Group Title: Environmental teaching plans
Title: Uses of Cassava
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300920/00033
 Material Information
Title: Uses of Cassava
Series Title: Environmental teaching plans
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: St. Croix Environmental Education Team
Publisher: Division of Fish and Wildlife
Place of Publication: Frederiksted, VI
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA01300920
Volume ID: VID00033
Source Institution: University of the Virgin Islands
Holding Location: University of the Virgin Islands
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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E. T. -A LOCAL WAY OF LEARNING


USES OF CASSAVA

Leona Iles Williams
Eulalie R. Rivera Elementary School

3


Concepts:
1. The Sun
6. Natural Resources


Disciplines:
1.Social Studies
2.Health
3.Science


Objective:


Student shall demonstrate the
starch for clothing.


uses of Cassava to make bread for food and to make


Student shall research modern "no iron" clothing products and. compare them with
pure cotton cloth which lacks body.

Student shall explain the presence of sugar and starch in plants and roots as
the result of photosynthesis; and identify carbohydrates as one of the four food
groups.

Rationale:

In the West Indies, knowing one's roots is more than just being familiar with
the family tree, it's a culinary experience. Roots in the tropics are what
grains are to the northern climates an important source of carbohydrates. The
Cassava root (bong bong in the B.V.I.) is an all purpose starchy vegetable used
similarly to the white potatoes Products from Cassava are flour, starch,
tapioca, glucose, alcohol and paper pulp.

Cassava comes in two varieties, sweet and bitter, (the bitter is poisonous until
cooked). Amerindians in Surinam today make bread from the flour as a diet
staple, and an alcoholic beverage from the juice.

Materials Needed:


Cassava root
Knife
Grater
Towel or cloth
Pans


Swatch of cotton-dacron or other blend textile
Swatch of pure cotton cloth
Iron


Directions/Activity:

Teach or review photosynthesis as the way in which radiant energy is transformed
into chemical energy, i.e., sugar or starch.

Teach or review the place of carbohydrates in the four basic food groups: i.e.,
the grains and roots and their products.


Title:

Author:


Grade Level:


E-33















USES OF CASSAVA



Wash and peel a cassava root and grate it with a fine grater. Cover the grated
Root with water and soak overnight.

Pour the grated cassava and water mixture through a fine strainer or thin cloth
or towel. Squeeze the liquid out and let it stand overnight.

Pour off the liquid; the starch will settle to the bottom of the container. Let
it dry for a few days.(This starch is what people used to starch their clothes).
Mix the dry starch with water and dip garment (or swatch) into the mixture. Iron
while slightly damp.

The grated meal which is left in the towel or cloth is the flour used for food,
according to the following recipe:

Cassava Bread

Fresh meal is pressed into thin cakes and baked on hot plates.

Cassava Biscuits Barbados

1 lb. sweet cassava, grated
4 T butter, softened
4 T lard
1/2 cup sugar
1 egg
1 1/2 cups finely grated coconut
2 cups flour
1 t double acting baking powder

Cream butter, lard and sugar together. Beat in egg and cassava and coconut.
Combine flour and baking powder.
Add about 1/2 cup at a time to creamed mixture, knead with hands and form into a
circle about 1/4 inch thick. Use biscuit cutter and cut 2 inch rounds.
Place I inch apart on ungreased baking sheets. Bake at 4000 for 20 minutes or
until
firm to the touch and golden brown. Serve at once.

References:

The Cooking of the Caribbean Islands by Linda Wolfe
Native Recipes by the College of the Virgin Islands
"Island Foods" by Claudia Colli, Virgin Islander, July, 1980.


E.T.


E-33




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