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Title: Survey of fishing tournaments in the U.S. Virgin Islands, October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005
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Title: Survey of fishing tournaments in the U.S. Virgin Islands, October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005
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Language: English
Creator: Toller, Wesley
Publisher: Division of Fish and Wildlife, Department of Planning and Natural Resources
Place of Publication: St. Croix, USVI
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Source Institution: University of the Virgin Islands
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Table of Contents
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        Page 1
    Main
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        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Tables and figures
        Page 19
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        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
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Full Text



F-8: USVI Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
Study 1, Job 3: Survey of Fishing Tournaments
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 2
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

SUMMARY

The Division of Fish and Wildlife conducted a recreational fisheries assessment nroiect in the US


05. Studie


surveys of shoreline recreational fishers,


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fshore pe
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id marlin. Th(
ias and St. Cr
oumament typ
umaments an(


igs data were collected at 25 offshore pelagic tournament
d representing 16 species were recorded. Landings were
y number, 47.5 % by weight), barracuda (22.3 % by nurr
5.3 % by number, 22.8 % by weight). Average catch rat
:r boat-hour. A greater number, weight and diversity of c
nas tournaments than in St. Croix tournaments.


:r, 48.4 9
it tournar
I more tc


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offshore pelagic tournan
ies were recorded. Lanc
it) and wahoo (43.2 % b
2.2 + 1.1 kg ner boat-he


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; pe






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 3
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

INTRODUCTION


Recreational fishing is of tremendous importance in the United States Virgin Islands (USVI).
Fishing is a popular recreational past time for a great many USVI residents (CFMC 1985).
Telephone surveys suggest that as much as 10 % of the population participates in recreational
fishing (Jennings 1992, ECC 2002, Mateo 2004). In addition, recreational fishing is an
important attraction for tourists, providing the resource base for a modest charter boat fishery
(Garcia-Molinar et al. 2002). Seasonally, a large number of recreational vessels arrive in St.
Thomas from the southeastern U.S., Puerto Rico, and adjacent Caribbean nations to fish for blue
marlin (Makaira nigricans) or to participate in billfish tournaments for blue marlin (Friedlander
1995).

Different segments within the USVI recreational fishery have been classified according to the
method of fishing (Olsen and Wood 1983). The recreational hook and line fishery is often
further subdivided, at least to some extent, by the fish species-groups which are sought by
anglers. Adams (1996) and Mateo (2000) divided the recreational line fishery into three sectors
that they termed the offshore, inshore and reef fish fisheries. These three fisheries sectors target
pelagic, coastal pelagic, and demersal fish species-groups, respectively.

Anglers in the offshore recreational fishery sector pursue open-water or pelagic species. Among
these fishes, the most popular are billfishes of the family Istiophoridae (see Brandon 1989,
Friedlander 1995). Other pelagic species taken by recreational fishers include dolphinfish or
"dolphin" (Coryphaena hippurus, Coryphaenidae), wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri,
Scombridae), and various other scombrids such as king mackerel or "kingfish" (Scomberomorus
cavalla), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), blackfin tuna (Thunnus atlanticus), and skipjack
tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis). Many previous DFW studies emphasized the billfish fishery (e.g.
Brandon 1985, Friedlander 1995, Adams 1996). The present study (study period 2000-05)
focuses on the importance of non-billfish species to the recreational anglers of the offshore
fishery. A forthcoming DFW study will provide an updated assessment of the USVI billfish
fishery (K.R. Uwate, pers. com.).

The inshore recreational fishery sector of the USVI targets a fish species-group which is more
strongly associated with waters of the insular shelf or shelf margin and less frequently
encountered in open pelagic habitat (Adams 1996). Fishes of this species-group are termed
coastal pelagics (Olsen and Wood 1983). Although the exact species composition of the group
may overlap with pelagics or with reef fishes, and the term is rather inconsistently applied by
different authors (e.g. Clavijo et al. 1980, Adams 1996, Mahon 1996), the following fishes have
been considered among the most important coastal pelagics landed by USVI inshore recreational
fishers: great barracuda or "barracuda" (Sphyraena barracuda, Sphyraenidae), cero mackerel
(Scomberomorus regalis, Scombridae), little tunny or "bonito" (E. alletteratus), and numerous
jack species (Carangidae) including crevalle jack (Caranx hippos), bar jack (C. ruber), blue
runner (C. crysos), and horse-eye jack (C. latus).

The third sector of the USVI recreational hook and line fishery targets demersal or bottom-
associated fish species. This species-group has been termed "Reef Fish" and it encompasses a






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 4
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

very great deal of taxonomic and ecological diversity. Adams (1996) provided the most
comprehensive list to date of reef fish species harvested by USVI recreational fishers on St.
Thomas and St. Croix, although he gave no quantitative information. Adams (1996) and Mateo
(2000) also provided information on shoreline angler behavior. Recreational anglers report a
preference for snappers (Lutjanidae) and groupers (Serranidae) (Jennings 1992, ECC 2002).
Fishes from several additional families are also reportedly taken in quantity including grunts
(Haemulidae), triggerfishes (Balistidae), squirrelfishes (Holocentridae), and jacks (Carangidae)
(Olsen and Wood 1983). Despite previous efforts, however, landing of reef fishes by USVI
recreational fishers still remains poorly documented and largely unquantified.

The Division of Fish and Wildlife (DFW), Department of Planning and Natural Resources
(DPNR), initiated a Recreational Fisheries Assessment Project in 1983 (Brandon 1989). Four
DFW reports (Brandon 1985, Tobias 1991, Adams 1996, Mateo 2000) summarize results from
almost two decades of work assessing the USVI recreational fishery. This project is also known
as the Recreational Port Sampling Program, or RecPort for short. In this report, we summarize
DFW activities conducted under RecPort during the five year period from October 1 of 2000 to
September 30 of 2005 for F-8, Study 1 Activity Patterns in U.S. Virgin Islands recreational
fisheries, Job 3 Survey of Fishing Tournaments

Results obtained from sportfishing tournaments are summarized and discussed. We identify
limitations of the study and make recommendations to improve monitoring of the USVI
recreational fishery.


MATERIALS AND METHODS

Sampling from SpI, 'rfi 'hii Tournaments

Organized sportfishing tournaments represent brief episodes of concentrated fishing activity that
occur within narrowly defined time periods. When tournaments are surveyed through direct
interviews of vessel captains (or anglers) in conjunction with port-based sampling of landings,
they offer a unique opportunity to collect large amounts of uniform and accurate information on
recreational catch and effort (e.g. Beardsley 1989, Friedlander and Contillo 1994, Adams 1996).
During this granting period, we studied the harvest activities of USVI recreational fishers by
sampling from sportfishing tournaments.

The Golden Hook Fishing Club (GHFC) organized most of the fishing tournaments held on St.
Croix. On St. Thomas, most tournaments were organized by the Virgin Islands Game Fishing
Club (VIGFC) or the Frenchtown Community. Approximately two inter-island tournaments per
year were jointly organized by GHFC and VIGFC. DFW staff participated in fishing
tournaments as assistant weigh-masters. This role enabled staff to collect biostatistical
measurements for all fish brought to the weigh station, and to interview most of the participating
vessel captains. It was observed that some fish were not presented at the weigh station, either
because of small size or because they were ineligible for awards based upon tournament rules.
This may have caused an under-representation of some species in the following datasets and






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 5
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

probably caused an underestimation of catch rates. We make note where we believe this bias to
be substantial.

All fish specimens that were brought to the weigh station were included in tournament samples.
Fish were identified to species-level with few exceptions. For pelagic and coastal pelagic
species, use of local common names (see Introduction) was used in preference to FAO or AFS
names (e.g. Carter 2002). Biostatistical measurements (length and weight) were taken for all
fish. For pelagic and coastal pelagic species, length was determined with tape measure (curved
fork length, FL) to the nearest mm and weight was determined on hanging scale, usually to the
nearest 0.1 pound (St. Croix) or 0.05 pound (St. Thomas). For smaller fish specimens landed in
shore-based handline tournaments, weight was determined on a top-loading scale to the nearest
0.1 ounce, and FL (or TL when appropriate) was measured to the nearest mm on a measuring
board or with a ruler. Weights were converted to kilograms (or grams) and lengths were
converted to centimeters for the purposes of this report [conversion: 2.2046 lbs. = 1.00 kg].

During the 5-year study period, DFW attended 78 sportfishing tournaments in the USVI, 43 on
St. Thomas (Table 1) and 35 on St. Croix (Table 2). Complete or near-complete data for effort
and catch were available from a lesser number of these tournaments: 25 tournaments on St.
Thomas and 29 on St. Croix. Five different types of USVI sportfishing tournaments were
distinguished based upon fishing gears allowed, seaward area of fishing (i.e. shoreline, bottom
fishing, offshore), and target species-group (see Figure 1). The number of samples obtained
from each type of tournament is shown by island in Table 3.

Captains of participating vessels were interviewed to obtain trip information. Data were
recorded onto standardized trip interview forms (Appendix 1 and 2). Information was obtained
for vessel size, number of anglers, number of lines fished, actual hours fished, and trip duration.
Landings data were recorded on the same form. No data were collected on fishing method
(trolling, drifting) or type of bait (artificial, natural). We attempted to interview all captains at
each tournament, whether directly at the weigh station or through subsequent follow-up
telephone calls.

During interviews, captains were also asked to identify the areas) that they fished and any
visitation of fish aggregation devices (FADs). Captains were shown a reference map of areas for
either St. Thomas (Figure 2) or St. Croix (Figure 3). The St. Croix map also showed location of
FADs (see Figure 3), however the number and spatial distribution of FADs varied during the
course of this study.


Data Analysis

Raw tournament data were entered into a standardized data spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel.
Descriptive summaries were prepared for each tournament day (descriptive statistics, histogram
analyses, etc.) and were archived in DFW files. Tournament data from St. Thomas and St. Croix
were treated independently. Catch rate (catch per unit effort, or CPUE) at offshore tournaments
was calculated as kg per boat-hour, and it was obtained by dividing the total weight of landings






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 6
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

by the total number of boat-hours fished for each tournament day. For handline tournaments,
catch rate was calculated as the number of fish per angler-hour.

Statistical analyses were performed using Statistica (Statsoft, Inc.). Inter-annual variation in size
was examined by a non-parametric test: Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA by ranks. Significant findings
were examined further using Multiple Comparisons Z' Value test with independent grouping (a
post-hoc non-parametric test). Tests were run using log-transformed data for weight (kg). Data
were pooled by species on an annual basis using fiscal year (FY) rather than calendar year. Note
that for some other datasets, results are reported collectively based upon the fiscal year due to
grant requirements (the relation of tournament date to fiscal year is shown in Tables 1 and 2).

Length-weight relations were explored using linear regression on Log-transformed data
following the approach of Rivera and Appeldoom (2000). This model assumes that length and
weight are related as follows:
W = aLb
where W = weight in kg, L = length (FL) in cm, and a and b are species-specific constants.

Data for fishing area were obtained from vessel captains in reference to DFW maps of six zones
surrounding St. Croix (areas 1 to 6). These data were treated in two ways. First, area visitation
frequency was calculated by tabulating the number of vessels which visited each area on each
tournament day. Second, "area boat-hours" was estimated by multiplying fishing effort (boat-
hours) by percentage of time in an area. Boat-hours were reported by captains. Percentage of
time spent within each area was calculated by assuming that an equal period of time was spent in
each area visited (i.e. equal-weighting). For example, a vessel which visited a single area spent
100 % of boat-hours in that area, but a vessel which visited two areas spent 50 % of boat-hours
in the first area and 50 % in the second area. Average values for area visitation frequency and
area boat-hours were calculated on an annual basis. Unfortunately, time constraints imposed
upon the authors precluded an analysis of FAD visitation. However, we noted that a fishers'
choice of fishing area and the location of FADs were often related.

For comparisons to historic information, data were taken from previous DFW reports (Tobias
1991, Adams 1996, Mateo 2000). Historic landings data were converted to metric units and
fishing effort was converted to appropriate units where necessary.


I handlines only. Results are shown in Table 4. On average, 145 al






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 7
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

approximately 53 g per fish. Anglers landed a wide diversity of fish species. Of the 62 species
observed across years (cumulative number of species), an average of 33 species were caught per
tournament. Yellowtail snapper (Ocyurus chrysurus), haemulids (especially tomtate, Haemulon
aurolineatum), and squirrelfishes of the genus Holocentrus predominated in landings. Fish were
small in size, being comprised mostly of juveniles or sub-adults (Table 4).

On St. Thomas, the Boy Scouts Handline Tournament was sampled in 2004 and 2005. These
tournaments were held at American Yacht Harbor's dock in Red Hook. Participants used only
handlines. Results are shown in Table 5. For the two years, 227 and 189 anglers fished for 4
and 3.5 hours and landed 0.06 and 0.18 fish per angler-hour, for 2004 and 2005 respectively.
Average weight of fish was 194.5 and 92.9 g respectively for 2004 and 2005. Of the 21 species
observed, 12 fish species were caught in 2004 and 18 species were caught in 2005. A large
number of unidentified crabs (25) were also landed. Catch was dominated by tomtate (H.
aurolineatum), gray snapper (Lutjanus griseus), and cottonwick (H. melanurum). Most of the
fish were juveniles or sub-adults (Table 5).

On St. Croix, a single shore-based handline tournament for children is held each year on the
Christiansted waterfront. Results from the GHFC Kids Handline Tournament are shown (Table
6) for four years (2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005) [data for the 2001 Vitelcellular Handline
Tournament are reported in Mateo 2001]. On average, 181 anglers fished for 2 hours and landed
0.36 fish per angler-hour. Average capture size was 49 g. Of the 38 fish species observed
among years (cumulative total), an average of 16 species were landed per tournament. French
grunts (H. flavolineatum) and Holocentrus spp. dominated landings. Fish were small in size,
being comprised mostly of juveniles or sub-adults. A large number of invertebrates were also
landed (Table 6).


Boat-Based Handline Tournaments

A single boat-based handline tournament is held each year in the USVI. The Mother's Day
Handline Tournament is a female-only tournament which occurs on St. Thomas. No equivalent
tournament occurs in the St. Croix district. Data were available for two years (2003 and 2005)
from the Mother's Day tournament (Table 7). For the two years, 21 or 15 anglers fished from 8
or 5 boats for 6.1 or 4.6 hours. Catch rate was 4.6 fish per angler-hour (3.2 kg per boat-hour) in
2003 and 4.5 fish per angler-hour (3.4 kg per boat-hour) in 2005. Average capture size was 0.26
kg. Of 26 fish species recorded during the two years, 20 were landed in 2003 and 16 in 2005.
Landings were predominated by coney (Cephalopholisfulva), red hind (Epinephelus guttatus),
and squirrelfishes (Holocentrus spp.). Landings also included a substantial number of two
lutjanid species silk snapper, L. vivanus, and vermillion snapper, Rhomboplites aurorubens -
which are generally considered deepwater fishes (e.g. Clavijo et al. 1980).


Sportfishing event was classified as an offshore coastal pelagic tour






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 8
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

fishing tournament held in the USVI, attracting approximately 250 anglers and 75 boats per year.
Results from the Bastille Day tournament for five consecutive years (2001 to 2005) are shown in
Table 8. Tournament officials recognize only seven species as valid tournament entries.
Therefore, the actual quantity and diversity of fishers' landings is likely to exceed those observed
at the weigh station. Nonetheless, comparisons across years are probably valid when
circumscribed to the seven tournament species. During the five years, an average of 258 anglers
fished from 73 boats and landed an average of 192 fish in total (645 kg). Landings were
dominated by barracuda and kingfish in all years, and also by bonito in 2003. Average catch rate
was 0.12 fish per angler-hour (1.47 kilograms per boat-hour) and was relatively constant across
years (Table 8).


Offshore Pelagic Tournaments

The majority of DFW sampling effort was directed towards the offshore pelagic category of
fishing tournaments (Table 3) and includes the annual father's day fishing tournament.
Landings from St. Thomas offshore pelagic tournaments are summarized in Table 9. A total of
641 fish (3,494.4 kg) from 16 species were recorded (FY03, FY04 and FY05 combined). More
detailed information on the landings from each St. Thomas offshore pelagic tournaments is
presented in Appendix 3. Landings from St. Croix offshore pelagic tournaments are summarized
in Table 10. A total of 889 fish (7,253.6 kg) from 9 species were recorded (FY01 to FY05
combined). More detailed information on the landings from each St. Croix offshore pelagic
tournaments is presented in Appendix 4.

Species composition of tournament landings differed between islands (compare Tables 9 and
10). St. Croix landings were dominated by dolphin (52.8 %) and wahoo (42.9 %), with the
remaining seven other species collectively accounting for only 4.3 % of landings by number. In
contrast, St. Thomas landings were comprised of greater fish diversity (16 species). Dolphin and
wahoo were of lesser importance (35.4 % and 15.3 % respectively) and barracuda were of
greater importance (22.3 %). The remaining 13 species, which included many coastal pelagic
species, collectively accounted for 27.0 % by number of landings in St. Thomas offshore pelagic
tournaments.

Fishing effort at offshore pelagic tournaments was slightly greater in St. Thomas tournaments
than St. Croix tournaments. There were an average of 12.9 boats that participated in St. Thomas
tournaments (range 5 to 27) and 11.4 boats in St. Croix tournaments (range 7 to 20). However,
fishing effort was highly variable within and among years at St. Thomas tournaments (Figure
4A) and at St. Croix tournaments (Figure 4B). A more detailed break-down of average fishing
effort and associated tournament attributes was tabulated on an annual basis for St. Croix
offshore pelagic tournaments (Table 11).

The average catch rate ( st. dev.) observed in St. Thomas offshore pelagic tournaments over
three years was 3.07 1.57 kg per boat-hour. For St. Croix tournaments, the average catch rate
was 2.16 1.12 kg per boat-hour over a five year period. Catch rates were seen to be highly
variable within and among years. This variability is evident in time-series plots of catch rates for
St. Thomas (Figure 5A) and for St. Croix (Figure 5B). The highest catch rate observed during






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 9
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

the entire study period was 7.1 kg per boat-hour, which occurred at the St. Thomas Dolphin
Derby on April 4, 2004.

Information on the spatial distribution of fishing effort was analyzed only for St. Croix offshore
pelagic tournaments insufficient data were available from St. Thomas tournaments for inclusion
in this analysis. Results are shown in Figure 6 and Table 13. Estimates for area visitation
frequency were comparable to those estimated for area boat-hours (Table 13). By rank order,
fishing effort was distributed among areas as follows:
Area 4 > Area 5 > Area 6 = Area 1 > Area 2 = Area 3
During the five year period, two areas saw increased visitation/effort (Areas 1 and 4), one saw
declining visitation/effort (Area 5), and three showed no consistent trends (Area 2, 3, 6), as
shown in Table 13.


Marlin Tournaments

Compared to previous RecPort (F-8) study periods, little information was collected from marlin
tournaments during FY01-FY05. Some data were available for the single annual marlin
tournament held on St. Croix each year the Golden Hook Challenge. This marlin tournament is
a relatively small event which attracts about 40 anglers (8 boats) per year. Unlike many St.
Thomas marlin tournaments, most participants in the GH Challenge are fishing club members
operating locally-registered vessels. Tournament organizers encourage catch and release (or tag
and release) billfishing. Points are awarded only for blue marlin, and boated (killed) fish brought
to the weigh-in must exceed minimum size (400 lbs.) or the angler is penalized tournament
points. Thus, the two-day tournament had no formal weigh station, and biostatistical data for the
other species caught during the tournament were not collected. Results from the GH Challenge
from 2001 to 2005 are presented in Table 12. On average, 8.2 boats fished for 8.5 hours and
caught 0.0321 blue marlin per boat-hour. A total of 21 blue marlin were caught during the five-
year period and all were released.

During this reporting period, assistance was occasionally provided to the Virgin Islands Game
Fishing Club's various marlin fishing tournaments. When there were insufficient numbers of
certified observers, staff assisted as observers on tournament registered vessels. Since these
were marlin fishing tournaments, few fish were landed, and only estimates were made of fish
sizes and weights (fish were not landed). VIGFC compiles billfish tournament data and
submitted these data to NOAA Fisheries. They have also been requested to provide DFW with
copies of the submitted data. However, to-date, no data files have been provided.


Characteristics of Fish Harvested in Offshore Pelagic Tournaments

Dolphin and wahoo were the predominant species landed in USVI offshore recreational
tournaments. Barracuda were also of importance in St. Thomas tournaments (above). Therefore,
more detailed analyses of landings were made for these three species. Small sample sizes
precluded analyses of biostatistical data for the remaining 14 species.






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 10
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

For St. Thomas, information for the weight distribution of the three primary harvest species was
available for three consecutive years (2003 to 2005). These data are shown for dolphin (Figure
7), for wahoo (Figure 8), and for barracuda (Figure 9). This size variation among years was
significant for dolphin (Kruskal-Wallis test: H2, 227 = 10.55, p = 0.0051). Dolphin size in FY03
was significantly larger than in FY04 (p < 0.001). Size of wahoo also varied significantly among
years (KW: H2, 98 = 24.80 p < 0.001). Wahoo size in FY05 was significantly larger than in FY04
(p < 0.001). Observed inter-annual variation in size of barracuda was not significant (KW:
H2,143 = 3.303, p = 0.1918).

For St. Croix, information for the weight distribution of the two primary harvest species was
available for five consecutive years (2001 to 2005). These data are shown for dolphin (Figure
10) and for wahoo (Figure 11). A comparison of average landing weight for dolphin showed
significant inter-annual variation (KW: H4,467 = 33.77, p < 0.001). Dolphin observed in FY03
were significantly larger than those in FY05, and dolphin observed in FY04 were significantly
smaller than those in FY02, FY03, and FY05 (p < 0.001). Wahoo average size also showed
significant inter-annual variation (KW: H4,384 = 48.32, p < 0.001). Wahoo size in FY02 was
significantly larger than in all other years (FY01, FY03, FY04 and FY05; p < 0.001).

It was hypothesized that big cash-prize tournaments, which attract the largest number of
participants each year (i.e. the effort "spikes" shown in Figure 4), might introduce a size bias into
landings data. These anglers may be less inclined to bring small fish to the weigh station than
anglers participating in regular fishing club tournaments who are awarded series points for all
dolphin and wahoo landed. To determine if tournament award structure (cash-prize vs. club
points) introduced a size bias, we compared five years of landings data from the St. Croix Wahoo
Wind-Up to the GHFC Wahoo Series Finale. These annual tournaments are generally held
within two weeks of one another (average separation of 16.8 days during the five year period).
Using a paired sample t-test, no significant differences were observed between tournament pairs
for average weight of wahoo landed (t = -0.491, p = 0.65) or for average number of wahoo
landed (t = -0.844, p = 0.46). Thus, there was no evidence that tournament award structure
introduced a size bias into the landings data.

The length-weight relationships of dolphin and wahoo were examined in greater detail. Results
are shown for dolphin (Figure 12A) and wahoo (Figure 12B). Data from St. Thomas and St.
Croix were qualitatively similar (see Figure 12). Whether datasets were pooled or tested
independently, they yielded similar estimates of parameters a and b for length-weight
relationships for either dolphin or wahoo (Table 14).

Historic trends in landings of dolphin and wahoo were compiled from previous RecPort (F-8)
studies and compared to our findings in this study. These data are shown for dolphin (Figure
13A) and wahoo (Figure 13B). Dolphin showed no clear trends over time. For wahoo, there was
some indication of decline in average size for the last two sampling years (2004 and 2005).
However, re-examination of wahoo size-frequency distributions (Figure 11) for these years
suggests that there was an influx of smaller fish (< 4 kg) rather than a disappearance of larger
individuals (> 10 kg) from the population.






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 11
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

DISCUSSION

Pelagics

Dolphin and wahoo are two of the most important species for USVI recreational fishers. This
fact may have been previously overshadowed by the greater emphasis that earlier studies placed
on the USVI billfish fishery (Brandon 1989, Friedlander and Contillo 1994, Friedlander 1995).
Based upon logbooks and interviews, Adams (1996) and Mateo (2000), reported that dolphin and
wahoo were among the most frequently harvested non-billfish species in the USVI recreational
fishery. An opinion survey of recreational fishing club members also indicated that anglers
prefer to fish for these two species (Messineo and Uwate 2004). Our results show that dolphin
and wahoo were the dominant species landed in USVI offshore sportfishing tournaments.

Dolphin and wahoo are considered to be migratory pelagic species. In the USVI, dolphin are
reported to have two seasonal abundance peaks, with a major "run" in the spring and a secondary
peak in the fall (Olsen and Wood 1983). Wahoo show a single peak in fall/winter (Olsen and
Wood 1983, Adams 1996). In our datasets, intra-annual variation was evident in catch rates (e.g.
Figure 5). The timing of peak dolphin and wahoo landings was also roughly coincident with
reported seasonal peaks (e.g. Appendix 3 and 4). However, seasonality could not be studied in
detail due to the limited temporal distribution of sampling dates.

Our results represent some of the most detailed biostatistical information presently available on
dolphin and wahoo landings for the USVI. This provides an opportunity to examine the dataset
for temporal trends. Capture size of dolphin and wahoo varied significantly among years, and
catch rates also varied substantially. This implies that both the size structure and abundance of
local dolphin and wahoo populations fluctuated among years. The source of inter-annual
variation is not known. Inter-annual fluctuations in landings of dolphin (Mahon and Oxenford
1999) and wahoo (Luckhurst and Trott 2000) are well known from elsewhere in the Caribbean
region.

Despite the foregoing evidence for changes in dolphin and wahoo populations among years, our
comparisons to historic USVI data give no evidence of declining trends over longer time periods.
Neither average capture size (over a 20 year period) nor catch rate (over a 5 year period)
showed a clear tendency towards an increase or decrease (e.g. Figure 13A and 13B). Thus, there
is presently no obvious indication of an impact by local fisheries to these populations. However,






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 12
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Caribbean fisheries but less information is available regarding wahoo stock structure, migratory
patterns or inter-annual variability in abundance (Mahon 1996). Some recent genetic evidence
(Garber et al. 2005) indicates that western Atlantic wahoo populations are widely distributed
with little sub-structuring.

USVI commercial fishers also harvest dolphin and wahoo, however the combined contribution of
these two species to total annual commercial harvests appears to be small less than 5 % of


primarily target reet tisn) should snitt to a pelagic tisnery






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Barracuda were the second most abundant species in St. Thomas tournament landings but they
were relatively rare in St. Croix landings. In contrast, previous studies showed barracuda among
the more common species in St. Croix recreational catches (Adams 1996). From 1996 to 2000,
barracuda was the sixth most important species (by weight) in non-tournament, offshore
recreational landings (Mateo 2000). The authors believe that the observed decline in barracuda
catch frequency in St. Croix tournaments is due to angler behavior (i.e. by not bringing barracuda
to the weigh station) rather than to an actual decline in stock abundance (W. Toller, pers. obs.).
No significant changes in barracuda size were seen among years in St. Thomas tournament
landings.


Reef Fish


Results from1 hlanlinelt toumlamentsll offered Illt llesghtl into lthe recreational harvest of reef
fishes. The spatial distribution of fishing effort at shoreline tournaments was extremely limited.
It is doubtful that these results can be extrapolated to non-tournament shoreline fishing activity
patterns of USVI recreational anglers because their activities are much more spatially diffused
(Mateo 2000). Landings from shoreline tournaments were characterized by a large number of
fish species, most of which were juveniles or subadults. This suggests that the waterfront areas
where tournaments were held are nursery habitats, and that sampling tournament landings will
provide little valuable information regarding the size distribution of the greater population.






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 14
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

St. Croix's fishing effort occurred off the northeast coast in areas 4, 5 and 6. Mateo (2000)
reported that 80 % of fishing effort was expended in areas 4 and 5 during 1996 to 2000, with 51
% occurring exclusively in area 5. Current activity patterns (from this study) indicate






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


is snorkeling, diving, spear, snare, and cast nets.

3) Monitoring of recreational fisheries should be expanded beyond tournament-based sampling.
Dther offshore and inshore recreational fisheries segments require better representation in
;ampling efforts such as charter boat operators and private recreational fishers. More
quantitative information is needed to assess recreational harvests of some pelagic species (e.g.
unas) and most coastal pelagic species. Biostatistical information should be collected and
qualified by port sampling agents.

1) Establishment of minimum harvest sizes should be encouraged by DFW through educational
'ethical angling" programs and continued involvement in Fishing Club activities. Recently,
3HFC voluntarily implemented minimum size restrictions in tournaments. This trend should be
encouraged and supported.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

WVe wish to acknowledge the numerous people who assisted with sampling at fishing
tournaments. Foremost among these were Willy Ventura and William Tobias on St. Croix. Als(
assisting were David Camoyan, Carmen Cortes, Ivan Mateo, Hector Rivera, John Schuster, and
vlikey Ventura. Assistance with St. Thomas tournaments came from Stacy Albritten, Donna
3eorge-Jackson, Shenell Gordon, Ron Sjoken, and Jason Vasques. The authors also wish to
hank Andy Anderson, Robert, Richard and Kathy MacKay, Eric Rasmussen, and other member!
)f the Golden Hook Fishing Club; Harry Clinton and Bob Raypok of the Virgin Islands Game
Fishing Club. Roger Uwate, Barbara Kojis and William Tobias provided insightful comments
)n an earlier draft of this report. The DFW Recreational Fisheries Assessment Project was
supportedd by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Sportfish Restoration Grant F-8, segments 10-
14.


alluC VV 11ulliv-1 V 1%V-






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 16
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Beardsley, G.L. 1989. Marine recreational fishing statistics: A Caribbean basin initiative. Proc.
Gulf Carib. Fish. Inst. 39:53-62.

Beerkircher, L.R. 2005. Length to weight conversions for wahoo, Acanthocybium solandri, in
the Northwest Atlantic. Col. Vol. Sci. Pap. ICCAT, 58(5):1616-1619.

Brandon, M. 1985. Recreational port sampling final report, Project FW:3, Period: October 1
1981 to September 30, 1985. Division of Fish and Wildlife, Department of Planning and
Natural Resources, Government of the U.S. Virgin Islands. Unpubl. MS. 46 pp.

Brandon, M. 1989. Marine recreational fisheries statistics of the U.S. Virgin Islands, January
1983 to September 1985. Proc. Gulf Carib. Fish. Inst. 38:665-683.

Caribbean Fishery Management Council. 1985. Fishery management plan. Final environmental
impact review for the shallow-water reeffish fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin
Islands. 69 pp.

Carter, K.E. 2002. The living marine resources of the Western Central Atlantic (Volumes 1-3).
FAO Species Identification Guides for Fishery Purposes and American Society of
Ichthyologists and Herpetologists Special Publication No. 5. Rome. 2127 pp.






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 17
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Jeffrey, C.F.G., U. Anlauf, J. Beets, S. Caseau, W. Coles, A.M. Friedlander, S. Herzlieb, Z.
Hillis-Starr, M. Kendall, V. Mayor, J. Miller, R. Nemeth, C. Rogers and W. Toller. 2005.
The state of coral reef ecosystems of the U.S. Virgin Islands. Pp. 45-90 In: J. Waddell (ed.)
The State of Coral Reef Ecosystems of the United States and Pacific Freely Associated
States: 2005. NOAA Tech. Memo. NOS NCCOS 11. Silver Spring, MD. 522 pp.

Jennings, C.A. 1992. Survey of non-charter boat recreational fishing in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
Bull. Mar. Sci. 50(2):342-351.

Luckhurst, B.E. and J.A. Ward. 1996. Analysis of trends in Bermuda's fishery statistical
database from 1975 1990 with reference to fishery management measures implemented
during this period. Proc. Gulf Carib. Fish. Inst. 44:306-324.

Luckhurst, B.E. and T. Trott. 2000. Bermuda's commercial line fishery for wahoo and
dolphinfish: landings, seasonality and catch per unit effort trends. Proc. Gulf Carib. Fish.
Inst. 51:404-413.

Mahon, R. 1996. Fisheries and research for tunas and tuna-like species in the western central
Atlantic. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper No. 357. Rome. 62 pp.

Mahon, R. 1999. Dolphinfish fisheries in the Caribbean region. Scientia Marina 63:411-420.

Mahon, R; W. Hunte, H. Oxenford, K. Storey and R. Hastings. 1982. Seasonality in the
commercial marine fisheries of Barbados. Proc. Gulf Carib. Fish. Inst. 34:28-37.

Mahon, R. and H.A. Oxenford. 1999. Precautionary assessment and management of dolphinfish
in the Caribbean. Scientia Marina 63:429-438.

Mateo, I. 2004. Survey of resident participation in recreational fisheries activities in the US
Virgin Islands. Proc. Gulf Carib. Fish. Inst. 55:205-222.

Mateo, I. 2001. Annual Performance Report, Recreational Fisheries Assessment Porject, F-8-
10. Division of Fish and Wildlife, Department of Planning and Natural Resources,
Government of the U.S. Virgin Islands. Unpubl. MS.

Mateo, I. 2000. Recreational Fisheries Assessment Project: 1 October 1995 to 30 September
2000. Final report to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Sportfish Restoration Program. F-8.
Division of Fish and Wildlife, Department of Planning and Natural Resources, Government
of the U.S. Virgin Islands. Unpubl. MS 52 pp.

Mazurek, R. 2004. Dolphinfish and Wahoo Southeast Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico Regions.
Seafood Report. Monterey Bay Aquarium, 28 pp.

Messineo, J. and K.R. Uwate. 2004. 2003 opinion survey of U.S. Virgin Island recreational
fishing club members. Division of Fish and Wildlife, Department of Planning and Natural
Resources. Government of the IU.S. Virgin Islands. Unnubl. MS. 14 nn.






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 18
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Olsen, D.A. and R.S. Wood. 1983. The marine resource base for marine recreational fisheries
development in the Caribbean. Proc. Gulf Carib. Fish. Inst. 35:152-160.

Oxenford, H.A. and W. Hunte. 1986a. A preliminary investigation of the stock structure of the
dolphin, Coryphaena hippurus, in the western central Atlantic. Fish. Bull. 84(2):451-460.

Oxenford, H.A. and W. Hunte. 1986b. Migration of the dolphin (Coryphaena hippurus) and its
implications for fisheries management in the western central Atlantic. Proc. Gulf Carib. Fish.
Inst. 37:95-111.

Quinn, N.J. 2005. Assessing pelagic fish stocks off Jamaica using game fishing tournament
results. Proc. Gulf Carib. Fish. Inst. 56:241-252.

Rivera, G. and R.S. Appeldoom. 2000. Age and growth of dolphinfish, Coryphaena hippurus,
off Puerto Rico. Fish. Bull. 98:345-352.

Tobias, W. 1991. Sport fisheries restoration program: Recreational port sampling report St.
Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands: October 1, 1985 September 30, 1990. Division of Fish and
Wildlife, Department of Planning and Natural Resources, Government of the U.S. Virgin
Islands. Unpubl. MS. 26 pp.

Tobias, W., R. Gomez, I. Mateo, and B. Kojis. 2000. Three Year Summary Report, 1 April 1997
31 March 1999, Cooperative Statistics Program NA77FT0093. Division of Fish and
Wildlife, Department of Planning and Natural Resources, Government of the U.S. Virgin
Islands. Unpubl. MS. 40 pp.

Toller, W. 2003. Impact of the expansion of Buck Island Reef National Monument on
recreational fishers of St. Croix. Division of Fish and Wildlife, Department of Planning and
Natural Resources, Government of the U.S. Virgin Islands. Unpubl. MS. 9 pp.

Valle-Esquivel, M. and G. Diaz. 2003. Preliminary estimation of reported landings, expansion
factors and expanded landings for the commercial fisheries of the United States Virgin
Islands. NOAA NMFS Sustainable Fisheries Division Contribution SFD-2003-0027, 50 pp.






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 19
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES

Table 1. St. Thomas sportfishing tournaments attended, FY01 to FY05.
Table 2. St. Croix sportfishing tournaments attended, FY01 to FY05.
Table 3. Sampling distribution among five types of USVI tournaments, FY01 to FY05.
Table 4. Landings from the July Kids Open Handline Tournament, St. Thomas.
Table 5. Landings from the Boy Scouts Handline Tournament, St. Thomas.
Table 6. Landings from the Kids Handline Tournament, St. Croix.
Table 7. Landings from the Mother's Day Tournament, St. Thomas.
Table 8. Landings from the Bastille Day Tournament, St. Thomas.
Table 9. Summary of landings from St. Thomas offshore pelagic tournaments.
Table 10. Summary of landings from St. Croix offshore pelagic tournaments.
Table 11. Characteristics of St. Croix offshore pelagic tournaments, FY01 to FY05.
Table 12. St. Croix marlin tournaments, FY01 to FY05.
Table 13. Distribution of fishing effort among areas in St. Croix offshore pelagic tournaments,
FY01 to FY05.
Table 14. Parameters of the length-weight relationship for dolphin and wahoo, FY01 to FY05.

Figure 1. Classification of USVI sportfishing tournaments.
Figure 2. Area map used for St. Thomas sportfishing tournaments.
Figure 3. Area map used for St. Croix sportfishing tournaments.
Figure 4. Fishing effort (number of boats and number of anglers) at offshore pelagic
tournaments, FY01 to FY05. A. St. Thomas and B. St. Croix
Figure 5. Catch rates at offshore pelagic tournaments, FY01 to FY05. A. St. Thomas and B.
St. Croix.
Figure 6. Distribution of fishing effort among areas in St. Croix tournaments, FY01 to FY05.
Figure 7. Weight distribution of dolphin landed in St. Thomas tournaments, 2002 to 2005.
Figure 8. Weight distribution of wahoo landed in St. Thomas tournaments, 2002 to 2005.
Figure 9. Weight distribution of barracuda landed in St. Thomas tournaments, 2002 to 2005.
Figure 10. Weight distribution of dolphin landed in St. Croix tournaments, 2000 to 2005.
Figure 11. Weight distribution of wahoo landed in St. Croix tournaments, 2000 to 2005.
Figure 12. Length-weight relationships for the two predominant fish species landed in USVI
offshore pelagic tournaments, FY01 to FY05. A. Dolphin and B. Wahoo.
Figure 13. Long-term trends in average landing size of dolphin and wahoo by recreational
fishers on St. Croix. A. Dolphin and B. Wahoo.

Appendix 1. Trip information form used at St. Thomas sportfishing tournaments.
Appendix 2. Trip information form used at St. Croix sportfishing tournaments.
Appendix 3. Detailed data for St. Thomas offshore pelagic tournaments, FY01 to FY05.
Appendix 4. Detailed data for St. Croix offshore pelagic tournaments, FY01 to FY05.
Appendix 5. Collected literature with relevance to the USVI recreational fishery.






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 20
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Table 1. St. Thomas sportfishing tournaments attended, FY01 to FY05.

Fiscal Calendar Fish
Fcal Cle ar Date(s) Tournament Name Gear Area Fi
Year Year Comp


2000


Nov 12


Wahoo (Wind-Up)*


FY01


2005


Feb 13
Apr 24
May 22
Jun 5
Jun 26


Couple's
Dolphin Derby
Mother's Day
Father's Day
June Moon


Feb 25 Sweetheart's (=Couple's)* G OF P
Apr 8 Dolphin (Derby)* G OF P
May 6 Mother's Day* HL BT R
2001 Jun 11 Father's Day* G OF P
Jul 4 July Kids Open* HL SH R
Jul 16 Bastille Dayt G OF CP/P
Aug 5 Vitelcellular Boy Scouts* HL SH R
Sep 1-2 Offshore Four* G OF P
Dec 2 Wahoo Wind-Up* G OF P
Feb 24 Couple's* G OF P
Apr 21 Dolphin (Derby)* G OF P
May 5 Mother's Day* HL BT R
Jun 9 Father's Day* G OF P
2002 Jun 21-23 June Moon* G OF P
Jul 4 July Kids Open* HL SH R
c. 14 Jul Bastille Dayt G OF CP/P
Aug 18 Boy Scouts* HL SH R
Nov 17 Wahoo Wind-Up G OF P
Mar 2 Couple's G OF P
Apr 27 Dolphin Derby G OF P
May 4 Mother's Day HL BT R
2003 Jun 8 Father's Day G OF P
Jul 4 July Kid's Open HL SH R
Jul 13 Bastille Dayt G OF CP/P
Nov 9 Wahoo Wind-Up G OF P
Feb 22 Couple's G OF P
Apr 4 Dolphin Derby G OF P
Jun 7 Father's Day G OF P
2004 Jul 4 July Kid's Open HL SH R
Jul 11 Bastille Dayt G OF CP/P
Aug 29 Boy Scouts HL SH R
Nov 7 Wahoo Wind-Up G OF P


FY02


FY03


FY04


FY05






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 21
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Table 1. St. Thomas sportfishing tournaments attended, FY01 to FY05 (continued).

Fiscal Calendar Fish
Year Yenar Date(s) Tournament Name Gear Area Co
Year Year Comp
Jul 3 July Kids Open HL SH R
Jul 10 Bastille Dayt G OF CP/P
Jul 15-17 July Open Billfish* G OF M
Aug 14 Boy Scouts HL SH R
Aug 15,20 USVI Open Atl Blue Marlin* G OF M
Abbreviations used are as follows: for fishing gears, G = General hook and line, HL = Handline
only; for area of fishing, SH = shoreline (without boat), BT = bottom fishing from boat, OF =
offshore from boat; for composition of fish species, R = reef or bottom-associated fishes, P =
pelagic species, CP/P = coastal pelagic and pelagic species, M = marlin.
Asterisks (*) indicate missing tournaments datasets.
Partial data (t) was obtained for Bastille Day tournaments from tournament organizers (no trip
information, no length measurements).






F-8: USVI Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 2,
Study 1, Job 3: Survey of Fishing Tournaments
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Table 2. St. Croix sportfishing tournaments attended, FY01 to FY05.

Fiscal Calendar Fish
Year Yenar Date(s) Tournament Name Gear Area Fi
Year Year Comp


2000


Nov 18-19


GHFC Wahoo


Mar 4 GHFC Dolphin G OF P
Jun 2-3 GHFC Guys/Gals Shootout G OF P
2001 Aug 19 Vitelcellular Boy Scouts1 HL SH R
Sep 16-17 GHFC Marlin2 G OF M
Nov 17-18 GHFC Wahoo G OF P
Dec 9 Wahoo Wind-Up G OF P
Feb 23 GHFC Dolphin G OF P
Apr 21 Offshore Marine Dolphin Derby G OF P
Jun 8-9 GHFC Guy/Gal Reel Challenge G OF P
2002 Aug 11 GHFC Kids Hand-line
Tournament HL SH R
Oct 19-20 GHFC Challenge2 G OF M
Nov 17 Wahoo Wind-up G OF P
Nov 30-Dec 1 GHFC Wahoo G OF P
Mar 9 GHFC Dolphin G OF P
Apr 27 Offshore Marine Dolphin Derby G OF P
May 17-18 GHFC Guy/Gal Reel Challenge G OF P
2003 Aug 3 GHFC Kids Hand-line
Tournament HL SH R
Sep 6-7 GHFC Challenge2 G OF M
Nov 9 Wahoo Wind-Up G OF P
Nov 22-23 GHFC Series Finale G OF P
Feb 29 GHFC Dolphin G OF P
Apr 4 Offshore Marine Dolphin Derby G OF P
May 29-30 VIGFC Memorial Day Weekend G OF P
2004 Jun 26-27 GHFC Challenge2 G OF M
Aug 8 GHFC Kids Hand-line
Tournament HL SH R
Sep 25-26 GHFC Guy/Gal Reel Challenge G OF P
Nov 7 Wahoo Wind-Up G OF P
Dec 4-5 GHFC Series Finale G OF P


2005


Feb 20
Apr 24
May 28-29
Jun 18-19


GHFC Dolphin
Dolphin Derby
VIGFC Memorial Day Weekend
GHFC Challenge2


FYO1


FY02


FY03


FY04


FY05






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 23
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Table 2. St. Croix sportfishing tournaments attended, FY01 to FY05 (continued)
Fiscal Calendar Fish
Fiscal Calendar Date(s) Tournament Name Gear Area Fish
Year Year Tout N e Comp
Aug 7 GHFC Kids Hand-line
Tournament HL SH R
Sep 17-18 GHFC Guy/Gal Reel Challenge G OF P
Abbreviations used are as follows: for fishing gears, G = General hook and line, HL = Handline
only; for area of fishing, SH = shoreline (without boat), BT = bottom fishing from boat, OF =
offshore from boat; for composition of fish species, R = reef or bottom-associated fishes, P =
pelagic species, CP/P = coastal pelagic and pelagic species, M = marlin.
1 Data reported in Mateo (2001).
2 Partial data on marlin tournaments supplied by GHFC.






F-8: USVI Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 24
Study 1, Job 3: Survey of Fishing Tournaments
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Table 3. Sampling distribution among five types of USVI tournaments, FY01 to FY05.
St. Thomas St. Croix
Total No. No. with Total No. No. with
Tournament Type Attended* Datat Attended* Datat

Shore-Based Handline 9 5 5 4

Boat-Based Handline 4 2

Offshore Coastal Pelagic 5 5

Offshore Pelagic 23 13 25 25

Marlin 2 5* -

Total 43 25 35 29

* DFW attended all St. Croix and St. Thomas fishing tournaments (excluding marlin
tournaments) during the five-year period.
t Excluded tournament datasets were either lacking essential information or missing
altogether.
$ Currently, USVI marlin tournaments are tag and release events. This precludes collection of
biostatistical data from landings. However, some qualitative data for effort were collected
from five St. Croix tournaments. Comparable data have been requested from the Virgin
Islands Game Fishing Club which organizes the marlin tournaments on St. Thomas and
submitted marlin tournament data to NOAA Fisheries.








F-8: USVI Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
Study 1, Job 3: Survey of Fishing Tournaments
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Table 4. Landings from the July Kids Open Handline Tournament, St. Thomas.
Year
2003 2004 2005 Total
Species Common Name No. Wt. No. Wt. No. Wt. No. Fish


Landings
Acanthurus chirurgus
Acanthurus coeruleus
Apogon sp.
Bothus lunatus
Caranx latus
Caranx crysos
Caranx rubber
Trachinotus goodei
carangid sp.
gerreid sp.
Haemulon aurolineatum
Haemulon carbonarium
Haemulon chrysargyreum
Haemulon flavolineatum
Haemulon melanurum
Haemulon sciurus
Myripristis jacobus
Holocentrus spp.
holocentrid sp.
Halichoeres gamoti
Halichoeres pictus
Halichoeres radiatus
Halichoeres sp.
Xyrichtys novacula
Xyrichtys sp.
Labrisomus nuchipinnis
Lutjanus analis
Lutjanus apodus
Lutjanus griseus
Lutjanus jocu
Lutjanus synagris
Lutjanus sp.
Ocyurus chrysurus
Echidna catenata
Gymnothorax moringa
Lactophrys bicaudalis
Lactophrys triqueter
Abudefduf saxatilis
Stegastes adustus
pomacentrid sp.
Sparisoma chrysopterum
Sparisoma viride
scarid sp.
Calamus sp.
Cephalopholis cruentatus

Epinephelus adscensionis
Epinephelus guttatus
Epinephelus striatus
Hypoplectrus aberrans
Hypoplectrus chlorurus
Hypoplectrus guttavarius
Hypoplectrus nigricans
Hypoplectrus puella
Hypoplectrus sp.
Sphyraena barracuda
Synodus intermedius
synodontid sp.
Sphoeroides sp.


doctorfish
blue tang
cardinalfish, unid.
peacock flounder
Horse-eye jack
blue runner
bar jack
palometa
jack, unid.
mojarra, unid.
tomtate
smallmouth grunt
caesar grunt
french grunt
cottonwick
bluestriped grunt
blackbar soldierfish
squirrelfish, unid.
soldierfish, unid.
yellowhead wrasse
rainbow wrasse
puddingwife
wrasse spp.
pearly razorfish
razorfish, unid.
hairy blenny
mutton snapper
schoolmaster
gray snapper
dog snapper
lane snapper
"mangrove" snapper
yellowtail snapper
chain moray
spotted moray
spotted trunkfish
smooth trunkfish
sergeant major
dusky damselfish
damselfish, unid.
redtail parrotfish
stoplight parrotfish
parrotfish, unid.
porgy, unid.
grasby
coney
rock hind
red hind
Nassau grouper
yellowbelly hamlet
yellowtail hamlet
shy hamlet
black hamlet
barred hamlet
hamlet, unid.
great barracuda
sand diver
lizardfish, unid.
pufferfish, unid.


5 594

1 45
1 41

3 921
1 9

1 14

7 268
1 41

26 871
43 1429
8 590

105 6527
1 50
1 77
4 181




3 141

5 889


5 263
3 340
120 4491
1 109
1 803
1 259

5 386
6 172

3 449
3 1157

1 254
7 989
4 535
1 95
1 272

1 14
1 27
1 18
19 562
16 268


1 68
3 86
3 395


38 3760
5 567


23 449



2 36
2 204
70 1905


20 789
7 109
7 943

147 6096



1 73

2 54

4 122
1 798
10 1116
1 91

21 1293

203 8714




1 77
3 86
2 54
3 186

2 363

4 599



4 798




9 1492
7 154


43
5
1
1
23
3
1
1 463 1
2 191 5
2
182 5203 259
1 32 2
1 91 1
22 644 68
50
5 163 20
2 159 2
115 5897 367
1
1
4
1
1 104 1
2
1 5 1
8 159 15
1
1 345 16
1
1 104 1
41 2817 67
3
41 2921 364
1
1
1
1 277 1
3 113 9
4 268 13
2
2 1084 8
1 168 4
2
1
3 445 14
4
1
8 336 9
0 4
1
1
1
1 45 20
2 36 27
2 50 9
1 558 1
S 1
1 18 4
3







Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 26
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005



Table 4. Continued.
Landings
clupeid or atherinid sp. fry, unid. 1 5 1
fish sp. fish, unid. 1 50 1
belonid sp. needlefish, unid. 1 458 1

Totals
Total Number of Fish 424 600 455 1479
Total Weight of Fish (g) 24,703 30,981 23,152 78,835
Total Number of Fish Species 41 28 29 62

Effort and Catch Rate
Number of Anglers 173 112 150
Hours Fished 4 4 4
Number of Fish per Angler-Hour 0.61 1.34 0.76








F-8: USVI Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 27
Study 1, Job 3: Survey of Fishing Tournaments
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Table 5. Landings from the Boys Scouts Handline Tournament, St. Thomas.
Year
2004 2005 Total
Species Common Name No. Wt. (g) No. Wt. (g) No. Fish
Landings
carangid sp. jack, unid. 2 213 2
Diodon hystrix Porcupinefish 2 3488 1 2064 3
gerreid sp. mojarra, unid. 2 708 1 18 3
Haemulon aurolineatum tomtate 14 445 18 413 32
Haemulon chrysargyreum caesar grunt 1 9 1
Haemulonflavolineatum french grunt 1 32 4 73 5
Haemulon melanurum cottonwick 21 435 21
Haemulon sciurus bluestriped grunt 4 408 2 122 6
Myripristis jacobus blackbar soldierfish 1 50 1
holocentrid sp. squirrelfish, unid. 1 41 1
Xyrichtys sp. razorfish, unid. 1 23 1
Labrisomus nuchipinnis hairy blenny 2 68 2
Lutjanus apodus schoolmaster 1 186 1
Lutjanus griseus gray snapper 4 694 20 2046 24
Lutjanus mahogoni mahogany snapper 2 127 1 23 3
Lutjanus synagris lane snapper 11 1098 11
Ocyurus chrysurus yellowtail snapper 2 50 10 299 12
muraenid sp. moray, unid. 5 1166 5
Sphyraena barracuda great barracuda 3 1415 5 1914 8
Sphoeroides testudineus checkered puffer 17 2368 17
Sphoeroides sp. pufferfish, unid. 17 2141 17

Landings Invertebrates
"crab" crab, unid. 25 1070 25

Totals Fish Only
Total Number of Fish 57 119 176
Total Weight of Fish (g) 11,086 11,050 22,136
Total Number of Fish Species 12 18 21

Effort and Catch Rate
Number of Anglers 227 189
Hours Fished 4 3.5
Number of Fish per Angler-Hour 0.06 0.18








F-8: USVI Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
Study 1, Job 3: Survey of Fishing Tournaments
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Table 6. Landings from the Kids Handline Tournament, St. Croix.
Year
2002 2003 2004 2005 Total
Species Common Name No. Wt. No. Wt. No. Wt. No. Wt. No. Fish


Landings Fish
Bothus lunatus peacock flounder
Caranx crysos blue runner
Caranx latus horse-eye jack
Eucinostomus jonesi slender mojarra
gobiid sp. goby, unid.
Haemulon aurolineatum tomtate
Haemulon carbonarium smallmouth grunt
Haemulon chrysargyreum caesar grunt
Haemulonflavolineatum french grunt
Haemulon plumieri white grunt
Holocentrus adcensionis squirrelfish
Holocentrus rufus longspine squirrelfish
Holocentrus spp. squirrelfish, unid.
Myripristis jacobus blackbar soldierfish
Neoniphon marianus longjaw squirrelfish
Halichoeres bivivitattus slippery dick
Halichoeres sp. wrasse, unid.
Labrisomus nuchipinnis hairy blenny
labrisomid sp. blenny, unid.
Lutjanus apodus schoolmaster
Lutjanus mahogoni mahogany snapper
Lutjanus synagris lane snapper
Ocyurus chrysurus yellowtail snapper
Gymnothoraxfunebris green moray
Gymnothorax moringa spotted moray
Gymnothorax vicinus purplemouth moray
Echidna catenata chain moray
Acanthostracion quadricornis scrawled trunkfish
Abudefdufsaxatilis sergeant major
Stegastes dorsopunicans dusky damselfish
Stegastes leucosticus beaugregory
Sparisoma aurofrenatum redband parrotfish
Sparisoma chrysopterum redtail parrotfish
Cephalopholis cruentatus grasby
Epinephelus guttatus red hind
Scorpaena plumieri spotted scorpionfish
Sphaeroides testudineus checkered puffer
synodontid sp. lizardfish, unid.


Landings Invertebrates
Hermodice carunculata
Clappa sp.
Mithrax sp.
"crab"


bearded fireworm
crab, unid.
crab, unid.
crab, unid.


Totals Fish Only
Total Number of Fish
Total Weight of Fish (g)
Total Number of Fish Species


Effort and Catch Rate
Number of Anglers
Hours Fished
Number of Fish per Angler-Hour


6 234

13 489

1 7
1 43
75 2728



39 2430


6 269


2 49
4 510

1 43

1 680
4 326


1 85



1 71


11 120


155
7,965
14



157
2
0.49


1 43

3 128


1 60
46 1889

42 2256
8 460



4 193

2 88
1 31



1 14

2 210
1 17


1 116
1 196
1 20


2 31
1 25

1 9


115
5,722
15



205
2
0.28


8 1068

1 27

5 191


29 845

18 1000


2 145
1 32


1 27




1 41

1 64
3 145
2 118


1 9


1 255



7 64


74
3,968
14



200
2
0.19


1
8
9
1 75 2
13
2 55 7
1
9 432 11
83 2779 233
1 52 1
60
8
30 1486 69
1 93 3
1
2 75 12
1 48 1
2 61 5
1
4 500 4
1 91 1
1 34 1
3 75 7
4
3
1 14 6
2
1
1 61 5
1
1 30 1
1
1 211 1
1 125 1
4 57 4
2
1 175 3
1


2


151
6,529
21


7 22
1
23 1
1



495
24,184
38








Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Table 7. Landings from the Mother's Day Tournament, St. Thomas.
Year
2003 2005 Total
Species Common Name No. Wt. (kg) No. Wt. (kg) No. Fish


Landings
Balistes vetula
Remora remora

Haemulon aurolineatum
Haemulon flavolineatum
Haemulon melanurum
Haemulon plumieri
Haemulon sciurus
Holocentrus spp.
Halichoeres radiatus
Halichoeres maculipinna
Lutjanus analis
Lutjanusjocu
Lutjanus synagris
Lutjanus vivanus
Ocyurus chrysurus
Rhomboplites aurorubens
Malacanthus plumieri
Acanthostracion quadricornis
Pomacanthus arcuatus
Priacanthus arenatus
Calamus sp.
Cephalopholis cruentatus

Epinephelus adscensionis
Epinephelus guttatus


queen triggerfish
remora
atlantic spadefish
tomtate
french grunt
cottonwick
white grunt
bluestriped grunt
squirrelfish, unid.
puddingwife
clown wrasse
mutton snapper
dog snapper
lane snapper
silk snapper
yellowtail snapper
vermillion snapper
sand tilefish
scrawled cowfish
gray angelfish
bigeye
porgy, unid.
grasby
coney
rock hind
red hind


32 29.7

3 4.3


5 3.8 37
1 0.4 1
3
16 2.3 16
1 0.2 1
12
5 0.5 7
5
70 13.7 190
1 0.2 2
1
1
1 1.7 1
10 3.0 11
76 16.7 76
5 1.6 22
113
1 0.2 1
1
1
21
4 1.2 12
50 10.9 65
45 12.7 175
27
22 9.5 97


Totals
Total Number of Fish
Total Weight of Fish (kg)
Total Number of Fish Species

Effort and Catch Rate
Number of Anglers
Number of Boats
Hours Fished (Average per Boat)
Number of Fish per Angler-Hour
Kilograms of Fish per Boat-Hour


586
158.3
20


21
8
6.1
4.6
3.2


899
236.9
26







mpletion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
VI Grant Agreement F-8
iod: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

ible 8. Landings from the Bastille Day Tournament, St. Thomas.
Year Total
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 No./Wt.
endings*
Barracuda (Great) No. 62 63 70 69 91 355
Sphyraena barracuda Wt. 260.0 257.6 285.2 276.1 376.9 1455.9

Kingfish (King Mackerel) No. 47 36 27 42 78 230
Scomberomorus cavalla Wt. 226.3 204.0 154.0 172.3 319.0 1075.6

Bonito (Little Tunny) No. 7 46 114 2 25 194
F,, i1,.in,.,, alletteratus Wt. 8.6 61.6 139.4 2.7 35.3 247.6

Mackerel (Cero) No. 19 17 21 20 15 92
Scomberomorus regalis Wt. 22.7 20.7 28.3 21.8 21.9 115.4

Jack (Crevalle/Horse-Eye) No. 19 5 12 10 12 58
Caranx hippos /C. latus Wt. 59.4 17.6 31.7 30.7 38.9 178.3

Tuna (Blackfin) No. 5 5 8 3 4 25
Thunnus atlanticus Wt. 27.5 27.2 41.5 13.8 31.9 142.0

Dolphin No. 3 1 1 5
Coryphaena hippurus Wt. 5.8 2.6 1.3 9.7


,tals
Total Number 162 172 252 147 226 959
Total Weight (kg) 610.3 588.7 680.1 520.1 825.3 3224.5

fort and Catch Rate

Number of Anglers 275 253 266 246 352
Number of Boats 77 71 73 68 75
Hours Fished** 6 6 6 6 6
Number of Fish per Angler-Hour 0.10 0.11 0.16 0.10 0.11
Kilograms per Boat-Hour 1.32 1.38 1.55 1.27 1.83
eight is reported in kilograms. Results were provided to DFW by tournament officials. No trip information was
elected from anglers at this tournament.
Only seven species (listed in this table) are recognized by tournament officials. Data for other species were not
recorded.
Based upon tournament rules, hours fished was estimated at 6 hours and assumed to be constant across all five years








F-8: USVI Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 31
Study 1, Job 3: Survey of Fishing Tournaments
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Table 9. Summary of landings from St. Thomas offshore pelagic tournaments.
FY03 FY04 FY05

Species Total Total Avg. Avg. Total Total Avg. Avg. Total Total Avg. Avg. Total Total
No. Wt. Wt. FL No. Wt. Wt. FL No. Wt. Wt. FL No. Wt.

Dolphin 30 257.0 8.6 100.2 176 1229.8 7.0 98.4 22 172.9 7.9 94.9 228 1659.7

Barracuda 54 169.7 3.1 79.7 33 109.2 3.3 80.2 56 175.0 3.1 78.9 143 453.9

Wahoo 21 186.6 8.9 113.9 62 406.0 6.5 100.4 15 204.2 13.6 128.9 98 796.8

Kingfish 23 128.7 5.6 86.4 9 53.5 5.9 84.8 20 122.2 6.1 86.6 52 304.4

Bonito (Little Tunny) 20 24.0 1.2 43.7 18 16.6 0.9 40.7 38 40.6

Horse-Eye Jack 10' 34.7 3.5 61.0 2 5.9 2.9 55.0 13 39.8 3.0 57.0 25 80.4

Cero Mackerel 12 17.2 1.4 53.8 3 8.8 2.9 67.1 5 5.9 1.2 52.6 20 31.9

Spanish Mackerel* 1 3.7 3.7 77.0 6 12.2 2.0 61.0 7 15.9

Blackfin Tuna 1 4.4 4.4 62.0 4 8.1 2.0 46.8 82 30.3 3.8 57.4 13 42.8

Yellowfin Tuna 1 4.3 4.3 61.0 4 28.4 7.1 74.0 5 32.7

Skipjack Tuna 1 3.4 3.1 56.0 2 5.5 2.8 52.6 1 3.8 3.8 59.0 4 12.7

Amberjack, unid. 3 7.1 2.4 53.8 3 7.1

Blue Runner 3 4.7 1.6 46.0 3 4.7

Bar Jack 1 1.3 1.3 44.9 1 1.3

Mutton Snapper 1 5.0 5.0 67.8 1 5.0

Rainbow Runner 1 1.3 1.3 47.0 1 1.3

Yellow Jack 1 3.1 3.1 59.2 1 3.1

Totals 175 834.4 297 1841.5 171 818.4 643 3494.3

Weight (Wt.) is reported in kilograms and curved fork length (FL) reported in centimeters.
* Landings of seven "Spanish mackerel" (Scomberomorus maculatus) were recorded on data forms from St. Thomas tournaments in FY04 and FY05. Based upon the known
distribution of S. maculatus (see Carter 2002), we assume these were misidentified specimens of cero mackerel, Scomberomorus regalis.
t Two similar species of amberjack occur in the USVI- the greater amberjack, Seriola dumerili, and the almaco jack, S. rivoliana (Clavijo et al. 1980) however no distinction
was made on the datasheets.
One horse-eye jack (3.9 kg) in FY03 was excluded from this table because no length measurement was obtained.
2 Four blackfin tuna (25.9 kg) in FY05 were excluded because length measurements were not obtained.








F-8: USVI Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
Study 1, Job 3: Survey of Fishing Tournaments
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Table 10. Summary of landings from St. Croix offshore pelagic tournaments.
FY01 FY02 FY03 FY04 FY05

Species Total Total Avg. Avg. Total Total Avg. Avg. Total Total Avg. Avg. Total Total Avg. Avg. Total Total Avg. Avg. Total Total
No. Wt. Wt. FL No. Wt. Wt. FL No. Wt. Wt. FL No. Wt. Wt. FL No. Wt. Wt. FL No. Wt.

Dolphin 49 367.7 7.5 97.0 776 595.6 7.7 90.4 62 563.1 9.1 102.3 99 616.0 6.2 90.2 180 1367.6 7.6 86.4 467 3510.0

Wahoo 401 322.6 8.3 113.8 53 699.5 13.3 128.5 66 616.5 9.3 113.8 97 828.5 8.3 110.7 128 1009.6 7.9 108.2 384 3476.7

Kingfish 52 30.8 6.2 34.5 2 10.7 5.4 88.1 1 9.9 9.9 101.1 1 5.1 5.1 87.0 9 56.5

Blackfin Tuna 2 9.8 4.9 63.3 1 2.3 2.3 49.5 5 10.0 2.0 47.9 8 22.1

Yellowfin Tuna 17 1.9 1.9 47.0 6 124.1 20.7 110.0 7 126

Skipjack Tuna 1 9.7 9.7 54.4 1 10.4 10.4 78.2 4 15.0 3.7 56.7 6 35.1

Barracuda 2 3.9 2.0 66.5 3 5.5 1.8 65.8 5 9.4

Yellowtail Snapper 1 1.4 1.4 46.9 1 2.0 2.0 55.5 2 3.4

Horse-Eye Jack 1 5.5 5.5 72.0 1 5.5


Totals 95 730.8 135 1320.1 131 1199.3 203 1465.1 325 2529.4 889 7244.7

Weight (Wt.) is reported in kilograms and curved fork length (FL) is reported in centimeters.
The following fish were excluded from this table and further analyses because length measurements were not obtained:
1 One wahoo (2.7 kg) in FY01.
2 One kingfish (3.6 kg) in FY01.
3 One blackfin tuna (4.4 kg) in FY01.
4 One skipjack tuna (5.2 kg) in FY01.
5 Eight barracuda (16.3 kg) in FY01.
6 One dolphin (4.5 kg) in FY02.
7 One yellowfin tuna (18.4 kg) in FY04.







mpletion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
VI Grant Agreement F-8
iod: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

able 11. Characteristics of St. Croix offshore pelagic tournaments*, FY01 to FY05.
Fiscal Year 5 Yr.
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Avg.

. of Tournament-Dayst/Year 5 7 7 9 9 7.4

erage No. Boats/Tournament-Day 9.4 11.1 12.6 11.3 11.7 11.4

erage No. Anglers/Tournament-Day 26.0* 41.6 48.7 46.8 41.4 42.1

,an Boat Size (length in feet) 32.8 34.1 33.0 32.8 32.4 33.0

. Anglers/Boat (avg.) 2.7 3.7 3.8 4.1 3.6 3.7

. Lines/Boat (avg.) 3.2 4.0 4.5 4.6 4.4 4.3

. Hours/Boat/Toumament-Day (avg.) 8.6 7.9 8.5 7.9 7.9 8.1

Marlin tournaments not included.
St. Croix has about two 2-day tournaments each year. Each tournament day was treated independently for these
calculations.
Insufficient trip information was obtained for number of anglers for some tournaments in FY01 leading to
underestimates of actual fishing effort.






mpletion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
VI Grant Agreement F-8
iod: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

ible 12. St. Croix marlin tournaments*, FY01 to FY05.
Fiscal Year
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

imber of Hours Fished/Dayt 8 8 8 9 9.5

)tal Number of Boats 8 6 11 8 8

)tal Number of Boat-Hours 128 96 176 144 152

imber of Blue Marlin Caught 4 3 3 4 7

imber of Blue Marlin Released 4 3 3 4 7

Itch Rate (No. of Blue Marlin/Boat-Hour)0.031 0.031 0.017 0.028 0.049

timber of Boat-Hours to Catch a Marlin* 32.0 32.0 58.7 36.0 20.6

Very few trip interviews of vessel captains were obtained from St. Croix marlin tournaments.
Information on fishing effort and landings are collective estimates based upon information suppli
by the Golden Hook Fishing Club.
All five St. Croix marlin tournaments were 2-day tournaments.
The average number of hours to catch a blue marlin was calculated as 1/(catch rate).







F-8: USVI Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
Study 1, Job 3: Survey of Fishing Tournaments
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Table 13. Distribution of fishing effort among areas in St. Croix offshore pelagic tournaments, F)
Area Fished
Area 1 Area 2 Area 3 Area 4 Area 5
No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % ]

Area Visitation Freq.
FY01 1 2.2 4 8.7 4 8.7 14 30.4 22 47.8
FY02 9 11.0 3 3.7 4 4.9 20 24.4 29 35.4
FY03 27 18.4 25 17.0 13 8.8 27 18.4 27 18.4
FY04 19 19.0 12 12.0 7 7.0 35 35.0 13 13.0
FY05 37 19.3 13 6.8 17 8.9 59 30.7 38 19.8

Average 18.6 14.0 11.4 9.6 9.0 7.7 31.0 27.8 25.8 26.9
St.Dev. 14.2 7.4 8.8 5.1 5.8 1.7 17.5 6.5 9.2 14.4


Area Boat-Hours
FY01 4.5 1.3 19.7 5.8 28.7 8.5 99.7 29.6 180.0 53.4
FY02 32.0 9.4 5.3 1.5 25.0 7.4 96.9 28.5 122.5 36.0
FY03 94.6 17.9 82.3 15.6 35.0 6.6 140.9 26.7 83.6 15.8
FY04 96.1 17.0 52.5 9.3 34.1 6.0 272.2 48.2 49.5 8.8
FY05 145.7 19.6 34.2 4.6 45.5 6.1 303.5 40.8 132.1 17.8

Average 74.6 13.1 38.8 7.4 33.6 6.9 182.6 34.8 113.5 26.4
St.Dev. 56.2 7.6 30.0 5.4 7.8 1.0 98.2 9.3 49.6 18.2






F-8: USVI Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 36
Study 1, Job 3: Survey of Fishing Tournaments
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Table 14. Parameters of the length-weight relationship for dolphin and wahoo, FY01 to
FY05.
Model Parameters as Determined from Regression
Analysis
n b Log a r2

Dolphin
This Study
St. Croix only* 466 2.86 -4.82 0.94
St. Thomas only 277 2.87 -4.83 0.93
Combined Islands 743 2.86 -4.82 0.93

Previous studies
Rivera and Appeldoorn (2000) 170 2.78 -4.42 0.98
Froese and Pauly (2003) n/a 2.83 -3.79 n/a

Wahoo
This Study
St. Croix only* 377 3.24 -5.74 0.95
St. Thomas only 96 3.30 -5.86 0.96
Combined Islands 473 3.26 -5.78 0.95

Previous Studies
Beerkircher (2005)$ 164 3.24 -5.69 0.84
Froese and Pauly (2003) n/a 3.19 -5.99 n/a

Parameters a and b were estimated for the exponential model W = aLb where W is weight
in kg and L is fork length in cm. Values reported in this study were determined by linear
regression on Log-transformed data for L and W.
* For St. Croix data, 1 dolphin and 7 wahoo were excluded from L-W analysis because
either length data were missing (FY01) or erroneous (i.e. extreme outliers; 3 fish from
FY01), or because fish had been gutted prior to weighing.
t Values from Froese and Pauly (2003) were In-transformed.
$ Values reported in Beerkircher were Loglo-transformed.







Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 37
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Figure 1. Classification of USVI sportfishing tournaments. Sampling from offshore pelagic tournaments (highlighted in blue) was
emphasized during the present five year study period.






GEAR AREA TARGET FISH NAME FOR TYPE
ISLAND ALLOWED FISHED SPECIES-GROUP OF TOUR NAM ENT

SShoreline Reef Fish I Shore-Based Handline
Handline Only O- (Bvoat
Bottom .., Reef Fish b Boat-Based IIandline
St. Thoma (Boat)
Hook & Line Inshore & I Coastal Pelagics O Offshore Coastal Pelagic
(General) Offshore & Pelagics
Offshore Pelagics Offshore Pelagic
(Boat)
(Boat) Marlin Marlin Tournament


U SV I ------------------ ------------------ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Shoreline I Reef Fish Shore-Based Handline
llandline Only
St. Croix
Hook & Line
(General) Offshoreelagishre Pgic
(Boat) agi

SMarlin Marlin Tournament







F-8: USVI Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
Study 1, Job 3: Survey of Fishing Tournaments
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Figure 2. Area map used for St. Thomas sportfishing toumamel












I a k .I a
S IrB ItT
I i?=~~





F-8: USVI Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
Study 1, Job 3: Survey of Fishing Tournaments
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Figure 3. Area map used for St. Croix sportfishing tournaments. Approximate location of Fish Aggregation Devices (FADs) are
shown (yellow circles) with letter code names.


DFW
23-May-05


St. Croix Fishing Areas


Area
5


Ii

I
I -- ---F


Ot


Area
3


-- S


Lang
Bank


- Area
4


Area
6


Area
1


0


Area
2


I c------lc`:








Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Figure 4. Fishing effort (number of boats and number of anglers) at offshore pelagic

tournaments, FY01 to FY05. A. St. Thomas and B. St. Croix


A.


g g oJ oJ oJ
9O C C' C' C C0 C C CO
7 7 7 7


100


80


60

6
40
z

20


0


OC L
-co
<4


40











50


40


30


20 d


10


0


50


40


30 0
0

20 6
z

10


0


0 0, 0 0 <0 7 0 0< 7 0 < 7 0 < 7


--Anglers St. Thomas
--o- Boats R


6
*


o......6


'0 ..0, .
0








Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 41
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Figure 5. Catch rates at offshore pelagic tournaments, FY01 to FY05. A. St. Thomas and
B. St. Croix.


A.



average = 3 07 St. Thomas



0
st dev = 1 57




I 0





0
OQ ..




2






9' < < 90 < < 9 C' < 7 < '0 <7< 9o









B.



average 2 16 St. Croix
st dev =1 12

6
0

0 .0 P.
4-'
E
Co;
00


0 'f -R0 b.
6 7 b'- --
o~~~ ~ D----------------------------------
O.~~~B B B ~ ~ ~






F-8: USVI Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
Study 1, Job 3: Survey of Fishing Tournaments
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Figure 6. Distribution of fishing effort among areas in St. Croix tournaments, FY01 to FY05. Map (lower inset) shows St. Croix
areas.


Area Boat-Hours (%)
26.4


Area Visitation Frequency (%)
26.9


14.1


11.5


14.0
14.0 '


13.1


34.8


27.8


7.7
7.7


6.9


4 Am
1 1


SC1

* C6

] C5

* C4

0 C3

] C2








Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 43
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005




Figure 7. Weight distribution of dolphin landed in St. Thomas offshore pelagic tournaments,
FY03 to FY05.
90
FY03 n=30
average weight = 8 58
80 st dev =2 64

70

60

50

40

30

20

10 -m.r

90
FY04 n=175
average weight = 7 04
80 st dev=218

70

60

50 -


40 -

30 -

20

10

90
FY05 no 22
average weight = 788
80- st. dev = 4.25

70

60

50

40

30

20

10
_m _--mm








Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 44
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Figure 8. Weight distribution of wahoo landed in St. Thomas offshore pelagic tournaments,
FY03 to FY05.


40
FY3 no= 21
FY03 average weight = 8 90
st. dev. = 5.60


30




20




10




40
FY04 no. = 62
average weight = 6.56
st. dev. =6.20


30



20
S20
LL



10




40
no= 15
*FYO5 average weight= 1364
st. dev. = 6.21


30


2 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14 14-16 16-18 18-20 20-22 22-24 >24
Weight (kg)








Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 45
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Figure 9. Weight distribution of barracuda landed in St. Thomas offshore pelagic tournaments,
FY03 to FY05.

40
FY03 no = 54
average weight = 3.15
st dev.= 1 51

30 -




20 -




10 -





FY04 no = 33
average weight = 3 32
st. dev= 1 OB

30




z 20




10




40
FY05 '=
average weight= 3 13
st. dev = 1.81

30 -




20 -




10 -





5<2.0 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14 14-16 16-18 18-20 20-22 22-24 >24.0
Weight (kg)








Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 46
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Figure 10. Weight distribution of dolphin landed in St. Croix offshore pelagic tournaments,

FY01 to FY05.
50
FY01 7
FY01 avere =7 52
stdev =337
40


30









FY0 F -=77
FY02 average weight =775












in


FY03 12
40





20





Y................
FY04 n 99
average weight = 24
st _fv 3 1


S20 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14 14-16 16-18 18-20 20-22 22-24 >24(
Weight (ka)








Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 47
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Figure 11. Weight distribution of wahoo landed in St. Croix offshore pelagic tournaments,
FY01 to FY05.

30,
FY01 =40



20



,.if., ..




3lll ..l
F102



20



10




FY03 =936



20









FY04 3= 97



20



10



30-
FY05 n=128
averageweight =7 90


20









-20 2-4 4-6 6-8 8-10 10-12 12-14 14-16 16-18 18-20 20-22 22-24 >240
Weight (kg)








Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 48
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Figure 12. Length-weight relationships for the two predominant fish species landed in USVI
offshore pelagic tournaments, FY01 to FY05. A. Dolphin and B. Wahoo.


A.


Dolphin
160

S0 0
o *o
i120









o St. Thomas n = 277
0







0 5 10 15 20 25 30
Weight (kg)




B.
200
Wahoo 0

160 0

0 0




800



40 St. Croix n = 377
SSt. Thomas n =96

o0


0 5 10 15 20 25
Weight (kg)


30 35 40 45







Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 49
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Figure 13. Long-term trends in average landing size of dolphin and wahoo by recreational
fishers on St. Croix. A. Dolphin and B. Wahoo. Error bars show SEM. Data sources and time
intervals were as follows: 1986 to 1990 (Tobias 1991); 1991 to 1995 (Adams 1996); 1996 to
2000 (Mateo 2000), 2001 to 2005 (the present study). Data from 1985 were excluded due to
limited sample sizes.


A.
20
Dolphin OTournament Data Only
Logbook, Interview a/o Tournament

15



S,1











15


B.

Wahoo OTou name Data Only
r c ogbook, Interview a/o Tournament






Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 50
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005

Appendix 1. Trip information form used at St. Thomas sportfishing tournaments.





RECREATIONAL TOURNAMENT (S) EFFORT SHEET


* Get list of registered boats and anglers from committee








Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project 51
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Appendix 2. Trip information form used at St. Croix sportfishing tournaments.







BPORTFTSHTN T-TIRNKAMKRNT DATA RM
Dlv-,al". -' Fai-sh and il-dlLte
U Viirgin Zal:.da

5'" Annual Golden Hook Dolphin Tournament
Sunday, February 29'h, 2004


VIESSli INFORMATION

Vessel Nami: ID ff:

('Cplain: Vessel [Lengl:

l li)m Pr: Numlbr ,ofanglkrs:


I VO)R I NIN)RMA T ION

Actual bours Iistlhe: Nmwtel.r oft lines lfishLd:

Areais fishic: I ADl" I rip Hlurs:


CATCl 1 INFORMATION

iSpecis I.gat Elhmm) Will bs) Skx

2

4



7


fl
]1

12








Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Appendix 3. Detailed data for St. Thomas offshore pelagic tournaments, FY01 to FY05*.
Year Date Tournament Name
Year Date TournamentName TotalNo. TotalNo. TotalNo. AvgBoat TotalNo. Wahoo Dolphin Barracuda Other Total CPUE

ofBoats ofAnglers ofLines Length(ft) Boat-Hours No. Wt.(kg) No. Wt.(kg) No. Wt.(kg) No. Wt.(kg) No. Wt.(kg) (kg/boat-hour
2002 Nov. 17 Wahoo Wind-Up
2002 Nov17 Wp 7 27 31 ND 515 17 139.0 17 139.0 2.70
2003 Mar2 Couple's 7 26 30 ND 37.5 2 36.5 4 322 9 29.5 11 63.7 26 1618 4.32
2003 Apr27 DolphinDerby 15 61 57 ND 117.5 2 111 26 224.8 1 4.3 29 240.1 2.04
2003 Jun 8 Father's DayI 16 56 45 215 80.5 45 140.2 59 157.1 104 297.3 3.69
2003 Nov9 Wahoo Wind-Up2 19 77 45 34.4 176.3 15 182.0 1 20.9 16 202.8 115
2004 Feb22 Couple's 5 24 24 24.6 26.8 2 15.6 9 32.5 3 110 14 59.1 2.21
2004 Apr4 Dolphin Derby3 27 62 64 32.3 2011 47 224.0 173 1193.3 4 9.4 224 1426.7 7.09
2004 Jun7 Father's Day4 10 29 33 ND 65.5 24 76.7 19 76.1 43 152.8 2.33
2004 Nov 7 Wahoo Wind-Up5 20 84 42 ND 77.8 14 1910 14 1910 2.46
2005 Feb 13 Couple's6 9 37 36 33.8 45.0 8 23.1 4 10.8 29 80.0 41 113.9 2.53
2005 Apr24 DolphinDerby7 9 30 32 30.5 617 14 149.8 14 149.8 2.43
2005 Jun5 Father's Day 13 38 38 22.1 65.5 52 164.3 41 154.0 93 318.2 4.86
2005 Jun26 JuneMoon 5 20 25 35.7 34.0 1 13.2 12 58.3 13 715 2.10


..... ....... I" .' "' J '4' "'3.3 " ". I.'.'1.' H J J ,
* Data from November 2000 to August 2002 not available.
1 Trip information missing for two boats.
2 Trip information missing for two boats and hours fished was missing for 10 boats.
3 Trip information missing for 13 boats.
4 Incomplete trip information for 6 boats.
5 Trip information missing for 10 boats.
6 Trip information was missing for 1 boat.
7 Trip information was missing for 2 boats.
ND = Not Determined. Average boat length was not calculated when information was obtained from < 50 % of participating boats.


I"''1 -, I.? I. ? -I4 ,








Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2005


Appendix 4. Detailed data for St. Croix offshore pelagic tournaments, FY01 to FY05
Year Date Tournament Name
Year DateTotal No. Total No. Total No. Avg Boat Total No. Wahoo Dolphin Other Total Landings CPUE

of Boats of Anglers of Lines Length (ft) Boat-Hours No. Wt.(kg) No. Wt.(kg) No. Wt. (kg) No. Wt. (kg) (kgboat-hour)
2000 Nov18 Day 1-GHFC Wahoo1 10 36 41 32.9 90.0 3 22.0 3 14.9 6 36.9 0.41
2000 Nov 19 Day 2-GHFC Wahoo' 10 40 43 32.9 90.0 6 40.3 4 34.8 10 24.6 20 99.7 1.11
2001 Mar4 GHFCDolphin2 11 31 20 32.6 99.0 10 71.8 34 231.2 2 15.8 46 318.8 3.22
2001 Jun2 Day 1-GHFC Guys/Gals Shootout3 8 9 25 32.8 64.0 9 71.0 4 39.4 2 14.5 15 124.9 1.95
2001 Jun 3 Day 2-GHFC Guys/Gals Shootout4 8 14 23 32.8 64.0 16 142.2 4 40.3 20 182.5 2.85
2001 Nov 17 Day 1-GHFC Wahoo1 10 35 31 33.5 70.0 22 324.6 1 4.5 23 329.1 4.70
2001 Nov18 Day 2-GHFC Wahoo5 10 28 26 33.5 70.0 20 256.4 20 256.4 3.66
2001 Dec 9 Wahoo Wind-up 7 27 29 38.0 56.0 4 51.1 1 4.5 5 55.6 0.99
2002 Feb23 GHFC Dolphin 9 39 41 31.9 81.0 1 10.0 22 139.7 23 149.7 1.85
2002 Apr 21 Offshore Marine Dolphin Derby 18 73 80 34.2 153.0 1 7.6 45 358.6 46 366.2 2.39
2002 Jun8 Day 1-GHFC Guy/Gal Reel Challenge 12 47 57 33.9 95.5 6 62.8 1 6.7 7 69.5 0.73
2002 Jun9 Day 2-GHFC Guy/Gal Reel Challenge 12 42 57 33.9 96.0 5 49.8 3 30.0 4 18.3 12 98.2 1.02
2002 Nov 17 Wahoo Wind-up 20 76 87 32.8 183.0 22 243.6 2 9.8 24 253.4 1.38
2002 Nov 30 Day 1-GHFC Wahoo 10 33 46 31.4 89.0 12 142.8 12 142.8 1.60
2002 Dec 1 Day 2-GHFC Wahoo 10 33 46 31.4 89.5 2 23.9 2 31.9 4 55.8 0.62
2003 Mar 9 GHFC Dolphin 14 58 65 32.6 118.5 17 104.2 10 78.5 27 182.7 1.54
2003 Apr 27 Offshore Marine Dolphin Derby 16 70 69.5 35.6 132.5 2 9.1 33 296.1 35 305.2 2.30
2003 May 17 Day 1-GHFC Guy/Gal Reel Challenge 9 32 41 33.6 72.0 3 24.1 9 79.2 12 103.3 1.44
2003 May 18 Day 2-GHFC Guy/Gal ReelChallenge 9 39 41 33.6 72.0 8 68.9 8 77.4 1 9.9 17 156.1 2.17
2003 Nov 9 Wahoo Wind-Up 13 51 58 31.4 119.5 7 68.3 2 29.2 1 18.5 10 115.9 0.97
2003 Nov 22 Day 1-GHFC Series Finale 11 48 51 31.2 86.0 7 71.4 4 22.1 11 93.5 1.09
2003 Nov 23 Day 2-GHFC Series Finale 11 48 51 31.2 88.0 8 96.1 3 29.3 11 125.4 1.42
2004 Feb4 GHFC Dolphin 13 61 61 31.8 100.5 14 100.8 53 315.4 67 416.2 4.14
2004 Apr4 Offshore Marine Dolphin Derby 11 48 49 32.4 91.5 11 47.0 20 130.0 31 177.0 1.93
2004 May 29 Day 1-VIGFC Memorial Weekend 10 41 46 36.2 80.5 7 93.3 4 38.3 6 17.4 17 149.0 1.85
2004 May 30 Day 2-VIGFC Memorial Weekend 11 43 51 36.2 70.3 9 88.6 1 3.1 10 91.7 1.31
2004 Sep25 Day 1-Guy/Gal Reel Challenge 11 44 51 32.3 88.0 13 78.8 10 37.3 23 116.1 1.32
2004 Sep 26 Day 2-Guy/Gal Reel Challenge 11 37 52 32.3 88.0 21 184.3 3 14.4 24 198.7 2.26
2004 Nov 7 Wahoo Wind-Up 8 33 36 33.4 65.6 8 92.7 3 18.3 1 24.3 12 135.3 2.06
2004 Dec 4 Day 1-GHFC Series Finale 12 44 54 30.6 95.0 15 137.8 9 58.2 1 5.1 25 201.1 2.12
2004 Dec 5 Day 2-GHFC Series Finale 12 45 54 30.6 95.5 14 173.0 9 58.1 5 13.5 28 244.6 2.56
2005 Feb20 GHFC Dolphin 12 44 51 30.7 96.5 4 29.8 69 434.5 73 464.3 4.81
2005 Apr24 Dolphin Derby 11 44 47 30.2 88.0 12 74.5 36 276.2 48 350.7 3.98
2005 May 28 Day 1-Memorial Day Weekend4 15 49 71 34.9 114.3 12 92.6 28 288.9 4 9.0 44 390.5 3.42
2005 May 29 Day 2-Memorial Day Weekend4 15 48 57 34.9 105.0 13 81.9 20 204.0 33 285.9 2.72
2005 Sep 17 Day 1-Guy/Gal Reel Challenge 10 33 45 33.1 80.0 20 155.9 1 3.8 4 74.7 25 234.4 2.93
2005 Sep 18 Day 2-Guy/Gal Reel Challenge 10 33 46 33.1 80.0 30 171.4 5 25.6 2 25.7 37 222.6 2.78


Total = 37 tournament days


11.4 42.1 48.6 33.0 3417.2 385 3479.5 468


3514.5 50 305.7 903 7299.7 2.15








Completion Report: Recreational Fishery Assessment Project
USVI Grant Agreement F-8
Period: October 1. 2000 to September 30. 2005


' Information on boat length for one boat missing.
2 Information on number of lines fished for six boats and number of anglers for one boat missing.
3 Trip information for 2 boats missing.
4 Trip information for 3 boats missing.
5 Information on number of lines fished for five boats and number of anglers for two boats missing




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