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Title: How-To-Do-It: A Booklet for Aliens
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 Material Information
Title: How-To-Do-It: A Booklet for Aliens
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: University of the Virgin Islands
Publisher: University of the Virgin Islands
Place of Publication: Virgin Islands
Publication Date: 2002
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA01300712
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of the Virgin Islands
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Preface
        Page 3
    Main
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Appendix
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
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COLLEGE OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


February 1, 1968
Dear Reader:

This book was prepared by the Implementation
Committee on the Alien Worker, as a means of acquainting
aliens, primarily British citizens -frdm "down islands, with
some of the procedures and regulations which pertain to
them here in the United States Virgin Islands. The book
came about in recognition of how hard it is for anyone who
comes here to find in one place all the rules and regula-
tions necessary for working and becoming a responsible
member of the community.

Moreover, whether having a temporary or permanent
status, aliens have rights and duties, and it is unwise to take
for granted a knowledge of these, rights and duties.

Behind this book is the idea that if aliens are assist-
ed in establishing themselves as members of the community,
there will be less friction between them and those people wh(
are already established, and there will be less reason for
anguish or dissatisfaction among themselves.

The research and writing was done under the directic
of the Committee by SOCIAL, EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND
DEVELOPMENT, INC. of Silver Spring, Maryland. This docu-
ment is part of the Alien Worker Program sponsored by the
College of the Virgin Islands with the assistance of a grant
of funds under the Title I of the Higher Education Act of 196,

Sincerely, ftsr. O 6 t4
Project Director, Title I
Community Service and
Continuing Education Programs

moxrar2 a ST. THOMAS VIRGIN ISLANDS ** *e


















I. Aliens-What, Who and Why ...................... 4
II. How Can An Alien Enter the U.S. Virgin Islands ? .. 4
III. How to Become a Bonded Alien ................................ 5
IV. Becoming a Permanent Resident Alien ............... 5
V. How to Get A Job As a Bonded Alien .................... 8
A. Employment Rights and Duties ................ 8
B H ow to G et a Job ......................... .................. 9
VI. What Kind of Housing is Available? ........................ 10
VII. Rights and Duties of Aliens ..................................... 10
VIII. Education ................. ....... ....... ........... 12
X I. W here to G et H elp ................................. ...... .... ... 13
Appendix I. Packet 3 .............................................. ... 14
Appendix II. Packet 4 ........... ................... ............ 21
Appendix III. Minimum Recruitment Wage Rates for
Some Jobs in the Virgin Islands .............. 26


Where to Find /t. 0 a











What This Booklet is ALL About...
This is a booklet for aliens in the United States Virgin
Islands. It has one purpose: to help aliens understand their
rights and responsibilities in the Virgin Islands.
This is a hoj.-to" booklet. It describes:
-how to get to the Virgin Islands
-what forms are necessary
-how to complete the required forms.
-the differences between a "bonded" alien and a
"permanent resident" alien
-how to become a permanent resident alien
-the social, job, and other rights of aliens


AND MANY OTHER THINGS...












IN TERMS OF CITIZENSHIP, WHAT KIND OF PEOPLE
ARE THERE IN THE UNITED STATES VIRGIN ISLANDS?






















SII. ... ....


II.


SUPPOSE YOUR HOME COUNTRY IS ANOTHER ISLAND. HOW CAN
YOU ENTER THE VIRGIN ISLANDS? THERE ARE FOUR WAYS.
1. "A Visitor's VISA." You may visit friends or relatives for up to three months.
You can apply at the United States Consulate in your home country. A visa
is not required for British Islands or several other Caribbean Islands. You
must be able to prove that your transportation to the U.S. Virgin Islands and
home is paid for. You should have a passport. You must show that you will
be self-supporting while here. If you come from the British Islands, the U.S.
Consulate is in Bridgetown, Barbados.
2. "Become a 'Bonded Alien.'" Find an employer in the U.S. Virgin Islands who
will hire you. He will help you get the necessary papers filled out. This report
describes on page 5 how this can be done.
S. "Become a Permanent Resident Alien." Pages 5 to 7 of this report tell you
how this can be done.
4. "Marriage to a U.S. Citizen or a Permanent Resident Alien."


I ALIENS: What, Who & Why


-LNDS


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III.


If you, your wife, a friend or a relative want to come to the United States
Virgin Islands and work and your home country or Island is not part of the
United States, what must be done? There are two basic things:
1. An employer must be willing to hire the person wishing to come to the Virgin
Islands.
2. A series of forms must be completed.
How to find a job is discussed in Section V; how to become a "bonded
alien is described here.
The employer usually starts these proceedings by doing these things:
1. He applies to the Virgin Islands Employment Securit, .\ Aclvi certifying
that he needs workers and cannot find citizens of the t'nted State. or per-
manent resident aliens to qualify.
2. The Virgin Islands Iaor Departmient reviews the employer's work standards.
3. The Virgin Islands Employment Security Agency then certifies that a job
with this employer is available.
4. The United States Immigration and Naturalization Service permits a worker
to enter the Islands.
The employer can ask the Immigration Service for a specific individual
alien or for an alien who can perform a certain kind of job.


IV.


i BEOMN A PEMNN REIET ALE I


If you are in the Virgin Islands as a "bonded" alien and you wish to apply
for permanent residency (that is, become an immigrant) in the United
States, here is what you must do:
As in the case of non-citizens becoming "bonded" aliens, for a
"bonded" alien to become a resident alien, the usual procedure is for the em-
ployer to start the process. This is done by the employer certifying to the
U.S. Department of Labor that the "bonded" alien has a permanent job.
This information is sent to the American Embassy located in the
alien's home country. In the case of British Colonies, the Embassy is in
Bridgetown, Barbados. In late 1967, a temporary office was established in
Roadtown, Tortola, British Virgin Islands to speed the process. The Em-
bassy then sends to the person applying for permanent resident status, a
series of forms entitled "Packet 3." This can be found in Appendix I, page
14.

"Packet 3" requires:
1. A completed Biographic or background statement.
2. That the alien gather a series of documents which are listed in "Packet 3."
3. When the documents are assembled, the applicant must send (by air) Packet
3, NOT THE DOCUMENTATION to:
Vice Consul of the United States
Embassy of the United States
Bridgetown, Barbados.


I HOW TO BECOME A BONDED ALIEN















1. Read Appendix I, (Packet 3) carefully;
2. Do not send the documents, but send I
Packet 3 to Barbados.
S. Send all correspondence by air malL
4. Make sure abu have all the documents be-
fore sending Packet 3 to Barbados.



Tilt. MOST COMMON REASON FOR AP-
I'1.1 \NTS FAILING TO GET PERMANENT f
RIJ:FII)FNCY IS THAT THEY DO NOT
II Xl i: \LL THE DOCUMENTS TOGETHER.





When the Embassy receives "Packet 3," it is put on the bottom of the list
and an interview is scheduled. The applicant is notified of this interview
and the location when he receives "Packet 4." (This is reproduced in
Appendix II, Page 21).
Packet 4 contains:
1. Infurnmlinn about the aliens' interview for processing as a permanent
resident allen.
2. Information about the required medical examination.





1. Read Packet 3 and Packet 4 very carefully.
2. If you have questions, see Section IX, page 13 of this report for suggestions
where you might receive help.
3. Do not hesitate to write to the American Embassy in Bridgetown for help.
State your problem clearly. Write by Air Mall to:
Vice Consul of the United States
American Embassy
Bridgetown, Barbados










When the foreign citizen goes to Bridgetown for the interview, if the papers
are in order, the process should be a simple one; but, there are 31 reasons
for which a person can be refused permanent resident status. Some im-
portant ones are:
-





If the interview is successful, the alien is able to go back to the Virgin
Islands. Immediately upon arrival, the Immigration officer will stamp the
alien's visa and, at that point, the alien becomes a permanent resident
alien with most of the rights and privileges of a citizen of the United
States with the major exception that he cannot vote.
The number of people who become permanent resident aliens each year
is determined by the immigration laws, the number of people permitted
into the United States from each Colony each year, and the speed with
which the papers can be processed.
A very important change will occur in the law affecting the number
who can become permanent resident aliens in 1968. Up to July 1, 1968, the
law has permitted each Colony (Nevis, St. Kitts, and Anguilla, considered
one Coloney, for example) to provide at least 650 permanent resident
aliens each year. As of January 1968, all quotas up to July 1, 1968 were
filled.
No one knows how long it will take to process applications for per-
manent resident alien status after July 1, 1968. After the law changes in
July 1968, tne number who will become permanent residents each year will
be less than in the past-possibly 150 from all the colonies together. Thus,
people interested in becoming permanent resident aliens can probably ex-
pect fairly long waits in the future.
Finally, another way to become a permanent resident alien and event-
ually a citizen is by marriage to a permanent resident alien or to a citizen.
Check with the U.S. Immigration authorities to find out how this works.






DO YOU HAVE QUESTIONS?
-Have your papers been sent to the American Embassy in your home
Island and you want to know what has happened?
-Do you want to know how long it will take to process your application?
-Do you have a question about your eligibility for permanent residency?
If so, see Section IX, page 13.












You, your wife, a friend or a relative wants to come to the Virgin Islands
to work but does not have a job. What can be done? There are at least
six things the person can do:
1. Get a list of employers and write them a letter. The Virgin Islands Telephone
Directory lists some businesses.
2. If you have a friend or relative working in the Virgin Islands, ask for ideas
and ask him to talk to his employer.
3. Put an ad in a newspaper. This is expensive, but it can be effective.
4. Write to agencies like: Labor Unions, Religious Groups, etc.; they may know
of Job openings.
5. Many companies located in the Virgin Islands send recruiters to other islands.
Be on the alert for them.
6. Read ads in the local newspapers.
As a visitor, it is illegal to seek employment.










The Virgin Islands Department of Labor enforces minimum wage regula-
tions that affect workers (aliens as well) in most jobs and categories. Rates
for some jobs are included in Appendix III.
The bonded alien, with two major exceptions, has the same rights in
terms of jobs as do permanent resident aliens and citizens of the United
States. These two exceptions are:
1. When the bonded alien comes to the Virgin Islands, he is certified to work
for one employer at one job. Legally, if he leaves this employer or that job,
he must also leave the Virgin Islands before coming back for another job.
2. The bonded alien in the Virgin Islands can be bumped off hik job by a per-
manent resident alien or a citizen.
A bonded alien must pay social security. The Social Security Act of 1967,
says an alien living outside the United States for more than 6 months is not
eligible for Social Security benefits unless he returns for 30 consecutive
days every 6 months, has been drawing benefits for 10 years, or has had
10 years residence in the United States. Aliens from Barbados and Antigua
are affected; the British Virgin Islands and Nevis, St. Kitts and Anguilla
are not affected by special agreement with the United States. For addi-
tional information, contact the Social Security Office on St. Thomas (See
P. 13 ). Bonded aliens qualify for workmen's compensation and, if injured
on the job, can be compensated.
If a bonded alien thinks his employer is not living up to the minimum
wage regulations established by the Department of Labor, he can file a
complaint with the Labor Department and the Virgin Islands Attorney
General's Office. Check the minimum wage rate list in Appendix III.













BE
SESIN


S-~*-
-~4~S--


In seeking a job, keep in mind these important things:
1. Know what you can do.
2. Do not le about experience and background.
3. Give the employer names and addresses of people you have worked for before
or people who can testify to your honesty, reliability, and skills.
4. Try to see the employer personally to let him have an opportunity to see
what kind of a person you are. Iook over the working facilities.
5. Many employers send job recruiters to the Islands. If one contacts you. get
the answers to these questions:
-Have you been offered a joh? Did you accept? Does the recruiter know you
accepted? Do you have a written statement?
-Do you know the conditions under which you will work? Must you furnish
a uniform or tools? Do you know how much you will be paid? How often
will you be paid?
-Do you know the exact day the job will start? Do you have this in writing?
-Has the employer agreed to furnish you a place to live? If not, what
arrangements will you make?
6. Prepare a personal background form that is simple and describes who you
are, where you are from and what your experiences are. A sample form
follows:








PERSONAL BACKGROUND FORM
1. Name:
8. Address:
8. Married: Yes or No
4. Sex:
5. Date of Birth:
6. Education: List schools attended, number of years yon attended eialh M a-she '.
and any certificates received.
7. Lst last four Jobs. Describe these jobs: the dates you worked, yeaw sar ,.
the names and addresses of the employers.
8. Ust munes and addresses of three or four referenes-peopele Wwho lW ;r.
something about your background and the kind of person yu. are.
9. Special skills. List any special skills yon may have asuc a: operatlg..al L
dozer, driving a truck, typing, spelling, child care, gardening, etc.



9 -.- ..











VI.


I WHATKIN OF HOSN0SAALBE


IF YOU ARE AN ALIEN NEWCOMER TO THE U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS,
YOU WILL NEED A PLACE TO LIVE. WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT TO
FIND?

1. Rooms are available; but, rents are high. One room, with no sanitary facili-
ties or furnishings, may cost at least $50 a month.
2. Public housing is being built, but it is not available to "bonded" aliens. Citi-
zens of the United States are given first preference.
3. Some bonded aliens "build houses" out of materials they pick up. But, often
these units do not meet government standards and get torn down.
4. Some bonded aliens sign working agreements that include a "live-in" clause,
particularly those who are to perform work as domestics. Much of this hous-
ing is adequate. Many, however, find that it is too restrictive socially.
5. Some companies like Hess Oil and Harvey Alumina on St. Croix provide
housing at about $3.50 per week.

FINDING ADEQUATE HOUSING
WILL BE A SERIOUS PROBLEM.


VII.


I~~~~ RIHT AN UISOFAIN


WHAT PROTECTION DOES THE ALIEN HAVE UNDER THE LAWS?
WHAT ARE HIS DUTIES?
1. Aliens, like citizens, must oely all the laws of the U.S. Virgin Islands and
the United States. Failure to obey the laws can result in deportation.
2. The bonded alien and permanent resident aliens pay income taxes at the
same rate as citizens.
3. Bonded aliens have no "right" to a job. Should either a qualified citizen or a
permanent resident alien apply for the job the bonded alien holds, the em-
ployer must replace the bonded alien.
4. Male permanent resident aliens are eligible for the U.S. Selective Service
(draft) after six months.
5. Aliens can get drivers' licenses in the U.S. Virgin Islands. A 90-day permit
will be issued to aliens who have drivers' licenses from their home Islands.
Police and rental car agencies issue the permits. For those wishing to apply
for drivers' licenses, the police give tests. Under a new law, bonded aliens who
have applied for permanent residence and who hold a valid operator's license
may obtain a chauffeur's (taxi) license provided he will drive for the owner
of five or more taxicabs.
Permanent resident aliens and citizens are allowed to have chauffeurs' licenses
if (1) they have been a licensed driver for three years; (2) they have been a
resident of the U.S. Virgin Islands for one year, and; (3) they have not been
convicted of a felony.
6. A bonded alien will have difficulty in getting credit and loans. Permanent
resident aliens qualify for loans on the same basis as citizens.
7. All aliens can use the public libraries. Cards are issued to all.
8. Aliens, bonded and permanent residents, can belong to labor unions.










#1~


WHAT SOCIAL SERVICES

ARE AVAILABLE?


SHOULD YOU NEED HELP BECAUSE OF ILLNESS OR FAMILY
NEEDS, WHERE CAN YOU GET IT?

1. The bonded alien has no "right" to any welfare benefits. But, In the event of
a dire emergency, the Department of Social Welfare will provide short-term
assistance.
t. Medical facilities are available. Government clinics will provide medical serv-
itks for bonded aliens. But fees are charged, and the fees are higher for
bonded aliens than they are for citizens or permanent resident aliens.
3. Should a bonded alien become ill, he must report his illness to a doctor. If
he does not, the Department of Health can get a court order requiring treat-
ment or ordering deportation.
4. Employers sometimes provide medical care for bonded alien employees. Cheek
with your prospective employer to see if he provides such service.
5. The United Fund has limited resources. United Fund agencies do not gen-
erally provide aid for bonded aliens.
6. Should an alien die, he will be buried. Expenses of the burial can come from
Social Security--If you are eligible. Or your employer may pay the cost. In
snme cases, the British Consul has paid for burial of British citizens who
have died while working in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
7. Children who are deserted by bonded aliens will receive aid until a relative
can be found, either in the U.S. Virgin Islands or on the home Island.
8. Permanent resident aliens qualify for nearly all social services on the samb
basis as citizens. These services include welfare payments.









EDUC*ATIO


Children of permanent resident aliens are permitted to attend public and
parochial schools. Because of overcrowding, however, the Board of Educa-
tion in December, 1966, established a list of priorities for children of per-
manent resident aliens:



..,,Ws C rt lha god hea '.K- A :'
.a.. -l ''-a t school records or take Placeent exajlm~4 t ,a.
-A. fttaoce mst not came number of paplh to an s to exceed preibe. ,
ateadaga.
eren-ce girea at paaets have legrly workeLd -l Vtgta. Md for te*M .
emsmecattve yeBrs and exnpet to remain uplwed.&
.-i -UlIdence of Intabty of off-land guardians to aspervie _ali~.na maMt he
: I * preM.ted. "

':s is not. the case with children whose parents are bonded aliens They
aEt attend private schools which may be costly.
s..."'" ie school must have completed a form supplied by the United States
..rntligration and Naturalization Service. According to Immigration authr-
pps%, .al schools in the Virgin Islands with the exception of the Department
.''. dFl1ation have completed this form. Thus, children of bonded aliens can.
!::.tteld (If they can find room and are accepted) any school in the Virgin... '
i-sands with th e exception of the public schools.


The 1968 edition of the Virgin Islands telephone directly lists theseschools:
The 1968 edition of the Virgin Islands telephone directory lits these schools:


r



r

91
Cyf


Phone Numbers
The Department of Education ................................................ 774-0100
Adele M M other, Christiansted ......................... ... ... .. ... 773-0117
All Saints Church School, Charlotte Amalie ................................. 774-0231
Antilles School, Charlotte Amalie ........................ .. ... .. 774-1966
Bluewater Bible College, Charlotte Amalie ............................... 774-4029
Calvary Elementary School. Charlotte Amalie ...................... 774-1759
College of the Virgin Islands .. .. .............................. 774-1252
Commercial Center, Charlotte Amalie ............................-....... 774-2905
Frederick Lutheran School, Charlotte Amalie ........... .................. 774-1741
Good Hope School. Frederiksted ...... .......................... .... 772-0022
Grove Place School, Frederikstd ........ ... ................... 772-0831
The Manor School, Christiansted ........... ................. .... 773-1448
Montesorri School, Charlotte Amale .... .... .................... ..... 774-4144
St. Croix Country Day School, Christiansted ........................ 773-2885
St. Joseph's Central High School, Frederiksted ........................ 772-0455
St. Patrick's School. Frederiksted .................... ............ ....... 772-0220
St. Peter and Paul High School, Charlotte Amalic .............. 774-2199
Seventh Day Adventist School. Christiansted ............ .......... 773-1822
Seventh Day Elementary School, Charlotte Amalie ................ 774-3851


VIII.


14 414









.. '"


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. _


IX.


The Governor's Commission for Human Services has
published a Directory of Human Services. It eontai sa
list of such agencies as:
-@elhoo- eBmpitatl -Charohee---D tor-wiers *

Consult this Directory if you have questions. The Public Library has copies.
Also, consult the telephone directory, especially the "Yellow Pages" in which numbers
are listed by services.
Some important agencies for aliens are:
Phone Number
1. The Virgin Islands Employment Security Agency, St. Thomas .. 774-0660
St. Croix ........ 773-1440
2. The Virgin Islands Department of Labor, St. Thomas ................ 774-2401
3. The Virgin Islands Department of Social Welfare, St. Thomas 74-0930
St. Croix ...... 773-0345
4. The Virgin Islands Department of Public Safety, St. Thomas .... 774-2310
St. Croix ....... 773-1310
5. The Virgin Islands Attorney General, St. Thomas ...................... 774-1163
St. Croix ........................... 773-0295
6. British Consulate, St. Thomas .............. .............. .................. 774-0033
7. U. S. Department of Justice, St. Thomas .............. 774-1390
Immigration and St. Croix ................. 773-1545
Naturalization Service, St. John .................... 774-4940
8. The Virgin Islands Department of Health, St. Thomas ........... 774-0177
St. Croix ................ 773-1112
9. The Oflice of Economic Opportunity, St. Thomas ..................... 774-4799
10. U.S. Social Security, St. Thomas ...................... .............. ..... 774-0446
11. V.I. Department of Education, St. Thomas .................................... 774-0100
St. Croix ..................................... ... 773-1025














GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS ARE THERE TO
HELP YOU. DO NOT BE AFRAID TO ASK.

*






















DEPARTMENT OF STATE













Sir or Madam:

Reference is made to your inquiry reoaidinq steps to be taken in applying for an immigrant
visa for admission into the United States.

Lj This office has received an approved petition according you immediatee
relative" status.

[] This office has received an approved petition according you
_______pireerence status.
T] Ihis office has received an approved Department of Labor certification.
j It has bhee determined h~nt yori ,ire exvrnpt from the provlsion7. of
Section 212(u)(14) of the lintIuatrLion unu Nutoinality Act, as aunended.

You may now prepare for the filing of your ionral visu upplicatiul by taking the following
three steps:
A. FIRS, complete and return immediately to this office the enclosed Form DSP-70, Biographic
Data for Visa Purposes.

B. SECOND, obtain the fnllowirin dcinrrents, but DO NOT SEND THEM TO THIS OFFICF. An
you obtain each document, iceck the bIx [. thie iiqhlt of each .ter;

1. PASSPORTS. A passport must be vahd tor at least six months 'nrd it must he endorsed
by the issuing authority for travel to the United States. Each child sixteen yeis u! a e or
older, who is included in the passport of his parents but hose photograph does not appear
in such passport, must obtain his own passport.

2. BIRTH CERTIFICATES. Two ueiuiled copies of the birth record ct each person wishing
to immigrate are rrecired. The certificate must state the date and place of birth and the
names of both parents. It must also be iidtJiutd un the certificate that it is an extract frhn [l
the official birth records. Photnstntir copies are acceptable, provided the original is of-
fered for inspection by the consular lihei.
Unobtuiiuble Butth Certilicute. In lare cases, it may be impossible to obtain a birth rprtif-
leate because records have been destroyed, or the government will not issue one. In such.
a case, a buptisinal ceitilicute, in dupli-ate, may be submitted tor consideration provided it
contains the date and place of the applicant's birth, information concerning parentage and
the baptisin took pluce shortly ufitmi biAth. Should a baptismal certificate be unobtainaohl, [I
a close relative, preferably the applicant's mother, should prepare an affidavit. in duplihult,
station the place and date ol the applicant's birth, the names of both parents and maiden
name of the mother. Such an affidavit r.ust be executed before an official authorized to ud-
Iinii teli oaths or ao irmations.
overi
LETTER DSL-869
it -as













-2-


3. POLICE CERTIFICATES. Each visa applicant aged 16 years or over is required to submit
a police certificate, in duplicate. Such certificates must be obtained from the police author-
ities of each locality, including places in the United States, where the applicant has re-
sided for six months or more since attaining the age of 16 years. A police certificate must
also be obtained from the police authorities of any place where the applicant has been
arrested for any reason, regardless of how long he lived there. Such certificates must cover
the entire period of the applicant's residence in the area. A certificate Issued by local
police authorities must be of recent date (not more than two months old) when presented to
the consular officer. The term "police certificate" as used in this paragraph means a certi-
fication by the appropriate police authorities stating what their records show concerning the
applicant, including any and all arrests, the reasons therefore, and the disposition of each
case of which there is a record.

4. COURT AND PRISON RECORDS. Persons who have been convicted of a crime must obtain
two certified copies of each court record and of any prison record, regardless of the fact [E
that they may have subsequently benefited from an amnesty, pardon or other act of clemency.
5. MILITARY RECORD. Two certified copies of any military record, if applicable, should be
obtained.
6. PHOTOGRAPHS. Three identical photographs, Igy x l~i inches (37mm x 37mm), showing
full face view, no head-covering, white background and on thin paper. This applies to all [7
applicants, regardless of age.
7. EVIDENCE OF SUPPORT. Any evidence which will show that you and the members of
your family, who will accompany you, are not likely to become public charges while in the
United States. The enclosed information sheet, Form DSL-845, lists evidence which may
be presented to meet this requirement of the law.
8. MARRIAGE CERTIFICATES. Married persons should present two copies of their marriage
certificate. Proof of the termination of any previous marriage must also be submitted, in [F]
duplicate (e.g. death certificate of rpouse;decree of divorce or annulment).
9. TRANSLATIONS. All documents not in the official language of the country in which appli-
cation for a visa is being made, or in English, must be accompanied by certified translations
into English. Translations must be in duplicate and certified by a competent translator and
sworn to by him before a Notary Public.

C. THIRD, when you and all accompanying members of your family have obtained all of the required
documents listed above and checked in red on the left by the consular officer, sign the statement
below and return this entire form to this office. No further action can be taken on your appli-
cation until you have completed these three steps.

Very truly yours,
William Ryerson
Vice Consul of the
United States of America

Enclosure:
Form DSL-845

I have in my possession the documents I have checked above. I want to proceed
with my immigrant visa chose and request an appointment at the consulate for myself
and accompanying members of my family to make formal application for visas.


(Signature)
PLEASE DO NOT SEND ANY DOCUMENTS TO THIS OFFICE UNTIL YOU ARE SPECIFICALLY
DL.,-, REQUESTED TO DO SO BY THIS OFFICE.
I *65















POST SYOLDEPARTMENT OF STATE I For Approvd

BIOGRAPHIC DATA FOR VISA PURPOSES Boda Be.... N. 47-R i.2

INSTRUCTIONS
Complete this form for your entire family (yourself, spouse and unmarried children under 21 years of age).

I. NAME (F-aily nIme) (First ne (Middle ina.)



OTHER NAMES, ALIASES ( I menaied women, maiden nam and .rn. of any pr..ou.s pou.s )


NAME IN NATIVE LETTERS OR CHARACTERS IF DIFFERENT FROM ABOVE


2. PLACE OF BIRTH (City) (State o province) ICownty) DATE OF BIRTH (Month) (Doy) (Y-or)



SEX PRESENT NATIONALITY PAST NATIONALITY
0 Male
J Femal.
NAME OF FATHER 4. MAIDEN NAME OF MOTHER



S. FATHER'S BIRTHPLACE (City) (State or p.ovinc) (Count.ry 6- MOTHER'S BIRTHPLACE (City) (Stote or province) (Counny)



7. NAME OF SPOUSE (Maiden or lmily noew] (Firs0 nao.) (Middle noMes)



S. SPOUSE'S BIRTHPLACE (City) (Stte or province) 9. SPOUSE'S BIRTHDATE (Monh)(Doy) 10. WILL SPOUSE IMMIGRATE WITH YOU?
(Country) (yTer)
LY-, UNo

II. NAME OF SPOUSE'S FATHER 12. NAME OF SPOUSE'S MOTHER


13. BIRTHPLACE OF SPOUSE'S FATHER (Clty) (State or proven) 14. BIRTHPLACE OF SPOUSE'S MOTHER (City) (Stoa or provinc.)
(Country) (Country)


15. LIST UNMARRIED CHILDREN UNDER 21 YEARS. NOT U.S.CITIZENS WHO WILL ACCOMPANY YOU
NAME OF CHILO PLACE OF BIRTH (City, *tat or prr-ince, country) IIIORTDoATE







16. IF YOU OR YOUR SPOUSE ARE NOW, OR HAVE BEEN, IN THE UNITED STATES, STATE:
A T WHERE WAS VISA OBTAINED WHEN WAS VISA GRANTED (Month, Year)
I APPLICANT

SPOUSE
CHECK TYPE OF VISA USED FOR SUCH ENTRY:
O IionirntMt ] Ovo.,rnmnt or intrnotlonoal or.nil.ti.n oflI .il or mplor. y j Exchnge Visitot
iE Otha. nMoniMigronr Specify
17. IF YOU OR YOUR SPOUSE PREVIOUSLY LIVED IN THE UNITED STATES. STATE:
DATE ADMITTED DATE DEPARTED REASON FOR DISCONTINUING RESIDENCE



FM DSP-70 (O )
3-4111 (0-.r)


















10. LIST BELOW IN DATE ORDER ALL PLACES WHERE YOU, YOUR SPOUSE AND UNMARRIED CHILDREN NAMED ON THE
OTHER SIDE HAVE LIVED SINCE REACHING THE AGE OF 16. (It in not nec...ary to sli, tk plceI w.h..r you havo li;ed
les. thon ix month.).

FIRST NAME OF FROM TO
FAMILY MEMBER CITY OR TOWN. PROVINCE, COUNTRY OCCUPATION (Mlh, y-o*) (Mont., Y.)
































19. MEMBERSHIP OR AFFILIATION IN ORGANIZATIONS IN EACH COUNTRY NAMED IN ITEM 18I
CULTURAL, SOCIAL, LABOR OR POLITICAL
ORGANIZATION FROM TO












.____._ certlify tha all information given is complete and correct,
DATE SIGNATURE AND PRESENT ADDRESS



NOTE: II spo. .bov* n.fflelnt t no.ler ..y questions prperly, tke oddi8ional inlamaltin moy bo printed alow n on leoprat sheet of
poper -nd totochd to this form.


GPO 40044


FORM DSP-70 2 -66


Po9 2
















THE FOREIGN SERVICE
OF THE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA




EVIDENCE WHICH CAN BE PRESENTED TO MEET THE
PUBLIC CHARGE PROVISION OF TIE LAW


Section 212(aX15) of the Immigration and Nationality Act of the United States requires an applicant
for a visa to establish to the satisfaction of the consular officer at the time of his application for a visa,
and also to the satisfaction of the United States Immigration officials at the time of his application for
admission into the United States, that he is nor likely at any time to become a public charge.

An applicant for an immigrant visa may generally meet the public charge requirements of the law by
the presentation of documentary evidence, in duplicate, establishing that:

(a) he has, or will have, in the United Stares funds of his own sufficient to provide for his support.

(b) he has employment awaiting him in the United States which will provide an adequate income; or

(c) relatives or friends in the United States will assure his support. Since court decisions have held
that affidavits of support constitute only a moral and not a legal obligation these affidavits have
significance only to the extent that they show compelling moral reasons which prompt the affiant to
assume responsibility for the alien should he be in need of assistance.

EVIDENCE OF APPLICANT'S OWN FUNDS

An applicant who has, or will have, in the United States funds of his own available for his support may
submit to the consular officer one or more of the following items:

(a) statement from an officer of a hank showing present balance of applicant's account, date account
was opened, and average balance during the year. If there have been recent unusually large de-
posits an explanation therefore should be given.

(b) proof of ownership of property or real estate, in the form of a letter from a lawyer, banker or re-
sponsible real estate agent showing its present valuation. Any mortgages or loans against the
property must be stated.

(c) letter or letters verifying ownership of stocks and honds, with present market value indicated:

(d) statement from insurance company showing policies held and present cash surrender value;

(e) proof of income from business investments or other sources.

*PREARRANGED EMPLOYMENT

Evidence of prearranged employment should be presented in the lorm of a written statement, in dupli-
cate, from the prospective employer, on his business letterhead or if he has no letterhead in the form of an
affidavit.

The statement or affidavit should:

(a) contain a definite offer of employment;

(b) state whether the employment will be immediately available upon the applicant's arrival in the
United States;

(c) specify the location, type and duration (whether seasonal, temporary or indefinite) of the employ-
ment offered;
*Form DSL-900 (General Information on Visas for Dow,,url S-rvoant) is as itahle for pftsnns
entering the United Statrs to take up household work. (d) specify

TTER DSL-45
B -65














(d) specify the rate or range of compensation to be paid;

(e) be of fairly recent date and

(f) if the prospective employer is an individual rather than a firm, some evidence proving that the
individual is in a financial position to carry our the offer of employment.

AFFIDAVIT OF SUPPORT

There ate no prescribed forms to be used by persons in the United States who desire to furnish spon-
sorship in the form of a so-called affidavit of support for presentation to the consul.

Each sponsor should furnish a statement, in duplicate, in affidavit form setting forth his willingness
and financial ability to contribute to the applicant's support and his reasons in detail for sponsoring the
applicant.

The sponsor's statement should include:

(a) information regarding his income;

(b) where material, information regarding his resources;

(c) his obligations for the support of members of his own family and other persons, if any;

(d) his other obligations and expenses;

(e) plans and arrangements made for the applicant's reception and support in the absence of a legal
obligation to support the applicant.

To substantiate the information regarding his income and resources the sponsor may attach to his
affidavit:

(a) certified or notarized copies of his latest income tax return;

(b) a statement, in duplicate, from his employer showing his salary and the length and permanency of
employment;

(c) a statement, in duplicate, from an officer of a bank regarding his account, showing the date the
account was opened and the present balance;

(d) any other evidence adequate to establish his financial ability to carry out his undertaking toward
the applicant for what might be an indefinite period of time.

If the sponsor is a well established businessman, he may submit a rating from a recognized concern
in lieu of the foregoing.

The sponsor should include in his affidavit a statement concerning his status in the United States,
e.g. whether he is a United States citizen or an alien legal resident of the United States. The consular
officer may require proof to substantiate such a statement. Proof of United States citizenship of a sponsor
may be provided by means of a United States birth certificate or, in the case of a naturalized citizen, by
means of an Immigration and Naturalization Service Form N-585 (Application for Information From or Copies
of Immigration and Naturalization Service Records). An alien sponsor may provide proof of his lawful ad-
mission into the United States for permanent residence by means of an Immigration and Naturalization Ser-
vice Form 1-550 (Application for Verification of Last Entry of an Alien). Either of these forms may be ob-
tained from any office of the Immigration and Naturalization Service in the United States. It is important to
note that reproduction of United States Naturalization Certificates or of Alien Registration Receipt Cards
(Form 1-151) is prohibited by law and severe legal penalties are prescribed for such reproduction.

If the sponsor is married, the affidavit should be jointly signed by both husband and wife.

Affidavits of support should be of recent date when presented to the consular officer. They are un-
acceptable if more than a year has elapsed from the date of execution.

IMPORTANT: All support documents must be presented to the consular officer in duplicate.





BETTERR
a-66 DSL-845
PAGE 2













EMBASSY OF THE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Bridgetown, Barbados

SPECIAL MEMO FOR PERSONS APPLYING FOR VISAS IN BRIDGETOWN


1. Birth Certificates and Baptismal Certificates. If your birth certificates
do not contain your first name (Christian name,) you must also present
two copies of your baptismal certificate.

2. Police Certificates.

You must have two copies of a police certificate from each place where
you have stayed for six months or more even if you were only on holiday.
For example, a person who lives in Barbados and who worked in Antigua for
two and half years and who spent a seven month holiday in New York must
present police certificates from Barbados, Antigua and New York.
















I sfs.tt I t
I ~'t '. -

11


1. The forms that must be with the alien
when he arrives for the Interview.
2. The amount of money the alien must have
with him.
3. Instructions for the Medical examination.
IAA,,,,,,,lli I I Ill,,_,,


DEPARTMENT OF STATE


Sir or Madam

This office has received your notice t ,ou have the documents needed in connection
your application for an immigrant visa /
Sis necessary for all immnigra' undergo rain medical examinations. Complete instruc-
tns for these examinaut uns re conta ed on rhe attached sheet.
n appointment haaeen scheduled for yu to come to this office on.______________
All members of your fami iiging with/ ou, except
must appeal x with you on the abo. dappoi d date. If you CANNOT KEEP THE APPOINTMENT,
please notify this office at n. /
Now see the "Application for migrant Visa and Alien Registration" (Form FS-510) which is
enclosed. You will notice that mr of it is in question and answer form. Fill this form out com-
pletely, using a typewriter or pr jing in block letters, but do not sign it now (you will have to swear
to or affirm it before the consul ar officer). Every numbered part must be answered or otherwise com-
pleted. If any part does not/pply to your case, write in "Not Applicable". Do Not use dashes or
the letters "n.a." or othe abbreviations to fill in such parts. The form must be completed, in dupli-
cate, by each member o /our family 14 years of age or over, who wishes to apply for an immigrant
visa. You may comply e the form, in duplicate, on behalf of each child under 14 years of age.
You are remi ed that you must bring with you all of the documents pertinent to your case.
Your application cannot be accepted if you fail to bring complete documentation. For your con-
venient referee e, the generally required documents are listed and described below:
PoMsporl / Military record, if applicable Forme FS-510 (2 for each person)
I.-








Birth Cerlcat. Photographs (3 for vach person) Marriage Certificote, if applicable
Policy ertificate Afflidovit of Support ar Jab Letter Evidence previously submitted to
/ F (unl you have evidence of your mee requirement of .sc.212(a)(14)
For FSP-497 own o aetr)
Translations All documents not in the official language of the country in which application for
visa is being made, or in English, must be accompanied by certified translations ino English.
Translations must be in duplicate and certified by a competent translator and sworn to by him be-
fore a Notary Public.
Affidavits of support and evidence of prearranged employment (job letters) must be of fairly recent
date; affidavits should be less than 12 months, job letters less than six months old when presented
to the consular officer.


L"TT"K DSL-871
1 -67















Married persons should present two copies of their marriage certificate. Proof of the termination of
any previous marriage should also be submitted, e.g. death certificate of spouse; decree of divorce
or annulment.
All documents, except passports and photographs, must be submitted in duplicate. If you have only
one copy of your birth certificate and cannot obtain another, you may submit two photostatic copies
thereof hut you must bring the original with you, for inspection by the consular officer; it will be
returned to you. The same applies to any other certificate which may have been photostated.
A child sixteen years of age or older, who is included in the passport of his parents but whose photo-
graph does not appear in such passport, must obtain his own passport.
Each child, regardless of ae, re uires a medical examination, a birth certificate in duplicarc, and
three identical photographs.

You must be prepared to pay in cash a total fee of $25.0D in United States currency or the equiva-
lent in currency ( ) for each visa. ($5.00 for the application and
$20.00 for the visa.) Each person immigrating, regardless of age, requires a separate visa. If a
person is found ineligible to receive a visa, the fee of $5.00 for the application cannot be refunded.
No assurance can be given in advance that a visa will be issued. Only after all your documents
have been reviewed, your medical examination completed, you have signed and sworn to your formal
application and have been interviewed by the consular officer can a decision be reached by that
officer as to your eligibility under the law to receive a visa. You are advised not to make any travel
arrangements for departure from this country, not to dispose of your property and not to give up your
position until the visa has been issued to you. Usually, a visa is valid for four months from date of
issuance, which means that any time within that four-month period it may be used to apply for ad-
mission into the United States.
This office will make every effort to expedite the processing of your application on the day of
your appointment, but it is a process which does require several hours. It is possible that you will
have to spend the entire morning or afternoon in the office before final action can be taken on your
application. Should complications arise, it is unlikely that you will receive the visa on the day of
your appointment; you may be required to return to this office another time.
PLEASE MAKE CERTAIN THAT YOUR DOCUMENTATION IS COMPLETE AND THAT YOU
HAVE TWO COPIES OF EACH DOCUMENT (except for passport and photographs).
Upon arrival a this office on your appointment day, please present this letter to the recep-
tionist.


Very truly yours,



Consul of the United States of America

Enclosures;

1. Instructions for Medical Examinations
2. Forms FS-510 (2 for each person)






BRING ALL DOCUMENTS WITH YOU ON APPOINTMENT DATE
LCTZa DSL-871
PAGE 2



















PLACE
OFPARTMENT OF STATE
FOREIGN SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF VISA APPLICANTS DATE OF EXAMINATION

CITY COUNTRY
At the ieqcgu of t Amtrican Consul at

NAME AGE SEX
I ce-rfd .ha d on the aboe datc I cxamin cd

I examined scllfca~li for evidence of any of the foliowng conditions:
CLASS A:
F)AN GFROI CONTAGIOUS DISEASES:
Actinormycosis Granolma [nguinalc Rnngworm of scalp
Amebias.s Keratocon'uncti.vis, lnmcctious Schbstoaomiasts
Blastomycosis L'eishma; ass SyphMlIs.ifcttocs stage
Chn troad Lepsy (Halsen's Disease) Trachoma
Favu LylllhiugranulomaO Vencreum Trypanosomnasis
Friartasi Mytcryema Tuberculosis (pulmonary or extrapulmonary)
Gonorrhea paiagonitiiasls yaws
MENTAL CONDITIONt
Mena! retardation Prrtvinus occurrence of one or more Mental detect
mental deficiency) arraL s of insaniy Norcotic drug addiction
Insanity Psyt hnpaihic personality Chronic alcoholism
Sexual de.ation (See proviso, sec. 34.7, USPHS Regs.)

C Lss a
Physical Defect, DIsease, or Disability S.i -is ,. Degree or Permanent to Nature Amoun.tin to a bubstatial Ueparture from Normal
Phiysicai Fell-Rcina.
CLASS C:
MHti Cnditionss.




CHECK NUMBER ti BOdLto Ot riMPI FTF NUMBER It11
My examination, including the X-ray and other reports below, revrafrd:
F I (1) N tif i, disease, or disability,
(2) Defect, disease, or disability, or previous occurrence of one 0or mir. aitar ks io insanity, as follows (ive class A. B. or
C diagnosis, and pertlneni details+):

















Check X.rap r-p








from Dr.


Blood serological report_ from Dr .


Other special :reotIrs) (when needed)

hrom Dr.
SiMATURE F MEOCAL CHNCa AvisB TTLE -DATE OF FINIAL REPORT



ORML.ontine on reverse sirle it nr3s8ay-y.
FORM














American Consulate General
P.O. Box No. 302
Bridgetown, Barbados

FOR VISA APPLICANTS RESIDENT AT ANTIGUA, W.I.

To: Date:

An appointment to enable you to make a formal application for a nonimmigrant/an
immigrant visa will be made for you upon the receipt of the visa panel doctor's
report and findings.

Examinations required are as follows:


Persons 15 years and over:


Children 11 to 14:


Children under 11:


Physical examination, chest X-ray and blood
tests. Urinalysis if indicated.

Physical examination and chest X-ray.
Urinalysis if indicated.

Physical examination. Urinalysis if indicated.


Only the Doctors listed below are authorized to perform medical examinations
of visa applicants in behalf of the Consulate General:


Dr. W.T. Joseph,
St. Mary's Street, St. Johns



Dr. A. P. MacDonald
Avondasset, St. John's



Dr. Z. Wisinger,
Newgate Street, St. John's

Dr. L. R. Wynter,
Long Street, St. John's


Any weekday, except Tuesday and Friday
morning. 9:00 12:00 a.m., 2:00 4:00 p.m.
9:00 12:00 a.m. only on Saturday. Phone 125


Any weekday, except Tuesday and Friday
morning. 9:00-12:00 a.m., 2:00-4:00 p.m.
9:00-12:00 a.m. only on Saturday. Phone 167


Any weekday, 9:00-12:00 a.m.


Appointment only.


Prices charged (B.W.I. Currency): Physical examination including urinalysis $5.00;
vaccination including international certificate $3.00; blood test $2.00; X-ray
film (if small) and reading $6.00 OR if large X-ray film and reading $10.00.

You must take your passport to the visa panel doctor and radiologist for
identification purposes. The doctor making the examination will forward your
medical certificate in duplicate, directly to the Consulate General. You will
be required to present evidence on entry into the United States that you have
been vaccinated against small pox within the past three years.

THE FEE FOR AN IMMIGRANT VISA IS $25.00 U.S. OR THE EQUIVALENT $43.00 B.W.I.
CURRENCY.












AMERICAN EMBASSY
P.O. BOX 302
BRIDCETOWN, BARBADOS


FOR VISA APPLICANTS AT ST. THOMAS, U.S.V.I.
AND BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS


It is necessary for you to obtain a Medical Examination at your own expense.
This examination MUST be obtained from Dr. Benjamin Nath. Only Dr. Benjamin
Nath, Director, T.B. Control, St. Thomas, is authorized to perform medical
examinations of visa applicants on behalf of the Embassy.

Examinations are required as follows:

Persons 15 years and over: Physical examination, chest X-ray and
blood tests. Urinalysis if indicated.

Children 11 to 14: Physical examination and chest X-ray.
Urinalysis if indicated.

Children under 11: Physical examination. Urinalysis if
indicated.

There are enclosed Forms FS-398 "Medical Examination of Visa Applicants"
which you should take to Dr. Nath. You should present your passport or
other suitable document for identification purposes to the doctor. You will
be required to show evidence on entry into the United States that you have
been vaccinated against small pox within the past three years.

The standard fee for a medical examination is $7.00 U.S. plus $3.00 U.S. for
X-ray, urinalysis and serology tests, combined.

THE FEE FOR EACH IMMIGRANT VISA IS $25.00 U.S. OR THE EQUIVALENT $43.75 E.C.
CCY.








S ireamtm ein t wageW rates for
_tWam Vitygpt IBbamd6a. In effect In 1987,
i n: -. a m W i e g wNae to get at least thee rates.
S.. # a a ap meon reeelving lean, motact the
VKth iAih De prtmenat 4 tLabor at 774-S40L


1. Alcoholic Beverages and Industrial Alcohol Industry


Rate
Category Per Hour


Barrelling and
Bottling Worker
Boiler Man
Assistant Boilerman
Bookkeeper
Secretary
Electrician
Welder
Charwoman
Bottler, Part Time
Bottline Plant Worker
Cooper
Assistant Cooper
Fermentor


$1.20

1.50
1.25
1.50
1.50
1.90
1.95
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.50
1.25
1.50


Assistant
Fermentor
Laboratory Assistant
Laborer
Still Operator
Assistant Still
Operator
*Truck Driver:
Light
Medium
Heavy
Special
Watchman
Chemical Analyst
Clerk


2. Bar and Restaurant Industry


Rate
Per Hour


Category


Bartender
Bookkeeper
Clerk
Cook
Assistant Cook
Short Order Cook


$1.25
1.50
1.25
2.00
1.45
1.35


Counterman/woman
Waiter or Waitress
Dishwasher
Handyman, Janitor
Pantryman
Secretary


3. Construction Industry


Rate
Per Hour


Category


Carpenter
Carpenter's Helper
Mason
Mason's Helper
Field Clerk, and
Timekeeper
Electrician


$1.95
1.50
1.95
1.50
1.50

2.00


Electrician's Helper
**Equipment Operator:
Heavy
Medium
Light
Handyman


Category


Rate
Per Hour


$1.25

1.25
1.25
1.50
1.25


1.30
1.60
1.90
2.20
1.20
1.50
1.25


Category


Rate
Per Hour


$1.00
.95
.95
.95
1.15
1.50


Category


Rate
Per Hour


$1.55

2.50
2.25
2.00
1.50












3. Construction Industry (Cont'd)


Rate
Per Hour


Category


Laborer Foreman
Laborer
Mechanic
Mechanic's Helper
Painter
Laborer Painter
Bookkeeper
Secretary
Clerk
Plumber
Plumber's Helper
Boiler Maker
Boiler Operator
Boiler Operator's
Assistant
Cement Finisher
Chairman
Chipper


$1.75
1.25
2.00
1.55
1.75
1.35
1.50
1.50
1.25
2.00
1.55
1.75
2.25
1.50

1.75
1.50
1.50


Instrument Technician
Millwright
Oiler
Oiler's Helper
Pipe Fitter
Pipe Fitter's Helper
Plasterer
Rigger
Structural Steel
Worker
Steel Fitter
Reinforced Steel
Worker
*Truck Driver:
Light
Medium
Heavy
Special
Welder
Welder's Helper


4. Garage Industry


Rate
Per Hour


Category


Bookkeeper
Clerk
Bodyman
Bodyman's Helper
Cashier
Car Washer
Grease Rack Man


$1.50
1.25
1.90
1.45
1.50
1.00
1.45


Mechanic
Mechanic's Helper
Tire Repairman
Laborer, Car Porter
Secretary
Gas Attendant


5. Hotel and Guest House Industry

Rate
Per Hour Category


Category


Baker
Bartender
Beach Boy
Bell Boy
Bus Boy
Boat Operator


$1.35
1.25
.95
.85
.85
1.75


Dishwasher
Electrician
Grounds Keeper,
Gardener
Bookkeeper
Secretary


Rate
Per Hour


$1.95
2.00
2.00
1.50
2.00
1.50
1.80
2.25
2.00

1.75
1.45


1.30
1.60
1.90
2.20
1.95
1.50


Rate
Per Hour


$2.00
1.55
1.25
1.25
1.50
.95


Rate
Per Hour


$ .95
1.90
1.00

1.50
1.50


Category








5. Hotel and Guest House Ind


Rate
Per Hour


Category


Front Office Clerical
employees including
Cashiers,
Receptionists, and
front office
personnel
Elevator Operators
and Other Clerical
Employees
Cook
Assistant Cook
Housemaid
Mechanic
Night Watchman
Pantryman
Pool Attendant


$1.50 Handyman, Houseman, $ .95
Janitor
Kitchen Helper 1.00
Hotel Laundry Worker .90
Laborer .95
Lifeguard 1.05
1.25 Maintenance man 1.90
including Plumber,
Electrician, Carpenter,
2.00 and related occupations
1.25 Maintenance Helper 1.40
.95 Seamstress 1.15
1.85 Storeroom man 1.15
.95 Waiter or Waitress .95
1.15
1.15

6. Laundry and Dry Cleaning Industry


Rate
Per Hour Category


Category


Office Clerk
Assorter
Checker
Checker Trainee
Counterman/woman
Driver
Dry Cleaning Machine
Operator
General Laundry
Worker
Hand Presser
Laundry Attendant
Machine Operator
Machine Operator
Trainee


$1
1
1


1


1


.25 Maintenance Mechanic
.00 Janitor
.00 Mangle Operator .
.75 Marker
rO0%'-; Shirt Pressei
.30 Spotter Assorter
.95 Steam Presser
Utility Man
.85 Washer
Bookkeeper
.00 Secretary


1.00
1.00
.90


7. Retail and Gift Shop Industry

Rate
Per Hour Category


Category


Bookkeeper
Cashier
Cutter
Deliveryman
Handyman
Janitor


$1.50
1.50
1.25
1.25
.95
.95


Shipping Clerk
Secretary
Stockman/maid
Stock Laborer


Category


Rate
Per Hour


$1.25
.95
.80
.95
.90
1.25
1.15
.95
1.00
1.50
1.50


Rate
Per Hour


$1.25
1.50
.95
.95











7. Retail and Gift Shop Industry (Cont'd)


Category


Office Worker
Packer
Porter
Refrigerator Repairman
Salesman/lady
Sales Clerk
Seamstress


Rate
Per Hour


$1.25
.95
.95
1.95
1.25
.95
1.15


Category

*Truck Driver:
Light
Medium
Heavy
Special
Television & Radio
Technician
Upholsterer
Warehouse Clerk
Yard Man


Rate
Per Hour


$1.30
1.60
1.90
2.20
1.95

1.25
1.25
.85


Digitally signed by
U V I .ib a UVI Library
SI i r DN cn=UVI
I iLibrary, c=US
Date 2002 07 16
Vanidity 16 33 48 -08'00'
unknown




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