Group Title: Environmental teaching plans
Title: Leaf people
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300920/00007
 Material Information
Title: Leaf people
Series Title: Environmental teaching plans
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: St. Croix Environmental Education Team
Publisher: Division of Fish and Wildlife
Place of Publication: Frederiksted, VI
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA01300920
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of the Virgin Islands
Holding Location: University of the Virgin Islands
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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E.T. A LOCAL WAY OF LEARNING


Title: LEAF PEOPLE
Author: Ruth Emery, Eulalie R. Rivera
Grade Level: K-2

Concepts: Disciplines:
2. Ecosystems 1. Social Studies
6. Resources 2. Science
3. Art
Objective:

Children shall identify various native leaves, noting size, color, and shape of each individual
leaf as well as observing the leaf vein structure made visible through an artistic experience.

Rationale:

With the swing from natural papaya leaves to bottled meat tenderizer in the present day home,
the importance of keeping alive familiarity with native Plants increases. Skills of close
observation, classification, as well as manual dexterity can be sharpened in an artistic activity.

Materials Needed:

Various types of native leaves. Several colors of large flat crayons with outside paper
removed. Sheets of thin white paper.

Directions/Activity:

Take children on a nature walk observing the many types of native shrubs, plants, bushes and
trees. Flamboyant, papaya, pigeon pea, tan tan, tibet, lime, sugar cane are among the few the
children may expect to see. Try to identify as many different types as possible. Children, with
adult supervision, may pick no more than two leaves from each tree or find fresh leaves that
have fallen from the tree.

Upon returning to the classroom, discuss the size, shape, and color of each leaf. Discuss the
importance of leaves to all plant life (photosynthesis) in making, food for plant growth.

Give each child two or three different types of leaves, crayons, and paper. A direct impression
of the leaf may be made. Note the veins in the leaves. One side is relatively smooth; the other
side shows the veins more distinctly. Center the leaf with the vein side up on the desk; place
the white paper on top of the leaf. Shade with crayon on the top of the paper until the imprint
of the leaf comes through.

This leaf impression may serve as the "body" of a child's "leaf person." Legs, arms, head may
be added to the leaf pattern using the crayon. Use your imagination!







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