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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Table of significant violation...
 Summary of 2001 violations
 List of public water systems (PWS)...
 Definitions






Group Title: U.S. Virgin Islands annual public water system compliance report
Title: U.S. Virgin Islands annual public water system compliance report. 2001.
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 Material Information
Title: U.S. Virgin Islands annual public water system compliance report. 2001.
Series Title: U.S. Virgin Islands annual public water system compliance report
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: United States Virgin Islands. Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Division of Environmental Protection. Public Water Systems Supervision Program.
Publisher: United States Virgin Islands
Publication Date: 2002
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Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean
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Bibliographic ID: CA01300674
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of significant violations
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Summary of 2001 violations
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    List of public water systems (PWS) with violations during 2001
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Definitions
        Page 23
        Page 24
Full Text





UNITED STATES VIRGIN ISLANDS
DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND NATURAL RESOURCES
DIVISION OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
PUBLIC WATER SYSTEMS SUPERVISION PROGRAM







U. S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
ANNUAL PUBLIC WATER SYSTEM
COMPLIANCE REPORT FOR
CALENDAR YEAR 2001









Prepared August 2002
DPNR/DEP/PWSS









Table of Contents


1.0 Introduction _____________________________________________ 1
1.1 Public Water Systems-__________________________________ 1
1.2 The Public Water System Supervision Program: An Overview.___ 2-3
1.3 Violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act -_________________ 3-6

2.0 Table of Significant Violations ___________________________________ 7
2.1 Total Coliform Rule 7
2.2 Lead and Copper Rule ____________________________________ 7
2.3 Inorganic Chemical Contaminants___________________________8
2.4 Organic Chemical Contaminants ______________ ____________ 9-10
2.5 Radiological Contaminants________________ 11

3.0 Summary of 2001 Violations _____________________________________12
3.1 Total Coliform Rule MCL Violations 12-13
3.2 Total Coliform Rule Monitoring/Reporting Violations___ ______13
3.3 Nitrate Monitoring 13-14
3.4 Volatile Organic Compounds Monitoring 14
3.5 Total Trihalomethanes Monitoring ----------------------14
3.6 Lead & Copper Monitoring 15
3.7 Significant Noncompliance (SNC)-------------------------15

4.0 List of Public Water Systems (PWS) with Violations during 2001 16-22
4.1 St. Croix PWS with Violations during 2001 16-17
4.2 St. Thomas/St. John PWS with Violations during T --------- 18-22


Appendix A: Definitions


23-24









U.S. Virgin Islands
Public Water System Compliance Report
Calendar Year 2001

1.0 Introduction

Each State and Territory with primacy is required by section 1414(c)(3)(A)(i) of the Federal Safe
Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Amendments of 1996 to prepare an Annual Public Water System
Compliance Report. These annual compliance reports provide information on events or lack of
activity that constituted a violation of the SDWA by a public water system (PWS) at some time
during the calendar year covered by the report.

The Department of Planning and Natural Resources' (DPNR's) intention through this report is to
inform the citizens of and visitors to the United States Virgin Islands (USVI) about how well the
PWSs of the USVI are complying with the requirements of the SDWA. As mandated by law, these
reports must be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and made readily
available to the public. The U.S. Virgin Islands Annual Public Water System Compliance Report
for Calendar Year 2001 is available at DPNR's, Division of Environmental Protection (DEP). It
is also available at all public libraries, the University of the Virgin Islands' (UVI) library, UVI's
Water Resource Research Institute, and at local laboratories.

EPA will prepare an annual national violations report which summarizes and evaluates the States'
and Territories' report. EPA's report must also make recommendations concerning the resources
needed to improve compliance with the SDWA, and must include information on PWSs in Indian
reservations.


1.1 PUBLIC WATER SYSTEMS

A public water system (PWS) is defined as a system that provides water via piping or other
constructed conveyances for human consumption to at least 8 service connections or serves an
average of at least 20 people for at least 60 days each year. There are three classifications of public
water systems depending on how regularly a set population is supplied with the water. A PWSs is
designated a Community Public Water System if it regularly serves the same people all year round
(i.e., WAPA and apartment complexes). A Non-transient, Non-community Public Water System
regularly serves the same people for at least six months out of the year (i.e., schools and businesses).
Transient, Non-community Public Water Systems serve different people at least sixty days out of
the year (i.e., hotels and restaurants). For this report, the use of the acronym "PWS" refers to public
water systems of all three types, as well as bottled water plants and ice manufactures, unless
specified in greater detail.

There were approximately 400 active PWSs on the three islands of St. Thomas, St. Croix and St.
John in calendar year 2001. The number of PWSs is continually changing due to businesses opening
and closing. Some systems also become inactive water systems because they utilize a direct


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U.S. Virgin Islands
Public Water System Compliance Report
Calendar Year 2001

connection to the Virgin Islands Water and Power Authority (WAPA) as their only source of water.
The Virgin Islands Water and Power Authority's (WAPA) desalinization plants on St. Thomas and
St. Croix are the largest public water systems in the USVI. The WAPA St. Thomas system serves
approximately 29,000 residents on a regular basis, this does not include the transient population
which includes tourists. The WAPA St. Croix system serves approximately 35,000 residents on a
regular basis. The majority of public water systems in the USVI, however, serve between 25 to
1000 individuals. These facilities, for the most part, utilize rainwater collection systems augmented
by trucked water for the provision of potable water. The use of reverse osmosis treatment units to
produce potable water from brackish wells or sea water is increasing throughout the Territory.



1.2 THE PUBLIC WATER SYSTEM SUPERVISION PROGRAM: AN OVERVIEW

EPA established the Public Water System Supervision (PWSS) program under the authority of the
1974 SDWA. As directed by the SDWA and Amendments, EPA sets national limits on contaminant
levels in drinking water to ensure that the water is safe for human consumption. These limits are
known as maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). For some regulations, EPA has established
treatment techniques in place of an MCL to control unacceptable levels of a contaminant in water.
The EPA has also developed frequencies for which public water systems (PWSs) must monitor their
water for contaminants. PWSs are required to report the monitoring data to the States, Territories,
or to EPA. In addition, EPA requires PWSs to monitor for unregulated contaminants to provide data
for the development of future drinking water regulations. Finally, EPA requires PWSs to notify the
public when they have violated these regulations.

The SDWA applies to the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Indian Lands, the U.S. Virgin Islands,
Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and the
Republic of Palau.

The SDWA allows States and Territories to seek EPA approval to administer their own PWSS
programs. The authority to run a PWSS program is called primacy. To receive primacy, States and
Territories must meet certain requirements described in the Federal SDWA and regulations. States
and Territories must adopt drinking water regulations that are at least as stringent as the Federal
regulations. To obtain primacy, a State or Territory must also demonstrate that they can enforce the
requirements of the SDWA.

The United States Virgin Islands promulgated the Virgin Islands Safe Drinking Water Act
(VISDWA) in 1975 under 19 Virgin Islands Code (V.I.C.) Section 1303. In 1977, the drinking
water Rules and Regulations were issued as Title 19, Part VI, Chapter 51, Subchapter 1303, Sections
1303-11 to 1303-53, Drinking Water Standards. After the Virgin Islands demonstrated their ability
to enforce the SDWA, EPA transferred primacy from EPA Region 2 to the USVI Department of


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U.S. Virgin Islands
Public Water System Compliance Report
Calendar Year 2001

Conservation and Cultural Affairs in 1979. This department was officially restructured and named
the Department of Planning and Natural Resources (DPNR) in 1987 and the authority for
enforcement of the Drinking Water Standards was given to the Commissioner of DPNR by Title 19,
Part VI, Chapter 51, Subchapter 1309. The Virgin Islands' PWSS program is now administered
through the DPNR's Division of Environmental Protection.

Amendments to the VISDWA added Sections 1303-54 through 1303-70 in 1994 to fulfill primacy
requirements which were added to the Federal SDWA by the 1986 Amendments. In January 1998,
DPNR was given the legislative authority to regulate locally produced and imported bottled water
and ice.


1.3 VIOLATIONS OF THE SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT

This Annual Public Water System Compliance Report provides a summary of the number of
violations of the categories listed in section 1414(c)(3) of the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act
Reauthorization. These categories include but is not limited to the following:

* maximum contaminant level (MCL) violations;
* treatment technique requirement (TT) violations;
* significant violations of monitoring and reporting (M/R) requirements;
* violations of variances and exemptions; and
* significant violations of consumer notification requirements.

Primacy States and Territories submit data to the EPA's Safe Drinking Water Information System
(SDWIS/FED) on a quarterly basis. Data include PWS inventory statistics, the incidence of MCL
exceedances, major M/R violations, and TT. The enforcement actions taken against the violators
is also submitted to SDWIS/FED..

Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL)

Under the Federal SDWA, the EPA sets national limits on the level that contaminants may be
present in drinking water. These limits are known as Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs). MCLs
were developed to ensure that the water is safe for human consumption. The levels set by EPA for
each contaminant are amounts of that contaminant that can be present in the water without causing
adverse health effects to humans or pose health risks over a long period of time. The Virgin Islands
SDWA and Drinking Water Standards adopted all of the contaminants and MCLs regulated by the
Federal SDWA.

When a PWS exceeds a MCL, it is required to notify the public of the exceedance. Notices for
violating the MCL of a contaminant with potential to have a "serious adverse effect" must contain


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U.S. Virgin Islands
Public Water System Compliance Report
Calendar Year 2001

an explanation of the violation, the potential health effects, what the system is doing to correct the
problem, and whether consumers need to use an alternate source of water. Notices must be given
to the public within 24 hours after the occurrence of the violation and the notice must run for at least
three consecutive days. Violations which occurred in 2001 for exceeding MCLs are discussed in
Section 3 of this report .

Monitoring & Reporting Requirements (M/R)

A PWS is required to monitor for water quality parameters and to verify that the levels of
contaminants present in the water do not exceed the MCLs. If the PWS fails to have its water tested
as required by the VISDWA, then a monitoring violation occurs. A reporting violation occurs when
the PWS does not report test results correctly to the primacy agency. In the Virgin Islands, the
proper authority to report monitoring data to is the Division of Environmental Protection's Public
Water System Supervision program.

For this report, significant M/R violations are defined as any major monitoring and reporting
violation that occurred during calendar year 2001. A maj or M/R violation occurs when no samples
were taken or no results were reported during a compliance period. A compliance period varies for
different contaminants. For example, biological testing for total Coliform must be done on a
monthly basis, on the other hand, testing for nitrates must occur annually. Significant M/R
violations which occurred in calendar year 2001 are discussed in Section 3 of this report.

Treatment Techniques (TT)

For some regulations, the EPA establishes treatment techniques in lieu of an MCL. Treatment
techniques are required for contaminants that laboratories cannot adequately measure. For example,
EPA requires a water disinfection process instead of an MCL for viruses, bacteria, and turbidity.

Under the Lead and Copper Rule, corrosion control treatment is required for the control of lead and
copper in drinking water. Although a specific treatment technique is not dictated by the rules and
regulations, the corrosion control treatment must be reviewed and approved by DPNR before it may
be implemented by the public water system. There were no treatment technique violations in the
Virgin Islands during calendar year 2001.

Variances and Exemptions

Variances and exemptions to specific requirements under the SDWA Amendments of 1996 may be
granted under certain circumstances. If a PWS cannot meet the MCL, due to the characteristics of
the raw water sources reasonably available, a primacy State (Territory) can grant the PWS a variance
from the applicable primary drinking water regulation on the condition that the system install the
best available technology, treatment techniques, or other means which the Administer finds are


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U.S. Virgin Islands
Public Water System Compliance Report
Calendar Year 2001

available. The State (Territory) must find that the variance will not result in an unreasonable risk
to public health. An exemption may be granted by a primacy State (Territory) to relieve a PWS
from its obligation to comply with a MCL if the systems' noncompliance results from compelling
factors. The PWS will be required to come into compliance with the MCL as expeditiously as
practicable, but no later than three years after the otherwise applicable compliance date. No
variances or exemptions have been given to any PWS in the Virgin Islands, therefore, there were
no violations for this category during calendar year 2001.

Consumer Notification Requirements

A PWS is required to notify persons served when it fails to comply with the requirements of the
SDWA or are facing other situations posing a risk to public health. The 1996 Amendments to the
SDWA require public notification (PN) to include a clear and understandable explanation of the
nature of the violation, its potential adverse health effects, steps that the PWS is undertaking to
correct the violation, and the possibility of the provision of alternative water supplies during the
violation.

In addition to PN, the 1996 Ammendments to the SDWA requires community public water systems
(CPWSs) to prepare and provide to their customers annual consumer confidence reports (CCR) on
the quality of the water delivered by the system. These reports provide valuable information to
customers of CPWS and allow them to make personal health-based decisions regarding their
drinking water consumption.

Contaminant Waivers

The Department of Planning & Natural Resources fully utilizes the waiver provisions provided by
the Federal regulations. Under these regulations, DPNR is allowed to develop waiver programs that
reduce or eliminate a public water system's monitoring requirements. Waivers are based mainly
upon two criteria: 1) analytical results of previous sampling, and 2) a vulnerability assessment.
Waivers based on analytical results may use data collected prior to initial monitoring (grandfathered)
or data collected to meet the initial monitoring requirements. A vulnerability assessment involves
two steps: 1) Use Waiver: A determination is made whether a given contaminant was used,
manufactured, and/or stored in an area that possibly would affect the water quality of a public water
system; and 2) Susceptibility Waiver: An assessment of the water source is made to determine a
public water system's susceptibility to contamination.

A number of individual public water systems have received waivers for volatile organic compounds
(VOCs) and inorganic contaminants (IOCs) based on analytical results of previous sampling. DPNR
has initiated a synthetic organic compound (SOC) waiver procedure to determine which SOCs could
qualify for either a use waiver or a susceptibility waiver. DPNR hopes that this procedure will
identify a select group of SOCs for which monitoring may be waived for all public water systems


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U.S. Virgin Islands
Public Water System Compliance Report
Calendar Year 2001

in the Virgin Islands. Since roof catchment is the most common source of drinking water in the
Virgin Islands, DPNR will consider granting susceptibility waivers to a selected group of small roof
catchment systems on a case-by-case basis if they can provide information which verifies that no
regulated organic contaminants or other toxic chemicals which may cause a concern for adverse
health effects are contained in the roof coating.


Page 6








2.0 Table of Significant Violations


2.1 TOTAL COLIFORM RULE
Virgin Islands
2001


MCLs Treatment Techniques Significant
Monitoring/Reporting
MCL Number Number of Number Number of Number Number of
(Mg/I) of Systems With of Systems With of Systems With
Violations Violations Violations Violations Violations Violations
Total Coliform Rule
Acute MCL violation Presence 65 43
Non-acute MCL violation Presence 11 11
Major routine and 69 32
follow up monitoring
Sanitary survey 0 0
Tota I 76 48* 69 32
*6 PWS had both acute and non-acute MCL violations
2.2 LEAD & COPPER RULE
Virgin Islands
2001

.~ Significant
MCLs Treatment Techniques Significnt
Monitoring/Reporting
MCL Number Number of Number Number of Number Number of
(Mg/I) of Systems With of Systems With of Systems With
Violations Violations Violations Violations Violations Violations
Lead and Copper Rule
Initial lead and copper tap MIR 0 0
Follow-up or routine lead 0 0
and copper tap MIR
Treatment Installation 0 0
Public education 0 0
Total o o o 0


Page 7








2.3 INORGANIC CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS
Virgin Islands
2001


MCLs Treatment Techniques Significant
Monitoring/Reporting
MCL Number Number of Number Number of Number Number of
(Mg/I) of Systems With of Systems With of Systems With
Violations Violations Violations Violations Violations Violations
Inorganic Contaminants
Antimony 0.006 0 0 0 0
Arsenic 0.05 0 0 0 0
Asbestos 7 million fiber/I 0 0 0 0
Asbestos 0 0 0 0
< 10 um long
Barium 2 0 0 0 0
Beryllium 0.004 0 0 0 0
Cadmium 0.005 0 0 0 0
Chromium 0.1 0 0 0 0
Cyanide (as free cyanide) 0.2 0 0 0 0
Fluoride 4 0 0 0 0
Mercury 0.002 0 0 0 0
Nitrate 10 (as Nitrogen) 0 0 71 71
Nitrite 1 (as Nitrogen) 0 0 0 0
Selenium 0.05 0 0 0 0
Thallium 0.002 0 0 0 0
Total nitrate & nitrite 10 (as Nitrogen) 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 71 71


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2.4 ORGANIC CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS


Virgin Islands
2001


Significant
MCLs Treatment Techniques Signi
Monitoring/Reporting
MCL Number Number of Number Number of Number Number of
(Mg/I) of Systems With of Systems With of Systems With
Violations Violations Violations Violations Violations Violations
Organic Contaminants
1,1,1 -Trichloroethane 0.2 0 0 0 0
1,1-Dichlororthylene 0.007 0 0 0 0
1,1,2-Trichloroethane 0.005 0 0 0 0
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene 0.07 0 0 0 0
1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) 0.0002 0 0 0 0
1,2-Dichloroethane 0.005 0 0 0 0
1,2-Dichloropropane 0.005 0 0 0 0
2,3,7,8-TCDD (Dioxin) 3x10-8 0 0 0 0
2,4,5-TP 0.05 0 0 0 0
2,4-D 0.07 0 0 0 0
Acrylamide 0 0
Alachlor 0.002 0 0 0 0
Atrazine 0.003 0 0 0 0
Benzene 0.005 0 0 0 0
Benzo[a]pyrene 0.0002 0 0 0 0
Carbofuran 0.04 0 0 0 0
Carbon tetrachloride 0.005 0 0 0 0
Chlordane 0.002 0 0 0 0
cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene 0.07 0 0 0 0
Dalapon 0.2 0 0 0 0
Di(2-ethylhexyl)adipate 0.4 0 0 0 0
Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate 0.006 0 0 0 0
Dichloromethane 0.005 0 0 0 0
Dinoseb 0.007 0 0 0 0
Diquat 0.02 0 0 0 0
Endothall 0.1 0 0 0 0
Endrin 0.002 0 0 0 0
Epichlorohydrin 0 0


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2.4 ORGANIC CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS


Virgin Islands
2001


Significant
MCLs Treatment Techniques Signi
Monitoring/Reporting
MCL Number Number of Number Number of Number Number of
(Mg/I) of Systems With of Systems With of Systems With
Violations Violations Violations Violations Violations Violations
Ethylbenzene 0.7 0 0 0 0
Ethylene dibromide 0.00005 0 0 0 0
Glyphosate 0.7 0 0 0 0
Heptachlor 0.0004 0 0 0 0
Heptachlor epoxide 0.0002 0 0 0 0
Hexachlorobenzene 0.001 0 0 0 0
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene 0.05 0 0 0 0
Lindane 0.0002 0 0 0 0
Methoxychlor 0.04 0 0 0 0
Monochlorobenzene 0.1 0 0 0 0
o-Dichlorobenzene 0.6 0 0 0 0
para-Dichlorobenzene 0.075 0 0 0 0
Total polychlorinated biphenyls 0.0005 0 0 0 0
Pentachlorophenol 0.001 0 0 0 0
Tetrachloroethylene 0.005 0 0 0 0
Trichloroethylene 0.005 0 0 0 0
Styrene 0.1 0 0 0 0
Toluene 1 0 0 0 0
trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene 0.1 0 0 0 0
Xylenes (total) 10 0 0 0 0
Toxaphene 0.003 0 0 0 0
Oxamyl (Vydate) 0.2 0 0 0 0
Picloram 0.5 0 0 0 0
Simazine 0.004 0 0 0 0
Vinyl chloride 0.002 0 0 0 0


Total trihalomethanes 0.1 0 0 1 1
Total o 0 1 1


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2.5 RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINANTS


Virgin Islands
2001


Significant
MCLs Treatment Techniques Signi
Monitoring/Reporting
MCL Number Number of Number Number of Number Number of
(Mg/I) of Systems With of Systems With of Systems With
Violations Violations Violations Violations Violations Violations
Radionuclides
Gross alpha 15 pCi/l 0 0 0 0
Radium-226 and radium-228 5 pCi/l 0 0 0 0
Gross beta 4 mrem/yr 0 0 0 0
Total o 0 0 0


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U.S. Virgin Islands
Public Water System Compliance Report
Calendar Year 2001

3.0 Summary of 2001 Violations

3.1 TOTAL COLIFORM RULE MCL VIOLATIONS

Pathogens are disease causing microorganisms. Bacterial diseases include typhoid, salmonellosis,
shigellosis, bacterial dysentery, and asiatic cholera. Giardia and Cryptosporidium are caused by
protozoans and can cause gastroenteritis. Organisms which cause diseases are usually transmitted
through feces and urine, although they can also be found in animals and soil reservoirs. Many
microorganisms can be found in water. Bacteria from sewage and animal wastes have presented the
most frequent and immediate health risks to public water supplies over the years. Protecting our
water sources and employing proper treatment techniques are key to providing safe drinking water
to the public. It is difficult, not to mention expensive and time consuming, to test for disease-
causing organisms. Since pathogens are primarily transmitted through feces and urine, water which
shows the presence of such contaminants is considered unfit for human consumption. Coliform
bacteria is excreted in much larger numbers than pathogens. Therefore, Coliform bacteria,
specifically the presence of fecal Coliform and Escherichia Coli bacteria, are used as the best (and
most easily tested for) indicators of pathogenic contaminated water. While the presence of Coliform
bacteria does not prove that the water is dangerous, the absence of these bacteria serves as evidence
that the water is free of pathogens.

All public water systems in the Virgin Islands are required to have their drinking water supply tested
for Coliform bacteria on a monthly basis. Failure to test the water or submit the test results, or
failure to meet the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for total Coliform are all violations of the
Total Coliform Rule under the Safe Drinking Water Act.

Compliance with the TCR MCL is determined simply by the presence or absence of total Coliform
bacteria in a sample. A public water system which collects fewer than 40 samples per month
exceeds this MCL when more than one sample is total coliform-positive. On the other hand, a
system which collects more than 40 samples each month exceeds the total coliform MCL if more
than 5% of the samples collected are total coliform-positive. Most of the water systems in the
Virgin Islands are only required to collect one sample each month. WAPA, since it serves a much
larger population, is required to take 30 bacteriological samples on St. Thomas and 40
bacteriological samples on St. Croix each month.

If a sample tests positive for total coliform, the lab will further analyze the water sample for fecal
Coliform. If the water sample only tests positive for total coliform, it is considered a non-acute
MCL violation. If the water sample also tests positive for fecal coliform, it is considered an acute
MCL violation. The reason for differentiating between acute and non-acute MCL violations is the
impending health effects that may be caused to an individual by the presence of fecal Coliform in
the water. The difference in enforcement of these two types of violations is the time frame in which
the PWS must notify users of the water supply of the MCL violation.


There were 76 violations of the Total Coliform MCL in 2001. Of approximately 400 PWSs in the


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U.S. Virgin Islands
Public Water System Compliance Report
Calendar Year 2001

Virgin Islands, forty-eight (48) systems were responsible for these violations. This represented
12% of the Territory's PWSs. The number of total coliform MCL violations decreased by
approximately 28% from 2000 to 2001.

This decrease in MCL violations may be attributed to an increase in the number of public water
system inspections, called sanitary surveys, performed by the PWSS program in 2001. Sanitary
surveys are on-site inspections of the water source, facilities, equipment, operation and maintenance
procedures, and management practices of a public water system for the purpose of evaluating the
adequacy of the system for producing and distributing safe drinking water. Sanitary surveys provide
the opportunity for discussion of the importance of providing safe drinking water to the public. It
also provides an opportunity to educate public water system operators on proper chlorination and
other disinfection techniques. Recommendations are provided to the PWS by DPNR on
improvements to the facility which will result in better water quality produced by the system. The
decease in TCR violations shows that this open dialogue between public water system operators and
managers, and DPNR has directly benefitted the public and their health through improved water
quality.




3.2 TOTAL COLIFORM RULE MONITORING/REPORTING VIOLATIONS

A PWS is required to monitor for total Coliform bacteria on a monthly basis. The number of
samples required each month depends on the population served by the PWS. If the PWS fails to
have its water tested as required by the Virgin Islands Safe Drinking Water Act, then a monitoring
violation occurs. A monitoring violation also occurs when the PWS does not report test results
correctly to the primacy agency.

There were 69 monitoring/reporting (M/R) violations of the Total Coliform Rule. Of approximately
400 PWSs in the Virgin Islands, thirty-two (32) PWSs were responsible for all of these violations.
This represents approximately 8% of the Territory's PWSs. M/R violations of the Total Coliform
Rule, cited during 2001 decreased by approximately 7% from the number of 2000 M/R violations.
This decrease in TCR M/R violations may, again, be attributed to a more aggressive outreach policy
by the PWSS program.



3.3 NITRATE MONITORING

Nitrate is used in fertilizer and is found in sewage and waste from human and/or farm animals and
generally gets into drinking water from those activities. Excessive levels of nitrate in drinking water
has caused serious illness and sometimes death in infants under six months of age. The MCL for
Nitrate is 10 mg/1. Exceeding this concentration constitutes a violation of the MCL for Nitrate. No
PWS exceeded the MCL for Nitrate in 2001.


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U.S. Virgin Islands
Public Water System Compliance Report
Calendar Year 2001

PWSs are required to monitor for Nitrate on a annual basis. Failure to perform this monitoring as
required by the Virgin Islands Safe Drinking Water Act, constitutes a monitoring violation. A
monitoring violation also occurs when the PWS does not report analytical samples results to the
primacy agency. Seventy-one (71) public water systems failed to monitor for Nitrate in 2001. This
represents approximately 18% of the Territory's PWSs and a decrease by approximately 17% in the
number of violations that occurred in 2000.


3.4 VOLATILE ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS (VOC) MONITORING

Volatile Organic Contaminants (VOC) are chemicals derived from petroleum and refined petroleum
products that produce vapors readily at room temperature and normal atmospheric pressure. VOCs
include gasoline, industrial chemicals and solvents. Volatile industrial solvents have many uses
because of their ability to dissolve oils, fats, resins, rubber and plastic. PWSs are required to
initially monitor for VOCs on a quarterly basis. Subsequent monitoring must occur annually, unless
a PWS is granted a waiver by DPNR. Failure to perform this monitoring as required by the Virgin
Islands Safe Drinking Water Act, constitutes a monitoring violation. A monitoring violation also
occurs when the PWS does not report analytical samples results to the DPNR. DPNR did not issue
any M/R violations for VOCs.

There are different MCLs for the twenty-one regulated VOCs. Exceeding any of these established
limits constitutes a violation of the MCLs for VOCs. There were no MCL violations for VOCs.


3.5 TOTAL TRIHALOMETHANES (TTHM) MONITORING

Many PWSs treat their water with a chemical disinfectant in order to inactivate disease causing
pathogens. Chlorine is a commonly used disinfectant for the effective control of many harmful
microorganisms. Chlorine, however, reacts with organic matter and form the group of contaminants
known as the trihalomethanes. CPWSs which serve a population of 10,000 or more and which add
a disinfectant are required to monitor for Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM) on a quarterly basis.
Compliance is based on a running annual arithmetic average, computed quarterly, of quarterly
averages of all samples collected Failure to perform this monitoring as required by the Virgin
Islands Safe Drinking Water Act, constitutes a monitoring violation. A monitoring violation also
occurs when the PWS does not report analytical samples results to the DPNR. There was only one
M/R violation for TTHM in 2001.

The MCL for TTHM is 0.10 mg/1. Exceeding this concentration constitutes a violation of the MCL
for TTHM. No PWS exceeded the MCL for TTHM in 2001.


Page 14










U.S. Virgin Islands
Public Water System Compliance Report
Calendar Year 2001

3.6 LEAD AND COPPER MONITORING


Community and Non-Transient, Non-Community, Public Water Systems are required to initially
monitor for Lead and Copper during two consecutive 6-month sampling periods. The number of
samples required to be collected during each sampling period is based on the population served by
a PWSs. Failure to perform this monitoring as required by the Virgin Islands Safe Drinking Water
Act, constitutes a monitoring violation. There are no MCLs for lead and copper. EPA has, however,
established Action Levels (AL) for lead and copper. Exceeding an AL is not a violation of the Safe
Drinking Water Act. PWSs exceeding the ALs for lead and copper are required to install optimal
corrosion control treatment. Failure to install treatment or recommend a corrosion control treatment
to the primacy agency constitutes a treatment technique violation of the Safe Drinking Water Act.


3.7 SIGNIFICANT NONCOMPLIANCE (SNC)


Significant noncompliance occurs when a public water system violates any water quality monitoring
requirement for three (3) or more months within a rolling 12-month period (i.e Total Coliform
monitoring) or two (2) or more compliance periods (i.e. chemical parameter monitoring
requirements). Significant noncompliance is considered the most reprehensible and significant
violation under the SDWA.

List of Significant Noncompliers
No. Public Water System EPA ID # Type Island
1 School of the Good Shepherd VI3000066 NTNCPWS St. Croix
2 Villa La Reine Shopping Center VI0000413 NTNCPWS St. Croix
3 Burnett Towers VI0000122 CPWS St. Thomas
4 Charlotte Amalie High School VI0000172 NTNCPWS St. Thomas
5 Curriculum Center (Laga Building) VI0000274 NTNCPWS St. Thomas
6 Edith Williams School VI0000200 NTNCPWS St. Thomas
7 Hometown Convenience VI1000201 TNCPWS St. Thomas
8 Ivanna E. Kean High School VI0000250 NTNCPWS St. Thomas
9 James Monroe School VI0000524 NTNCPWS St. Thomas
10 Joseph Sibilly (Art Room) VI0000508 NTNCPWS St. Thomas
11 Joseph Sibilly (Cafe) VI0000507 NTNCPWS St. Thomas
12 Ralph Wheatley Center VI1000069 NTNCPWS St. Thomas
13 Romano's Restaurant VI1000148 TNCPWS St. Thomas
14 Virgilio's Restaurant VI1000155 TNCPWS St. Thomas
C = Community public water system
NTNC = Non-transient,Non-Community public water system
TNC = Transient,Non-Community public water system


Page 15







4.0 List of Public Water Systems with Violations During 2001


4.1 St. Croix Public Water Systems with Violations during 2001
PWS EPAID Violation Violallon Acute Violallon
PWS St. Croix Classilicalion Pop. Contaminant NOV #
No. No. No. Type Violation Period


2 Cane Brake Apt. V10000305 C 304 Coliform 3 C-02-008 MCL Yes Nov-01
3 Caribe Do-It Center VI3000224 NTNC 150 Coliform 4 C-01-024 MCL Yes May-01
Coliform 5 C-01-013 MCL Yes Jan-01
4 Chenay Bay Resort VI3000091 TNC 25or -01-01 ML Yes -01
Coliform 6 C-01-015 MCL Yes Feb-01
5 Divi Carina Bay Resort VI3000504 NTNC 1240 Coliform 7 C-01-020 M/R N/A Apr-01
6 Fast Foto Inc. (2) DHS Main Office VI3000226 NTNC 125 Nitrate 8 C-02-300 M/R N/A 2001
7 Frederiksted Head Start V10000362 NTNC 32 Coliform 9 C-01-021 MCL No Apr-01
8 Galloway's Water Delivery VI3000445 TNC 25 Coliform 10 C-01-019 M/R N/A Apr-01
9 Gentle Winds Condo (I) VI3000052 TNC 40 Coliform 11 C-01-027 MCL Yes Jul-01
10 Gentle Winds Condo (K) VI3000054 TNC 50 Coliform 12 C-01-028 MCL Yes Jul-01
Coliform 13 C-02-002 MCL Yes Oct-01
11 Good Hope Townhouse V10000098 C 142 Coliform 1 C-02-0 ML Yes -01
Coliform 14 C-02-014 MCL Yes Dec-01
12 J & J Delivery VI3000089 ICE 3500 Coliform 15 C-01-030 M/R N/A Jul-01
13 Juanita Gardine Elementary VI0000332 NTNC 879 Nitrate 16 C-02-303 M/R N/A 2001
14 Kentucky Fried (F'sted) V10000392 TNC 400 Coliform 17 C-02-017 MCL Yes Dec-01
Coliform 18 C-01-029 MCL No Jul-01
15 Manor School VI3000044 NTNC 200
Coliform 19 C-02-004 MCL Yes Oct-01


17 Rainbow Beach Club V10000431 TNC 25 Coliform 22 C-01-025 MCL No Jun-01
Coliform 23 C-02-001 MCL Yes Oct-01
18 School of the Good Shepherd VI3000066 NTNC 185 Coliform 24 C-02-013 MCL Yes Dec-01
Coliform 25 C-01-033 MCL Yes Sep-01
19 Seventh Day Adventist Primary VI0000607 NTNC 260 Coliform 26 C-01-023 MCL Yes May-01
Coliform 27 C-01-014 MCL Yes Jan-01
20 St. Croix Yacht Club VI3000482 TNC 25
Coliform 28 C-01-016 MCL Yes Feb-01
21 Sunny Isle Shopping Center V10000406 NTNC 3000 Coliform 29 C-02-003 MCL Yes Oct-01
22 The STX Avis VI3000226 TNC 25 Coliform 30 C-02-020 MCL Yes Dec-01
23 Tropical Ten Pin VI300485 TNC 22 Coliform 31 C-02-006 MCL No Oct-01
24 UVI (REC) VI3000334 NTNC 300 Coliform 32 C-02-018 MCL Yes Dec-01


Page 16







4.0 List of Public Water Systems with Violations During 2001

4.1 St. Croix Public Water Systems with Violations during 2001
PWS I EPAID I I I Violation N. O Violallon Acute [ Violalion I
PWS St. Croix I I Classificalion Pop. Contaminants NOV #
No I Nn I I I No Tne Violation Perind


Page 17







4.0 List of Public Water Systems with Violations During 2001


4.2 St. Thomas/St. John Public Water Systems with Violations during 2001
PWS EPAID Violation Violation Acute Violation
PWS St. Thomas Classification Pop. Contaminant NOV #
No. No. No. Type Violation Period
1 Al Cohen's Plaza B-1 V11000194 TNC 15 Coliform 1 T-01-044 MCL Yes Jan-01
2 American Yacht Harbor, Inc V11000042 NTNC 400 Nitrate 2 T-02-300 M/R N/A 2001
3 Aquarian Systems V11000215 TNC 25 Coliform 3 T-01-098 M/R N/A Jul-01


5 Blackbeard's Castle V11000009 TNC 85 Coliform 6 T-01-048 M/R N/A Jan-01
6 Bluebeard's Beach Club & Villas A V10000211 NTNC 62 Nitrate 7 T-02-301 M/R N/A 2001
7 Bluebeard's Beach Club & Villas B V10000212 NTNC 62 Nitrate 8 T-02-302 M/R N/A 2001
8 Bluebeard's Beach Club & Villas C V10000213 NTNC 62 Nitrate 9 T-02-303 M/R N/A 2001
9 Bluebeard's Beach Club & Villas D V10000214 NTNC 62 Nitrate 10 T-02-304 M/R N/A 2001
10 Bluebeard's Beach Club & Villas E V10000215 NTNC 62 Nitrate 11 T-02-305 M/R N/A 2001
11 Bluebeard's Beach Club & Villas F V10000216 NTNC 62 Nitrate 12 T-02-306 M/R N/A 2001
12 Bluebeard's Beach Club & Villas G V10000217 NTNC 62 Nitrate 13 T-02-307 M/R N/A 2001
Coliform 14 T-01-045 MCL No Jan-01
13 Bolongo Hotel VI0000169 NTNC 150 T-00 N
Nitrate 15 T-02-308 MIR NIA 2001
14 Bunker Hill Guest House V11000108 TNC 25 Nitrate 16 T-02-309 M/R N/A 2001
Coliform 17 T-01-099 M/R N/A Jul-01
15 Burnett Towers VI0000122 C 50 Coliform 18 T-02-002 MCL Yes Oct-01
Coliform 19 T-02-014 MCL/Fine Yes Nov-01
16 Cabrita Point Resort VI1000131 C 75 Coliform 20 T-02-025 M/R N/A Dec-01
17 Caneel Bay & Turtle Resort V10000558 NTNC 328 Nitrate 21 T-02-310 M/R N/A 2001
Coliform 22 T-01-054 MIR-Fine N/A Feb-01
Coliform 23 T-01-064 M/R-Fine N/A Mar-01
Coliform 24 T-01-074 M/R-Fine N/A Apr-01
18 Charlotte Amalie High V10000172 NTNC 1715 C rm T01 M N/A 01
Coliform 25 T-01-089 M/R N/A May-01
Coliform 26 T-01-114 M/R N/A Sep-01
Nitrate 27 T-02-311 M/R N/A 2001


20 Church of God Academy V10000481 NTNC 37 Coliform 30 T-02-026 M/R N/A Dec-01
Coliform 31 T-01-049 M/R N/A Jan-01
21 Cinema One Building VI1000180 NTNC 100 Coliform 32 T-01-103 M/R-Fine N/A Jul-01
Nitrate 33 T-02-312 M/R N/A 2001
22 Cinnamon Bay Camp Ground-NPS V10000557 NTNC 490 Nitrate 34 T-02-313 M/R N/A 2001
23 Clearview Apts. V11000052 C 82 Nitrate 35 T-02-314 M/R N/A 2001
24 Cost-U-Less V11000301 NTNC 835 Nitrate 36 T-02-315 M/R N/A 2001
25 Cruz Bay Headstart-DHS V10000562 NTNC 30 Nitrate 37 T-02-316 M/R N/A 2001


Page 18







4.0 List of Public Water Systems with Violations During 2001


4.2 St. Thomas/St. John Public Water Systems with Violations during 2001
PWS EPAID Violation Violation Acute Violation
PWS St. Thomas Classification Pop. Contaminant NOV #
No. No. No. Type Violation Period



Coliform 41 T-01-061 MIR-Fine N/A Feb-01
Coliform 42 T-01-071 M/R-Fine N/A Mar-01
Coliform 43 T-01-081 M/R-Fine N/A Apr-01
27 Curriculum Center (Laga Bldg.) V10000274 NTNC 150 C rm 4 T-0-1 N/A
Coliform 44 T-01-110 M/R N/A Aug-01
Coliform 45 T-01-115 M/R N/A Sep-01
Nitrate 46 T-02-318 M/R N/A 2001
Coliform 47 T-01-093 MCL Yes Jun-01
28 Dorothea Condominiums VI1000072 C 68 Coliform 47 T-01-093 MCL Yes J
Nitrate 48 T-02-319 M/R N/A 2001
29 East Wind Condos V10000590 TNC 20 Coliform 49 T-01-100 M/R-Fine N/A Jul-01
Coliform 50 T-01-055 MIR-Fine N/A Feb-01
Coliform 51 T-01-065 M/R-Fine N/A Mar-01
30 Edith L. Williams School V10000200 NTNC 160 Coliform 52 T-01-075 M/R-Fine N/A Apr-01
Coliform 53 T-02-029 M/R N/A Dec-01
Nitrate 54 T-02-320 M/R N/A 2001


32 Emerald Beach Resort II V11000084 NTNC 130 Nitrate 57 T-02-322 M/R N/A 2001
Coliform 58 T-02-016 MCL No Nov-01
33 Estate Harmony #1 VI1000181 TNC 25 Colifor T020 ML 01
Coliform .59 T-02-022 MCL Yes Dec-01
34 Evelyn E. Marcelli School V10000522 NTNC 235 Nitrate 60 T-02-323 M/R N/A 2001
36 Frenchman's Reef Resort V10000095 NTNC 800 Nitrate 61 T-02-324 M/R N/A 2001
Coliform 62 T-0 1-116 MIR NIA Sep-01
37 Frenchtown Ballfield V11000200 TNC 25
Nitrate 63 T-02-325 MIR NIA 2001
38 Guy Benjamin Elementary-STJ V10000555 NTNC 135 Nitrate 64 T-02-326 M/R N/A 2001
39 Heritage Hills Condos VI1000118 C 150 Coliform 65 T-02-027 M/R N/A Dec-01


Page 19







4.0 List of Public Water Systems with Violations During 2001


4.2 St. Thomas/St. John Public Water Systems with Violations during 2001
PWS EPAID Violation Violation Acute Violation
PWS St. Thomas Classification Pop. Contaminant NOV #
No. No. No. Type Violation Period
Coliform CC T-01-046 MCL-Fine Yes Jan-01
Coliform 67 T-01-062 MCL-Fine Yes Mar-01
Coliform T-01-072 MCL-Fine Yes Apr-01
40 Hometown Convenience VI1000201 TNC 25
Coliform 69 T-01-084 MCL-Fine Yes May-01
Coliform 10 T-02-010 MIR N/A Oct-01
Coliform 71 T-02-017 MCL No Nov-01
41 Hospital Grnd. Proj. Bldg A (H, P, & R) VI0000112 C 25 Nitrate 72 T-02-327 M/R N/A 2001
42 Hospital Grnd. Proj. Bldg F (H, P, & R) V10000113 C 25 Nitrate 73 T-02-328 M/R N/A 2001
43 Hospital Grnd. Proj. Bldg G (H, P, & R) V10000114 C 25 Nitrate 74 T-02-329 M/R N/A 2001
44 Hull Bay Hideaway (formerly Larry's) V10000219 TNC 25 Nitrate 75 T-02-330 M/R N/A 2001
Coliform 76 T-01-056 MIR-Fine N/A Feb-01
Coliform 77 T-01-066 M/R-Fine N/A Mar-01
Coliform 78 T-01-076 M/R-Fine N/A Apr-01
46 Ivanna E. Kean High V10000250 NTNC 1105 Colm 7 TR NA
Coliform 79 T-01-088 M/R N/A May-01
Coliform 80 T-02-004 MCL Yes Oct-01
Coliform 81 T-02-030 M/R N/A Dec-01




Coliform 86 T-01-059 MIR-Fine N/A Feb-01
Coliform 87 T-01-069 M/R-Fine N/A Mar-01
48 Joseph Sibilly (Art Room) V1000508 NTNC 30 M/R N/A 01
Coliform 88 1 T-01-079 M/R-Fine N/A Apr-01
Nitrate 89 T-02-333 M/R N/A 2001




Coliform 94 T-02-005 rMlCL Yes Oct-01
50 Knud Hansen Hospital/Headstart-DHS VI0000124 NTNC 50
Coliform 95 T-02-018 MCL Yes Nov-01
51 La Vida Marina V10000501 TNC 311 Nitrate 96 T-02-335 M/R N/A 2001
52 Lionel Roberts Stadium (H, P, & R) VI1000152 TNC 50 Nitrate 97 T-02-336 M/R N/A 2001
53 Lulu's (Formerly Ferrari's Restaurant) V10000293 TNC 25 Nitrate 98 T-02-337 M/R N/A 2001
54 Mafolie Hotel V10000222 TNC 25 Coliform 99 T-02-011 M/R N/A Oct-01


Page 20







4.0 List of Public Water Systems with Violations During 2001


4.2 St. Thomas/St. John Public Water Systems with Violations during 2001
PWS EPAID Violation Violation Acute Violation
PWS St. Thomas Classification Pop. Contaminant NOV #
No. No. No. Type Violation Period
Coliform 100 T-01-097 MCL Yes Jul-01
55 Magen's Bay Concession V10000223 TNC 25 C m 10 T1 ML Ys u-
Coliform 101 T-01-106 MCL Yes Aug-01
56 Magen's Point Condos V10000188 NTNC 75 Coliform 102 T-01-107 MCL Yes Aug-01
Coliformn 103 T-01-108 MCL Yes AuLg-01
57 Magen's Point Resort VI1000198 TNC 25 Colifor 10 T-0 ML Yes -01
Coliform 10-1 T-02-006 MCL Yes Oct-01
58 McDonald's (Frenchtown) V11000145 TNC 1500 Nitrate 105 T-02-338 M/R N/A 2001
59 Mongoose Jnct.l (restaurant) V11000098 TNC 100 Nitrate 106 T-02-339 M/R N/A 2001
Coliform Yes
60 Natural Source Water V10000300 BW 500 Coform 107 T-02-019 MCL es Nov-01
Coliform Yes
61 Nisky Center V11000037 NTNC 400 Coliform 108 T-01-050 MCL Yes Feb-01
62 Old Stone Farmhouse V11000149 TNC 25 Nitrate 109 T-02-340 M/R N/A 2001
Coliform 110 T-02-031 MIR NIA Dec-01
63 Peace Corp Elem. (kitchen) VI0000267 NTNC 400 T-02-1 MR N/A 01
Nitrate 111 T-02-341 M/R NIA 2001
65 Pine Peace School VI2000019 NTNC 84 Nitrate 112 T-02-343 M/R N/A 2001
66 Plantation Manor (Banana) V10000235 C 100 Nitrate 113 T-02-344 M/R N/A 2001
67 Plantation Manor (Hibiscus) V10000234 C 50 Nitrate 114 T-02-345 M/R N/A 2001
68 Plantation Manor (Papaya) V10000236 C 50 Nitrate 115 T-02-346 M/R N/A 2001
69 Plantation Manor(Poinsetta) V10000237 C 100 Nitrate 116 T-02-347 M/R N/A 2001
Coliform 117 T-01-086 M/R N/A May-01
70 Professional Center VI1000085 NTNC 50 Coliform 118 T-01-091 M/R-Fine N/A Jun-01
Nitrate 119 T-02-348 M/R N/A 2001
71 Queen Louise Apt. I (H, P, & R) V11000018 C 30 Nitrate 120 T-02-349 M/R N/A 2001
72 Queen Louise Apt. II (H, P, & R) V11000019 C 25 Nitrate 121 T-02-350 M/R N/A 2001
73 R. Wheatley Skills Center V11000069 NTNC 50 Nitrate 122 T-02-351 M/R N/A 2001
74 Rain Maker (Long Bay) VI1000210 V 25 Coliform 123 T-01-083 MCL Yes May-01
Coliformn 124 T-01-051 MCL No Feb-01
75 Rain Maker (Redhook) VI1000113 V 25 Colifor T-0-0 ML -01
Coliform 1 -5 T-02-023 MCL Yes Dec-01
76 Raintree Inn/Fish Trap V11000095 TNC 25 Nitrate 126 T-02-352 M/R N/A 2001
Coliform 127 T-01-060 MIR-Fine N/A Feb-01
77 Ralph Wheatley Center V11000069 NTNC 50 Coliform 128 T-01-070 M/R-Fine N/A Mar-01
Coliforin 19 T-01-080 M/R-Fine N/ AA r-01




79 Seaview Nursing V11000138 C 100 Nitrate 134 T-02-353 M/R N/A 2001
80 Secret Harbour House III Vl0000469 C 30 Coliform 135 T-01-082 MCL Yes May-01
81 Sibs Mountain Top Bar V11000040 TNC 25 Coliform 136 T-02-007 MCL Yes Oct-01


Page 21







4.0 List of Public Water Systems with Violations During 2001


4.2 St. Thomas/St. John Public Water Systems with Violations during 2001
PWS EPAID Violation Violation Acute Violation
PWS St. Thomas Classification Pop. Contaminant NOV #
No. No. No. Type Violation Period
82 St. Thomas Yacht Club VI1000174 TNC 50 Nitrate 137 T-02-354 M/R N/A 2001
83 Sugar Bay Plantation V11000104 NTNC 600 Coliform 138 T-02-012 M/R N/A Oct-01
84 Sugar Estate Headstart-DHS V11000123 NTNC 116 Coliform 139 T-02-008 MCL No Oct-01
85 Taarneberg Ross Proj Bldg 1(H, P, & R) V10000471 C 100 Nitrate 140 T-02-355 M/R N/A 2001
86 Taarneberg Ross Proj. Big 2 (H, P, & R) V10000472 C 100 Nitrate 141 T-02-356 M/R N/A 2001
87 Taarneberg Ross Proj.Bldg 3 (H, P, & R) V10000129 C 100 Nitrate 142 T-02-357 M/R N/A 2001
88 Taarneberg Ross Proj.Bldg 4 (H, P, & R) V10000130 C 100 Nitrate 143 T-02-358 M/R N/A 2001
89 Thomasville Housing- office V10000031 C 400 Nitrate 144 T-02-359 M/R N/A 2001
90 Tillet Gardens V10000093 TNC 50 Coliform 145 T-02-013 M/R N/A Oct-01
91 Toad & Tart V10000207 TNC 25 Coliform 146 T-01-085 M/R N/A May-01
92 Tropical Marina-Little Porch VI1000178 TNC 25 Coliform 147 T-02-028 M/R N/A Dec-01
93 U.V.I. V10000174 C 1800 Nitrate 148 T-02-360 M/R N/A 2001
Coliform 149 T-02-020 MrCL Yes Nov-01
94 Vessup Bay Marina VI1000177 TNC 25 Colifor 1 T0202 ML Yes -01
Coliform 150 T-02-024 MCL Yes Dec-01
95 VI Medical Foundation (Lab Bath) V11000057 NTNC 50 Nitrate 151 T-02-361 M/R N/A 2001
Coliform 152 T-01-109 MCL Yes Aug-01
96 VI Port Authority-Airport V10000264 NTNC 2500 ir T0 M
Nitrate 153 T-02-362 M/R NIA 2001
97 Victor's Hideout VI1000150 TNC 25 Coliform 154 T-02-021 M/R N/A Nov-01
Coliform 155 T-01-063 M/R N/A Mar-01
Coliform 156 T-01-073 M/R-Fine N/A Apr-01
Coliform 157 T-01-087 M/R-Fine N/A May-01
Coliform 158 T-01-090 M/R-Fine N/A Jun-01
98 Virgilio's Restaurant V11000155 TNC 25 Coliform 159 T-01-101 M/R-Fine N/A Jul-01
Coliform 160 T-01-111 M/R-Fine N/A Aug-01
Coliform 161 T-01-117 M/R-Fine N/A Sep-01
Coliform 162 T-02-009 M/R-Fine N/A Oct-01
Nitrate 163 T-02-363 M/R N/A 2001


100 Watergate East-Bldg.14 V10000479 TNC 25 Nitrate 166 T-02-364 M/R N/A 2001
101 Watergate East-Big.15,16, 17 V10000042 TNC 25 Nitrate 167 T-02-342 M/R N/A 2001
102 Wharfside Village VI1000291 NTNC 300 Coliform 168 T-01-096 MCL Yes Jul-01
104 Wheatley Shopping I V10000275 NTNC 575 Nitrate 169 T-02-366 M/R N/A 2001
105 Wheatley Shopping II V10000296 NTNC 60 Nitrate 170 T-02-367 M/R N/A 2001
106 Winston Raymos Ctr. (H, P, & R) V11000137 TNC 50 Nitrate 171 T-02-331 M/R N/A 2001


Page 22









U.S. Virgin Islands
Public Water System Compliance Report
Calendar Year 2001

water [40 CFR 141.80-91]. Lead and copper corrosion pose various health risks when
ingested at any level, and can enter drinking water from household pipes and plumbing
fixtures. States report violations of the Lead and Copper Rule in the following six
categories:

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest amount of a contaminant that EPA allows
in drinking water. MCLs ensure that drinking water does not pose either a short-term or
long-term health risk. MCLs are defined in milligrams per liter (parts per million) unless
otherwise specified.

Monitoring: EPA specifies which water testing methods the water systems must use, and sets
schedules for the frequency of testing. A water system that does not follow EPA's
schedule or methodology is in violation [40 CFR 141].

States must report monitoring violations that are significant as determined by the EPA
Administrator and in consultation with the States. For purposes of this report, significant
monitoring violations are major violations and they occur when no samples are taken or
no results are reported during a compliance period. A major monitoring violation for the
surface water treatment rule occurs when at least 90% of the required samples are not
taken or results are not reported during the compliance period.

Organic Contaminants: Carbon-based compounds, such as industrial solvents and pesticides.
These contaminants generally get into water through runoff from crop land or discharge
from factories. EPA has set legal limits on 54 organic contaminants that are to be
reported [40 CFR 141.61].

Radionuclides: Radioactive particles which can occur naturally in water or result from human
activity. EPA has set legal limits on four types of Radionuclides: radium-226, radium-
228, gross alpha, and beta particle/photon radioactivity [40 CFR 141].

Total Coliform Rule (TCR): The Total Coliform Rule establishes regulations for
microbiological contaminants in drinking water. These contaminants can cause short-
term health problems. If no samples are collected during the one month compliance
period, a significant monitoring violation occurs.

Acute MCL violation: Indicates that the system found fecal coliform or E. coli, potentially
harmful bacteria, in its water, thereby violating the rule.

Non-acute MCL violation: Indicates that the system found total coliform in samples of its water
at a frequency or at a level that violates the rule. For systems collecting fewer than 40
samples per month, more than one positive sample for total coliform is a violation. For
systems collecting 40 or more samples per month, more than 5% of the samples positive
for total coliform is a violation.


Page 23









U.S. Virgin Islands
Public Water System Compliance Report
Calendar Year 2001

Major routine and follow-up monitoring violation: Indicates that a system did not perform
any monitoring.

Treatment Techniques: A water disinfection process that EPA requires instead of an MCL for
contaminants that laboratories cannot adequately measure. Failure to meet other
operational and system requirements under the Surface Water Treatment and the Lead
and Copper Rules have also been included in this category of violation for purposes of
this report.

Violation: A failure to meet any state or federal drinking water regulation.


Page 24




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