Group Title: Environmental teaching plans
Title: What are these garbled words?
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300920/00050
 Material Information
Title: What are these garbled words?
Series Title: Environmental teaching plans
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: St. Croix Environmental Education Team
Publisher: Division of Fish and Wildlife
Place of Publication: Frederiksted, VI
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA01300920
Volume ID: VID00050
Source Institution: University of the Virgin Islands
Holding Location: University of the Virgin Islands
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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E.T.
E.T.- A LOCAL WAY OF LEARNING


E-50


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WHAT ARE THESE GARBLED WORDS

Eulalie R. Rivera Elementary School
Environmental Education Team

3-6


Disciplines:
1.Language Arts
2.Science


Objective:

Following a quick review of DCCA Fact Sheet No. 4, students will correctly
identify the seven shoreline and marine associations of the Virgin Islands as
evidenced by the completion of the activity sheet.

Directions:

1. Distribute the DCCA Environmental Fact Sheet No. 4; allow 5-10 minutes for
review. Or, teacher may discuss the information on the Fact Sheet, with board
illustrations or a transparency.

2. Collect the Fact Sheet, or after discussion, distribute the Activity Sheet;
allow 10-15 minutes for completion.

3. Review, performance, with explanations as necessary.

4. Review importance to Island environment of such as salt ponds, mangroves,
reefs.

Resources:

Shoreline and Marine Associations of the Virgin Islands, DCCA Environmental Fact
Sheet No. 4:


Title:

Author:


Grade Level:

Concepts:
2.Ecosystem











E.T. Name:

School:
WHAT ARE TIIESE CAR BLED WORDS?

HOYSREOKLIRCNEI POLTNDSA ACHBE RONGVEMA SBASEDGR EFRE \'I!I.uI.CAOFRE

1. Look at the shoreline and marine areas included in areas between vertical dash lines for clues.

2. Unscramble the words or terms above and print the correct words or term in the block within the appropriate
dash lines.


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____ __ ____.


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E.T.
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DCCA ENVIRONMENTAL FACT SHEET NO. 4
SHORELINE AND MARINE ASSOCIATIONS
OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS




There are seven basic types of shoreline and marine habitats in the
Virgin Islands: rocky shorelines, salt ponds, beaches, mangroves, grass beds,
reefs, and off- shore cays. These natural systems, separately and in
combination, perform countless valuable functions for man at no cost, drawing
energy from the sun. They buffer storm winds and waves, stabilize and protect
the shoreline with its expensive man-made infrastructure and facilities, purify
water and offer an immense variety of diverse vistas and interesting wildlife
and vegetation. These habitats and their associated processes support the
safety, health, and welfare of every Virgin Island rids resident. Appropriate
resource protection and management are imperative to maintain natural
productivity, aesthetic and recreational values, as well as to preserve options
for future generations.

Each of those seven habitats are discussed in separate handouts.
However, they are rarely found in isolation. They are generally associated in
various combinations. Below are three of the most common associations, along a
fourth association which is man-made.


Rocky Shoreline Associations


Cactus-Agave Scrub

Shoreline vegetation tolerant
of salt and drying. Soil thin.


Coral Community

Bedrock and boulder
substrate. Corals near
surface. Sea fans, sea
whips deeper


Sea Grass and Algae

Sand layer thin nearshore
deepening offshore grading
to grass or algae bed


Island Resources Foundation, The Virgin Islands Marine Environment, V. I.
Coastal Zone Management Program, Technical Supplement No. 1, 1976 (Editor:
Marsha McLaughlin, Policy and Planning Unit, DCCA. Further info.: Environmental
Specialist, DCZM).


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Sand Beach-Grass Beds-Salt Pond-Reef Associations


SALT POND BEACH


Traps runoff, sediment,
pollutants. Controls
drainage


Dune Berm Foreshore

Recreational sites. Vegetations
stabilizes shore. Berm and foreshore
constantly changing in "dynamic
equilibrium". Filters water leaving the
land,


SEA GRASS BED

Stabilizes sand. Provides
oxygen Assimilates waste.
Feeds and shelters diverse
biota.


Mangrove-Lagoon-Reef Associations


ANGROV SEA GRASS
SHORELINE FLAT

led IQuiet water,
nangroves silty sand
award sediment,
lack and thick sea
vhite grass growth
nangroves abundant
andwai~rd tea life


MANGROVE CAY

Trapped sediments and
mangrove roots. Larger
cays with mangrove
zonation and terrestrial
vegetation. Wildlife
sanctuary


BACK REEF FLATS

Sea grass, algae,
scattered corals, clean
sand, reef rubble.


L, .. .... wave proueciiin.
f raps Sand production.
sediment
-xpanding
shoreline














Man-made Shoreline and Structures


DEVELOPED SHORELINE

Heavy use, altered drainage,
high proportion of impervious
surface, vegetation cleared,
high runoff, pollution sources


STRESSED BAY

Heavy use, increased turbidity, silty bottom, reduced
bottom diversity and productivity, possible
phytoplankton blooms, boats disturb bottom,
contribute hydrocarbons, heavy metals, sewage.
Structures may reduce circulation. Often require
maintenance dredging.


E-50


REEF

Protects shore
from waves and
swells. Sand and
biological
production high.


SALT POND

Traps runoff
Black and white
mangroves
landward.


FRINGING REEF

Typically Acropora
near surface.
Gorgon corals, sea
fans, etc. seaward
Finger coral
landward.
Abundant sea life.


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