off
cercan be found in the secunty booth at the
entrance to the Portia Smith Building He
proudly told The Spectrum, When I won
the essay competition in 1962, I got to meet
Sir Lynden Pindhng and that was the great
est day of my ife "
The reason 'PLP is a notable character
is because he will tell anyone within
eashot at anytime, about the great legacy
of the PLP which he refers to as the fist
majority rule political party in The
Bahamas
Another campus character is Banygh
Watson a third year Business Management
major, known as 'Banygh the phone card
guy' He sells cell phone air time in five
and ten dollar amounts around campus He
is hard to mss but his favorite place is at
the end of the walkway by the School of


Communication and Creative Arts
Watson s enterprise got started as a way to
make money to support his school fees and
so far business has been good
What makes Watson so memorable is
his unique sales pitch Get your phone
card needed ladies (or gents), tens, fives,
whatever ya need "
Recently Watson came up against cam
pus security who has been asking him to
move along and stop selling his phone
cards on campus They told him campus
laws do not permit soliciting but Watson
argues that he is pmviding a need service
to students and should not be penalized for
serving that need
Whatever the resulting decision,
Watson's entrepreneurial skills and unique
advertising approach, add spice to campus
life
There are other who may count as
campus characters in the minds of many
students, maybe even the foreign lecturer
who pmnounces Bahamas as Bahamer,"
despite being automatically corrected by
her students, may be considered a 'charac
ter'
Characters are just memorable people
who make college hfe grand And perhaps


* CHARACTER -- Teddy 'PLP' Charlton
smiles as he reclines in his booth at Porta
M Smith Building, forever ready to talk
about his favorite sublect-the Progressve
Liberal Party (PLP)-and how proud he is to
be called 'PLP'


20 years from now when you try to describe
things that were special about your college
to friends and colleagues and find it diffi
cult to bring these colorful character to
life, you will probably find it best to laugh
and say "Guess you had to be there "


Dear Editor


And why is the Colle
new spaces or enhance p


I am appalled by the decision of the dents who make up the m
College to cram like sardines all stu the school? I believe it is
dents vehicles into a single parking to see that whilst I find
space in the western end of the campus park on the section pr
What anger me further is the fact parking made available
that the College has gone out of its way faculty are empty
to enforce its parking rules The high- Something cannot b
tech digital gates are manned with this May I suggestthe C
physical security guards, whlst thesar sections at all parking s
dine can area has cars being broken into dents, at least 10 spaces I
and some stolen far as the same is given
Is the College serious about making staff near the TBlock
the campus attractive for working stu describe as the saidine ca
dents? And how can this be if students
are being turning away from every Signed
parking space on the College grounds
except in the small western section of Disgusted overParking
the campus?


ge not seeking
acking forstu
ajonrty here at
gmssly unfair
it difficult to
v.ded for us,
for staff and

e rght about
allege set asde
paces for stu
Forths is only
to faculty and
, or what I
an


Questions you sk Answers provided by VP Acdemic Affairs

Q I it tru that COB i revising the length of omedegreeprogramsuch as th BA in
Accounting-from 138 credits back to 120 creditsr

A. It is not correct to say that we are changing the BBA from 138 to 120. We will
be looldng at all of our programs es we review them and determine the number of
courses which should be included in these program s. It is not unusual for some
bachelor degrees to have more credits than others

Q Why is it that there are so few courses offered during the summerr Will the College
offr a second summer semester again

A. The Faculty are not required to teach in the summer and are expected to devote
this time to professional development. Many universities use this time to do
research, revision of programs, professional development, etc. Very few courses
tend to be offered in the summer. Usually, the courses are the lower level ones. Of
course, I am speaking about bachelor programs. Some universities run master's
programs in the summers, but at the moment, there are no plans to offer a second
summer session.

Q What must a student do if they want to change their maor

A. If a student wishes to change his/her major they should first discuss this with
the faculty dvisor and/or chair of the School and then complete a change of major
form.

Q What are the relevant details of COB' disciplinary policy for students involved in
fights on compusi

A. COB has a Disciplinary Board which deals with incidents such as fights. An
investigation is conducted and depending on the findings, a student could be sus-
pended or expelled. Everything depends on the circumstances but once a decision
is made by the board the student is informed. Before sanctions are administered,
the student has a right to appeal. This process is outlined in the Student-Handbook,
starting from page P122.








C Spectrum

S 3 Art Block
The College/Unverslty of The Bahamas
Oakes Field Campus
Tel (242) 302 4483 F (242) 326 7834
Email spectnm@cob edubs

EDITORIAL& CONTRIBUTING STAFF
Managing Editor Kendra Culmer ACCA
Production Editor Carvel Fanci Jr M Corn
Production Assistant Trais Cartight Carroll,EDU
Features Editor Chakara Bennett, ENG
Cartoonist/Reporter Patrick J Deveaux, ENGLIT
Staff Writer Reva Devi, PUBA
Special Assignments JoanaLo, EDU
Movie Reviewer Nikera Cartwnght EDU

REPORTERS
Csandra Nonage, Zenova Pinder, Jssca Simmons,
Sanova McPhee, Shannaka Hall and Thea Johnson
Caroonist Emerald Sands

FACULTYADVISOR
Marjone Cheetham
The Spetrum is published monthly dunng the fall
and sprmg semesters


NOTICE
To our readers
This is the last
issue of The
Spectrum for the
academic year
2008-20091 Thanks
for reading and for
all of your com-
ments, suggestions
and criticism over
the past year
Enjoy the sum-
mer and goodbye,
from all of us at
The Spectrunl See
you in September


Visit The Spectrum online
http //www cob edu bs/Students/StudentPubns php


, ,\ iill, Forward,Yet Giving Back


The Spectrm March 2009


~ll~Y~Hn~L~IL1a


For some it's a habit cultivated
from infancy Others do it when
they get mad, excited or stressed
out And many do it because they
think it's cool What's the buzz9
It's swearing, cursing or cussing,
whichever is your lingo It's so com
monplace it's practically a national
pastime
But is it acceptable behavior?
If you've been paying attention,
people are calling for a free day or
week-free from cussing Why9
Because most people are non
cussers and they say it's unaccept
able and downnght rude Non
cussers say their sensitivity is con
stantly bombarded by foul-mouths,
young and old, who have zero man
ners and zero social propriety
We hear cursing everywhere
schoolyards, downtown Bay Street,
food store, restaurants, airports and
on COB campuses, especially on
the basketball courts Even when
you are in your car driving, you hear
them What's a non cusser to do9
In the city of Los Angeles,
California, they recently called for a
Cuss Free Week and although
there's no legal recourse to this chal
lenge, it seems to be catching on in


many other cities in California
Can the 'No Cussing Challenge'
be taken up here in The Bahamas9
Let's give it a try. But it could get
worse before it gets better so here
are some suggestions for the non
cussers
Join non-cussers anonymous and
vent your frustration against those
who swear on youtube or twitter
Perhaps you can organize a demon
station calling for the pelting of
those who curse in public places or
send complaining emails to your
MP What about lobbying the
straight up youth groups such as
Gentlemen's Club, Toastmasters,
fraternites, sororities or your own
church action group for assistance
On COB campuses you carry bars
of soap and bottle water with you to
wash out the mouths of those who
offend you Or you can start a trend
by sticking yellow Pastelt on the
forehead of those who curse or start
your very own Campus Club for
Non Cussers
So, is it possible to stop people
from#%*&9 Let's try, for goodness
sakesl


They're the students who, despite
the stress associated with the end of
the semester walk around with a
smug, self-satisfied look on their
faces They are the ones who are
smiling, when everyone else is com
plaining about the lack of summer
courses and elusive advisors
They're the people most students
envy soon to-be graduates of the
class of 2009
Most of us are looking forward to
that day we can each wear the illus
trious cap and gown Unfortunately,
it's not just because we're anxious to
have proof of our academic endeav
ors, many of us are simply eager to
graduate because it means an end to
our time here at COB
College is supposed to be 'the best
years' of our lives but many students
leave COB with a bitter taste in their


mouths -anxious to get as far away
as possible from the institution with
out ever looking back We don't have
a campus culture here yet, where
Alumni are eager to return and con
tribute to our college both through
monetary donations and time It is
this sort of desire that is needed
(among other factors) to help further
this institution along
So to the members of the graduate
ing class of 2009, yes, we are all
looking forward to the end of these
college days but at the same time,
let's not forget the good memories
that were had along the way Even
though it's easier to just complain
about the bad, even though our time
as students has ended, we're still
College of The Bahamas Alumni for
life
KC


Campus Cart00o





SThe Spectrum March 2009


Breakfast Served from 7a.m. -10:30a.m.
Open Daily 7a.m. 11p.m.
SStudent Discount Present your
Student I.D. and receive 10% off the
purchase of your meal. Valid only with It's waaaay better than fast food.
the purchase of one (1) meal. It's Wendy's.













N by Jessica Simmons


People often think that it is quite easy to
be a full time student at The College of The
Bahamas But, how true is that
A fulltime student at COB is said to be
a student who is registered to complete a
minimum of 12 credits within a given
semester, averaging about four to five
classes
A misconception of many fulltime stu
dents is that because they are not employed
at a fulltime job, they are always free even
though many of them are involved in extra
curricular activities that require a great deal
of time Whether they are members of an
active club held on campus, work in the
Wellness Center, reporters for The




wa- a


Spectrum, peer tutors, members of a
research project, or gain income in some
other form such as braiding hair, washing
cars, or selling phone cards, their time is
fully occupied


When fights break out on campus it's
not always COB students who are
involved For instance in early March a
group of C C Sweeting High School stu
dents tried to settle their grudge against
each and brought their fight to campus
Several students were chased by police
officers on campus before they were
caught near the TBlock and then taken to
the police station in the area to await the
arrival of their guardians
Afternoons, around 3 pm, can some
times be rather dicey for campus secure
ty," Wellington Francis, Campus Security
Director


Reva Sharma, a fourth year, full time
Public Administration major, says that her
field of study is dominated by part timers
who are mature, working adults Because I
am not only a fulltme student but also the
youngest among my classmates many of
them feel as though I have a lot of time on
my hands and that I can do it However, this
is not so because I am involved in a lot of
activities" says Sharma
Anastasia Deveaux, part time account
ing major feels that though the academic
load is the same for both sets of students,
"fulltime students have more study time
than do part timers She adds that apart
from school work, parttimers are faced
with many challenges such as demanding
jobs and families to take care of, while

%a


many full-timers have the pleasure of just
having to focus on school work
There is also a misconception that full
* Continued on page 14


Francis said Campus Security has a
good working relationship with commune
ty police officers from the Urban Renewal
Division who often patrol the area as a
check on the many high school students
who crowd the streets after school, on
their way home As sometimes happen
several of the students involved in fight
managed to get onto COB campus and
were chased by plain clothes and uni
formed officers reports Francis
He descnbed C C Sweeting students
as a challenge They are noisy, rowdy
and ready to fight on the street or on COB
campus if they get through the gates


Misconceptions

about Fulltime Students


N by CarvelFrancis
staff Reporter & Produton Ed r
Pledging $250,000 over a period of five
years to support the development of a
Literacy Diagnostic Research Center at The
College of Bahamas, Managing Director
Paul McSweeney said his bank's donation
will help open a door of opportunity for
thousands of students
Calling the five-year commitment a
partnership, McSweeney said, Education
gives us all the chance to be what we want
to be It gives us the chance to contribute to
productive societies and make a difference
But we cannot have that chance if we are
unable to read and wnte
An illiterate population is doomed to
wallow in its past, but a literate population
will gallop towards its future Therefore
every child living in The Bahamas must
know how to read and write, and if they
don't we need to find out why," he said
This is the largest donation the bank has
ever made and McSweeney said the bank
was pleased to make the commitment to
The College and he looks forward to the
findings of the research as it unfolds He
added, We trust that the findings will be
put to good use so that one day every single
child educated in The Bahamas will walk
that road to human progress and realize his
or her full potential "
The Literacy Diagnostic Research
Centre will facilitate the analysis of lan
guage and reading deficiencies as well as
add the provision of professional develop
ment workshops and seminars for in-serv-
ice teachers
The Centre's programme will invest
gate existing policies and evaluate pro
grams that will seek to impact the national
literacy agenda through provision of essen


trial reports and scholarly publications The
data produced will inform the process by
which teachers transform the landscape of
the education system and ensure that the
problem of illiteracy is adequately
addressed
College of The Bahamas' Reading
Specialist, Dr Ruth Sumner will oversee
the research She sees the need for research
and training in reading diagnostics as criti
cal Sumner has studied the problem for
over ten years discussing this issue with
pre-service, in-service and classroom teach
ers and conducting numerous literacy work
shops throughout the country
A space in the E-block on the main cam
pus has been allocated for the Diagnostic
Centre Necessary books and materials have
already been ordered and by first summer
session the Centre will be up and running,
Sumner indicated
Securing increased levels of research
support is integral to The College's univer
sity transition as the mission of the institu
tron is to contribute to national develop
meant through education, research and inno
vation and service
President Janyne Hodder praised Bank
of The Bahamas for its commitment to The
College She said, The College is very
pleased to be announcing another major
corporate donation and this time to a
research priority in an area of national need
literacy We thank Bank of The Bahamas
for recognizing this critical need and for
supporting us with their corporate philan
thropy We look forward to the findings as
the Literacy Diagnostic Research Centre
unfolds and trust that the findings will be
put to good use so that one day every single
child educated in The Bahamas will walk
that road to human progress and realize his
or her full potential "


The Spectrum March 2009


Bank of The Bahamas Pledges $250K

for Literacy Diagnostic Research










luMarchz2O9

H]E COLLECGO

$250,000.00

ThelBnkof1TeBahamass

U BIG CHEQUE PRESENTATION Paul McSweeney, Managing Director Bank of the
Bahamas, presented the College with a $250,000 commitment for the establishment of a
Literacy Diagnostic Research Centre, which will be housed in the School of Education.
Next to McSweeney is Dr. Brenda Cleare, Dean Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences and
Education; Dr. Ruth Sumner, Reading Specialist; Gloria Gomez, Chair School of
Education; President Janyne Hodder; Dr. Linda David, Graduate Program and Int'l
Relations.


HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

FIGHT ON COB CAMPUS





The Spectrum March 2009 l


. Sweetin's


COS Student IdenfeIatidr


Madeira Shopping Pla 3210703
Marthon Mall 393-113
RND Plaa, Freport 3513274






F1l The Spectrum March 2009


Towing & Parking Problems


* Cassandra Nottage & Thea Johnson
sta Rep r.....


Up to last year students parked
throughout the Michael Elden complex
parking lot whenever a parking spot was
available However, since the start of the
semester roughly 10 vehicles were towed
for illegally parking To get cars returned
students have to pay $60 00
There are appropriate signs erected on
the grounds informing students where they
can park and where they cannot on the
grounds but students still take the chance
that they will not be noticed
There is designated student parking
near the T-Block but students say there is
not enough space although some who have
classes in the Michael H Eldon Complex
simply do not try the T Block If it were
possible says, Wellington Francis, Director
of Security, students could park almost
everywhere but the physical makeup of the
campus does not allow for such thing to
occur "There must be some order and reg
ulation in respect to parking," he said
Parking will be better organized when
construction on the new library is complete
ed Francis explained that the grounds will
be refurbished and redesigned and that
entire area is under consideration in the
plan for the library which includes proper
parking Students may even be issued with
the appropriate push card when they enter
The College However, that may be the
case only when the library project is com-
pleted
In the Michael Elden Complex, there
are three different operations to consider
when it comes to parking Francis said
Class rooms for students (which is a cam-


.. rms..van u -r i ..ll.y. ul.7 ll..n n c.luu. u. ...pl. uulu yuur vr uwuu, ,m' u, l
one shown here Students are reminded to park in the designated student parking near the T-
Block, entrance on Tucker Road Photo by Cassandra Notage
pus), Starbucks and Chapter One explain that their car has been towed for a
Bookstore These three operations have a traffic violation and is at a specific wreck
whole lot of activity, "hence, parking is a er company Security will extend the cour
senous issue, Francis said "Therefore isn't tesy of driving the person to the company
it better for a student to comfortably park if needed Francis said that it's not their
in the TBlock and walk to where ever they interest to tow students but if they are
need to go "
Francis says Michael Elden complex Continued on page 12


a


is connected to the main campus and if stu
dents want to go to the fast food restaurants
they can walk instead of taking up allocat
ed parking spots unnecessarily Francis
stressed, "People will not subject them
selves to certain instructions or policy of
the Institution If they did it would make
things better for everyone, giving the con
straits COB has "
Hence towing occurs when anyone,
not only students, park illegally in the
Michael Elden Complex or where ever
unauthorized persons are parked
In addition to faculty, staff and student
parking areas, vehicles are not supposed to
be parked on the grass and anyone who
parks on the grass, could find their vehicle
towed
The T Block is designed for student
parking and persons outside of COB are
not allowed to park in the T-Block There
are two security guards that operate the T
Block parking lot from morning until
classes are over There have been inci
dences in the T Block parking lot which
have resulted in damage or stolen vehicles
Francis says the stolen cars do not consti
tute a fault in security procedure but due to
the manufacturer of some vehicles He
said master keys for certain vehicles are
easily duplicated He says the problem is
not limited to COB parking lot, this kind of
theft occurs all over New Providence

PROCEDURE TO FOLLOW
ONCE A VEHICLE IS TOWED

Francis said once a vehicle is towed
the student should contact campus security
responsible for that area Security would
mmmme- re


BOOK OF POEMS

a n Student Publishes Book of Poems-


t


* Dominic Bain holds book of Poems to
Rebecca Photo by Cassandra Nottage.


seven-year o i i i
Rebecca- A
his pains as he tries to cope with the possl
ability that he might not be able to see his
daughter as he wishes Bain and the child's
mother are not married and their relation
ship is not a happy one His poems also
speak to the expectations he has for her as
she journeys through adolescence to wom

dren and their children Poems to Rebecca is
available at ChapterOne Bookstore
Bain said his book of poems gave

h im I '
society that relate to men and their children,
----- tl--- I--- ---t -f ---l--k Bain
SI I of the
men in this country who do not have access
to their children and would discourage them


f 1 1 1 f wedlock
I tionship with Rebecca now I am trying my best to be instru
mental in her life because my father was instrumental in mine "



ENVIRONMENTAL CLUB ORGANIZES

CAMPUS PRIDE CLEANUP DRIVE
SamI pus environment
reflects us and it is our
duty to keep it clean,"
Club le-de. said
Group leaders said the
Sc c campus clean up showed
that not only are students
to blame for the trash, but
faculty and staff as well
They found PVCpipes, an

where on the grounds
Since many of the trash
bins on campus were not
full, Club members said
n PILES OF TRASH Picking up trash from the grounds of e there was really no legt
Oakes Field campus seems to bring smiles to the faces of thismate ecuse for the liter
group of Environmental Pride Club members and President that th
Janyne Hodder Bags of litter were collected Thursday, March raised tany question
12h, by this enthusiastic group who spent hours, armed with raised ma
huge trash bags and gloves, doing a lob that shouldn't be nec such p
essary if everyone put heir trash in the readily available bins ply failing to utlze sa
throughout the campus tay bins, or did garbage
SayingIts Interest is simply to help keep fall out of the tash ans
yCOB namps loan green anid pasl k while they were being emptied Also, should
there be a penalty of soni soft for peons
groups of Envloionmental Pride Club mem penalty of sot for Persons
bes joinedbyPresidentcaught hltterng on campus9 Should security
their backs into it Thursday, March 12 and ans e laced in areas that lack trash
spent about two hours picking up trash Envronmental Club elected VP for
aound the akes Field campus 2009/10 Shekem Romer It is our duty to
Trailed by large black plastic bags, the , ,
enthusiastic groups attracted attention but
few consciences were pricked enough to students to be environmentally conscious
ncreasethenumberofadherentstoany sg- "This campus belongs to us, so let us all try
to do bhingt few our best to keep the campus in a healthy con
, todobutfew dltlon Let us putourprideasideto makethe
of them volunteered to help pick up trashto mae the
Club members hope the cleanup project
will generate awareness to the fact that "our




The Spectrun March 2009

STO DOLIST
:C Z l1.Find the Nearest KFC






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable





The Spectrum March 2009 j


Perspectives Post Graduation Literacy and the College Student


* byJyna Mackey
ConF~rdresod


Whether they remain with the current
job, seek a better job or seek employment
for the very first time, all COB soon to be
graduates have a perspective post gradua
tion.
For many, the idea of completing their
degree in itself is sufficient compensation
for rany students like Dhalia Dames who
told The Spectrum, "I have great ambitions
in sight and I wish to attain a rewarding
career, but for right now, I must admit, I
just need a vacation."
After graduation she prefers to 'just
chill' for a while, until something good
comes along. "I want to take a break from
work. I want to pursue foreign languages
for the summer, or maybe the rest of the
year," she said, laughing. Another student
shares similar view. "All those long nights
and early mornings can finally be leveled
off with some rest, I see now what people
meant when they used to tell me, sleep
when you graduate!"
Many students already have their
resumes on the market and are awaiting
calls, anxious to join the workforce and
begin a career they've worked so hard
toward. This is the perspective of Travalies
Miller, who has completed the require
ments to graduate with a bachelor's degree


in Banking and Finance. Travalies, who
finished his studies this past December is
currently working and admits that he actu
ally missesa partof college life, and ittook
some getting used to not having a struc
turned routine, however, he values his spare
time, and being free of strenuous class
papers 'I'm still balancing accounts, but
now it's for a different type of grade, one
that my job recognition rewards me with;
my job has been challenge but rewarding
thus far!"
While it may be contrary and atypical
for a graduate, marriage is what occupies a
major part of Johnae Butler drive toward
graduation. She is completing last minute
plans for her wedding which comes only a
week after graduation. She also plans to put
her tutoring service into full fruition and
teach at the Bankers Institute. Johnae is
completing a degree in Economics.
Sandia Eugene plans to jump headfirst
into work with her current job of five years
and vacation at the same time. Being multi
lingual has afforded her the opportunity to
travel abroad for work purposes and this
summer she plans to enjoy herself and
expand her experience in the Dominican
Republic. Upon her return she anticipates a
salary increase, as well as empowered
sense of presence. 'Things can only get
better for me after graduation and I cant
wait," she said.


* by Joanna Louis
SpeoalAssignament
If you asked students about their read-
ing habit during the semester one thing is
evident Textbooks are the main fare and
they are not happy readers
Many lecturers fume when they come
to class to find only three out of a class of
25 students for example, have read the
course material they were counting on to
lead dass discussion. Could it be that stu-
dents are just lazy or disinterested? The
possibility has to be considered because
when it comes to rending their texts, stu-
dents are just burnt out
So the question arises, how literate are
COB students? Literacy refers to the abili-
ty to comprehend and produce written lan-
guage and the willingness to do so in order
to operate effectively in a practical social
context (Venezky 1995 qtd. Roe 2007).
Special emphasis should be placed on the
willingness of the participant and in this
case, the social context is COB. Actually it
is a compliment to The College student
who is now reading this artide as it proba-
bly will not directly impact their math
score.
At the 300 and 400 level courses the
workload increases but so does the time the
student is expected to spend on independ-
ent study and research to complete assign-
ments Reading becomes more of a chore
for classes because the reader isnotreading
about something they are familiar with but


By Caroois Elalg Sa6d


are trying to learn and understand. When
asked how college life has affected her
reading for pleasure L. Mckenzie, a third
year EDU major speaks for many when she
says, "I am honestly deprived of a social
life and have little time to do anything for
pleasure."
Moreover it is not only students, says
Maryann Lotmore, EDU lecturer, 'It hap
pens to older adults aswell." It seems peo-
ple often neglect reading for pleasure or
information because it is an involved active
ity, which takes time, interest and dedica
tion.
For most college students, they amply
do not have the time and anything that
reminds of school is often tossed out on
breaks and vacations, and that indudes
books.
So what can be done to reintroduceor build
a love of reading among college students?
Mostly, interest has to come from within
the person to want to read but also, books
sales and book dubs on campus may great-
ly affect the desire students have to read.
Besides, who doesn't want to be in the
know? The great dragon of time can be
defeated by students designating three
hours a week to reading a book. Even if it
is only one book for the whole semester,
take the time. And besides, do you wantthe
only regret you have foryour whole college
career to be that you turn in a term paper
that was eight pages instead of ten?



Virtual


Library

COB launched a Virtual Library
project in March where various
expanded services will provided.
Funds for the upgrade $1.5 million
were provided by the Lyford Cay
Foundation. Harry C. Moore, former
Chairman of the Foundation and a for
mer member of The College Council,
secured contributions to support the
building of the new library now under
construction.
The Virtual Library will expand
electronic resources by increasing the
Colleges subscriptions to books, links
to free public resources and other full
texts digitized local resources. The
project require the upgrading of exist-
ing network and digitization of existing
resources as well as further acquisition.






I The Spectrum March 2009

Presidential

Candidates
U from page 3
revise the parking policy and establish a job
intervention program which gave students
the opportunity to work and go to school.
He also hoped to focus on the School of
Nursing which he said is often neglected.
This is not McIntosh's first time running for
COBUS president. His reasons for running


New Slate of Officers elected and unopposed for COBUS 2009-10

Position Name Academic Disposition
School
President Mr. Jamaal Science & Elected
Knowles Technology
Vice President Mr. Antonio Business Elected
Butler
Treasurer Mr. Waylon CHMI Elected
Mcardy
Secretary Marcia Gibson Education Unopposed
Assistant Rashad Rolle CHMI Unopposed
Secretary
Senator Emica Scott Education Elected
Senator Steffon Grant Education Elected
Senator Ashley Evans Social Sciences Unopposed
Senator Shavonne M. CHMI Unopposed
Sherman
Senator Stefanie M. Science & Elected
Collie Technology
Senator Italia Science & Elected
Hutchinson Technology
Senator Benjamin Dorms unopposed
Ferguson Jr
Senator Ashnell Nursing Unopposed
Saunders
Senator Jonique Webb Business Unopposed

Presidential Votes Received Winner
Candidates
Renbert 476
Mortimer
Jamaal 568
Knowles
Delvano 204

Vice Presidential Votes Received Winner
Candidates
Antonio Butler 599 *
Brooke Sherman 510
Uranda Curtis 121


a second time are simply to offer his servic-
es, challenge the administration and
improve the student environment because
there is a lot of potential for COB to grow.
Asked what his race was like without a
team, McIntosh explained that leaders must
be self-motivated and having the passion
for change and wanting to make a differ-
ence were enough to keep him going.
All three presidential candidates have
served as COBUS senators or have been
involved or are currently a part of boards
and committees at The College.


* Campus Life Slave Auction, Really? -- Some campus events can have a
special flavour, like this Valentine's Slave Auction held February 10th. Meant
to pique students interest in campus activities. Men and women, singles and
groups were 'auctioned off' to student bidders for dates, homework or
"whatever". Photos by Reva Devi.


Misconceptions
* from page 7
time students do better in classes than do
part-timers. However, this is not necessar-
ily true. Many fulltime students who find
difficulty in being able to manage school
time and play time often find themselves
barely able to hold on. "Fulltime students
have it a little harder," says third-year, full-


time EDU major Angela Martin, "Lecturers
expect more from you because you are full-
time, and are sometimes not as lenient as
they are with part time students.
Because full timers are so involved,
they often feel, "if only I had more time, I
would have..." Martin says that the hours
within a day are never enough, it seems.


GRADUATION SCHEDULE

Nassau Campus

20 May, 2009 Nurses' Pinning Ceremony-- The College of The Bahamas Performing
Arts Center
21 May, 2009 Graduation Rehearsal -- Bahamas Faith Ministries
26 May, 2009 Baccalaureate Service -- Zion Yamacraw Baptist Church
27 May, 2009 Graduates' Awards Ceremony -- The College of The Bahamas
Performing Arts Center
28 May, 2009 Commencement Exercise -- Bahamas Faith Ministries

Northern Bahamas Campus

2 June, 2009 Graduation Rehearsal
3 June, 2009 Baccalaureate Service Peach Tree Street Church of God Temple
4 June, 2009 Commencement Exercise & Honours Convocation -Our Lucaya Resort












* by CavelFranc
tafRerter F Prduct on Edaor
Some were short and small, some were
wide and tall They were a kaleidoscope of
colours, some etched by the potter with
poetry or words lke "untouchable From
pink buffed bowls to teal green tea cup
zes, a room full of 'empty bowls' were on
display like collectors' teams ready for sale
This colorful event called "Empty
Bowls" was held at School of Culinary
Hosptality & Management (Institute
(CHMI) on a Sunday afternoon in early
March as a fundraiser to fight hunger in
The Bahamas Patrons gathered in the
courtyard of CHMI where proceeds from
the sales of empty ceramic bowls went
assst the Salvation Army projects for the
needy
Joann Behagg, Ceramicist and retired
COB Art Lecturer spearheaded the event
and explained how the ldea germinated 'I
went to the National Education in Ceramic
Arts conference and saw the dea there A
high school teacher, John Hartom, started a
project with his students to encourage them
to help needy people They came up with
the idea of making bowls which evolved
into the dea of "Empty Bowls "

Branding
U from page 3
these participants as well as those who
respond to the COB recently hoisted onlne
survey beforepresenting its creative state
gles to College administrators for consider
atlon
It was emphasized at the contract sign
mng that the creation of a new brand dental
ty should be seen as an historical process
for the institution and all stakeholder
groups are should have the opportunity to
participate and to convey their ideas and
impressions for the branding of the
Unversity
President Hodder has said that the
brand identity of The University of The


r,





Bows on display at the first ever Empty
Bows event held at CHMI March 1st

Patron Iris Finlayson loved what she
saw describing the event a a refreshing
idea She said, "We are doing this for a
worthy cause and on a Sunday afternoon,
with wonderful company, eating delicious
food This s just a refreshing idea "


Bahamas must reflect "a clear, command
ng and lasting image four institution one
that stungly affirms the Un=efty's rills
sion and also establishes a brand promise
that will cultivate and build loyalty and
understanding among all key constituent
groups and the wider community "
She said it is important that "we initiate
this process now because on whatever day
the Government announces the establish
meant of The Universty of The Bahamas,
which requires an Act of Parliament, we
intend to be fully dressed and ready to go
Karma Design is expected to present its
initial design concept to COB something in
mid May according to Brian Goudle
Partner and Account Director for the com-
pany


COB Sign $1.8M Contract For IT Upgrade

A comprehensive expansion and upgrade of COB's net-
work infrastructure at a cost of $1.8M was announced
recently by The College. IBM has been contracted to
perform the work, which will be carried out in phases.


The Spectrum March 2009 i


COB Faculty and Students Participate

In Marine and Agribusiness Expo


E byCaivelFrancs
Reponrer & Producl on Edior
Two students and three faculty members
from The College joined scores of stall
holders at the 2nd Annual Agricultural,
Marine Resources and Agribusiness Expo
The event was held at the Expo site on
Gladstone Road Feb 26-28th
Dr Patrcia Grant-Johnson of COB's
Marine and Envronmental Studies Institute
said the annual event was an excellent dea
to build awareness of how to become self
sufficient and green in the country She
shared information on how to mix compost
and how to start a garden
"Our samples of compost ranged from
chicken manure, to wood chips and shred
ded paper,"sheexplained, adding thatthese
are all excellent for use in starting up back
yard gardens and aids well in producing
excellent crops
High school students and adults also
gave much attention to The College's booth
according to Lsa Benjamin, a Professor
with the LLB program "Many persons also
shared and we had much interest from
adults on our continuing education pro
gram, the Small Island Sustainability
Program, and so this has been avery inspir
ing day,' Benjamin said
Speaking at the opening, Minister of
Agriculture and Marine Resources
Lawrence Cartwright said The Bahamas
has embarked on a mission to grow as
much food as possible, recognlzng the
expensive import food bill and the shortages
experienced after each hurricane He said
the Minnistry of Agrculture has implement
ed a number of irnartlves to make sure The
Bahamas is a success and to cut the coun
try's spending
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham also
attended the event and stated that his gov
ernment remains committed to encouraging


GGYA CL
by CassandraNottage

Fourteen COB students received Gold
Awards and had their pictures taken with
HRH Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex and
Governor General, Sir Arthur Hanna, Feb
4th during the award ceremony at
Government House Students received
awards and certificates for completing the
Gold Level in the GGY program To qual-
fy for the Gold Award participants must be
S17 or older have


agriculture and supporting the development
of food processing Toward this end, we
will upgrade agricultural services, establish
a farmer's credit program and a hurricane
and disaster insurance fund to assist farm
er suffering loss from natural disaster ,
the PMsaid








*lti, :*





[^


Manning COB Booth-Dr Patlcla Grant-
Johnson, student Nikera Brown and
Professor Lisa Benjamin of the LL B pro-
gram were on hand attheCOB booth at the
2nd Annual Agricultural, MarineResources
and Agribusiness Expo



UB NEWS
completed the SilverAward level
t completed 6 extra months of omm
nrty servlce/skll/physlcal reciration
Sshow commitment and improvement
from the initial level of ability and
display persistent and regular effort
Gold recipients are Charles Nottage
SyneishaBootle Arvis Mortimer, Shandra
Ferguson, Loukeisha Missick, Andrella
Dames, Lavaughn Dames, Kelly Delancy,
Oranique Hamilton, Sade Lopez, Kevette
Munnings, Angelique Nairn, Kevin Pratt
and Deja Rutherford


CHMI'Empty Bowls'Attract

Sunday Afternoon Crowd






ID The Spectrum March 2009


n Basketball Point Guard- Christine
Sinclair (# 5) shows off her smart moves on
the court with Savannah College of Arts bas-
ketball team during a competition in early
January. Sinclair is graduating from COB
with a degree in Physical Education but
hopes to continue to play for COB as an
Alumna if asked.
Nothing turns Christine Sinclair on
like basketball In fact that's what she will
miss most when she graduates from COB
this year with a degree in PhysEdu "From
the time I was young all I had was school
and ball Once I learned what the game
was all about, I just loved it There's noth
ing like basketball for me," she said, smil-
ing
She came to COB in 2001 as a part
time student Sinclair and had already
established a reputation playing for the
National Basketball team She joined the
COB team but it soon found it exhausting
playing ball, working full time and study
Ing so when COB offered her a scholar
ship to play on COB Ladies team she was
happy to switched to full-time status
Sinclair, who is a mere 4' 5" tall, has
been caption of the Ladies Baskeball team
for four years and is presently point guard,
a position that requires her to do a lot of
passing of the ball to others "I really


would like to shoot the ball, like most peo
ple, but as the point guard players are
looking to me to pass them the ball
There's always pressure on the guard, I
have to call the play and delegate," she
explains
She explained that presently most of
COB experienced players have injuries or
have graduated so presently the majority
of the team are freshmen and that's the
pnme reason why she became point guard
The upcoming graduation for Sinclair
is seen as a mixed blessing "It's kind of
scary I have been here since 2001 so col
lege life is a big part of me I feel as if I
am letting go of something I know and
going into something I don't know You
get attached to college life and it has been
fun for me "
Since February Sinclair has been
teaching sports at Queen's College and has
a contract until the June when the academy
ic year runs out She says Queen's College
has indicated interest in offering her a
two-year contract starting in September
but she also has the option of teaching in a
Government school She will have to
decide soon
She indicated that COB is hoping to
organize an Alumm Basketball team and
she looks forward to playing again for her
Alma Mater when that time comes
What will she miss most after she
leaves COB9 "Playing basketball, without
a doubt, but I will also miss the friendship
and team spirit," she said
As a PhysED major she is a little con
cerned that she is able to continue to teach
team sports rather and not be expected to
coach in high school "People think that a
physical educator is the same as a coach
and that's simply not true I am a Physical
Education leader and coaching is differ
ent," she explained
Sinclair is already looking ahead, hop
ing to continue her education by applying
to enroll in the Special Education Master's
Degree "I have applied and right now I
am hoping for the best," she said


Sports Profile Focuses

On Christine Sinclair


CHESS AND SCRABBLE CLUB-These are the winners of the Chess and Scrabble Club
tournament held in March- from left are: Chico(2nd place Scrabble), Cleveland (3rd Place
Scrabble) Troval (1st place Scrabble), Club President Nacoya Ingraham, Kristian (1st place
Chess), Tournament Coordinator Mr. Seymour, Steven (3rd Place Chess) and Charles (2nd
Place Chess).


n Visiting Gymnasts Dazzle Crowds -Students from Union College in Lincoln, Nebraska
attracted large crowds of cheering COB students during their hour-long gymnastic dis-
plays on the basketball court. The visiting team was here for a short visit in mid March.


N TRACK & FIELD MEETS AT FAMU -COB team led by Coach Bradley Cooper participate
ed in quite a few track and field matches with schools and clubs in the Florida area during March
13-14 weekend trip to FAMU


CHESS AND SCRABBLE CLUB