Group Title: Environmental teaching plans
Title: Bugs about insects
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300920/00073
 Material Information
Title: Bugs about insects
Series Title: Environmental teaching plans
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: St. Croix Environmental Education Team
Publisher: Division of Fish and Wildlife
Place of Publication: Frederiksted, VI
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA01300920
Volume ID: VID00073
Source Institution: University of the Virgin Islands
Holding Location: University of the Virgin Islands
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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BUGS ABOUT INSECTS


Author: Eulalie R. Rivera Elementary School
Environmental Education Team

Grade Level: 5-8


Concepts: Disciplines:
2. Ecosystem 1. Science
3. Carrying Capacity
10. Economic Gains

Objective:
Students will discover some of the great variation in insects by collecting and
observing insects residing in major habitat types.

Students will use various methods for collecting insects which ,~ill expose for
them habitats in which insects live.

Students will note variation in detail within the common body plan for insects
by describing different insects of interest.

Rationale:
Insects comprise over one half the kinds of living things found on earth. They
are the dominant species in every habitat but salt water. Man's existence is
profoundly affected by insects: mosquitoes, fleas, lice, etc., feed directly
on man, ,which has spread the plague, typhus, malaria and yellow fever over the
ages.

Insects compete with man for food by eating his crops. Most insects don't
concern man at all and many are helpful. They produce honey, pollinate crops,
produce silk to name a few benefits.

Materials Needed:
Collecting jars, sweep nets, beating sheet, insect sieve, pinning materials;
aquatic nets, identification books, (Peterson Guide to Insects, Peterson Guide
to Butterflies, How to Know the Insects, How to Know the Immature Insects, How
to Know the Beetles, How to Know the Grasshoppers, Pond Life Golden Guides,
Golden Guide to Butterflies and Moths, plus several books on insect natural
history), clipboards, can traps, trowels, white enamel pans, hand lens.
Copies of study sheet, pencils, bait (sugar syrup or molasses, bits of meat.)


Title:











BUGS ABOUT INSECTS


BUGS ABOUT INSECTS


STRIP OF COTTON FABRIC SOAKED IN
SYRUP MOLASSES MIXTURE


ATTACH PREPARED
STRIP TO TREE


INSECT GRABBER
Purpose: To attract and catch a variety of insects for observation.

Materials: Strips of cloth, tack, different baits.

Procedure: 1. Cut several strips of cloth from an old sheet.

2. Dip these strips into different baits. such as syrup, sugar
Water, molasses mixture, or honey. Also try smearing jelly
or other such substances into cloth.

3. Tack these strips to various trees in an area which you are
sampling. Try placing them in a bush, beside a stream, by a
light bulb at night, or over water.













E.T.
BUGS


ABOUT INSECTS

BUGS ABOUT INSECTS


INSECT NET











WOOD SHOOT TO
MAKE HOOP


WOOD HANDLE
4 FT. LONG


SAMPLING SCREEN


Materials needed: dowels (2), stapler,
screen (2'x2')












Place dowels on floor parallel to each other
approximately 2 feet apart. Place screen
betz.een them. .'rap screen around dowels
and staple.


FINE MESH NETTING













E.T.
BUGS ABOUT INSECTS

Background Information to Teachers:

There are more than one million species of insects on earth occupying most
habitat areas except the open ocean. All are members of local food chains
and significant food sources to various predatory animal forms. Many are
directly beneficial to man such as the bees and butterflies which pollinate
many crops.

Some insects are harmful to man, mostly because man has set up ideal habitat
conditions for their needs or has destroyed natural predators. Some are highly
irritating to us, however, they fit into natural food chains; like mosquitoes
which are an important food to birds and lizards. Some are carriers of disease
such as dengue fever, intestinal parasites, etc. The elm bark beetle carries
the Dutch elm disease which has killed many trees in the United States.

Most insects are neutral to man's interest but play some key role in the living
community in which each resides. Each has a niche or place in the community.
We should learn more about insects, their variety and their ecological function.
We must learn to respect their place in the environment and learn the most
ecologically sound way to reduce the impact of those insects seriously harmful
to man.

Directions/Activity:
Permit students to find as many insect types as possible. Demand that insects
be released except those you wish to kill and take back to the classroom for
mounting.

Insects may be killed at the laboratory by using a few crystals of moth balls
or ice in the cotton filled sections of the collecting jars.

Bees pollinating flowers usually do not sting unless greatly disturbed.
Nevertheless, request that students use caution. Keep allergic children away
from areas where bees are active.











BUGS ABOUT INSECTS


USE NO. 10 CAN OR WIDE MOUTHED
GLASS JAR














RAIN COVER


USE BOTH SOLID
(SWEET) AND
SOLID (MEAT)
BAIT


INSECT TRAP
Materials: No. 10 can or wide-mouth glass jar, scrap wood, bait.

Procedure: 1. Dig a hole to accommodate can or jar
2. Set container in hole so that the mouth is flush with the soil.
3. Bait trap with either a solid sweet bait such as a candy bar or sugar cube,
or a solid meat bait
4. Place a scrap piece of wood over trap to protect from rain and keep small
mammals out. Raise lid slightly with supports on two ends so that beetles can
reach the trap.
5. Check trap occasionally, removing trapped insects.


-J- :
'- : .~.. . , ' `
3':-"
-e:i ~,
.~..













E.T.
BUGS AROUT INSECTS

I. Pre-Trip Activities:

A. Make drawings of the basic body plan of an insect.

B. Learn about eight important groups of insects (orders).

C. How many legs do insects have, how many wings?

D. List the different types of insects of which you can think.

E. How do insects help man?

F. What insects are harmful to man?

G. What insects are neutral to man normally?

H. What do insects eat?

I. What can you find out about insect life styles?

J. What are "grubs", larvae, pupae, cocoons?

K. Investigate the world of social insects such as bees and ants.


II. Field Activity:

Team Organization: Students should be organized into teams-of three.
One net and one catching jar will be assigned to each team, also one
clipboard and field sheet and five tin cans, bait, and one hand trowel.











E .T.
Name

BUGS ABOUT INSECTS

STUDY GUIDE

A. Insect Trapline

Teams ,will set out five tin can traps ,with a small amount of bait in each can.
Locate the traps in different habitats. With a trowel dig a hole, set the baited
can in the ground so that the top is level with the ground and leave the trap
until later.

If staying overnight, set traps in the evening. If coming for all day, set traps
early in the day and collect them before leaving.

Set traps in woods, in rotten wood or stump, under bushes, in the open field.
Note the following information when you collect the trap.


CAN #1 Habitat

Number of insects in the can

Number of insect types in can

Describe one insect


CAN #2 Habitat

Number of insects in the can

Number of insect types in can

Describe one insect


CAN #3 Habitat

Number of insects in the can

Number of insect types in can

Describe one insect


CAN #4 Habitat

Number of insects in the can

Numher of insect types in can

Describe one insect











BUGS ABOUT INSECTS


CAN #5 Habitat

Number of insects in the can

Number of insect types in can

Describe one insect


Count the total number and types of each insect. Select one of each type and
place in collecting jar. Release all other insects. Take collecting jar to your
teacher to show the variety you have found. The teacher may select insects for
mounting in the laboratory or classroom.


B. Each team will use the "sweep net" to catch insects on and around the
vegetation. Do not chase after butterflies. Watch for sitting insects and sneak
up on them with the net. Use the net properly by sweeping it through the grass.
Have the instructor demonstrate the proper use of a sweep net. Protect the net
from damage by sharp twigs, etc.

1. Meadow Habitat

For five minutes, "sweep" the net through the grass and around flowering plants.
Be careful of bees, wasps, etc. You may select one insect of each type to place
in the collecting jar. Count the number of insects of each type captured.
Release all other insects.

Bees Butterflies Dragonflies

Mosquitoes Jack Spaniard Beetles

Flies Leaf Hoppers Grasshoppers

Crickets Moths Other


True Bugs (Hemiptera)


Lace Wings


Other











BUGS ABOUT INSECTS
2. Brush and Wood Habitat

Go to a brushy wooded area and again "sweep" the vegetation for a short time.
Count the number of insects of each type.
Select one of each type to place in the collecting jar and
release all others. Be careful not to damage the net.
Bees Butterflies Dragonflies


Mosquitoes

Flies

Crickets

Lace Wings


Jack Spaniard

Leaf Hoppers

Moths


Other


Beetles


Grasshoppers

Other


True Bugs (Hemiptera)


3. Waterbugging
DO NOT USE WEEP NETS IN WATER
Use an aquatic dip net at the edge of a pond. Collect samples of
and insect larvae. Note the kinds of insects found. Insects have
Larvae may have six legs or may not have apparent legs. You will
which are not insects. Stay alert. Sample insects may be kept in
enamel pans. Release all other back into the water.


Dragonflies


Dragonfly Larvae

Springtails

Water Boatmen


aquatic insects
six legs.
find animals
water in the


Water Striders

Giant Water Bug

Back Swimmers

Mosquito Larvae


D. Beating About the Bush
Using the beating net, one team may place the white sheet under a bush or low
tree and beat the leaves with sticks. Insects will fall into the white sheet.
They should be quickly picked from the sheet and placed in the collecting jar.
Release all but one of each type.

Number of types of insects

Describe carefully two insects you have found in this exercise

#1















E. Bugs in the Woodwork


Option: The teacher may wish to use the exercise Nature's Recycling
System for a more complete study of wood decomposing animals.

In an area where old logs and stumps are on the ground, probe with your trowel
for examples of different types of wood rotting insects and their larvae. Stay
alert. You will find many non-insect animals.

How many types of animals did you find?

Describe two insects found in this exercise.

#1


F. Dirt Bugs
One team vlill use a trowel or small shovel to search for insects inhabiting the
soil. From a likely area dig soil down about 3-4 inches. Sift it through the
insect sieve, identify and count the insects of each different type. Try a
grassy area, pond edge, soil at the edge of the rain forest, and a place where
there is leaf litter. Place one insect of each type in the collecting jar.
Release all others.

Habitats Sampled


Number or insect types found

Describe two insect types

# 1











BUGS ABOUT INSECTS

G. Counting Up
Turn your collection over to the teacher. Teams will check each collecting jar
to view the variety of insect types collected. Try to determine how many kinds
of insects were found today.

Number of insect types found

The teacher may select insects to be taken back to the classroom. If they must
be killed for mounting, use moth balls as a killing agent.

If there is time, students may mount killed insects by pinning them and placing
them on a spreading board. This is a good exercise for a small number of
students.

Students may more carefully observe collected insects in the classroom using a
hand lens, microscopes, and insect books.

H. Habitat Review
Discuss back in class.

Pond
1. Why do some insects live within certain areas of a pond?

2. Are some insects found in all areas of a pond?

3. What are jobs or functions of insects in a pond community?

4. Are the pond insects dependent on each other?

5. Why are some insects in a pond more numerous than others?

Meadow
1. Why do certain insects live in certain areas of the meadow?

2. What attracts bees to the meadow?

3. What are the jobs or functions of the meadow insects?

4. How does the false coffee insect gall complete its life cycle?

5. Which insects are most numerous in the meadow and why?


Forest
1. Are the insects of the forest and meadow all the same?

2. Does the forest cover provide more protection than the meadow?

3. What is the primary job of the wood dwelling insects?

4. Are there more poor flyers in the woods than in the meadow?












Soil
1. How are the insects different from those in the meadow and forest?

2. What do insects do in the soil community?

3. Why would you find more insects in one soil type than another?


III. Post Trip Activities:


1. Investigate the ecological role of insects. Build food chains involving
insects in the wild.

2. Investigate how agriculture has created good breeding conditions for pest
insects.

3. Find out about natural methods of insect control.

4. Investigate pesticide safety for farm operators.

5. Mount and exhibit the variety of insects collected during your
field studies.

6. Read a book about insects and their habits.

7. Invite an entomologist from USDA to talk to the class.




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