Group Title: Environmental teaching plans
Title: Sun dried fruit
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300920/00025
 Material Information
Title: Sun dried fruit
Series Title: Environmental teaching plans
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: St. Croix Environmental Education Team
Publisher: Division of Fish and Wildlife
Place of Publication: Frederiksted, VI
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA01300920
Volume ID: VID00025
Source Institution: University of the Virgin Islands
Holding Location: University of the Virgin Islands
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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E.T. A LOCAL WAY OF LEARNING


Title:
AUTHOR:


Grade Level:


Concepts:
1. Sun Energy
6. Natural Resources


SUN DRIED FRUIT
Jane Ducey
Eulalie R. Rivera Elementary School


Disciplines:
1. Social Studies
2. Science


Objective:

Using several alternative techniques, students will dry fruit using the heat of sun energy as a means of
preserving such food resources for future use.

Rationale:

Tropical fruit has limited keeping capacity. When the fruit ripens there is more than can be consumed.
Drying fruit preserves it for a time, avoiding waste, and provides a healthy snack- type food. Preservation
can be extended by freezing the dried fruit.

Materials Needed:

Ripe banana, papaya, pineapple; window screening, cardboards, aluminum foil, shallow box or wood frame.

Directions/Activity:

There probably are as many ways of drying fruit as there are ingenious people, but the following are three
variations on a theme.

1.The simplest method is to place the sliced fruit between two pieces of window screen and expose this to
the sun. Pineapple in thick slices can be placed directly on the screen; soft fruits like papaya and banana do
better the first day with aluminum foil under the pieces of fruit. The assembly should be placed or moved so
that it is always in full sunlight.
Cover Screen




Bottom
Screen
Layer


E-25







2. Another method is to cover a piece of cardboard with foil, on which the fruit slices are placed, cover with
a screen and place in sunlight. There is less ventilation, but foil reflects heat well to dry the fruit. Placing
this on car top will add to sun reflection.



Screen cover


O Cardboard
0O with foil
ooi




3 A shallow box or wood frame assembly that has a glass cover and screen bottom, placed above ground
for ventilation, become a permanent, more protected rig for drying fruit. The glass intensifies heat-drying
cover capacity of the sun.


Glass cover


bottom


NOTES:

1. Usual time required for drying fruit is 2-3 days, depending on degree of desiccation preferred.

2. As long as the fruit is in the hot sun, bugs will not disturb it.

3. If it rains, or is cloudy while the process is on, use an oven to save your endeavor.


Questions for Discussion:

1. How did this activity show that heat is a form of sun energy?

2. What other things could we do to use sun energy more effectively?

3. In general, how are some other foods preserved to last a long time after harvest?

4. How was food preserved many years ago?




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