Title: EAM transportation tips for Virgin Islands Motorists
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300666/00001
 Material Information
Title: EAM transportation tips for Virgin Islands Motorists
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Virgin Islands Energy Office
Publisher: Virgin Islands Energy Office
Publication Date: 2006
 Subjects
Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA01300666
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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EAM Transportation Tips for Virgin Islands Motorists (30 seconds)

1. Save gasoline and money by driving more efficiently. Drive at a moderate
speed. Aggressive driving, speeding, rapid accelerating and braking can
lower gas mileage by 33 percent at highway speeds and by 5 percent in
town. Press lightly but steadily on the accelerator so that you flow
smoothly through traffic. This transportation tip was brought to you by the
Virgin Islands Energy Office, a division of the Department of Planning and
Natural Resources.

2. Save gasoline and money by caring for your vehicle. Tune-up your engine
every three months or 3000 miles. Check and replace air filters. Air filters
keep impurities from damaging the inside of the engine. Consider a high
performance washable filter to increase horsepower, fuel efficiency and
eliminate replacement costs. This transportation tip was brought to you by
the Virgin Islands Energy Office, a division of the Department of Planning
and Natural Resources.

3. Save gasoline and money by planning your vehicular trips. Plan your trips
to the store, library, school, or to visit friends in combination to serve two
or three purposes. Share the ride with other members of your household
or carpool with co-workers to the jobsite. You and your neighbors can
help each other by offering to run errands during these planned and
combined trips. This transportation tip was brought to you by the Virgin
Islands Energy Office, a division of the Department of Planning and
Natural Resources.

4. Save gasoline and money by choosing the right vehicle. Replace your
present car with another that gets 10 miles per gallon more than your
present one. Consult the Gas Mileage Guide for New Car Buyers.
Consider Hybrid gasoline/electric vehicles because they offer greater
operating and fuel efficiency and cleaner operation with their lower
emissions. This transportation tip was brought to you by the Virgin Islands
Energy Office, a division of the Department of Planning and Natural
Resources.

5. Save gasoline and money by driving more efficiently. Avoid idling your
engine for longer than 30 seconds. Idling gets zero miles to the gallon.
Cars with larger engines typically waste more gas at idle than cars with
smaller engines. Driving slowly for the first few minutes is a more efficient
way to warm the engine. Also, turn off the ignition when waiting in line at
drive-thru windows, restarting will take less gasoline than idling. This
transportation tip was brought to you by the Virgin Islands Energy Office, a
division of the Department of Planning and Natural Resources.

6. Save gasoline and money by caring for your vehicle. Check tire pressures
regularly before starting out. Manufacturer's recommended levels are for
cold pressure. Properly inflated tires will last longer and can improve gas
mileage. Rotate tires to get more mileage and replace all four with radials.
They last longer, give better mileage, and often provide better steering
qualities. But don't mix radials with conventional tires. This transportation
tip was brought to you by the Virgin Islands Energy Office, a division of the
Department of Planning and Natural Resources.





7. Save gasoline and money by planning your vehicular trips. Eliminate
unnecessary trips and take public transit if available. On mass transit
buses such as VITRAN, one can read, brainstorm, sleep or catch up on
work. When public transit is not available, groups of commuters can
sometimes hire a taxi van, or form vanpools with assistance from their
employers, the Office of Transportation, or the Virgin Islands Energy
Office. This transportation tip was brought to you by the Virgin Islands
Energy Office, a division of the Department of Planning and Natural
Resources.

8. Save gasoline and money by driving more efficiently. Keep windows
closed when driving at highway speeds. Open windows increase wind
resistance by creating drag, but closing windows and using air
conditioning at a moderate setting, will be more efficient than allowing
drag. Additionally, removing excess weight from the trunk and items from
a roof rack will increase fuel economy. This transportation tip was brought
to you by the Virgin Islands Energy Office, a division of the Department of
Planning and Natural Resources.

9. Save gasoline and money by caring for your vehicle. Have your wheels
properly aligned. Improper wheel alignment can increase fuel use and
cause unnecessary tire wear. Check the alignment after wheels have had
a jolt from striking potholes, bumps or curbs. Additionally, have your
brakes adjusted. Brakes that drag or grab unevenly rob you of gasoline.
Be sure that the brakes both grip and release properly. This
transportation tip was brought to you by the Virgin Islands Energy Office, a
division of the Department of Planning and Natural Resources.

10. Save gasoline and money by caring for your vehicle. Check and change
oil and oil filter at recommended intervals. Every time you add gasoline to
your vehicle, check the oil. Dirty or low oil level can cause friction and
wear that rob you of gasoline mileage and seriously damage your engine.
Use a good quality SE multi-grade oil. Do not use an oil of higher
viscosity than recommended. This transportation tip was brought to you by
the Virgin Islands Energy Office, a division of the Department of Planning
and Natural Resources.




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