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Title: Quantitative estimates of species composition and abundance of fishes, and fish species/habitat associations in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands
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Title: Quantitative estimates of species composition and abundance of fishes, and fish species/habitat associations in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands
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Creator: Toller, Wesley
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Quantitative estimates of species composition
and abundance of fishes, and fish
species/habitat associations in
St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands





Dr. Wesley Toller
Fisheries Biologist II




Division of Fish and Wildlife
Department of Planning and Natural Resources
US Virgin Islands


November 2002










ABSTRACT


Reef fish communities around St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands were studied by visual census
methods in order to identify fisheries-habitat links, to document the role of local coral reefs as
essential fish habitat, and to provide a baseline for monitoring studies. Seven reef sites were
surveyed by stationary fish censuses during spring and fall of 2002. In general, the fish
communities were similar across sites and survey periods: all reefs supported a diverse and
abundant fish assemblage that was largely replicated between spring and fall surveys.
Planktivorous fish (primarily labrids and pomacentrids) dominated the fauna numerically.
Herbivorous fish (acanthurids and scarids) were common and abundant at all sites. Piscivores
and other specialized feeders were least abundant. Serranids were common and relatively
diverse, however most observed fish were either diminutive or small species (e.g. harlequin bass,
hamlets, coney, and graysby). Lutjanids were of larger size, but less common, less abundant,
and less diverse than serranids. Very few large reef-associated piscivorous species were seen,
and the significance of this observation is discussed.

Some variation in fish assemblages was observed among reefs. Comparison of species richness
and diversity (H') among reefs showed a suggestive positive relationship to vertical relief, but no
obvious relation to percentage live coral cover or percentage turf alga cover. Planktivorous
pomacentrids predominated at the two reef sites with the highest coral cover. Acanthurids and
scarids, while both nearly ubiquitous, showed a reciprocal density relationship, with scarids
predominating on well-developed reefs. Chaetodontids were more abundant and diverse near a
submarine canyon (Salt River). Lutjanids were not observed at Lang Bank an offshore
platform with sparse coral cover.

These results imply that at least some members of reef fish communities respond to presently
unidentified biotic or abiotic differences among the coral reef habitats of St. Croix, and that the
source of this variation warrants additional investigation. Additional studies are recommended
to monitor changes in these reef fish communities over time, to improve assessments of rare (but
recreationally and commercially important) species, and to further elucidate critical fish-habitat
links.









Table of Contents
Page No.
Abstract ii
Table of Contents iii
List of Tables iv
List of Figures iv

INTRODUCTION 1
METHODS 1
Description of Study Sites 1
Visual Census Methods 2

RESULTS 3

DISCUSSION 5
Planktivores 6
Herbivores 6
Piscivores, Carnivores and Specialized Invertebrate Feeders 7
Recommendations 8

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 8

LITERATURE CITED 8

APPENDICES
1. Distribution of observations on 85 fish species across seven St.
Croix reef sites. 19-23

2. A. Fish Census Data from Lang Bank 24-25

B. Fish Census Data from Jacks & Isaacs Bay 26-28

C. Fish Census Data from East Wall, Salt River Canyon 29-31

D. Fish Census Data from West Wall, Salt River Canyon 32-34

E. Fish Census Data from Eagle Ray 35-38

F. Fish Census Data from Cane Bay 39-41

G. Fish Census Data from Sprat Hole 42-44











List of Tables Page No.
1 Description of St. Croix reef sites for fish census study. 15
2 Fish census effort 15
3 Total number offish and species observed during stationary fish
censuses 16
4 The 25 most abundant fish species observed in this study. 17-18





List of Figures Page No.
1 Map of St. Croix showing the seven reef sites where fish visual
censuses were conducted. 11

2 Summary of fish community structure at seven St. Croix reef
sites.
A. Diversity (H') 12
B. Species Richness 12
C. Fish Abundance 12

3 Fish abundance by family at seven St. Croix reef sites. 12

4 Abundance of fishes representing 8 families at 7 St. Croix reef
sites.
A. Labridae wrassess) 13
B. Pomacentridae (damselfishes) 13
C. Acanthuridae (surgeonfishes) 13
D. Scaridae (parrotfishes) 13
E. Serranidae grouperss) 14
F. Lutjanidae (snappers) 14
G. Haemulidae (grunts) 14
H. Chaetodontidae (butterflyfishes) & Pomacanthidae
(anglefish) 14









INTRODUCTION


Coral reefs of the U.S. Virgin Islands support a diverse assemblage of fishes. In addition to their
ecological roles on reefs, these fish have economic importance to local recreational and
commercial fisheries (Appledoorn et al. 1992).

Management of reef fish resources depends upon sound information about the status of local
populations, and knowledge of critical links between habitat and fish life-history (i.e. essential
fish habitats). Thus a first step is to simply establish the fine-scale patterns of fish distribution
among habitats. A descriptive study, such as this one, can provide valuable information about
habitat-species associations, which may ultimately lead to identification of critical links.

A second objective of management must be to monitor resources, so that the trajectory of
populations through time can be evaluated. A thorough and descriptive baseline survey,
whether it represents a natural or disturbed community (Jackson 1997), is the essential starting
point for any monitoring program. On St. Croix, for example a proposed Marine Protected Area
(MPA) will encompass the nearshore, eastern end of the island. Implementation of a broad "No-
Take" zone may conceivably influence the structure of entire reef fish communities located in
this area. Monitoring will be instrumental in gauging the effects of this proposed MPA on fish
communities. Alternatively, on a scale of individual species, monitoring may allow managers to
determine whether specific fisheries regulations, such as localized closures to protect spawning
aggregations, are effective at restoring depleted stocks (sensu Tobias et al. 1988).


METHODS

Description of Study Sites

Seven reef sites around the island of St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands were selected for this study
(see Figure 1): Lang Bank (LB), Jacks and Isaacs Bay (JI), East Wall (EW) of Salt River
Canyon, West Wall (WW) of Salt River Canyon, Eagle Ray (ER) on Long Reef, Cane Bay (CB),
and Sprat Hole (SH). Each of these reefs is surveyed annually by the Center for Marine and
Environmental Studies, University of the Virgin Islands, as part of their coral reef monitoring
program. Those studies provide much of the descriptive information on sessile reef biota, as
presented in Table 1 (Nemeth and Herzlieb 2002). Detailed geological, biological, and spatial
descriptions of these reef sites have been made previously, either in a general sense (Hubbard
1989a), in detail (at CB Hubbard 1989b; at EW and WW Hubbard 1989c) or at comparable
nearby reefs (at JI Hubbard 1989d). Briefly, the seven reef sites all represent shallow water (<
15 m depth) hard bottom substrates situated on the insular shelf of St. Croix. Despite geographic
proximity, there is considerable variation among reefs in terms of benthic flora and fauna,
physical structure, exposure to prevailing currents and wave forces, and adjacent habitats (to
name but a few of the variables). For example, the development of scleractinian coral
communities varies considerably among sites, from about 5% living coral cover at LB to >24%
at SH (Nemeth and Herzlieb 2002). Some of the reefs have previously been classified (Hubbard
1989a-d) as barrier-type reefs (ER), fringing reefs (JI), shelf edge reefs (CB, SH), or submarine









hardgrounds (LB). In the present study, only those attributes presented in Table 1 were
considered in relation to reef fish community structure.

Visual Census Methods

The stationary fish census method (Bohnsack and Bannerot 1986) was used to assess reef fish
community structure. Compared to other visual census methods (belt transects, timed random
swim methods), the stationary count offers the advantage of estimating fish community structure
as a function of density per unit area for each observed species, while enabling size (length)
estimates of individuals. Generally, results from stationary point counts are comparable to
results obtained from belt transects (e.g. Bortone et al. 1989), and the two methods differ
primarily in duration (belt transects are faster) and area surveyed per replicate. A typical belt
transect of 30 mx 2 m yields 60 m2 whereas a 15 m wide stationary census (used in this study)
yields 176 m2 per replicate. However neither of these two methods is likely to enumerate all of
the species present within a given area (i.e. to generate a species list) that purpose is best served
using replicated timed random diver swims (Kimmel 1985) or related methods (see Rogers et al
2001).

The census protocol is only slightly modified from Bohnsack and Bannerot (1986), and a brief
description is provided here. A 15 m diameter census "cylinder" was defined by transect tape
with the observer positioned in the center (7.5 m mark). Fish within this cylinder were censused
as follows. During an initial 5-minute "listing" period, the names of all observed fish species
were recorded onto pre-printed data forms. At the end of the listing period, the observer began
enumerating all individuals of each species, working from the bottom of the list upward and
making one 3600 sweep. Strict adherence was made to the 5-minute listing period. New species
observed during the enumeration period (e.g. fish that swam into the cylinder after 5 minutes of
listing) were not included in the stationary count data. Divers estimated fish total length to the
nearest cm, using a measuring "T-bar" for underwater visual reference. Maximum, minimum,
and average size was recorded for each species. Divers also recorded a brief description/sketch
of habitat features within the census area. All fish were identified to species, however gobies
(Gobiidae) and blennies (Blenniidae) were excluded from census counts. To insure that our fish
census areas coincided with ongoing UVI coral surveys, but that replicates did not cover
overlapping areas, census stations were marked with a small piece of rebar driven into nonliving
reef substrate.

Surveys were conducted during two sampling periods: Spring (May June, 2002) and Fall
(September, 2002). For each reef site, six replicate censuses were made [this is a level of
replication thought to adequately sample the species representing > 90% of all individuals at a
site (Bohnsack and Bannerot 1986)] except for LB (Spring) where only four replicate censuses
were conducted due to unfavorable weather conditions. Six replicate censuses surveyed a total
area of 1,056 m2 per reef site. A summary of census dates, number of replicates, and census
duration is presented in Table 2.

Data from this study were analyzed using Microsoft Excel software.









RESULTS


A total of 35,322 fish were sighted during the surveys (Table 3). More fish were observed in fall
(16,859) than spring (18,463). The number offish observed at each site ranged from 1,385 (JI,
fall) to 5,443 (CB, fall). A total of 85 fish species representing 27 families were sighted (Table
3; Appendix 1). More species were seen during fall (77 species) than during spring (72 species;
Table 3). The number of species observed at each site during spring or fall ranged from 24 (LB,
spring) to 42 (WW, ER, CB; all fall) and the cumulative number of species observed at each reef
site ranged from 32 (LB) to 52 (ER).

In general, fish assemblages present at each reef site were similar between spring and fall.
Average fish abundance (Figure 2A) remained relatively constant at 6 of the reef sites. At CB,
an increase in average abundance in fall was due to a large influx of small (- 3 to 5 cm TL)
creole wrasses (Clepticusparrae; see Appendix 2F). Average species richness also remained
relatively constant between spring and fall (Figure 2B). However the Shannon-Weiner diversity
index (H'), computed as an average per census, showed greater variability between survey
periods (Figure 2C; LB and ER), suggesting that community composition had changed in some
cases. At LB, change was attributed to a large (30%) decrease in abundance of the numerically
dominant species, the bluehead wrasse, Thalassoma bifasciatum, and a 3-fold increase in bicolor
damselfish (Stegastespartitus) abundance. At ER, the fall increase in diversity corresponded to
a 40% decrease in abundance of the bluehead wrasse and the appearance of large schools of
brown chromis, Chromis multilineata (an increase from 1.7 to 43.3 fish/census; Appendix 2E).

In contrast to temporal comparisons (i.e. spring vs. fall), comparisons across reef sites showed
greater dissimilarity in fish assemblages (Figure 2). Average abundance (Figure 2A) was highest
at CB and SH, sites with the highest coral cover, but also at LB where coral cover is sparse.
Average species richness varied from -15 to -22 species observed/census (Figure 2B) and LB
had the fewest species while ER, CB and SH had the most. Diversity indices showed a similar
trend (Figure 2C).

The 25 most abundant species observed in this study are present in Table 4. The bluehead
wrasse alone accounted for 38.6% of all fish sightings. The five most abundant species were the
bluehead wrasse, creole wrasse, bicolor damselfish, brown chromis, and blue chromis (Chromis
cyanea) all primarily planktivorous species. Together, they accounted for 87.2% of all fish
sightings. Despite comparably high abundance levels shared among these five species, their
distribution and frequency of occurrence were different (Table 4). While the strongly reef-
associated bluehead wrasse and bicolor damselfish were ubiquitous (present at each reef site) and
common (frequency > 97% of censuses), the schooling creole wrasse and brown chromis were
more patchy in distribution (Appendix 1) and less common (frequency < 45% of censuses).

A detailed account of species is beyond the scope of the present work (see Appendix 2A to G).
Here, an analysis of reef fish community composition is presented based upon taxonomic
divisions (families) that delineate eight commercially, recreationally or ecologically important
fish groups. These families are: Labridae wrassess), Pomacentridae (damselfishes),
Acanthuridae (surgeonfishes), Scaridae (parrotfishes), Serranidae grouperss), Lutjanidae
(snappers), Haemulidae (grunts), Chaetodontidae (butterflyfishes) and Pomacanthidae









angelfishess). The latter two families were combined as a single group (butterflyfish and
angelfish) for these analyses. Use of these taxonomic divisions is justified because: (1) each
family loosely represents a trophic (ecological) group, and (2) the families collectively
represented over 95% (usually >98%) of fish observed at each reef site (e.g. Table 4; Appendices
2A to G).

Fish abundance by family is summarized in Figure 3, where data were pooled from all seven reef
sites. Average fish abundance was similar between spring and fall, however abundance varied
considerably among families. Labrids and Pomacentrids were over 10 times more abundant than
all other families (- 100 fish observed/census). Acanthurids and scarids had similar abundance
levels of- 10 fish/census. The abundance of serranids, lutjanids, haemulids, chaetodontids and
pomacanthids was generally low (1 to 4 fish/census) and typically quite variable within and
among sites (see below).

To examine fish community structure across the seven reef sites, the same eight fish families
were utilized as a basis for analyses (Figure 4). Labrids were abundant at all sites (average 242
fish/census) but highly variable within and among sites (Figure 4a) [as noted above, an
exceptionally high abundance of creole wrasses was recorded at CB in spring]. Pomacentrids
were also abundant (average 148 fish/census), and showed the greatest variation among sites.
The highest abundances were seen at CB and SH, where > 300 fish/census were recorded in
spring and fall (Figure 4B). Blue chromis and brown chromis were the most abundant
pomacentrids at CB and SH (Appendix 2F and G). Herbivorous fish were less abundant than
planktivores. The abundance of acanthurids (average 10.7 fish/census) and scarids (average 9.6
fish/census) was also variable across the reef sites (Figures 4C and D). Acanthurids had their
highest abundances at WW, EW, JI, and LB and were least abundant at CB and SH. Scarids had
their highest abundance at SH.

Predatory fishes (piscivores, carnivores) are represented by the serranids, lutjanids and
haemulids. As a family, serranids had low abundance (average 4 fish/census) that showed little
variation among reef sites (Figure 4E). Serranid diversity was variable among reef sites. The
coney, Cephalopholisfulvus, was uniformly distributed across reefs (Appendix 1) and relatively
common (Appendix 2A-G), however the graysby, C. cruentatus, was more frequent in habitats
of high topographic complexity (ER, CB, SH). The red hind, Epinephelus guttatus, was
observed only infrequently at 4 sites (Appendices 1 and 2). Hamlets (genus Hypoplectrus) also
showed highest diversity levels at SH, ER, EW and WW but not CB. In contrast to serranids,
lutjanids showed greater variation in abundance and distribution. The yellowtail snapper,
Ocyurus chrysurus, and the mahogany snapper, Lutjanus mahogoni, were the most common and
abundant snappers, however the schoolmaster, L. apodus, and the mutton snapper, L. analis,
were also observed (Appendix 1). No lutjanids were recorded at LB. Haemulid abundance was
relatively uniform (average 2.4 fish/census) across reef sites (Figure 4G).

The combined group of Chaetodontidae and Pomacanthidae represent long-lived reef residents
with specialized feeding habits (e.g. feeding on cnidarians, sponges). Abundance and diversity
of this group varied among reef sites (Figure 4H) and was generally low (2.3 fish/census).
Chaetodontids were most frequent and abundant at EW, WW and ER. It is interesting that EW
and WW had the highest diversity of butterflyfish (4 and 3 species, respectively) whereas other









reef sites had 2 or 1 species. Only the banded butterflyfish, Chaetodon striatus, was recorded
from LB and JI, whereas only the foureye butterflyfish, C. capistratus, was recorded from CB
and SH (Appendix 2).


DISCUSSION

The reefs investigated in this study supported diverse and abundant fish communities. This is
not surprising previous studies have documented well over 200 reef-associated species in St.
Croix waters (Clavijo et al. 1980), and over 100 species may occur on a single patch reef
(Gladfelter and Gladfelter 1978). For the following discussion, it is important to note that the
stationary visual census method does not capture total reef fish diversity (i.e. Appendices 2A to
G do not represent complete species lists). Rather, these are quantitative data on the most
conspicuous and abundant components of each fish community. The absence of a given species
from our observations should be considered "relative" absence. Nonetheless, the average
number of species observed per census is a quantitative estimate of community species richness,
and a useful measure for comparing reef sites.

The goal of the present study was to document, in an exploratory manner, species-habitat links of
coral reef fish populations. This experimental design allows only a preliminary analysis of the
relationship between individual fish species (or fish communities) and specific reef attributes
(e.g. % live coral, vertical relief, benthic invertebrate community composition, wave exposure,
prevailing currents, etc). When fish communities were compared across the seven reef sites,
there was no obvious relation of average fish abundance to percentage live coral nor percentage
turf algal cover (not shown). Planktivore abundance (blue chromis and brown chromis), on the
other hand, may be positively related to percentage live coral cover (e.g. CB and SH; Figure 4B).
Species richness showed a more suggestive positive relation to coral cover, although ER
represents an important exception. At ER, coral cover is relatively low, but vertical relief is high
(a spur and groove area formed of Montastraea skeletons). A relatively high number of fish
species was observed at ER. This suggests that the richness of St. Croix reef fish communities
may be influenced more by three-dimensional architecture (topographic complexity) of the reef
than by the presence of living (versus dead) corals. This idea is not new (Roberts and Ormond
1987), and it has been suggested by results from long-term studies of fish populations at Buck
Island, St. Croix (Gladfelter et al. 1992), where hurricane damage and disease permanently
reduced live coral cover (Acroporapalmata), but left habitat structural complexity relatively
intact. Despite the loss of living coral, resident fish populations recovered to pre-hurricane
densities.

Nemeth and Herzlieb (2002) suggested that reef sites along St. Croix's northern coast harbor a
greater abundance of reef fish than the other reef sites. Our results did not corroborate this
finding (see Figure 2 and Figure 4). Neither that study nor this one included sufficient
replication of reef sites, adequate spatial coverage of insular reefs, nor control over confounding
variables (e.g. topographic complexity) to reach a definitive conclusion. Nonetheless, previous
studies indicate that recruitment patterns are highest on St. Croix's northwestern and
southeastern shores (Caselle and Warner 1996, and Swearer 2002). Recruitment studies, in









conjunction with community assessments, may clarify a postulated relationship between larval
supply and resident reef fish abundance.

Planktivores:

The reef fish communities were numerically dominated by labrids blueheadd wrasse, creole
wrasse) and planktivorous pomacentrids (bicolor damselfish, blue chromis, and brown chromis),
which were collectively 10 to 100-fold more abundant than all other species. The bluehead
wrasse, perhaps the most abundant of all West Indian reef fishes, is a facultative planktivore, and
the remaining species feed primarily on zooplankton (Randall 1968).

Large populations of planktivores form a major trophic link between coral reef habitats and
open-water communities (e.g. Hobson 1991). Undoubtedly, a large number of these fish fall
prey to resident and reef associated predatory fishes. Between spring and fall, bluehead wrasse
abundance decreased by 20%, which is suggestive of heavy predation. However we found no
relation between planktivore abundance and piscivore abundance (compare Figure 4A and B
with 4E and F). Some authors have argued that, rather than predation, the primary trophic link
between planktivores and coral reefs is through production of feces, which is then consumed by a
wide variety of reef fish and invertebrates (Robertson 1982). Nonetheless, the role of
planktivores as forage for commercially and recreationally important species should be
investigated further.

Herbivores:

Herbivorous fish were common, moderately abundant, and relatively diverse on all seven reefs.
For acanthurids and scarids, average abundance was similar (9.6 fish/176 m2 census and 10.7
fish /176 m2 census, respectively). In 2001, Nemeth and Herzlieb (2002) censused fish from the
same sites using belt transects. When normalized to 100m2, the density of acanthurids observed
in our study was slightly lower than in theirs (6.0 vs 9.0 fish/100 m2) and the density of scarids
observed in this study was substantially lower (5.5 vs 13 fish/100m2). The apparent decline in
parrotfish populations is unexplained. Methodological differences between the studies may
account for this discrepancy. Alternatively, scarid populations may be in decline due to
overfishing parrotfishes are actively sought by a local gillnet fishery. Given the important
trophic role that scarids play in maintaining scleractinian coral growth and diversity (e.g.
Pennings 1997), local parrotfish populations should be monitored carefully in the future.

In this study, parrotfishes (especially the redband parrotfish, Sparisoma aurofrenatum, and the
princess parrotfish, Scarus taeniopterus) and surgeonfishes (ocean surgeonfish, Acanthurus
bahianus, and blue tang, A. coeruleus) were nearly ubiquitous among the reef sites. Analysis of
their abundance patterns (Figure 4C and D) suggests that their densities were reciprocal.
Acanthurids were more abundant on low relief, low coral cover sites (LB, JI, EW, WW) while
Scarids were more abundant on reefs with greater topographic complexity (ER, CB, SH). This
pattern may arise from differences in feeding mode: acanthurids tend to browse over soft
bottoms while scarids are scrapers ofhardbottom substrates (e.g. Choat 1991).









Piscivores, Carnivores and Specialized Invertebrate Feeders:


A diversity of predatory fishes was recorded during censuses. The observed species varied in
their degree of reef association. For example carangids (bar jack, Carynx ruber, and blue runner,
C. crysos) and scombrids (cero mackerel, Scomberomorus regalis) were infrequently observed,
in part due to their highly mobility and their loose association with reefs. On the other hand, the
coney appears to represent a strongly reef-associated resident species that displayed no habitat
preference. This species was the most abundant serranid, occurring with moderate to high
frequency at all studied reef sites. The coney is important to both the recreational and
commercial fishery of the USVI (Appledoom et al. 1992; Bolden 1994). The graysby, another
frequently observed serranid, showed habitat preference for reefs with a high degree of
topographic complexity.

As adults, lutjanids are largely residents of reef habitats. However, the juveniles of many
lutjanid species, as well as haemulids and chaetodontids, depend upon "nursery habitats" during
their early post-settlement life. On St. Croix for example, Adams and Tobias (1993) documented
the importance of an estuarine environment (Salt River) for juvenile schoolmasters (L. apodus),
french grunts (Haemulonflavolineatum), and foureye butterflyfish (C. capistratus). Likewise,
St. Croix embayments (comprised of patch reef, sand and seagrass habitats) appear to function as
important nursery habitats for French grunts and yellowtail snapper (Mateo and Tobias 2001).
In our study, adults of these species (but not juveniles) were commonly observed on reefs. For
example, adult French grunts were among the most frequently observed fish (- 80% of all
censuses), but no juveniles were observed at these reef sites. For such species, these results
serve to underscore the connectivity between adult populations on reefs and juvenile populations
residing in nursery habitats.

Nonetheless, it is clear that many of the long-lived reef species were relatively rare.
Commercially and recreationally important species such as the red hind (E. guttatus) or mutton
snapper (L. analis) were observed only infrequently (6.1% and 3.7% of censuses, respectively).
Some of the larger non-piscivorous reef species such as the french angelfish (Pomacanthus
paru), queen angelfish (Holacanthus ciliaris), or puddingwife (Halichoeres radiatus) were also
rare in our studies. Formerly, all of the above species were considered "common" on St. Croix
reefs (Clavijo et al 1980). Overfishing is the likely explanation for the relative rarity of these
species. Establishment of a marine protected area should augment populations of long-lived fish
species with high susceptibility to fishing pressures (Bohnsack 1993), such as those discussed
above.

Crosby and Reese (1996) have suggested that butterflyfish density is an indicator of reef health.
In our study, butterflyfish reached their greatest abundance and diversity at Salt River canyon.
This distribution pattern was unique among fishes in our study. Localized abundance at Salt
River Canyon may be due to reduced fishing pressure in the immediate vicinity chaetodontids
are readily caught in fish traps (DFW, unpubl. SEAMAP study) or to the proximity of nursery
habitat (Salt River Estuary; see Adams and Tobias 1993), which may augment local butterflyfish
populations. Alternatively, the chaetodontids species may share a habitat preference for some
unidentified feature of the submarine canyon itself.









Recommendations:


Continued monitoring of these seven reef sites should be conducted semi-annually. One or two
additional reef sites should be added to include reef fish communities along the southern insular
shelf of St. Croix. The visual census method used here is robust and reproducible and should
therefore be used in future monitoring efforts. However, a second assessment method, such as
the timed random diver swim (TRDS) method, should also be included in the protocol.
Sufficient TRDS replicates (performed on an annual or biannual basis) would establish a species
lists for each reef site and enable more powerful inferences regarding rare species.

Population assessments of large, resident reef fishes were compromised by the rarity of these
fish. This is particularly troublesome because many are commercially and recreationally
important species. However, for species such as the Nassau grouper (Epinephelus striata),
goliath grouper (E. itajara), tiger grouper (Mycteroperca tigris), black grouper (M. bonaci),
yellowfin grouper (M. venenosa), mutton snapper (Lutjanus analis), and cubera snapper (L.
cyanopterus), populations are probably too low to adequately assess them by any of the
aforementioned visual census methods. Instead, future monitoring efforts should be directed
towards censusing these species during their annual spawning aggregations (e.g. Colin 1996).
Aggregation sites are already known for at least two species on St. Croix (L. analis and E.
guttatus) and these could be monitored using diver surveys or ROV.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

William Tobias provided technical guidance and assisted in many of the field surveys. Hector
Rivera and Willy Ventura were boat operators. A special thanks goes to Dianne "Dee" Osinski
and Robert Daniel Stone for their participation in (and enthusiasm for) the fish counts.


LITERATURE CITED

Adams, A.J., and W.J. Tobias. 1993. Red mangrove prop-root habitat as a finfish nursery area.
A case study of Salt River, St. Croix, U.S.V.I. Proc. GulfCarib. Fish. Inst. 46:22-47

Appledoorn, R., J. Beets, J. Bohnsack, S. Bolden, D. Matos, S. Meyers, A. Rosario, Y. Sadovy,
and W. Tobias. 1992. Shallow water reef fish stock assessment for the U.S. Caribbean.
NOAA Tech. Memo. NMFS:SEFSC-304, 70 pp.

Bohnsack, J.A. 1993. Marine reserves: they enhance fisheries, reduce conflicts, and protect
resources. Oceanus 36(3): 63-71

Bohnsack, J.A., and S.P. Bannerot. 1986. A stationary visual census technique for
quantitatively assessing community structure of coral reef fishes. NOAA Technical Report
NMFS 41, U.S. Dept of Commerce, 15 pp.









Bortone, S.A., J.J. Kimmel, and C.M. Bundrick. 1989. A comparison of three methods for
visually assessing reef fish communities: time and area compensated. Northeast GulfSci.
10(2):85-96.

Caselle, J.E., and R.R. Warner. 1996. Variability in recruitment of coral reef fishes: the
importance of habitat at two spatial scales. Ecology 77: 2488-2504.

Choat, J.H. 1991. The biology of herbivorous fishes on coral reefs. Pp. 120-155 In: P. F. Sale
(ed.) The Ecology of Fishes on Coral Reefs. Academic Press, Inc., New York, 754 pp.

Clavijo, I.E., J.A. Yntema, and J.C. Ogden. 1980. An annotated checklist of the fishes of St.
Croix U. S. Virgin Islands. West Indies Laboratory, St. Croix, USVI, 49 pp.

Colin, P.L. 1996. Longevity of some coral reef fish spawning aggregations. Copeia
1996(1):189-2.

Crosby, M.P., and E.S. Reese. 1996. A manual for monitoring coral reefs with indicator
species: butterflyfishes as indicators of change on Indo Pacific reefs. Office of Ocean and
Coastal Resource Management, NOAA, Silver Springs MD, 45 pp.

Gladfelter, W.B., and E.H. Gladfelter. 1978. Fish community structure as a function of habitat
structure on West Indian patch reefs. Rev. Biol. Trop. (suppl. 1):65-84.

Gladfelter, E.H., J.C. Bythell, and Z.M. Hillis. 1992. Changes in fish assemblage structure at
Buck Island, St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands from 1980-1990: an indication of predictability
in coral reef fish assemblages based on known habitat changes? Pages 14-29 In: Ecological
Studies of Buck Island Reef National Monument, St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands. Part II.
Report prepared for U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service.

Hobson, E.S. 1991. Trophic relationships of fishes specialized to feed on zooplankters above
coral reefs. Pp. 69-95 In: P. F. Sale (ed.) The Ecology of Fishes on Coral Reefs. Academic
Press, Inc., New York, 754 pp.

Hubbard, D. 1989a. Modern carbonate environments of St. Croix and the Caribbean: A general
overview. Pages 85-94 In: D. Hubbard (ed.) Terrestrial and marine geology of St. Croix, U.
S. Virgin Islands. Sp. Publ. No. 8, West Indies Laboratory, St. Croix, USVI, 213 pp.

Hubbard, D. 1989b. The shelf-edge reefs of Davis and Cane Bays, Northwestern St. Croix,
U.S.V.I. Pages 167-179 In: D. Hubbard (ed.) Terrestrial and marine geology of St. Croix, U.
S. Virgin Islands. Sp. Publ. No. 8, West Indies Laboratory, St. Croix, USVI, 213 pp.

Hubbard, D. 1989c. Depositional environments of Salt River Estuary and submarine canyon, St.
Croix, U.S.V.I. Pages 181-196 In: D. Hubbard (ed.) Terrestrial and marine geology of St.
Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands. Sp. Publ. No. 8, West Indies Laboratory, St. Croix, USVI, 213
pp.









Hubbard, D. 1989d. Depositional environments of the Turner Hole reef complex. Pages 155-
160 In: D. Hubbard (ed.) Terrestrial and marine geology of St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands.
Sp. Publ. No. 8, West Indies Laboratory, St. Croix, USVI, 213 pp.

Jackson, J.B.C. 1997. Reefs since Columbus. CoralReefs 16:S23-S32.

Kimmel, J.J. 1985. A new species-time method for visual assessment of fishes and its
comparison with established methods. Env. Biol. Fishes 12:23-32.

Mateo, I. and W.J. Tobias. 2001. The role of nearshore habitats as nursery grounds for juvenile
fishes on the northeast coast of St. Croix. Proc. GulfCarib. Fish. Inst. 52:512-530.

Nemeth, R.S., and S. Herzlieb. 2002. Video monitoring assessment of coral reefs in proposed
marine parks St. Croix, United States Virgin Islands. Center for Marine and Environmental
Studies, University of the Virgin Islands, St. Thomas, USVI. In: U. S. Virgin Islands Coral
Reef Monitoring Project, Year 1 Final Report. USVI Department of Planning and Natural
Resources, Division of Coastal Zone Management.

Pennings, S.C. 1997. Indirect interactions on coral reefs. Pp. 249-272 In: C. Birkeland (ed) Life
and Death of Coral Reefs. Chapman & Hall, New York, 536 pp.

Randall, J.E. 1968. Caribbean Reef Fishes. T.F.H. Publications, Inc., Jersey City, NJ, 318 pp.

Roberts, C.M. and R.F.G. Ormond. 1987. Habitat complexity and coral reef fish diversity and
abundance on Red Sea fringing reefs. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 41:1-8.

Robertson, D.R. 1982. Fish feces as food on a Pacific coral reef. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 7:253-
265.

Rogers, C.S., G. Garrison, R. Grober, Z. Hillis, and M.A. Franke. 2001. Coral Reef Monitoring
Manual for the Caribbean and Western Atlantic. 2nd Ed., Virgin Islands National Park.

Swearer, S.E. 2000. Self-recruitment in coral reef fish populations. Ph.D. dissertation,
University of California, Santa Barbara, 151 pp.

Tobias, W., E. Telemaque, and M. Davis. 1988. Buck Island fish and shellfish populations.
Biosphere Reserve Research Report No. 26, Virgin Islands National Park, 27 pp.










Figure 1. Map of St. Croix showing the seven reef sites where fish visual censuses were
conducted. Abbreviations are as follows: Lang Bank (LB), Jacks and Isaacs Bay (JI),
East Wall (EW) of Salt River Canyon, West Wall (WW) of Salt River Canyon, Eagle
Ray (ER) on Long Reef, Cane Bay (CB), and Sprat Hole (SH).




EW VWW


ThTh2 LB














Figure 2. Summary of fish community structure at seven St. Croix reef sites.

A. B.

Diversity (H') Species Richness


LB JI EW WW ER CB SH


LB JI EW WW ER CB SH


C.

Fish Abundance


1400
OSpnng '02
1200
*Fall '02
S1000

S800

600

, 400

200


LB JI EW WW ER CB SH




Figure 3. Fish abundance by family at seven St. Croix reef sites. Error bars show

range of average abundance values across sites.


Summary of Fish Abundance


10000



100 0

0 1000

o 100

Hr
0
10

0

01


0,"h~
~~90"


~ba~9'.

















Figure 4. Abundance of fishes representing 8 families at 7 St. Croix reef sites. Families are: A.

Labridae wrassess), B. Pomacentridae (damselfishes), C. Acanthuridae

(surgeonfishes), D. Scaridae (parrotfishes), E. Serranidae grouperss), F. Lutjanidae

(snappers), G. Haemulidae (grunts), and H. Chaetodontidae (butterflyfishes) and

Pomacanthidae (anglefishes). Error bars represent standard deviation.


Labridae
(Avg = 242.1)

OSpring '02
* Fall '02


LB JI EW WW ER


Pomacentridae
(Avg = 147.7)


CB SH


LB JI EW WW ER CB SH


Acanthuridae
(Avg = 10.7)


Scaridae
(Avg = 9.6)


LB JI EW WW ER CB SH


LB JI EW WW ER CB SH


1000

900

800

S700

U 600

E 500

d 400

3 300
200

100

0











Figure 4 (continued). Abundance of fishes representing 8 families at 7 St. Croix reef sites.
Families are: A. Labridae wrassess), B. Pomacentridae (damselfishes), C.
Acanthuridae (surgeonfishes), D. Scaridae (parrotfishes), E. Serranidae grouperss), F.
Lutjanidae (snappers), G. Haemulidae (grunts), and H. Chaetodontidae
(butterflyfishes) and Pomacanthidae (anglefishes). Error bars represent standard
deviation.


Serranidae
(Avg = 3.9)


Lutjanidae
(Avg = 1.8)


LB JI EW WW ER CB SH


Haemulidae
(Avg = 2.6)


LB JI EW VWV ER CB SH


Chaetodontidae & Pomacanthidae
(Avg = 2.3)


LB JI EW WW ER CB SH


OSpring '02
* Fall '02


dl~


OSpnrg ~02
* Fall '02


LB JI EW WW ER


CB SH


Ih.l












Table 1. Description of St. Croix reef sites for fish census study.
Jas & Et Wl West Wall Eagle Ray
Jack's & East Wall
Reef Site Lang Bank c t i (Salt (Long Cane Bay Sprat Hole
Isaac's (Salt River) Re Re
River) Reef)
Abbreviation LB JI EW WW ER CB SH

Location East Southeast North North North Northwest West
N 170 N 170 N 170 N 170 N 170 N 170 N 170
Latitude
44.448' 44.586' 47.221' 47.116' 45.688' 46.433' 44.038'
W 6 W 6 W 640 W 640 W640 W 640 W640 W 640 W 64
32.186' 34.310' 45.445' 45.564' 41.929' 48.810' 53.722'
Min. Depth 44 36 32 24 22 24 30
Max. Depth 48 49 45 27 35 36 35
Avg. Depth 45.8 41.7 36.8 25.3 28.0 28.8 32.3
Sloping
Reef Submarine Fringing Cobble, Steep Barrier Shelf- Shelf-
Description' Hardgounds Reef Canyon aReef Edge Reef EdgeReef
Wall
Vertical Relief Low &
2 Low Moderate Moderate High High High High
% Cover Live
SCor3 ~ 5% 9% ~ 12 % ~ 11% ~ 7% ~ 23% 25%
Coral
% Cover Turf
CoverTurf 80% 50% 72% 78% -70% 60% ~ 60%
Algae 3
*notes:
1. After Hubbard (1989a-d)
2. From diver observations (this study)
3. From Nemeth and Herzlieb (2002)



Table 2. Fish census effort
LB JI EW WW ER CB SH
Spring 2002
23,28- 22,23-
Date of Censuses 29-May 11-Jun May May 3--May 15-May 16-May
No. of censuses 4 6 6 6 6 6 6
Total Census Time (min) 91 195 187 190 233 242 255
Avg Time / Census (min) 22.8 32.5 31.2 31.7 38.8 40.3 42.5


Fall 2002
4&6-
Date of Censuses 3-Sept 4-Sept 6-Sept 12-Sept Sept 10-Sept 11-Sept
No. of censuses 6 6 6 6 6 6 6
Total Census Time (min) 197 179 225 254 309 294 285
Avg Time / Census (min) 32.8 29.8 37.5 42.3 51.5 49.0 47.5










Table 3. Total number of fish and species observed during stationary fish censuses*'
Reef Site Survey LB JI EW WW ER CB SH Total

No. of Fish Spring '02 1,659*2 1,921 1,755 1,922 2,156 3,120 4,326 16,859

Observed Fall '02 2,491 1,385 1,456 2,221 2,148 5,443 3,319 18,463

Total 4,150 3,306 3,211 4,143 4,304 8,563 7,645 35,322

No. of Species Spring '02 24 39 37 34 40 32 40 72

Observed Fall'02 28 37 38 42 42 42 40 77

Cumulative 32 47 47 48 52 44 49 85
Notes:
1. Values reported for Numbers of species are not additive because there is substantial overlap in
species compositions among different reef sites and between sampling periods.
2. Total number of fish from 4 replicate censuses.












Table 4. The 25 most abundant fish species observed in this study.
Spring '02


Common Name


bluehead wrasse
creole wrasse
bicolor
damselfish
brown chromis
blue chromis
ocean
surgeonfish
yellowhead
wrasse
black durgon
redband
parrotfish
princess
parrotfish

dusky damselfish
threespot
damselfish
coney
sergeant major
blue tang
french grunt
yellow goatfish
foureye
butterflyfish
stoplight
parrotfish
yellowtail
damselfish


Species


Thalassoma bifasciatum
Clepticus parrae

Stegastes partitus
Chromis multilineata
Chromis cyanea

Acanthurus bahianus

Halichoeres garnoti
Melichthys niger

Sparisoma aurofrenatum

Scarus taeniopterus
Stegastes adustus (S.
fuscus)

Stegastes planifrons
Cephalopholis fulvus
Abudefduf saxatilis
Acanthurus coeruleus
Haemulon flavolineatum
Mulloidichthys martinicus

Chaetodon capistratus

Sparisoma viride
Microspathodon
chrysurus


Family


Labridae
Labridae

Pomacentridae
Pomacentridae
Pomacentridae

Acanthuridae

Labridae
Balistidae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Pomacentridae

Pomacentridae
Serranidae
Pomacentridae
Acanthuridae
Haemulidae
Mullidae

Chaetodontidae

Scaridae

Pomacentridae


Total No.
of Fish
Observed


Avg
No.
Fish per
Census


% Freq
(n=40)


Total No.
of Fish
Observed


Fall '02
Avg
No.
Fish per
Census


% Freq
(n=42)


Total
No.
of Fish


+ 4 +


7,790
2,010

1,466
1,661
1,864

367

162
94

144

138

150

111
97
47
89
93
14


194.8
50.3

36.7
41.5
46.6


97.5
45

100
40
75


9.2 97.5


3.6 90

3.5 87.5

3.8 60


22.5
72.5
32.5
87.5
82.5
17.5


59 1.5 57.5

36 0.9 55


46 1.2


5,830
3,635

2,485
2,172
1,880

287

149
201

139

138

100

94
108
157
106
85
158


138.8
86.5

59.2
51.7
44.8


97.6
38.1

100.0
40.5
76.2


6.8 97.6


81.0
52.4


3.3 83.3

3.3 85.7

2.4 50.0


21.4
81.0
42.9
90.5
78.6
23.8


61 1.5 54.8

62 1.5 64.3

48 1.1 52.4


13,620
5,645

3,951
3,833
3,744

654

311
295

283

276

250

205
205
204
195
178
172

120

98

94


% of
All
Obs*











Table 4 (continued). The 25 most abundant fish species observed in this study.


Common Name


Species


Family


Total No.

of Fish
Observed


Spring '02
Avg
No.

Fish per
Census


% Freq
(n=40)


Total No.

of Fish
Observed


Fall '02
Avg
No.

Fish per
Census


% Freq
(n=42)


Total
No.
of Fish


% of
All
Obs*


Scarus iserti (S.
striped parrotfish croicensis) Scaridae 19 0.5 22.5 73 1.7 40.5 92 0.3
blackbar
soldierfish Myripristisjacobus Holocentridae 45 1.1 35 43 1.0 33.3 88 0.2
yellowtail
snapper Ocyurus chrysurus Lutjanidae 49 1.2 32.5 23 0.5 16.7 72 0.2
mahogany
snapper Lutjanus mahogoni Lutjanidae 23 0.6 12.5 27 0.6 23.8 50 0.1
fairy basslet Gramma loreto Grammatidae 11 0.3 10 37 0.9 16.7 48 0.1


* percent of all observations (n = 35,322)


Subtotal


16,585


Subtotal


18,098


Subtotal


34,683 98.2













Appendix 1. Distribution of observations on 85 fish species across seven St. Croix reef sites.


Common Name Species Family Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall


ocean
surgeonfish


doctorfish

blue tang

trumpetfish
queen triggerfish
black durgon
peacock flounder

blue runner
bar jack
longsnout
butterflyfish
foureye
butterflyfish
spotfin
butterflyfish
banded
butterflyfish
yellowfin
mojarra
fairy basslet

tomtate

caesar grunt

smallmouth grunt

french grunt
white grunt


Acanthurus
bahianus
Acanthurus
chirurgus
Acanthurus
coeruleus
Aulostomus
maculatus
Balistes vetula
Melichthys niger
Bothus lunatus
Caranx crysos (C.
fusus)
Caranx ruber
Chaetodon
aculeatus
Chaetodon
capistratus
Chaetodon
ocellatus

Chaetodon striatus

Gerres cinereus
Gramma loreto
Haemulon
aurolineatum
Haemulon
carbonarium
Haemulon
chrysargyreum
Haemulon
flavolineatum
Haemulon plumieri


Acanthuridae

Acanthuridae

Acanthuridae

Aulostomidae
Balistidae
Balistidae
Bothidae

Carangidae
Carangidae

Chaetodontidae

Chaetodontidae

Chaetodontidae

Chaetodontidae

Gerreidae
Grammatidae

Haemulidae

Haemulidae

Haemulidae

Haemulidae
Haemulidae


Lang Bank


Jacks


East Wall


West Wall


Eagle Ray


Cane Bay


Sprat Hole


1 1

1

1 1

1 1


1 1




1 1

1 1

1 1

1 1

1 1


1 1

1 1

1 1


1 1








1




1 1


1 1

1 1

1 1




1


1 1





1 1

1 1

1

1 1


1 1

1

1 1




1 1
1



1 1

1 1

1 1




1

1










1 1
1


1 1

1

1 1

1


1




1




1 1




1








1


1 1

1 1

1 1

1


1 1




1 1




1 1







1 1




1

1

1 1
1


1 1




1 1

1 1





1
1 1




1 1


1




1


"













Appendix 1 (continued). Distribution of observations on 85 fish species across seven St. Croix reef sites.


Common Name Species Family Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall


bluestriped grunt

squirrelfish
longspine
squirrelfish
blackbar
soldierfish
longjaw
squirrelfish
spanish hogfish
creole wrasse

slippery dick
yellowcheek
wrasse
yellowhead
wrasse

clown wrasse

puddingwife

bluehead wrasse
mutton snapper
schoolmaster
mahogany
snapper
yellowtail
snapper

sand tilefish
scrawled filefish
orangespotted
filefish


Haemulon sciurus
Holocentrus
adcensionis

Holocentrus rufus

Myripristis jacobus
Neoniphon
marianus
Bodianus rufus
Clepticus parrae
Halichoeres
bivittatus
Halichoeres
cyanocephalus
Halichoeres
garnoti
Halichoeres
maculipinna
Halichoeres
radiatus
Thalassoma
bifasciatum
Lutjanus analis
Lutjanus apodus

Lutjanus mahogoni

Ocyurus Chrysurus
Malacanthus
plumieri
Aluterus scripta
Cantherhines
Pullus


Haemulidae

Holocentridae

Holocentridae

Holocentridae

Holocentridae
Labridae
Labridae

Labridae

Labridae

Labridae

Labridae

Labridae

Labridae
Lutjanidae
Lutjanidae

Lutjanidae

Lutjanidae

Malacanthidae
Monacanthidae

Monacanthidae


Lang Bank


Jacks


East Wall


West Wall


Eagle Ray


Cane Bay


Sprat Hole


1

1 1

1 1



1 1
1






1 1

1

1

1 1

1 1

1 1


1

1 1





1



1

1

1 1

1 1




1 1













1


1

1

1



1







1 1






1 1

1




1 1





1 1


1

1 1

1 1


1 1

1

1 1




1 1

1




1 1






1 1

1 1




1 1



1

1


1

1 1






1 1
1
1 1




1 1


1 1

1 1

1

1 1


1 1






1 1

1

1







1 1


1




1


1 1

1




1 1
1
1 1

1 1




1













Appendix 1 (continued). Distribution of observations on 85 fish species across seven St. Croix reef sites.


Common Name Species Family Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall


yellow goatfish

spotted goatfish

spotted moray
honeycomb
cowfish

scrawled cowfish

spotted trunkfish

smooth trunkfish

queen angelfish

rock beauty

French angelfish

sergeant major
blue chromis

brown chromis
yellowtail
damselfish


dusky damselfish

beaugregory

bicolor damselfish


Mulloidichthys
martinicus
Psuedupeneus
maculatus
Gymnothorax
moringa
Acanthostracion
ploygonia
Acanthostracion
quadricornis
Lactophrys
bicaudalis
Lactophrys
triqueter
Holacanthus
ciliaris
Holacanthus
tricolor
Pomacanthus
paru
Abudefduf
saxatilis
Chromis cyanea
Chromis
multilineata
Microspathodon
chrysurus
Stegastes
adustus (S.
fuscus)
Stegastes
leucostictus
Stegastes
partitus


Mullidae

Mullidae

Muraenidae

Ostraciidae

Ostraciidae

Ostraciidae

Ostraciidae

Pomacanthidae

Pomacanthidae

Pomacanthidae

Pomacentridae
Pomacentridae

Pomacentridae

Pomacentridae


Pomacentridae

Pomacentridae

Pomacentridae


Appendix 1 (continued). Distribution of observations on 85 fish species across seven St. Croix reef sites.


Lang Bank


Jacks


East Wall


West Wall


Eagle Ray


Cane Bay


Sprat Hole


1






1 1






1




1 1


1 1

1 1


1 1

1

1 1


1

1


1






1

1 1





1 1




1







1 1


1 1







1 1


1

1















1 1


1 1

1 1


1 1

1

1 1


1

1




1


1 1

1 1


1 1

1 1

1 1


1 1











1











1 1
1 1

1 1

1 1


1 1

1

1 1


1 1




1

1






1




1 1


1 1

1


1 1




1 1












Common Name Species Family Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall
threespot Stegastes
damselfish planifrons Pomacentridae 1 1 1 1
Stegastes
cocoa damselfish variabilis Pomacentridae 1 1 1
Scarus iserti (S.
striped parrotfish croicensis) Scaridae 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Scarus
princess parrotfish taeniopterus Scaridae 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
queen parrotfish Scarus vetula Scaridae 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
greenblotch Sparisoma
parrotfish atomarium Scaridae 1
Sparisoma
redband parrotfish aurofrenatum Scaridae 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Sparisoma
redtail parrotfish chrysopterum Scaridae 1 1 1 1 1
yellowtail Sparisoma
parrotfish rubripinne Scaridae 1
stoplight parrotfish Sparisoma viride Scaridae 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Pareques
highhat acuminatus Sciaenidae 1
Scomberomorus
cero mackerel regalis Scombridae 1
spotted Scorpaena
scorpionfish plumieri Scorpaenidae 1
Cephalopholis
graysby cruentatus Serranidae 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Cephalopholis
coney fulvus Serranidae 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Epinephelus
red hind guttatus Serranidae 1 1 1 1 1
Hypoplectrus
yellowtail hamlet chlorurus Serranidae 1 1 1
Hypoplectrus
shy hamlet guttavarius Serranidae 1 1 1
Hypoplectrus
black hamlet nigricans Serranidae 1 1 1 1


Lang Bank


Jacks


East Wall West Wall Eagle Ray Cane Bay Sprat Hole











Appendix 1 (continued). Distribution of observations on 85 fish species across seven St. Croix reef sites.


Lane Bank


Jacks


East Wall


West Wall


Eagle Ray


Cane Bav


Sprat Hole


Common Name Species Family Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall
Hypoplectrus
barred hamlet puella Serranidae 1 1 1
Hypoplectrus
butter hamlet unicolor Serranidae 1 1
Rypticus
greater soapfish saponaceus Serranidae 1
Serranus
tobaccofish tabacarius Serranidae 1 1
harlequin bass Serranus tigrinus Serranidae 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Calamus
jolthead porgy bajonado Sparidae 1
Synodus
sand diver intermedius Synodontidae 1 1

sharpnose puffer rostrata Tetraodontidae 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
porcupinefish Diodon hystrix Tetraodontidae 1
Grand Total= 85 species Subtotal = 24 28 39 37 37 38 34 42 40 42 32 42 40 40

















Common
Name
ocean
surgeonfish

doctorfish

blue tang
queen
triggerfish
black durgon
banded
butterflyfish

caesar grunt

french grunt
bluestriped
grunt

squirrelfish
longspine
squirrelfish
spanish
hogfish

slippery dick
yellowcheek
wrasse
yellowhead
wrasse

clown wrasse


Species
Acanthurus
bahianus
Acanthurus
chirurgus
Acanthurus
coeruleus

Balistes vetula
Melichthys niger
Chaetodon
striatus
Haemulon
carbonarium
Haemulon
flavolineatum

Haemulon sciurus
Holocentrus
acensionis

Holocentrus rufus

Bodianus rufus
Halichoeres
bivittatus
Halichoeres
cyanocephalus
Halichoeres
garnoti
Halichoeres
maculipinna


Family

Acanthuridae

Acanthuridae

Acanthuridae

Balistidae
Balistidae

Chaetodontidae

Haemulidae

Haemulidae

Haemulidae

Holocentridae

Holocentridae

Labridae

Labridae

Labridae

Labridae

Labridae


Appendix 2A. Fish census data from Lang Bank
Spring '02 Census Fall '02 Census


%
Freq


(n=4)

100.0

50.0

100.0

25.0
100.0

25.0

0.0

100.0

25.0

0.0

100.0

0.0

50.0

0.0

100.0

25.0


No. of Fish


Total Avg.


StDev I Avg Min Max


2.6

0.6

1.7

0.5
4.2

1.0

0.0

1.3

0.5

0.0

0.5

0.0

2.4

0.0

1.0

1.0


14.5 11 17


18.0

16.3

27.0
22.0

10.5



15.8

26.0



17.5



6.0



10.5

9.5


17 20



5 9


%
Freq


(n=6)

100.0

33.3

100.0

16.7
83.3

33.3

16.7

66.7

0.0

50.0

50.0

50.0

0.0

33.3

83.3

33.3


No. of Fish


Total Avg.

64 10.7

7 1.2

24 4.0

1 0.2
58 9.7

4 0.7

1 0.2

13 2.2

0 0.0

6 1.0

5 0.8

3 0.5

0 0.0

2 0.3

25 4.2

15 2.5


StDev I Avg Min Max


2.8

2.0

1.5

0.4
11.1

1.0

0.4

2.2

0.0

1.3

1.2

0.5

0.0

0.5

3.1

4.0


14.8 10

20.5 17

14.7 10

20.0 20
21.0 15

12.3 11

20.0 20

16.5 14



15.8 10

16.5 16

14.3 9



18.5 12

9.1 4

5.5 3

















Common
Name


Species


Family


bluehead Thalassoma
wrasse bifasciatum Labridae
orangespotted Cantherhines
filefish pullus Monacanthidae
scrawled Acanthostracion
cowfish quadricornis Ostraciidae
queen Holacanthus
angelfish ciliaris Pomacanthidae
Holacanthus
rock beauty tricolor Pomacanthidae
blue chromis Chromis cyanea Pomacentridae
yellowtail Microspathodon
damselfish chrysurus Pomacentridae
bicolor Stegastes
damselfish partitus Pomacentridae
striped Scarus iserti (S.
parrotfish croicensis) Scaridae
princess Scarus
parrotfish taeniopterus Scaridae
redband Sparisoma
parrotfish aurofrenatum Scaridae
redtail Sparisoma
parrotfish chrysopterum Scaridae
stoplight
parrotfish Sparisoma viride Scaridae
Cephalopholis
coney fulvus Serranidae
Epinephelus
red hind guttatus Serranidae
harleauin bass Serranus tigrinus Serranidae


Appendix 2A (continued). Fish census data from Lang Bank
Spring '02 Census


% Freq

(n=4)

100.0

0.0

25.0

25.0

75.0
75.0

0

100.0

25.0

100.0

75.0

0.0

50.0

100.0

0.0
50.0


No. of Fish


Total Avg. StDev I Avg


1340 335.0

0 0.0

1 0.3

1 0.3

3 0.8
7 1.8

0 0

171 42.8

1 0.3

11 2.8

7 1.8

0 0.0

3 0.8

14 3.5

0 0.0
3 0.8


102.5

0.0

0.5

0.5

0.5
1.5

0

18.6

0.5

1.3

1.3

0.0

1.0

2.4

00


Min Max


3.0 2 9


22.0

25.0

17.7
4.0



4.0

24.0

16.8

14.7



27.8

16.6


1.0 I 8.3


6 10


%
Freq

(n=6)

100.0

33.3

0.0

0.0

33.3
83.3

16.7

100.0

16.7

100.0

83.3

16.7

50.0

100.0

16.7
16.7


Fall '02 Census

No. of Fish


Size


Total Avg. StDev Avg Min Max


1405

3

0

0

4
45

1

721

1

28

16

1

7

29

1
1


234.2

0.5

0.0

0.0

0.7
7.5

0.2

120.2

0.2

4.7

2.7

0.2

1.2

4.8

0.2
0.2


86.2

0.8

0.0

0.0

1.0
4.4

0.4

25.6

0.4

1.9

1.8

0.4

1.5

2.4

0.4
0.4


Tota 165 Toa 2491


4.3 2 10

21.8 17 25


9.0 3
4.8 2

12.0 12

3.8 2

30.0 30

17.2 10

17.0 10

22.0 22

30.7 25

15.2 10

25.0 25
7.0 7


Total= 1659


Total= 2491
















Common
Name
ocean
surgeonfish

doctorfish

blue tang
black durgon

blue runner
bar jack
banded
butterflyfish

tomtate

caesar grunt
smallmouth
grunt

french grunt
bluestriped
grunt

squirrelfish
longspine
squirrelfish
blackbar
soldierfish
spanish
hogfish
creole wrasse


Species


Family


Acanthurus
bahianus Acanthuridae
Acanthurus
chirurgus Acanthuridae
Acanthurus
coeruleus Acanthuridae
Melichthys niger Balistidae
Caranx crysos
(C. fusus) Carangidae
Caranx ruber Carangidae
Chaetodon
striatus Chaetodontid
Haemulon
aurolineatum Haemulidae
Haemulon
carbonarium Haemulidae
Haemulon
chrysargyreum Haemulidae
Haemulon
flavolineatum Haemulidae
Haemulon
sciurus Haemulidae
Holocentrus
acensionis Holocentridae
Holocentrus
rufus Holocentridae
Myripristis
jacobus Holocentridae

Bodianus rufus Labridae
Clepticus parrae Labridae


Appendix 2B. Fish census data from Jacks & Isaacs Bay
Spring '02 Census


% Freq

(n=6)

100.0

50.0

100.0
0.0

16.7
16.7

16.7

16.7

16.7

16.7

83.3

0.0

0.0

83.3

66.7

33.3
0.0


No. of Fish


Total Avg. StDev I Avg Min Max


% Freq

(n=6)


74 12.3 5.5 15.0 7 20 100.0

5 0.8 1.2 19.0 17 21 16.7

12 2.0 0.9 14.7 8 20 100.0
0 0.0 0.0 33.3

1 0.2 0.4 30.0 30 30 0.0
2 0.3 0.8 22.5 21 24 16.7

4 0.7 1.6 11.0 10 12 16.7

1 0.2 0.4 19.0 19 19 16.7

1 0.2 0.4 19.0 19 19 16.7

3 0.5 1.2 12.0 12 12 0.0

19 3.2 2.9 18.0 14 23 66.7


0 0.0 0.0

0 0.0 0.0


7 1.2 0.8 19.6 18 22 33.3

7 1.2 1.2 16.4 16 18 33.3

2 0.3 0.5 18.5 17 20 16.7
0 0.0 0.0 33.3


Fall '02 Census
No. of Fish


Total Avg.

32 5.3

1 0.2

17 2.8
2 0.3

0 0.0
2 0.3

2 0.3

2 0.3

1 0.2

0 0.0

9 1.5

2 0.3

3 0.5

2 0.3

6 1.0


StDev Avg Min Max

1.2 13.7 6 20

0.4 18.0 18 18

1.0 11.2 3 17
0.5 17.5 15 20

0.0 -
0.8 20.0 20 20

0.8 9.0 8 10

0.8 14.5 14 15

0.4 16.0 16 16


0.0 I


1.6 15.5 13 16

0.8 19.0 18 20

0.8 19.3 19 20

0.5 16.5 16 17

2.0 13.5 12 15

0.4 6.0 6 6
4.8 10.0 4 15


Appendix 2B (continued). Fish census data from Jacks & Isaacs Bay


ae













Common
Name


Species


yellowhead Halichoeres
wrasse garnoti
clown Halichoeres
wrasse maculipinna
Halichoeres
puddingwife radiatus
bluehead Thalassoma
wrasse bifasciatum
schoolmaster Lutjanus apodus
mahogany


Family


Labridae

Labridae

Labridae

Labridae
Lutjanidae


snapper Lutjanus mahogoni Lutjanidae
Malacanthus
sand tilefish plumieri Malacanthidae
scrawled
filefish Aluterus scripta Monacanthidae
yellow Mulloidichthys
goatfish martinicus Mullidae
honeycomb Acanthostracion
cowfish ploygonia Ostraciidae
smooth Lactophrys
trunkfish triqueter Ostraciidae
Holacanthus
rock beauty tricolor Pomacanthidae
sergeant
major Abudefdufsaxatilis Pomacentridae
blue chromis Chromis cyanea Pomacentridae
brown Chromis
chromis multilineata Pomacentridae
yellowtail Microspathodon
damselfish chrysurus Pomacentridae
dusky Stegastes adustus
damselfish (S. fuscus) Pomacentridae
Stegastes
beaugregory leucostictus Pomacentridae


% Freq

(n=6)


83.3

0.0

16.7

100.0
16.7

16.7

50.0

16.7

0.0

33.3

0.0

33.3

16.7
100.0

16.7

50.0

33.3

33.3


Spring '02 Census
No. of Fish


Total Avg. StDev I Avg Min Max


2.2 1.3 I 9.8 6


0 0.0 0.0


0.2 0.4 8.0 8

165.8 78.3 5.3 2
0.2 0.4 17.0 17

0.5 1.2 22.0 20

0.5 0.5 27.3 26

0.2 0.4 25.0 25


0 0.0 0.0


0.3 0.5 1 24.0 22


0 0.0 0.0


0.3 0.5 11.5 8

0.2 0.4 13.0 13
32.8 32.0 5.3 2

1.3 3.3 5.5 5

1.0 1.1 12.2 11

0.5 0.8 7.8 6

0.5 0.8 7.0 6


% Freq

(n=6)


83.3

16.7

0.0

100.0
16.7

33.3

16.7

0.0

16.7

16.7

33.3

16.7

0.0
100.0

16.7

66.7

16.7

0.0


Fall '02 Census
No. of Fish


Total


Avg. StDev I Avg Min Max


2.7 2.6 9.0 4

3.3 8.2 3.5 3


0 0.0 0.0


106.7 59.6 4.0 2
0.2 0.4 20.0 20

0.5 0.8 18.0 15

0.2 0.4 25.0 25


0 0.0 0.0


0.8 2.0 18.0 16

0.2 0.4 20.0 20

0.5 0.8 17.0 15

0.2 0.4 18.0 18


0.0 0.0
23.2 19.3


4.3 2


0.3 0.8 5.5 5

1.0 0.9 12.3 12

0.2 0.4 8.0 8


0 0.0 0.0











Appendix 2B (continued). Fish census data from Jacks & Isaacs Bay


Common


Name


Species


bicolor
damselfish Stegastes partitus
striped Scarus iserti (S.
parrotfish croicensis)
princess Scarus
parrotfish taeniopterus
queen
parrotfish Scarus vetula
redband Sparisoma
parrotfish aurofrenatum
redtail Sparisoma
parrotfish chrysopterum
stoplight
parrotfish Sparisoma viride
Pareques
highhat acuminatus
spotted Scorpaena
scorpionfish plumieri
Cephalopholis
coney fulvus
Epinephelus
red hind guttatus
sharpnose C.,,niii. ,,,.
puffer rostrata


Family

Pomacentridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Sciaenidae

Scorpaenidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Tetraodontidae


% Freq

(n=6)

100.0

16.7

83.3

16.7

100.0

16.7

66.7

0.0

16.7

100.0

16.7

16.7


Spring '02 Census
No. of Fish Size


Total Avg.

446 74.3

2 0.3

17 2.8

2 0.3

24 4.0

12 2.0

6 1.0

0 0.0

1 0.2

32 5.3

1 0.2


StDev I Avg Min Max


22.5

0.8

2.8

0.8

1.3

4.9

0.9

0.0

0.4

2.7

0.4


1 0.2 0.4


5.1 3

13.0 12

15.4 8

21.0 20

14.2 5

23.0 18

19.5 15


27.0 27

18.1 12

22.0 22


5.0 5 5


% Freq

(n=6)

100.0

16.7

66.7

0.0

100.0

16.7

50.0

16.7

0.0

100.0

0.0


Total = 1921


Fall '02 Census
No. of Fish Size

Total Avg. StDev Avg Min Max


400 66.7 31.1

3 0.5 1.2

5 0.8 0.8

0 0.0 0.0

17 2.8 1.6

1 0.2 0.4

4 0.7 0.8

2 0.3 0.8

0 0.0 0.0

19 3.2 1.6

0 0.0 0.0

0 0.0 0.0
1385


3.8 2

10.0 6

21.5 16



16.8 10

22.0 22

22.7 16

11.5 8



16.6 10


Total:












Appendix 2C. Fish census data from East Wall, Salt River Canyon
I Spring '02 Census


Common Name


ocean Acanthurus
surgeonfish bahianus
Acanthurus
doctorfish chirurgus
Acanthurus
blue tang coeruleus
Aulostomus
trumpetfish maculatus
Melichthys
black durgon niger
barjack Caranx ruber
longsnout Chaetodon
butterflyfish aculeatus
foureye Chaetodon
butterflyfish capistratus
spotfin Chaetodon
butterflyfish ocellatus
banded Chaetodon
butterflyfish striatus
Haemulon
french grunt flavolineatum
Haemulon
white grunt plumieri
Haemulon
bluestriped grunt sciurus
Holocentrus
squirrelfish acensionis
longspine Holocentrus
squirrelfish rufus
blackbar Myripristis
soldierfish jacobus
spanish hogfish Bodianus rufus


Acanthuridae 100.0 73

Acanthuridae 33.3 3

Acanthuridae 83.3 18

Aulostomidae 16.7 2


Chaetodontidae 16.7 1

Chaetodontidae 100.0 16

Chaetodontidae 16.7 1

Chaetodontidae 50.0 6


Holocentridae 0.0 0

Holocentridae 50.0 5

Holocentridae 0.0 0
Labridae 16.7 2


No. of Fish Size
Total Avg. StDev Avg Min


12.2 4.4 14.5 12

0.5 0.8 20.3 19

3.0 0.9 15.4 14

0.3 0.8 27.5 25

1.8 1.5 23.7 20
0.7 1.0 21.0 14


0.2 0.4 8.0

2.7 1.8 9.3


0.2 0.4 16.0 16

1.0 1.1 10.5 8

1.8 0.8 15.3 12

0.5 0.5 22.3 20

0.2 0.4 22.0 22


0.0 0.0


0.8 1.0 16.2 15

0.0 0.0 -
0.3 0.8 11.5 3


Max


%
Freq
(n=6)


Fall '02 Census


No. of Fish


Total


18 100.0 62

23 0.0 0

18 100.0 20

30 33.3 3

25 83.3 31
20 16.7 2

8 16.7 3

11 83.3 18

16 16.7 1

12 16.7 2

17 100.0 17

25 16.7 1

22 0.0 0


16.7 I 3


17 0.0 0

16.7 1
20 0.0 0


Size


Avg. StDev Avg Min

10.3 2.8 13.3 8


0.0 0.0


Max


3.3 1.6 15.0 10

0.5 0.8 42.5 30

5.2 7.4 21.2 15
0.3 0.8 19.0 18

0.5 1.2 9.0 8

3.0 2.4 9.0 5

0.2 0.4 13.0 13


0.3 0.8 I 11.0 11 11


2.8 1.2 15.6 10

0.2 0.4 20.0 20


0.0 0.0


0.5 1.2 I 19.0 18


0.0 0.0


0.2 0.4 18.0 18
0.0 0.0 -


Species


Family


%
Freq
(n=6)


Balistidae
Carangidae


83.3 11
33.3 4


Haemulidae

Haemulidae

Haemulidae


100.0 11

50.0 3

16.7 1












Appendix 2C (continued). Fish census data from East Wall, Salt River Canyon
Spring '02 Census


Common
Name
yellowhead
wrasse
bluehead
wrasse

schoolmaster
yellowtail
snapper
orangespotted
filefish
yellow
goatfish
spotted
goatfish
honeycomb
cowfish
smooth
trunkfish

rock beauty
french
angelfish

sergeant major
blue chromis
yellowtail
damselfish
bicolor
damselfish
striped
parrotfish
princess
Darrotfish


Family


Halichoeres
garnoti Labridae
Thalassoma
bifasciatum Labridae
Lutjanus
apodus Lutjanidae
Ocyurus
chrysurus Lutjanidae
Cantherhines
pullus Monacanthidae
Mulloidichthys
martinicus Mullidae
Psuedupeneus
maculatus Mullidae
Acanthostracion
ploygonia Ostraciidae
Lactophrys
triqueter Ostraciidae
Holacanthus
tricolor Pomacanthidae
Pomacanthus
paru Pomacanthidae
Abudefduf
saxatilis Pomacentridae
Chromis cyanea Pomacentridae
Microspathodon
chrysurus Pomacentridae
Stegastes
partitus Pomacentridae
Scarus iserti (S.
croicensis) Scaridae
Scarus
taeniovterus Scaridae


Species


No. of Fish


Total Avg. StDev Avg


%Freq

(n=6)

50.0

100.0

0.0

100.0

16.7

16.7

50.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

33.3

16.7
33.3

83.3

100.0

16.7

83.3


8 1.3 1.5

1290 215.0 114.8

0 0.0 0.0

19 3.2 2.1

1 0.2 0.4

1 0.2 0.4

3 0.5 0.5

0 0.0 0.0

0 0.0 0.0

0 0.0 0.0

2 0.3 0.5

2 0.3 0.8
71 11.8 24.0

5 0.8 0.4

143 23.8 7.8

2 0.3 0.8

15 2.5 2.1


Size


Min Max

5 14


%Freq

(n=6)


9.8

3.2



22.6

17.0

20.0

18.7








24.5

13.0
3.0

12.4

4.0

8.0

17.0


Fall '02 Census
No. of Fish


Total Avg. StDev Avg Min


22 3.7


2.6 1 8.6 4


100.0

100.0

16.7

16.7

16.7

16.7

0.0

16.7

66.7

33.3

0.0

83.3
50.0

66.7

100.0

16.7

83.3


136.7 61.5

0.8 2.0

0.5 1.2

0.2 0.4

0.5 1.2

0.0 0.0

0.2 0.4

0.7 0.5

0.3 0.5

0.0 0.0

11.2 10.7
10.8 13.9

1.2 1.0

35.2 8.1

1.0 2.4

3.5 2.3


4.8 2

13.0 10

21.0 18

16.0 16

19.0 18



26.0 26

15.8 15

17.5 13



11.8 8
4.3 3

11.6 10

4.0 2

5.0 4

17.1 7


Size


Max


1 I I I I I I












Appendix 2C (continued). Fish census data from East Wall, Salt River Canyon
Spring '02 Census


greenblotch Sparisoma
parrotfish atomarium
redband Sparisoma
parrotfish aurofrenatum
stoplight Sparisoma
parrotfish viride
Cephalopholis
graysby cruentatus
Cephalopholis
coney fulvus
Epinephelus
red hind guttatus
Hypoplectrus
shy hamlet guttavarius
Hypoplectrus
black hamlet nigricans
Hypoplectrus
butter hamlet unicolor
greater Rypticus
soapfish saponaceus
Serranus
tobaccofish tabacarius
Serranus
harlequin bass tigrinus
sharpnose C,,i ,.
puffer rostrata


Common
Name


%
Freq

(n=6)

0.0

83.3

33.3

16.7

100.0

16.7

16.7

16.7

16.7

0.0

0.0

16.7

0.0


No. of Fish


Size


Total Avg. StDev Avg Min Max


Species


16.9 12 21

22.5 15 30

17.0 17 17

16.4 14 19

25.0 25 25

13.0 13 13

14.0 14 14

10.0 10 10


Family

Scaridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Tetraodontidae


%
Freq

(n=6)


Fall '02 Census

No. of Fish


Size


Total Avg. StDev Avg Min Max


0.7 1.6

3.5 1.9

1.0 0.9

0.2 0.4

2.5 1.9

0.2 0.4

0.0 0.0

0.0 0.0

0.0 0.0

0.2 0.4

0.2 0.4

0.5 0.5

0.2 0.4


14.5 14 15

17.2 11 23

19.8 6 32

18.0 18 18

17.8 8 24

20.0 20 20


0.0 0.0

2.2 1.7

0.3 0.5

0.2 0.4

2.5 1.6

0.2 0.4

0.2 0.4

0.2 0.4

0.2 0.4

0.0 0.0

0.0 0.0

0.2 0.4

0.0 0.0


Total= 1456


11.0 11


15.0 15

5.0 5

7.0 5

6.0 6


Total= 1755












Appendix 2D. Fish census data from West Wall, Salt River Canyon
I Spring '02 Census


Common
Name
ocean
surgeonfish

doctorfish

blue tang

black durgon
peacock
flounder
bar jack
longsnout
butterflyfish
foureye
butterflyfish
banded
butterflyfish
yellowfin
mojarra

french grunt

white grunt

squirrelfish
longspine
squirrelfish
blackbar
soldierfish

creole wrasse


Species Name
Acanthurus
bahianus
Acanthurus
chirurgus
Acanthurus
coeruleus
Melichthys
niger

Bothus lunatus
Caranx ruber
Chaetodon
aculeatus
Chaetodon
capistratus
Chaetodon
striatus

Gerres cinereus
Haemulon
flavolineatum
Haemulon
plumieri
Holocentrus
adcensionis
Holocentrus
rufus
Myripristis
jacobus
Clepticus
parrae


Family


%
Freq

(n=6)


Acanthuridae I 100.0 I 96


Acanthuridae

Acanthuridae

Balistidae

Bothidae
Carangidae

Chaetodontidae

Chaetodontidae

Chaetodontidae

Gerreidae

Haemulidae

Haemulidae

Holocentridae

Holocentridae

Holocentridae

Labridae


0.0

83.3

66.7

0.0
16.7

33.3

100.0

50.0

0.0

100.0

0.0

33.3

0.0

16.7


0

14

27

0
1

3

20

5

0

17

0

3

0

1


No. of Fish

Total Avg. StDev


Avg


16.0 6.3 I 13.6


0.0 0.0

2.3 1.6

4.5 6.3

0.0 0.0
0.2 0.4

0.5 0.8

3.3 2.3

0.8 1.0

0.0 0.0

2.8 1.0

0.0 0.0

0.5 0.8

0.0 0.0

0.2 0.4


66.7 1 136


Max

17



20

26


22

7

11

12



17



20



14


16.4

23.1


22.0

6.3

9.5

11.5



13.8



17.3



14.0


27.0 1 10.5


%
Freq

(n=6)

100.0

33.3

100.0

66.7

16.7
33.3

33.3

83.3

0.0

16.7

83.3

16.7

16.7

33.3

16.7


15 1 66.7


Fall '02 Census


No. of Fish

Total Avg. StDev


Avg


8.2 4.3 I 14.8


0.5 0.8

2.0 0.6

7.3 8.9

0.2 0.4
0.5 0.8

0.5 0.8

2.5 1.6

0.00 0.0

0.3 0.8

2.5 2.4

0.2 0.4

0.2 0.4

0.3 0.5

0.2 0.4


345 57.5


16.5

16.8

23.0

12.0
29.5

8.0

9.2



25.0

17.2

22.0

18.0

16.5

15.0


58.8 1 16.3


Max


7 22


10 20











Appendix 2D (continued). Fish census data from West Wall, Salt River Canyon
Spring '02 Census


Species Name Family


Halichoeres
slippery dick bivittatus Labridae
yellowhead Halichoeres
wrasse garnoti Labridae
bluehead Thalassoma
wrasse bifasciatum Labridae
Lutjanus
schoolmaster apodus Lutjanidae
yellowtail Ocyurus
snapper chrysurus Lutjanidae
scrawled
filefish Aluterus scripta Monacanthidae
orangespotted Cantherhines
filefish pullus Monacanthidae
Mulloidichthys
yellow goatfish martinicus Mullidae
spotted Psuedupeneus
goatfish maculatus Mullidae
Holacanthus
rock beauty tricolor Pomacanthidae
Abudefduf
sergeant major saxatilis Pomacentridae
blue chromis Chromis cyanea Pomacentridae
Chromis
brown chromis multilineata Pomacentridae
yellowtail Microspathodon
damselfish chrysurus Pomacentridae


Stegastes
adustus (S.


Pomacentridae

Pomacentridae


Common
Name


%
Freq

(n=6)

16.7

33.3

100.0

33.3

33.3

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

16.7

50.0
16.7

33.3

100.0


100.0

16.7


Avg Min

2.5 2

10.0 10

3.0 1.5

22.0 18

25.0 20


Max


No. of Fish

Total Avg. StDev

2 0.3 0.8

2 0.3 0.5

1333 222.2 41.8

3 0.5 0.8

20 3.3 5.2

0 0.0 0.0

0 0.0 0.0

0 0.0 0.0

0 0.0 0.0

1 0.2 0.4

20 3.3 5.9
3 0.5 1.2

41 6.8 14.0

14 2.3 0.8


39 6.5 10.1

1 0.2 0.4


%
Freq

(n=6)

0.0

83.3

100.0

33.3

50.0

16.7

50.0

16.7

16.7

16.7

50.0
0.0

33.3

100.0


83.3

0.0


Fall '02 Census


No. of Fish

Total Avg. StDev

0 0.0 0.0

14 2.3 1.2

1235 205.8 130.2


2

15

1

3

4

1

1

20
0

90

17


15

0


0.3 0.5 I 30.0


2.5 2.8

0.2 0.4

0.5 0.5

0.7 1.6

0.2 0.4

0.2 0.4

3.3 4.3
0.0 0.0

15.0 23.5

2.8 1.2


2.5 1.8

0.0 0.0


17.0

11.3
4.0

5.3

10.0


7.9

9.0


Avg


Max


9.4

4.6


dusky


damselfish fuscus)
Stegastes
beaugregory leucostictus


26.0

35.0

15.7

17.0

20.0

6.0

12.8


6.0

12.1


8.9


30 30


7 11












Appendix 2D (continued). Fish census data from West Wall, Salt River Canyon
I Spring '02 Census


Common
Name Species Name Family
bicolor Stegastes
damselfish partitus Pomacentridae
striped Scarus iserti (S.
parrotfish croicensis) Scaridae
princess Scarus
parrotfish taeniopterus Scaridae
queen
parrotfish Scarus vetula Scaridae
redband Sparisoma
parrotfish aurofrenatum Scaridae
redtail Sparisoma
parrotfish chrysopterum Scaridae
yellowtail Sparisoma
parrotfish rubripinne Scaridae
stoplight Sparisoma
parrotfish viride Scaridae
cero Scomberomorus
mackerel regalis Scombridae
Cephalopholis
coney fulvus Serranidae
yellowtail Hypoplectrus
hamlet chlorurus Serranidae
Hypoplectrus
shy hamlet guttavarius Serranidae
barred Hypoplectrus
hamlet puella Serranidae
harlequin Serranus
bass tigrinus Serranidae
Synodus
sand diver intermedius Synodontidae
sharpnose C,,~iig,i .,
puffer rostrata Tetraodontidae


%Freq

(n=6)

100.0

33.3

66.7

16.7

100.0

0.0

0.0

16.7

0.0

100.0

16.7

0.0

0.0

66.7

16.7


No. of Fish

Total Avg. StDev


Avg


Max


8.7 8.7 1 5.3


0.3 0.5

2.7 2.9

0.5 1.2

3.0 1.9

0.0 0.0

0.0 0.0

0.3 0.8

0.0 0.0

3.2 1.5

0.3 0.8

0.0 0.0

0.0 0.0

0.7 0.5

0.2 0.4


16.7 | 1 0.2
Total= 1922


24.5

17.8

24.0

15.5






15.0



11.5

12.5






8.0

22.0


0.4 1 4.0


4 4


%/Freq

(n=6)

100.0

50.0

100.0

16.7

83.3

16.7

16.7

50.0

16.7

100.0

0.0

16.7

16.7

66.7

0.0

50.0


Fall '02 Census
No. of Fish


Total Avg. StDev Avg Min


36.7 10.8 4.4


1.0 1.3

2.7 1.6

0.2 0.4

3.3 2.8

0.2 0.4

0.2 0.4

0.8 1.0

0.2 0.4

3.3 1.0

0.0 0.0

0.2 0.4

0.2 0.4

1.7 1.6

0.0 0.0


Total = 2221


Max


2 8


20.2 15

20.9 14

40.0 40

15.6 5

23.0 23

25.0 25

26.0 13

30.0 30

18.7 12



11.0 11

10.0 10

8.9 7


0.5 0.5 1 7.7 4

















Common
Name
ocean
surgeonfish

doctorfish

blue tang

trumpetfish

black durgon
bar jack
foureye
butterflyfish
banded
butterflyfish

caesar grunt

french grunt

white grunt

squirrelfish
longspine
squirrelfish
blackbar
soldierfish
spanish
hogfish

creole wrasse


Species
Acanthurus
bahianus
Acanthurus
chirurgus
Acanthurus
coeruleus
Aulostomus
maculatus
Melichthys
niger
Caranx ruber
Chaetodon
capistratus
Chaetodon
striatus
Haemulon
carbonarium
Haemulon
flavolineatum
Haemulon
plumieri
Holocentrus
acensionis
Holocentrus
rufus
Myripristis
jacobus

Bodianus rufus
Clepticus
parrae


Family


Acanthuridae

Acanthuridae

Acanthuridae

Aulostomidae

Balistidae
Carangidae

Chaetodontidae

Chaetodontidae

Haemulidae

Haemulidae

Haemulidae

Holocentridae

Holocentridae

Holocentridae

Labridae

Labridae


Appendix 2E. Fish census data from Eagle Ray
Spring '02 Census


%
Freq

(n=6)

100.0

0.0

66.7

0.0

16.7
0.0

83.3

0.0

0.0

83.3

33.3

0.0

50.0

50.0

16.7

66.7


No. of Fish

Total Avg. StDev


9.0 1.8

0.0 0.0

1.0 0.9

0.0 0.0

0.3 0.8
0.00 0.0

1.8 1.0

0.00 0.0

0.0 0.0

1.7 1.8

0.3 0.5

0.0 0.0

0.7 0.8

3.2 4.8

0.2 0.4


96 16.0 12.9


Avg Min

15 12


Max


%
Freq

(n=6)


18 I 100.0


15.625 12 18


22 24


7 12


15.8 15

23 21



18.167 17

15.167 12

20 20

7 3


17

25



20

17

20


16.7

83.3

33.3

0.0
33.3

83.3

66.7

16.7

100.0

0.0

50.0

33.3

83.3

66.7


12 1 50.0 1 260


Fall '02 Census

No. of Fish Size

Total Avg. StDev Avg Min Max


6.2 2.6 I 12.8 7 16


0.5 1.2

2.3 1.8

0.3 0.5

0.0 0.0
1.2 2.0

2.2 1.2

1.3 1.0

0.2 0.4

2.2 1.0

0.0 0.0

1.0 1.3

0.3 0.5

3.0 3.6

0.8 0.8


18.0 16 20

13.7 8 18

41.0 32 50


22.5 20 30

10.1 9 12

11.5 10 15

30.0 30 30

14.8 12 18



19.0 17 31

16.0 16 16

13.8 10 18

11.4 5 25


43.3 70.9 1 6.3 2 15

















Common
Name


Species


Family


yellowcheek Halichoeres
wrasse cyanocephalus Labridae
yellowhead Halichoeres
wrasse garnoti Labridae
bluehead Thalassoma
wrasse bifasciatum Labridae
mutton snapper Lutjanus analis Lutjanidae
Lutjanus
schoolmaster apodus Lutjanidae
yellowtail Ocyurus
snapper chrysurus Lutjanidae
Mulloidichthys
yellow goatfish martinicus Mullidae
spotted Psuedupeneus
goatfish maculatus Mullidae
honeycomb Acanthostracion
cowfish ploygonia Ostraciidae
spotted Lactophrys
trunkfish bicaudalis Ostraciidae
smooth Lactophrys
trunkfish triqueter Ostraciidae
Holacanthus
rock beauty tricolor Pomacanthidae
Abudefduf
sergeant major saxatilis Pomacentridae
blue chromis Chromis cyanea Pomacentridae
Chromis


brown chromis multilineata
yellowtail Microspathodon
damselfish chrvsurus


Pomacentridae

Pomacentridae


Appendix 2E (continued). Fish census data from Eagle Ray
Spring '02 Census


%
Freq

(n=6)

0.0

100.0

100.0
0.0

16.7

83.3

33.3

50.0

16.7

0.0

0.0

0.0

33.3
100.0

16.7

66.7


No. of Fish

Total Avg. StDev

0 0.0 0.0

18 3.0 1.4

1460 243.3 36.1
0 0.0 0.0

2 0.3 0.8

10 1.7 1.8

2 0.3 0.5

3 0.5 0.5

1 0.2 0.4

0 0.0 0.0

0 0.0 0.0

0 0.0 0.0

12 2.0 3.1
104 17.3 12.9

10 1.7 4.1

7 1.2 1.5


Avg Min


Max


8.3333

4.25


17

20.1

23.5

16.333

24


11.5 10
4.6667 2

3 3

11.25 6


%
Freq

(n=6)


Fall '02 Census

No. of Fish Size

Total Avg. StDev Avg Min Max


16.7 I 1


83.3

100.0
33.3

16.7

50.0

16.7

83.3

0.0

16.7

16.7

16.7

83.3
100.0

66.7

33.3


29

805
2

1

5

7

6

0

1

1

1

57
200

260

4


0.2 0.4 I 15.0 15 15


4.8 3.3

134.2 75.7
0.3 0.5

0.2 0.4

0.8 1.2

1.2 2.9

1.0 0.6

0.0 0.0

0.2 0.4

0.2 0.4

0.2 0.4

9.5 7.4
33.3 11.1

43.3 68.4

0.7 1.2


8.6 4 16

4.6 2 12
35.0 35 35

17.0 17 17

20.7 20 25

17.0 0 19

17.2 15 20



13.0 13 13

14.0 14 14

17.0 17 17

11.7 8 14
5.0 3 8

3.6 3 6

11.0 8 12


i I I I I I I















Common
Name

dusky
damselfish

beaugregory
bicolor
damselfish
cocoa
damselfish
striped
parrotfish
princess
parrotfish
queen
parrotfish
redband
parrotfish
redtail
parrotfish
stoplight
parrotfish

graysby

coney

red hind
yellowtail
hamlet

black hamlet

butter hamlet


Family


Species
Stegastes
adustus (S.
fuscus)
Stegastes
leucostictus
Stegastes
partitus
Stegastes
variabilis
Scarus iserti (S.
croicensis)
Scarus
taeniopterus

Scarus vetula
Sparisoma
aurofrenatum
Sparisoma
chrysopterum
Sparisoma
viride
Cephalopholis
cruentatus
Cephalopholis
fulvus
Epinephelus
guttatus
Hypoplectrus
chlorurus
Hypoplectrus
nigricans
Hypoplectrus
unicolor


Appendix 2E (continued). Fish census data from Eagle Ray
Spring '02 Census Fall '02 Census


No. of Fish Size


Total Avg.


StDev


Pomacentridae

Pomacentridae

Pomacentridae

Pomacentridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae


Avg Min Max


% Freq

(n=6)


83.3

66.7

100.0

16.7

50.0

83.3

16.7

83.3

50.0

66.7

66.7

50.0

0.0

16.7

16.7

16.7


% Freq

(n=6)


83.3

33.3

100.0

33.3

50.0

66.7

0.0

83.3

0.0

83.3

50.0

66.7

16.7

0.0

0.0

0.0


No. of Fish Size

Total Avg. StDev Avg Min Max


5.2

1.5

32.0

0.8

1.3

2.5

0.5

3.5

0.7

0.8

1.5

1.2

0.0

0.2

0.2

0.2


8.2 6 12

9.5 10 12

3.8 2 6

9.0 5 12

14.0 7 21

15.5 10 22



16.9 10 22



25.9 7 40

18.7 17 20

17.6 12 21

18.0 18 18


7.2

6.5

4.3333

6

16.833

17.7

30

16.9

26.5

23

16.5

14.667



12

13

11


3.7 2.2

1.2 1.8

41.8 19.6

1.0 1.7

3.3 5.6

2.2 2.2

0.0 0.0

4.3 3.1

0.0 0.0

1.5 1.0

0.7 0.8

1.8 1.6

0.2 0.4

0.0 0.0

0.0 0.0

0.0 0.0











Appendix 2E (continued). Fish census data from Eagle Ray


Family


% Freq

(n=6)


Spring '02 Census
No. of Fish Size

Total Avg. StDev Avg Min Max


% Freq

(n=6)


Fall '02 Census
No. of Fish Size

Total Avg. StDev Avg Min Max


Serranus
tobaccofish tabacarius Serranidae 16.7 2 0.3 0.8 4 4 4 0.0 0 0.0 0.0 -
Serranus
harlequin bass tigrinus Serranidae 16.7 3 0.5 1.2 8 7 9 50.0 6 1.0 1.3 6.3 5 8
Calamus
jolthead porgy bajonado Sparidae 33.3 2 0.3 0.5 25.5 25 26 0.0 0 0.0 0.0 -
sharpnose C.,,"i0 .,,.
puffer rostrata Tetraodontidae 33.3 3 0.5 0.8 5.75 5 6 33.3 3 0.5 0.8 5.5 7 7


Total = 2156


Total = 2148


Common


Name


Species

















Common
Name


Species


ocean Acanthurus
surgeonfish bahianus
Acanthurus
doctorfish chirurgus
Acanthurus
blue tang coeruleus
Aulostomus
trumpetfish maculatus
orangespotted Cantherhines
filefish pullus
Melichthys
black durgon niger
barjack Caranx rubber
foureye Chaetodon
butterflyfish capistratus
fairy basslet Gramma loreto
Haemulon
caesar grunt carbonarium
smallmouth Haemulon
grunt chrysargyreum
Haemulon
french grunt flavolineatum
Haemulon
white grunt plumieri
bluestriped Haemulon
grunt sciurus
Holocentrus
squirrelfish adcensionis
longspine Holocentrus
squirrelfish rufus
blackbar Myripristis
soldierfish iacobus


Family


Acanthuridae

Acanthuridae

Acanthuridae

Aulostomidae

Monacanthidae

Balistidae
Carangidae

Chaetodontidae
Grammatidae

Haemulidae

Haemulidae

Haemulidae

Haemulidae

Haemulidae

Holocentridae

Holocentridae

Holocentridae


Appendix 2F. Fish census data from Cane Bay
Spring '02 Census


%
Freq

(n=6)


No. of Fish


Total


100.0 24

16.7 1

100.0 13

16.7 1

33.3 3

100.0 39
16.7 1

66.7 8
50.0 10


Avg. StDev Avg Min Max


%
Freq

(n=6)


4.0 1.1 14.7 10 20 100.0

0.2 0.4 15.0 15 15 50.0

2.2 0.4 15.8 10 20 66.7

0.2 0.4 35.0 35 35 0.0

0.5 0.8 12.8 12 14 33.3

6.5 6.4 22.0 12 28 100.0
0.2 0.4 17.0 17 17 83.3

1.3 1.0 11.3 8 15 50.0
1.7 2.1 2.7 1 3 66.7


0 0.0 0.0

0 0.0 0.0


50.0 I 20


- 33.3

- 16.7


3.3 6.7 I 13.5 12 15 I 66.7


0 0.0 0.0


16.7 3

16.7 1


- I 16.7


0.5 1.2 22.0 20 25 16.7

0.2 0.4 13.0 13 13 16.7


0 0.0 0.0


16.7 I 2


- I 16.7


0.3 0.8 I 15.0 15 15 I 33.3


Fall '02 Census


No. of Fish
Total Avg.
No. No.


29 4.8 2.2

5 0.8 1.0

10 1.7 1.6

0 0.0 0.0

3 0.5 0.9


2 0.3

2 0.3

13 2.2

1 0.2

4 0.7

3 0.5

1 0.2

5 0.8


Size


StDev Avg Min Max


16.0 11 20

17.0 15 20

15.3 11 18


I 15.5 14 16


6.7 22.7 13 30
1.5 22.0 12 30

1.0 9.7 8 10
4.6 4.0 2 5

0.5 21.5 18 25

0.9 14.5 14 15

2.2 16.0 12 20

0.4 18.0 18 18

1.6 24.0 20 25

1.3 18.0 16 20

0.4 15.0 15 15

1.7 17.0 15 20


(I I I I I I I

















Common
Name


Species


Family


longjaw Neoniphon
squirrelfish marianus Holocentridae
spanish
hogfish Bodianus rufus Labridae
Clepticus
creole wrasse parrae Labridae
yellowhead Halichoeres
wrasse garnoti Labridae
bluehead Thalassoma
wrasse bifasciatum Labridae
Lutjanus
schoolmaster apodus Lutjanidae
mahogany Lutjanus
snapper mahogoni Lutjanidae
yellow Mulloidichthys
goatfish martinicus Mullidae
spotted Lactophrys
trunkfish bicaudalis Ostraciidae
sergeant Abudefduf
major saxatilis Pomacentridae
blue chromis Chromis cyanea Pomacentridae
brown Chromis
chromis multilineata Pomacentridae
yellowtail Microspathodon
damselfish chrysurus Pomacentridae
Stegastes
dusky adustus (S.
damselfish fuscus) Pomacentridae
Stegastes
beaugregory leucostictus Pomacentridae
bicolor Stegastes
damselfish partitus Pomacentridae


Appendix 2F (continued). Fish census data from Cane Bay
Spring '02 Census


%
Freq

(n=6)

0.0

50.0

66.7

66.7

100.0

0.0

0.0

33.3

0.0

83.3
100.0

100.0

83.3


100.0

0.0

100.0


No. of Fish


Total Avg. StDev


0.0

0.5

51.8

1.7

120.3

0.0

0.0

0.8

0.0

1.7
113.7

150.2

2.0


8.0

0.0

37.8


0.0

0.5

84.9

1.6

43.5

0.0

0.0

1.3

0.0

1.0
79.0

101.7

1.1


5.3

0.0

14.0


Avg Min Max


19.7 17

7.0 1

8.0 5

2.3 1


16.8 12 22


8.2 5 12


%
Freq


(n=6)

16.7

33.3

50.0

66.7

100.0

50.0

33.3

50.0

16.7

83.3
100.0

83.3

83.3


100.0

16.7

100.0


Fall '02 Census

No. of Fish
Total Avg.


StDev Avg Min Max


1

2

2332

24

600

5

4

12

1

13
642

1170

13


36

1

285


0.2

0.3

388.7

4.0

100.0

0.8

0.7

2.0

0.2

2.2
107.0

195.0

2.2


6.0

0.2

47.5


0.4

0.5

463.4

4.3

91.0

1.0

1.3

3.4

0.4

2.1
62.3

126.2

1.2


2.8

0.4

26.0


13.0 13

25.0 20

4.0 2

6.1 4

4.4 2

36.2 30

19.5 18

17.0 12

18.0 18

13.0 10
5.0 2

5.2 2

13.3 4


9.8 5

7.0 7

4.5 2


Size


















Species


Family


Common
Name
threespot
damselfish
striped
parrotfish
princess
parrotfish
queen
parrotfish
redband
parrotfish
stoplight
parrotfish

graysby

coney

black hamlet
harlequin
bass
sharpnose
puffer


Appendix 2F (continued). Fish census data from Cane Bay
Spring '02 Census


% Freq

(n=6)

50.0

0.0

100.0

16.7

83.3

50.0

33.3

50.0

0.0

0.0

16.7


No. of Fish


Total


Avg. StDev Avg Min Max


1.7 2.0

0.0 0.0

3.0 1.1

0.2 0.4

3.3 2.3

0.8 1.2

0.3 0.5

1.0 1.1

0.0 0.0

0.0 0.0

0.2 0.4


5.7 3 10



16.9 10 22

32.0 32 32

17.4 7 24

20.7 6 35

20.0 18 22

14.8 12 18


Stegastes
planifrons Pomacentridae
Scarus iserti (S.
croicensis) Scaridae
Scarus
taeniopterus Scaridae

Scarus vetula Scaridae
Sparisoma
aurofrenatum Scaridae
Sparisoma
viride Scaridae
Cephalopholis
cruentatus Serranidae
Cephalopholis
fulvus Serranidae
Hypoplectrus
nigricans Serranidae
Serranus
;1,., ,11, Serranidae

rostrata Tetraodontidae


% Freq

(n=6)

66.7

50.0

83.3

0.0

66.7

83.3

83.3

50.0

50.0

16.7

33.3


Fall '02 Census
No. of Fish


Total Avg.
No. No.


StDev

5.4

2.4

3.2

0.0

1.6

2.3

0.8

1.2

0.5

0.4

1.1


Avg Min Max

7.3 3 11

8.7 5 25

19.3 5 30



16.8 10 30

27.0 5 35

18.3 15 23

17.0 15 20

9.0 6 12

6.0 6 6

5.5 4 7


Total = 3120


6.0 6 6


Total = 5443













Appendix 2G. Fish census data from Sprat Hole


Species Name


ocean Acanthurus
surgeonfish bahianus
Acanthurus
blue tang coeruleus
Aulostomus
trumpetfish maculatus
Caranx crysos
blue runner (C. fusus)
barjack Caranx ruber
foureye Chaetodon
butterflyfish capistratus
yellowfin
mojarra Gerres cinereus
fairy basslet Gramma loreto
Haemulon
caesar grunt carbonarium
Haemulon
french grunt flavolineatum
Holocentrus
squirrelfish adcensionis
blackbar Myripristis
soldierfish jacobus
spanish
hogfish Bodianus rufus
creole Clepticus
wrasse parrae
yellowhead Halichoeres
wrasse garnoti
clown Halichoeres
wrasse maculipinna
bluehead Thalassoma
wrasse bifasciatum


Common
Name


Scoring '02 Census


Fall '02 Census


_______________ r r + r r


Family

Acanthuridae

Acanthuridae

Aulostomidae

Carangidae
Carangidae

Chaetodontidae

Gerreidae
Grammatidae

Haemulidae

Haemulidae

Holocentridae

Holocentridae

Labridae

Labridae

Labridae

Labridae

Labridae


No. of Fish


Total Avg. StDev Avg Min Max


%
Freq

(n=6)

83.3

83.3

16.7

0.0
33.3

33.3

16.7
16.7

16.7

66.7

16.7

83.3

16.7

100.0

83.3

0.0

83.3


16 2.7 2.1

15 2.5 1.5

1 0.2 0.4

0 0.0 0.0
5 0.8 1.6

4 0.7 1.0

2 0.3 0.8
1 0.2 0.4

2 0.3 0.8

7 1.2 1.2

1 0.2 0.4

16 2.7 2.9

1 0.2 0.4

1467 244.5 252.7

100 16.7 31.3

0 0.0 0.0

650 108.3 79.6


% Freq

(n=6)

83.3

83.3

50.0

16.7
16.7

83.3

0.0
50.0

0.0

66.7

0.0

50.0

50.0

66.7

66.7

16.7

83.3


No. of Fish


Total Avg. StDev Avg Min Max


15.1 12

14.4 10

50.0 50


28.0 26

9.0 7

18.5 17
2.0 2

17.5 15

15.5 14

17.0 17

14.2 10

22.0 22

5.5 1

6.3 2



2.7 1


2.3 2.3

1.5 1.0

0.5 0.5

0.2 0.4
0.3 0.8

1.7 0.8

0.0 0.0
0.8 1.0

0.0 0.0

0.8 0.8

0.0 0.0

2.0 2.3

1.0 1.3

114.2 240.1

3.2 3.0

0.2 0.4

54.2 31.8


15.1 12

16.8 15

24.7 15

30.0 30
21.0 20

9.6 7


4.0 3


17.0 15



15.7 14

15.2 5

9.0 2

7.6 4

11.0 11

4.0 2

















Common
Name
mutton


Species Name Family


snapper Lutjanus analis Lutjanidae
Lutjanus
schoolmaster apodus Lutjanidae
mahogany Lutjanus
snapper mahogoni Lutjanidae
Malacanthus
sand tilefish plumieri Malacanthidae
yellow Mulloidichthys
goatfish martinicus Mullidae
spotted Gymnothorax
moray moringa Muraenidae
honeycomb Acanthostracion
cowfish ploygonia Ostraciidae
smooth Lactophrys
trunkfish triqueter Ostraciidae
Holacanthus
rock beauty tricolor Pomacanthidae
sergeant Abudefduf
major saxatilis Pomacentridae
blue chromis Chromis cyanea Pomacentridae
brown Chromis
chromis multilineata Pomacentridae
yellowtail Microspathodon
damselfish chrysurus Pomacentridae
Stegastes
dusky adustus (S.
damselfish fuscus) Pomacentridae
bicolor Stegastes
damselfish partitus Pomacentridae
threespot Stegastes
damselfish planifrons Pomacentridae


Appendix 2G (continued). Fish census data from Sprat Hole
Spring '02 Census


No. of Fish Size


%
Freq

(n=6)

0.0

16.7

66.7

16.7

33.3

0.0

16.7

0.0

33.3

16.7
100.0

100.0

16.7


83.3

100.0

100.0


Avg Min Max


47.0 40 55

16.3 10 20

40.0 40 40

14.0 12 16



30.0 30 30



13.5 12 15


Total Avg. StDev

0 0.0 0.0

2 0.3 0.8

20 3.3 5.0

1 0.2 0.4

6 1.0 2.0

0 0.0 0.0

1 0.2 0.4

0 0.0 0.0

2 0.3 0.5

2 0.3 0.8
800 133.3 48.9

701 116.8 32.0

2 0.3 0.8


29 4.8 3.8

235 39.2 13.6

101 16.8 5.7


4.5 1 7

10.0 10 10


6.4 4 10

4.1 1 6

5.5 3 8


%
Freq

(n=6)


16.7

16.7

100.0

0.0

50.0

16.7

0.0

16.7

50.0

0.0
100.0

83.3

0.0


66.7

100.0

83.3


Fall '02 Census


No. of Fish


Total Avg.


1 0.2 0.4

1 0.2 0.4

20 3.3 1.6

0 0.0 0.0

127 21.2 31.2

1 0.2 0.4

0 0.0 0.0

1 0.2 0.4

4 0.7 0.8

0 0.0 0.0
789 131.5 61.9

650 108.3 70.3

0 0.0 0.0


26 4.3 4.4

397 66.2 29.6

70 11.7 9.2


Size


StDev Avg Min Max


38.0 38 38

40.0 40 40

20.3 15 25



14.3 10 24

60.0 60 60



10.0 10 10

18.7 15 22


4.7 2 9

4.8 2 8




10.3 7 15

4.5 2 10

8.2 4 15


13.0 13
2.8 1
















Common
Name Soecies Name Family


cocoa Stegastes
damselfish variabilis
striped Scarus iserti (S.
parrotfish croicensis)


princess
parrotfish
queen
parrotfish
redband
parrotfish
stoplight
parrotfish

graysby

coney
yellowtail
hamlet

shy hamlet

black hamlet
barred
hamlet
harlequin
bass

sand diver
sharpnose
puffer


Scarus
taeniopterus

Scarus vetula
Sparisoma
aurofrenatum
Sparisoma
viride
Cephalopholis
cruentatus
Cephalopholis
fulvus
Hypoplectrus
chlorurus
Hypoplectrus
guttavarius
Hypoplectrus
nigricans
Hypoplectrus
puella
Serranus
tigrinus
Synodus
intermedius

rostrata


porcupinefish Diodon hystrix


Pomacentridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Scaridae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Serranidae

Synodontidae

Tetraodontidae
Tetraodontidae


Appendix 2G (continued). Fish census data from Sprat Hole
Spring '02 Census Fall '02 Census


%/Freq

(n=6)


No. of Fish


Total Ave. StDev


Ave Min


Max


% Freq

(n=6)


No. of Fish


Total Ave.


StDev I Av Min Max


I '4 4 + '


16.7

100.0

66.7

100.0

100.0

66.7

16.7

0

16.7

0.0

33.3

16.7

0.0

33.3
0.0


1 0.2 0.4

4 0.7 1.6

46 7.7 5.0

10 1.7 1.5

41 6.8 1.9

13 2.2 0.8

9 1.5 1.4

4 0.7 1.6

0 0.0 0.0

1 0.2 0.4

0 0.0 0.0

3 0.5 0.8

1 0.2 0.4

0 0.0 0.0

3 0.5 0.8
0 0.0 0.0


5.0

5.0

17.2

26.8

16.2

21.6

14.9

17.0


8.0 8



13.5 10

10.0 10


4.2 3 5


0.0

83.3

100.0

33.3

83.3

66.7

66.7

66.7

16.7

0.0

50.0

16.7

33.3

16.7

50.0
16.7


0.0

2.7

4.0

0.5

2.7

2.6

1.0

1.5

0.8

0.0

0.5

0.4

0.5

0.4

1.3


2 0.3


11.6 4

18.6 5

27.5 25

16.0 3

13.5 4

16.5 10

16.1 8

9.0 8



10.0 9

10.0 10

7.0 6

32.0 32

4.5 4


0.8 1 35.0 35


Total = 3319


Total= 4326




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