• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Board of trustees
 Executive officers: President's...
 Academic calendar
 Graduate programs offered
 Graduate education
 General admission requirements
 Admission procedures
 Student classifications
 Registration
 Graduate tuition and fees
 Assessment of learning
 Grades, standards and points
 Advisement
 Probation and dismissal
 Academic Withdrawl
 Transcripts
 Privacy act
 Thesis
 Programs
 Course descriptions
 Services directory






Group Title: UVI graduate bulletin
Title: UVI graduate bulletin. 2006.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300602/00001
 Material Information
Title: UVI graduate bulletin. 2006.
Series Title: UVI graduate bulletin
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of the Virgin Islands. Office of the Provost.
University of the Virgin Islands. Office of Global and Graduate Education ( Contributor )
Affiliation: University of the Virgin Islands -- Office of the Provost
Publisher: University of the Virgin Islands
Publication Date: 2006
 Subjects
Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean
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Bibliographic ID: CA01300602
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Board of trustees
        Page v
    Executive officers: President's cabinet
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Academic calendar
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
    Graduate programs offered
        Page xiv
    Graduate education
        Page 1
    General admission requirements
        Page 2
    Admission procedures
        Page 3
    Student classifications
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Registration
        Page 6
    Graduate tuition and fees
        Page 7
    Assessment of learning
        Page 8
    Grades, standards and points
        Page 8
    Advisement
        Page 9
    Probation and dismissal
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Academic Withdrawl
        Page 12
    Transcripts
        Page 12
    Privacy act
        Page 12
    Thesis
        Page 13
    Programs
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Course descriptions
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Services directory
        Section
Full Text











SPECIALIZING IN FUTURES






HISTORICALLY AMERICAN.
UNIQUELYCA IBBEAN.
GLOBALLY I NTERACTIVE.













Graduate Bulletin








The University of the Virgin Islands is accredited by the Commission on Higher Educa-
tion of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.
The University recognizes institutions and academic programs which are approved by
the six regional accrediting agencies recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.
Courses accredited by other regional, national, or internationally recognized accredit-
ing agencies may be considered for admission and transfer credit. Official transcripts or
their equivalent must be submitted for consideration of admission and/or transfer credit.
Students may be asked to submit additional information, including syllabi, and course
descriptions to determine comparability to UVI courses.
The information contained in this bulletin is effective as of Fall 2006. The University
reserves the right to change academic requirements, course offerings, calendar, fees,
rules and regulations after the publication of this bulletin. Such changes will be pub-
lished in the bulletin on its website at www.uvi.edu and in other appropriate media.


0 Copyright UVI 2006
The University of the Virgin Islands is an equal opportunity, affirmative action,
Title IX, Section 504, PL 101-542 educator and employer.

This Bulletin has been developed and produced by the Office of
Global and Graduate Education under the auspices of the
Office of the Provost and the Public Relations Office.

SPECWALz IN FUTURES

TniversityVirgin]slands
Sof the V e -5'
HISTORICALLY AMERICAN.
Www.uvi.edu UNICUELYCARIBBEAN
GLOBALLY INTERACTIVE.








ii University of the Virgin Islands


UVI Mission Statement


The University of the Virgin Islands is a learner-centered institution dedicated to the
success of its students and committed to enhancing the lives of the people of the U.S.
Virgin Islands and the wider Caribbean through excellent teaching, innovative research,
and responsive community service.

UVI Vision Statement

The University of the Virgin Islands will be an exceptional U.S. institution of higher
education in the Caribbean dedicated to student success, committed to excellence, and
pledged to enhancing the social and economic transformation of the U.S. Virgin Islands.


St. Croix Campus
RR1 Box 10000
Kingshill, St. Croix
U.S. Virgin Islands
00850-9781
(340)778-1620


St. Thomas Campus
#2 JohnBrewer's Bay
St. Thomas
U.S. Virgin Islands
00802-9990
(340)776-9200


http://www.uvi.edu








Graduate Bulletin


Table of Contents


Page
Board of Trustees .......... ........ ..... ... v
Executive Officers: President's Cabinet . . . .vi
Academic Calendar. .................. . .. ix-xiii
Graduate Programs Offered ................... xiv
Graduate Education ........... . . . .....1
General Admission Requirements . . . . . 2
Admission Procedures .......................... 3

Student Classifications. ........... . . .. 3
Matriculated Status. .................. 3
Non-Matriculated Status. ......... . . .. 3
Full-Time and Part-Time Status. ..... . . . 4
Resident and Non-Resident Status 4
Undergraduate Students. . ......... . ....5
A auditors . . . . . . . 5
Senior Citizens .. .. ........ . . . .. 5
Proof of Status.............. 5

Registration ............... ............... 6
Senior Citizen Registration . . . 6
Change of Registration . . . . . ... 6

Graduate Tuition and Fees. .................. .7
Refunds ........ ... ..... ..... .........
GraduationFee ................... . .. .7
Housing. .................. .. 7

Assessment of Learning. ......... . . .. 8

Grades, Standards and Points .............. . 8
Incomplete. ............. . . .. 8
Change of Grade. ........... . . 8
Quality Points.. .......... . . .. 9

Advisement .............. .............. ... 9

Probation and Dismissal ......... . . . .. 9
Academic Probation . ................... 9
Dismissal ....... ........... .. ....... 9
Academic Integrity. .................. 9
Definitions ............. ............... 9
Penalties ................ .. ... ......... 11
Procedures ............... .. .. ......... 11









iv University of the Virgin Islands
Academic Withdrawal ................... . .. ..12
Withdrawal from Courses .. ................ 12
Withdrawal from the University . . . .... 12

Transcripts .............. .. . . 12

Privacy Act ........ ....... ....... ........ 12

Thesis . . ..... . . ....... 13

Programs ................... ... .......... 14
Master of Business Administration . . . 14
MBA Prerequisites ........ . . . ...14
MBA Course Summary. ...... . . 15
MBA Comprehensive Exam . . . .... 15
MBAElectives ......... ....... ..... 15

Master of Arts in Education ..........16
Core Requirements.. ....... . . ... 16
No Thesis Option ........... .. ........ .17
Education Administration Concentration . . 17
Counseling and Guidance Concentration .. . .. 17
Teaching Concentration. .... . . . 17
Computers and Technology Concentration. . .... 17
Reading Concentration ................... 18
Special Education Concentration . . . ... 18

Education Specialist in School Psychology. ........... 19
Education Specialist Prerequisite . . .... 20
Core Requirements ...... . . . ...20

Master of Public Administration . . . 22
Prerequisites ......... . . . .....22
Comprehensive Exam ................. .22
Thesis ........... ....... ...... 23
Course Summary . .............. 23
Core Requirements ..... . . . ...23
Core Electives ........ . . . ......23

Master of Arts in Mathematics for Secondary Teachers . .. 24
Core Requirements ...... . . . ...24
Electives . . . . . .... 25

Course Descriptions . . ........ . .26
Business Administration (BUS) ................. .26
Education including School Psychology (EDU) . . ..28
Mathematics for Secondary Teachers (MAT) . . .... 36
Public Administration (PUA) . . *.... .38
Services Directory .... . . .. inside back cover








Graduate Bulletin


Board of Trustees


THE HONORABLE CHARLES W. TURNBULL
Governor of the U.S. Virgin Islands
Honorary Chair of the Board of Trustees


Members of the Board

AUGUSTE E. RIMPEL, Jr, Chair
Concord, Massachusetts

ALEXANDER MOORHEAD, Vice Chair
St. Croix, USVI


JUDY M. GOMEZ, ex-officio
Chair, Board of Education
St. Thomas, USVI

ROY D. JACKSON
St. Thomas, USVI

NOREEN MICHAEL, ex-officio
Commissioner of Education
St. Thomas, USVI

BERNARD PAIEWONSKY
Bethesda, Maryland

LAVERNE E. RAGSTER, ex-officio
President of the University
St. Thomas, USVI

DEANNAROGERS
Alumni Association Trustee
St. Thomas, USVI


AUDREYTHOMAS
St. Thomas, USVI

HENRY C. SMOCK
St. Thomas, USVI

YVONNE E. L THRAEN
St. Thomas, USVI

JUANITAM. WOODS
St. Croix, USVI

ALETHABAUMANN
Faculty Representative
St. Croix, USVI

Student Representative
St. Croix, USVI









vi University of the Virgin Islands


Executive Officers


PRESIDENT'S CABINET

LaVerne E. Ragster, President
B.S., University of Miami
AM.Sc., San Diego State University
Ph.D., University of California, San Diego 1980

Al Hassan IL Musah, Provost and Professor of Biology
B.S., University of Ghana
M.S., Iowa State University
Ph.D., Iowa State University 1986

Vincent Samuel, Vice President forAdministration and Finance and Associate Professor
of Accounting and Finance
B.A., University of the Virgin Islands
M.S., Alelphi University 1986
M.B.A., University of Aichigan 1992

Joseph Boschulte, Vice President for Institutional Advancement
B.B.A., College of William andMary
M.B.A., University of Virginia 1995

Tina M. Koopmans, Vice President of Information Technology and Learning Resources
B.A., University ofIowa
M.A., University of Iowa 1991

Monique Guillory, Campus Executive Administrator, St. Croix
B.A., Tulane University
Ph.D., New York University 1998

John A. D'Orazio, Campus Executive Administrator, St. Thomas
A.A., Springfield Technical Community College
B.A., 'I -1, ii i .,r, College
M.Ed., Springfield College 1978

Henry H. Smith, Vice Provost, Research and Public Service and Director of the Water
Resources Research Institute
B.A., College of the Virgin Islands
M.S., University of Maryland
Ph.D., Colorado State University 1985
J.D., University ofDayton 1993










Graduate Bulletin


Calendar


2006

September
S M T W T F S


December
S MT W

3 4 5 6
10 11 12 13
17 18 19 20
24 25 26 27


T F S
1 2
7 8 9
14 15 16
21 22 23
28 29 30


2007


February
S M T W T
1
4 5 6 7 8
11 12 13 14 15
18 19 20 21 22
25 26 27 28


May
S M


August
S M T


August
S M T
1
6 7 8
678
13 14 15
20 21 22
27 28 29


October
S MT
1 2 3
8 9 10
15 16 17
22 23 24
29 30 31


November
S MT W
1
5 6 7 8
12 13 14 15
19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29


January
S M T
1 2
7 8 9
14 15 16
21 22 23
28 29 30


March
S MT


W T
1
7 8
14 15
21 22
28 29


T W T F
1
5 6 7 8
12 13 14 15
19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29


June
S M


April
S M
1 2
8 9
15 16
22 23
29 30


July
S M
1 2
8 9
15 16
22 23
29 30


September
S MTW


continued, next page


T F S
1
6 7 8
13 14 15
20 21 22
27 28 29


2 3 4
9 10 11
16 17 18
23 24 25
30










viii University of the Virgin Islands


2007

October November December
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 1
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
21 22 23 22 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 22 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31



2008

January February March
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 1
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
20 21 22 23 22 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31

April May
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
27 28 29 30 25 26 27 28 29 30 31








Graduate Bulletin ix


Academic Calendar

Fall Semester 2006

August
7 Last day for payment of tuition/fees by returning students for Fall 2006 semester
14 Faculty return date
16 Faculty Convocation
14-17 Orientation for new students
15 Advisement and registration for new students
16-18 Advisement and late registration
17 Classes begin
21-25 Add/Drop period
25 Final day to add a course

September
4 Labor Day (University closed)
15 Final day to drop a course without WF, WP, or to change from audit to credit or
credit to audit
29 Mid-Term Low Grade Reports due

October
6 Final day to drop a course or withdraw without Provost's permission
24-Nov. 2 Advisement and registration of continuing students for Spring 2007 semester
31 Admission application deadline for Spring 2007

November
1 Liberty Day (University closed)
9 English Proficiency Exam (EPE)
10 Veteran's Day (University closed)
23 Thanksgiving Day (University closed)
24 Fortsberg Discovery Day (University closed)
25 No classes
28 Study Day
30 Study Day

December
1 Last day of classes
2-8 Final Exams (no other student activities to be scheduled during this period)
8 Fall semester ends for students
12 Last day for instructors to submit grades (by 10 a.m.)
12 Fall semester ends for faculty
18 Last day to pay tuition and fees by returning students for the Spring 2007 semester








x University of the Virgin Islands


Spring Semester 2007


January
8 Faculty return date
9 New student orientation
9 Advisement and registration for new students
10-12 Advisement and late registration
11 Classes begin
15 Martin Luther King Day (University closed)
16-19 Add/Drop period
19 Final day to add a course

February
2 Last day to apply for graduation
16 Last day to drop a course without WF, WP, or to change from audit to credit or
credit to audit

March
2 Mid-Term Low Grade Reports due
9 Final day to drop a course or withdraw without Provost's permission
12-15 Spring Recess (no classes)
16 CharterDay

April
2-5 Advisement and registration of continuing students for Fall 2007 semester
6-8 University Recess (University closed)
12 EnglishProficiencyExam(EPE)
26 Schedule Adjustment Day (Monday classes meet; study day for Wednesday
classes)
26 Last day of classes
28 Admissions application deadline for Fall 2007
27-29 Carnival Recess (no classes)
30-May 5 Final Exams (no other student activities to be scheduled during this period)

May
5 Spring semester ends for students
7 Last day for instructors to submit grades (by 10 a.m.)
8 Faculty meeting to certify graduates
9-11 Faculty Professional Development
14 Commencement St. Thomas Campus
15 Commencement St. Croix Campus








Graduate Bulletin xi


Summer Session I 2007 (May 16 June 19)

May
16 Classes begin
28 Memorial Day (University closed)

June
19 Last day of classes and final exams
19 Summer Session I ends

Summer Session II 2007 (June 22 July 27)

June
21 Late registration(10 a.m. 7 p.m.)
22 Classes begin

July
3 VI. Emancipation Day (University closed)
4 Independence Day (University closed)
27 Last day of classes and final exams
27 Summer Session II ends

Additional dates for Summer Sessions I and II will be provided by addendum as they
become available. Check www. uvi. edu for updates.








xii University of the Virgin Islands


Fall Semester 2007

August
6 Last day for payment of tuition/fees by returning students for Fall 2007 semester
13 Faculty return date
15 Faculty Convocation
14 Orientation for new students
14 Advisement and registration for new students
15-17 Advisement and late registration
16 Classes begin
20-24 Add/Drop period
24 Final day to add a course

September
3 Labor Day (University closed)
14 Final day to drop a course without WF, WP, or to change from audit to credit or
credit to audit
28 Mid-Term Low Grade Reports due

October
8 Final day to drop a course or withdraw without Provost's permission
23-31 Advisement and registration of continuing students for Spring 2008 semester
31 Admission application deadline for Spring 2008

November
1 Liberty Day (University closed)
12 Veteran's Day (University closed)
22 Thanksgiving Day (University closed)
23 Fortsberg Discovery Day (University closed)
24 No classes
27 Study Day
28 Schedule Adjustment Day (Monday classes meet; study day for Wednesday
classes)
29 Last day of classes
30 Study Day

December
1-7 Final Exams (no other student activities to be scheduled during this period)
7 Fall semester ends for students
11 Last day for instructors to submit grades (by 10 a.m.)
11 Fall semester ends for faculty
17 Last day to pay tuition and fees by returning students for the Spring 2008 semester








Graduate Bulletin xiii


Spring Semester 2008

January
7 Faculty return date
8 New student orientation
8 Advisement and registration for new students
9-11 Advisement and late registration
10 Classes begin
14-18 Add/Drop period
18 Final day to add a course
21 Martin Luther King Day (University closed)

February
1 Last day to apply for graduation
15 Last day to drop a course without WF, WP, or to change from audit to credit or
credit to audit
29 Mid-Term Low Grade Reports due

March
10-13 Spring Recess (no classes)
14 Final day to drop a course or withdraw without Provost's permission
16 CharterDay
17-21 Advisement and registration of continuing students for Fall 2007 semester
21-22 University Recess (University Closed)

April
24 Schedule Adjustment Day (Monday classes meet; study day for Wednesday
classes)
24 Last day of classes
28 Admissions application deadline for Fall 2007
25-26 Carnival Recess (no classes)
28-May 3 Final Exams (no other student activities to be scheduled during this period)

May
3 Spring semester ends for students
5 Last day for instructors to submit grades (by 10 a.m.)
6 Faculty meeting to certify graduates
7-9 Faculty Professional Development
12 Commencement St. Thomas Campus
13 Commencement St. Croix Campus








xiv University of the Virgin Islands


Graduate Programs Offered

St. Croix Campus
Business Administration Division
Master of Business Administration
692-4151

Education Division
Master ofArts in Education
Education Specialist in School Psychology
692-4118

Humanities and Social Sciences Division
Master of Public Administration
692-4117

Science and Mathematics Division
Master ofArts in Mathematics for Secondary Teachers
692-4157


St. Thomas Campus
Business Administration Division
Master of Business Administration
693-1301

Education Division
Master ofArts in Education
Education Specialist in School Psychology
693-1321

Humanities and Social Sciences Division
Master of Public Administration
693-1260

Science and Mathematics Division
Master ofArts in Mathematics for Secondary Teachers
693-1230








Graduate Bulletin 1


Graduate Education

The graduate programs at the University of the Virgin Islands were developed to meet
specific needs in the Territory and beyond. While each of the programs has its own
mission, the overall aim of all the areas of graduate study is to provide a high quality
education for students to meet their professional and technical training needs. In some
of the programs, research training includes activities directed toward the acquisition
of new knowledge.

The University of the Virgin Islands offers the following graduate degrees:

1. Education
A. Master of Arts in Education: MA
Areas of specialization: Administration and Supervision;
Counseling and Guidance; Teaching
B. Specialist in School Psychology: EDS

2. Business Administration
Master of Business Administration: MBA

3. Humanities and Social Sciences
Master of Public Administration

4. Science and Mathematics Division
Master of Arts in Mathematics for Secondary EducationTeachers

Programs of study leading to the acquisition of these graduate degrees are described in
this Bulletin. The Graduate Council oversees the graduate programs.

A graduate degree attests to the completion of a coherent program of specialized study
beyond the baccalaureate degree. The graduate programs provide for the acquisition
of in-depth knowledge in a specific area of study through a combination of lectures,
directed or independent research and projects, assessments, and thesis work. Minimal
entry requirement to a graduate degree is a relevant Bachelor's degree or an approved
equivalent.

The graduate programs at UVI also serve as stepping stones to doctoral degrees.

It is important to note that while this Bulletin serves to provide students with informa-
tion about the graduate program requirements at UVI, each student is responsible for
keeping informed about changes or specific programmatic requirements through close
interactions with the appropriate graduate Divisions from which a degree is being
sought. The various graduate Divisions reserve the right to modify the graduate pro-
grams to better enhance the programs and serve the student. Furthermore, the avail-
ability of degree programs and the scheduling of courses are subject to change as
required by enrollment and funding constraints. All changes will be published in the
subsequent printing of the Bulletin, the University's website at www. uvi. edu, and through
other appropriate media.








2 University of the Virgin Islands


General Admission Requirements

1. A formal application for admission must be submitted. To be accepted, applicants
must meet the program prerequisites for the degree sought.

2. Applicants for matriculation should normally have a minimum undergraduate av-
erage of 2.50 on a 4.00 scale and a Bachelor's degree from an accredited institu-
tion. Applicants who do not satisfy the minimum undergraduate average may be
admitted to matriculated status if they have substantial relevant professional ex-
perience, as determined by the appropriate graduate program. Only students with
matriculated status will be considered for the award of a graduate degree.

3. Students who have not yet received an acceptance to matriculate in a graduate
program will be allowed to register for not more than six credits in the semester
that their application is pending. Non-matriculated students may take up to nine
credit hours but may register for no more than six in one semester.

4. A maximum of six graduate credits earned at another university or college may be
accepted towards the fulfillment of the requirements for a graduate degree. Only
credits earned within the last five years at a grade no lower than B will qualify for
acceptance under this regulation. Students should request that an official copy of
their graduate transcript be sent to the Admissions Office for consideration of
courses to be transferred.

5. Students who have earned credits in fulfillment of the requirements of one Master's
degree at the University of the Virgin Islands may apply for a total of not more
than 12 such credits to be applied to the fulfillment of the requirements of another
Master's degree. Applications under this regulation will only be granted where
credits applied for have been earned at a grade no lower than B on courses judged
to be equivalent to those of the degree for which the student is currently regis-
tered.

6. Students will have a maximum of five years to complete the Master's programs.
This period may be extended only if special circumstances exist. Persons seeking
an extension of this five-year period must make application in writing to the Pro-
vost through the Division Chair, stating the reason for the delay, providing evi-
dence of ability to progress toward the completion of the degree and a plan and
proposed date for completion. In no case will a candidate be permitted an exten-
sion beyond seven years.








Graduate Bulletin 3


Admission Procedures

All applicants must:

1. Submit an application form to the Admissions Office on the appropriate campus
requesting admission to the Graduate Program by April 30th for Fall and October
30th for Spring admissions.

2. Submit official transcripts) of all previous college course work. (Transcript(s)
must be forwarded by the institutions) attended.)

3. Submit Graduate Management Aptitude Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Ex-
amination (GRE) scores in accordance with the specific requirements for the re-
spective program for the Business Administration, Public Administration, Educa-
tion, Education Specialist in School Psychology and Mathematics for Secondary
Teachers programs.

4. Submit supporting documents to complete the application process by October 30
for the Spring semester and April 30 for the Fall semester. Applicants must com-
plete the admission procedures according to schedule and may register for courses
while the application process is pending.

5. See University academic calendar for registration dates. See student classification
section for registration restrictions.

Student Classifications

Students in the graduate programs may fall in any of the following categories:

Matriculated Status
Applicants who have satisfied all requirements for admission and have been formally
notified of admission and approval to pursue a degree at UVI are considered to be
matriculated once they have registered.

Non-Matriculated Status
1. A regular non-matriculated student is one whose application for admission is pend-
ing, or who is not pursuing a graduate degree, but who has met the prerequisites
for courses listed in the bulletin. Such individuals may take up to nine (9) credit
hours but may not register for more than six (6) credits per semester.

2. The special non-matriculated student is an individual who is enrolled in a gradu-
ate program at another accredited institution of higher learning or a student with a
graduate degree from an accredited institution. Such students will be permitted to
take up to 15 credits in the graduate program. The Provost may grant permission
to enroll in courses beyond this limit, on the recommendation of the appropriate
Division Chair.








Graduate Bulletin 3


Admission Procedures

All applicants must:

1. Submit an application form to the Admissions Office on the appropriate campus
requesting admission to the Graduate Program by April 30th for Fall and October
30th for Spring admissions.

2. Submit official transcripts) of all previous college course work. (Transcript(s)
must be forwarded by the institutions) attended.)

3. Submit Graduate Management Aptitude Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Ex-
amination (GRE) scores in accordance with the specific requirements for the re-
spective program for the Business Administration, Public Administration, Educa-
tion, Education Specialist in School Psychology and Mathematics for Secondary
Teachers programs.

4. Submit supporting documents to complete the application process by October 30
for the Spring semester and April 30 for the Fall semester. Applicants must com-
plete the admission procedures according to schedule and may register for courses
while the application process is pending.

5. See University academic calendar for registration dates. See student classification
section for registration restrictions.

Student Classifications

Students in the graduate programs may fall in any of the following categories:

Matriculated Status
Applicants who have satisfied all requirements for admission and have been formally
notified of admission and approval to pursue a degree at UVI are considered to be
matriculated once they have registered.

Non-Matriculated Status
1. A regular non-matriculated student is one whose application for admission is pend-
ing, or who is not pursuing a graduate degree, but who has met the prerequisites
for courses listed in the bulletin. Such individuals may take up to nine (9) credit
hours but may not register for more than six (6) credits per semester.

2. The special non-matriculated student is an individual who is enrolled in a gradu-
ate program at another accredited institution of higher learning or a student with a
graduate degree from an accredited institution. Such students will be permitted to
take up to 15 credits in the graduate program. The Provost may grant permission
to enroll in courses beyond this limit, on the recommendation of the appropriate
Division Chair.








4 University of the Virgin Islands

Full-Time and Part-Time Status
Students registered for nine or more credit hours are full-time students.
Students registered for fewer than nine credit hours are part-time students.

Resident and Non-Resident Status
The information provided herein provides a broad definition of "resident" for the pur-
pose of assessing tuition at the University of the Virgin Islands. For further clarifica-
tion, contact the Office of the Registrar on the St. Thomas Campus or the Academic
Services Office on the St. Croix Campus.

A United States Virgin Islands "resident for tuition purposes" is a person who: 1) has
established and maintained legal residence in the United States Virgin Islands for at
least twelve (12) months prior to the semester in which there is the intent to register; 2)
is a United States citizen or holder of a permanent visa (resident alien); or, 3) a legal
alien who has been granted indefinite stay by the United States Immigration and Natu-
ralization Services (INS). Residence in the United States Virgin Islands must be as a
bona-fide domiciliary, rather than for the purpose of maintaining a residency merely
for enrollment at an institution of higher education. Documentation must reflect that
presence in the United States Virgin Islands is for purposes other than to attend school.
When residency is in question, students may be required to provide documentation to
affirm intent and demonstrate length of residency. No single document will be suffi-
cient to provide substantial and conclusive evidence establishing United States Virgin
Islands residency. Documents which may be used to support the demonstration of per-
manent ties to the United States Virgin Islands include: 1) The most recent Income Tax
and W-2 forms; 2) U.S. Voter Registration card; 3) Declaration of Domicile; 4) lease
agreements; 5) proof of marriage to a resident along with proof of the spouse's U.S.
Virgin Islands residency for a period of at least twelve (12) months prior to the first
day of classes for the term for which residency classification is sought.

Requests for change in residency classification will be considered by the Office of the
Registrar. Specific procedures are followed to make determinations regarding resi-
dency reclassification for persons classified as nonresidents at the time of admission to
the University. The burden of proof lies with the applicant to demonstrate established
permanent and fixed legal ties to the United States Virgin Islands and separation of ties
to any other state. Submission of fraudulent documents to obtain or demonstrate resi-
dency will result in expulsion from the University of the Virgin Islands. Change of
Resident Classification forms are available at the Office of the Registrar on St. Tho-
mas and the Academic Services Office on St. Croix. An approved change in residency
status will take effect in the next regular Fall or Spring semester after the change of
residency has been approved. Non-resident students who marry a bona-fide resident of
the United States Virgin Islands may be reclassified to residency status for tuition
payment purposes; the changed residency status will go into effect 12 months after the
date of the marriage.

In cases where questions involving classification of an applicant or student exists, the
burden of showing resident status will be on the applicant or student, and the decision
of the University will be final.








Graduate Bulletin 5

Undergraduate Students
A student who is matriculated as an undergraduate at the University of the Virgin Is-
lands or a visiting NSE student is eligible to register for courses in the University's
graduate program if that student has:

1. Written approval of his/her advisor and the Graduate Coordinator of the respec-
tive division by the end of the registration period of the previous semester.
2. Met all of the graduate course prerequisites.
3. Earned at least 90 credits at the undergraduate level.
4. A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher.

Undergraduate students who are eligible to register for graduate courses are limited to
a maximum of six credits in the graduate program, with a maximum of three credits in
any given semester.

Graduate courses taken by undergraduate students do not substitute for required un-
dergraduate courses. Undergraduates will be admitted to graduate courses on a space
available basis. An undergraduate full-time matriculated student taking graduate courses
as part of hisor her full-time credit load will pay undergraduate fees.

Auditors
Holders of Bachelor's, Master's and Doctoral degrees from accredited U.S. institu-
tions and comparable foreign universities may audit graduate courses at the Univer-
sity. Tuition will be charged at the same rate as for credit. Auditors receive no grades,
credits or quality points. Auditing a course requires regular class attendance and comple-
tion of all required work except graded work. A notation of AUD will be entered upon
a student's transcript only if these requirements are fulfilled. In the event the require-
ments are not fulfilled, a notation of W (Withdrawal) will be entered.

A matriculated student may normally audit not more than one course per semester
without permission from the Provost through a recommendation from the Chair of the
appropriate Division.

Senior Citizens
The Virgin Islands Legislature by Act #5358 has provided that certain senior citizen
residents of the U.S. Virgin Islands may enroll in regularly scheduled courses at the
University of the Virgin Islands free of charge. Regularly scheduled courses are those
that appear in the fall, spring or summer schedule of classes.

Proof of Status: To be eligible for waiver of tuition and fees a person must meet the
following criteria:

1. Be at least 60 years of age, as verified by the senior citizen ID card issued by the
V.I. Department of Human Services;
2. Be a resident of the Virgin Islands for at least one year, as verified by rent receipts,
utility bills, date on ID card or other such proof of residence.








6 University of the Virgin Islands


Registration

All students are required to register on the dates announced. Late registrants are as-
sessed an additional late registration fee.

Students are considered registered for a course only when in registering they have
conformed to all applicable University regulations and requirements.

Students not properly registered in a course shall not receive credit for the course or
part of the course completed.

The University reserves the right to cancel a course or section of a course with fewer
than 10 registered persons. Tuition refunds are made in full when a course or section of
a course is cancelled by the University.

Senior Citizen Registration
1. Senior citizens will register during the late registration period. They may enroll in
courses for which they qualify and if space is available at that time. Priority will
be given to those persons enrolled in programs administered by the Department of
Human Services.

2. Senior citizens must present verifying documents to the Registrar's Office on St.
Thomas and to the Academic ServicesAcademic Services Office on St. Croix.
The Registrar's Office or the Academic Services Office will provide a form which
eligible students will present to the Business Office for waiver of payment.

3. Prospective students will present proof of prerequisites for courses for which they
wish to receive credit. Seniors who wish to audit a course need not present such
evidence.

Change of Registration
In no case may a course be added or a change of section made after the deadline date.
To make any change of registration, students must complete the Change of Registra-
tion form obtained from the Registrar's Office. Students who wish to add or drop a
course or to change a section must obtain the signature of the instructor of the course,
and the written permission from their advisor and the Division Chair on their respec-
tive campus.

Following the formal registration period, a fee will be charged for each Petition for
Change of Registration form submitted to the Registrar unless the course change is
necessitated by a change in the University's course offerings or other needs of the
University.

The deadline for a student to change from regular status to audit status coincides with
the deadline for student withdrawal from a course without prejudice to the grade.








Graduate Bulletin 7


Graduate Tuition and Fees

A list of fees and tuition cost can be obtained from the Registrar's Office and on the
UVI website. A partial list is provided below:


Tuition (per Credit) Technology Fee
Registration Fee Transcript Fee
Property Fee Add/Drop Fee
Graduation Fee Late Registration


Students are encouraged to pay all bills at registration time. U.S. currency is required
for payment of all bills.

Refunds
When students withdraw, the University refunds only a portion of its charges. The
schedule of tuition refunds during the fall and spring semesters is as follows:
During the first week of classes 90%;
during the second week of classes 70%;
during the third week of classes 50%;
during the fourth week of classes 25%;
thereafter none.

Graduation Fee
A non-refundable fee is charged each candidate for a graduate degree. It is payable at
the time of application for graduation. If the requirements for the degree are not com-
pleted, students must reapply for graduation at the appropriate time and pay another
fee.

Housing
On campus housing is not available for graduate students. Students from outside the
territory are advised to make their own housing arrangements.








8 University of the Virgin Islands


Assessment of Learning

Assessment of program outcomes and student learning may vary from amount the
programs. Each has its own methods for evaluating intellectual growth, professional
growth, and cumulative achievement. Indicators of intellectual and professional growth
may be direct or indirect measures. Indicators of cumulative achievement may include
a comprehensive examination, a capstone course and/or a thesis. Students are advised
to obtain specific information on these evaluation methods from their academic advi-
sors or from the graduate coordinator for their specific program.

Grades, Standards and Points

Letter Grade Standard Grade Point
A Superior 4.00
A- Excellent 3.67
B+ Very High 3.33
B High 3.00
B- Good 2.67
C+ Above Average 2.33
C Average 2.00
F Failure 0.00
I Incomplete 0.00
AUD Audit 0.00

A pass/fail grade is awarded on completion of the Thesis course and on completion of
Education 530, Independent Study. Pass/fail carries no grade point.

Matriculated students in the masters' programs must maintain at least a B cumulative
average after earning 15 credits.

A grade of C is the lowest grade counted toward graduation in the Graduate program.
Matriculated graduate students are allowed a maximum of two C grades. No course
may be taken for credit more than twice.

Note: Auditors receive no grades, credits or quality points.

Incomplete
The grade of I must be removed by mid-term of the semester following the one in
which the grade of I was earned. Failure to remove the grade of I by this time will
result in a conversion of the I to an F, except when registered for a Thesis course.
Grades of I are assigned only when, in the opinion of the instructor, there is likelihood
that the student can satisfactorily complete the missing work which will substantially
influence his/her final grade.

Change of Grade
Changes of grade are normally allowed for computational errors only. A request to
change a grade after official grades have been deposited in the Registrar's Office may








8 University of the Virgin Islands


Assessment of Learning

Assessment of program outcomes and student learning may vary from amount the
programs. Each has its own methods for evaluating intellectual growth, professional
growth, and cumulative achievement. Indicators of intellectual and professional growth
may be direct or indirect measures. Indicators of cumulative achievement may include
a comprehensive examination, a capstone course and/or a thesis. Students are advised
to obtain specific information on these evaluation methods from their academic advi-
sors or from the graduate coordinator for their specific program.

Grades, Standards and Points

Letter Grade Standard Grade Point
A Superior 4.00
A- Excellent 3.67
B+ Very High 3.33
B High 3.00
B- Good 2.67
C+ Above Average 2.33
C Average 2.00
F Failure 0.00
I Incomplete 0.00
AUD Audit 0.00

A pass/fail grade is awarded on completion of the Thesis course and on completion of
Education 530, Independent Study. Pass/fail carries no grade point.

Matriculated students in the masters' programs must maintain at least a B cumulative
average after earning 15 credits.

A grade of C is the lowest grade counted toward graduation in the Graduate program.
Matriculated graduate students are allowed a maximum of two C grades. No course
may be taken for credit more than twice.

Note: Auditors receive no grades, credits or quality points.

Incomplete
The grade of I must be removed by mid-term of the semester following the one in
which the grade of I was earned. Failure to remove the grade of I by this time will
result in a conversion of the I to an F, except when registered for a Thesis course.
Grades of I are assigned only when, in the opinion of the instructor, there is likelihood
that the student can satisfactorily complete the missing work which will substantially
influence his/her final grade.

Change of Grade
Changes of grade are normally allowed for computational errors only. A request to
change a grade after official grades have been deposited in the Registrar's Office may








Graduate Bulletin 9

be made by an instructor by filing a "Change-of Grade" slip with the Registrar.

Quality Points
To compute the quality points earned in a course, multiply the number of credits of that
course by the grade points earned. To compute the quality point average for a semes-
ter, divide the total quality points earned by the number of credits attempted. Three
times the number of quality points as registered credits (equivalent to a B grade aver-
age) are required for graduation.

Final grades are issued at the end of the semester. Only final grades are recorded on the
student's permanent record in the Registrar's Office.

The University maintains a transcript record of all courses taken by each student. A
grade report is provided to all students at the end of each semester and summer ses-
sion. Copies of this complete transcript may be obtained upon written request to the
Registrar's Office and payment of the requisite fee.

Advisement

The chairpersons of the appropriate academic divisions assign a faculty advisor to
each student within two weeks of the time the student is admitted to a graduate pro-
gram. New students, at the time of registration or before, should contact the appropri-
ate chairperson to determine their advisors. Students are urged strongly encouraged to
work closely with their advisors in planning their course of study, and in meeting de-
gree requirements.

Probation and Dismissal

Students are expected to maintain an academic record which will qualify them for
graduation. It is the responsibility of the student to complete all assigned work, and to
strive for the best performance of which he/she is capable to meet graduation require-
ments. Instructors, faculty advisors, Division Chairpersons, the Registrar and the Pro-
vost are available for consultation and assistance. It is the responsibility of students to
familiarize themselves with the contents of this bulletin, in order to satisfy the require-
ments for the degree they are pursuing.

Academic Probation
Academic probation is a warning issued to students that they must show scholastic
improvement in order to remain at the University.

Students will be placed on academic probation if:

A. The cumulative grade point average falls below 3.00 after 15 graduate credit hours,
or;
B. A grade of F is earned, or;


C. More than two grades of C are earned in the program.








Graduate Bulletin 9

be made by an instructor by filing a "Change-of Grade" slip with the Registrar.

Quality Points
To compute the quality points earned in a course, multiply the number of credits of that
course by the grade points earned. To compute the quality point average for a semes-
ter, divide the total quality points earned by the number of credits attempted. Three
times the number of quality points as registered credits (equivalent to a B grade aver-
age) are required for graduation.

Final grades are issued at the end of the semester. Only final grades are recorded on the
student's permanent record in the Registrar's Office.

The University maintains a transcript record of all courses taken by each student. A
grade report is provided to all students at the end of each semester and summer ses-
sion. Copies of this complete transcript may be obtained upon written request to the
Registrar's Office and payment of the requisite fee.

Advisement

The chairpersons of the appropriate academic divisions assign a faculty advisor to
each student within two weeks of the time the student is admitted to a graduate pro-
gram. New students, at the time of registration or before, should contact the appropri-
ate chairperson to determine their advisors. Students are urged strongly encouraged to
work closely with their advisors in planning their course of study, and in meeting de-
gree requirements.

Probation and Dismissal

Students are expected to maintain an academic record which will qualify them for
graduation. It is the responsibility of the student to complete all assigned work, and to
strive for the best performance of which he/she is capable to meet graduation require-
ments. Instructors, faculty advisors, Division Chairpersons, the Registrar and the Pro-
vost are available for consultation and assistance. It is the responsibility of students to
familiarize themselves with the contents of this bulletin, in order to satisfy the require-
ments for the degree they are pursuing.

Academic Probation
Academic probation is a warning issued to students that they must show scholastic
improvement in order to remain at the University.

Students will be placed on academic probation if:

A. The cumulative grade point average falls below 3.00 after 15 graduate credit hours,
or;
B. A grade of F is earned, or;


C. More than two grades of C are earned in the program.








10 University of the Virgin Islands
A student on academic probation will be permitted to register for not more than three
credits per semester.

A student who is on probation does not qualify for graduation.

Probation is removed when:

A. The cumulative GPA is at least 3.0, and

B. A course in which an F has been received is re-taken and a passing grade received,
and

C. At least one course with a C grade is re-taken and a grade in the B category or
better is obtained if the student has earned more than two grades in the C category.

Dismissal
A student will be dismissed from the Graduate program if:

A. Two F grades are earned.

B. Probationary status is not removed by the end of four four semesters.

A student dismissed from a graduate program may not register for further graduate
courses for credit in that program.

Academic Integrity
Philosophy: Among the purposes of colleges and universities are scholarly and per-
sonal growth for all members of the academic community, and open communication
among members of this community. Such growth requires an atmosphere of honesty
and trust. It is for this reason that the University of the Virgin Islands strives to main-
tain an environment of mutual trust among its students and faculty and will not tolerate
academic dishonesty.

Definitions
Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following examples of of-
fenses, committed or attempted:

Collaboration- allowing another student to see an examination paper during the ex-
amination.
Copying- obtaining informationby looking at the answers on another student's exami-
nation paper during an examination.
Cribbing- taking prohibited material, such as books or notes, into an examination for
the purpose of taking said material to assist.
Plagiarism- Passing off the ideas or work of another as one's own without crediting the
source.
Sabotage- destroying the work of another student, such as laboratory experiments or
computer programs.
Substitution- taking an examination or writing a paper for someone else, or inducing
another person to perform such acts.








Graduate Bulletin 11

Theft- stealing an examination, experiment, papers or the materials belonging to an-
other.

Penalties- For a first offense, the penalty will be an F in a credit course, failure in any
non-course exercise such as the comprehensive examination, or thesis research, plus
disciplinary probation for the remainder of the student's graduate career. The Provost
will also notify all current instructors of the student. For a second offense, the penalty
will be suspension from the University for an academic year, with notation of the
suspension for academic dishonesty on the student's transcript and notification of the
student's instructors by the Provost. The penalty for a third offense will be dismissal
from the University, with notation of dismissal for academic dishonesty on the student's
transcript and notification to the student's instructors by the Provost.

Procedures-In cases of suspected academic dishonesty, the faculty member making
the charge will meet privately with the student suspected of the action to discuss the
charge within five days of the detection of the incident. Within five days, the faculty
member shall decide disciplinary action to be taken and if so, shall notify the appropri-
ate Division Chairperson and the Provost in writing of:

1. The name of the student.

2. The course or activity where the infraction is alleged to have occurred.

3. The date and time of the alleged infraction.

4. The circumstances of the stated infraction with supportive information.

5. The action taken.

Within 10 days of the meeting with the instructor, the student may appeal, in writing, to
the appropriate Divisional Grievance Committee which will hold a hearing within 10
days of receiving the written appeal. The instructor making the charge of academic
dishonesty and the student will be present at the hearing and may be represented by third
parties of their own choosing. The committee will send its finding to the student, the faculty
member, Chair of the Division and the Provost within 10 days of the hearing.

Within 10 days of being informed of the decision of the Divisional Grievance Com-
mittee, the student may appeal the decision to the Faculty Review Committee (FRC).
FRC shall be composed of one member from each academic division elected by the
faculties of each division, plus one representative elected from the St. Croix Campus
faculty. Each member shall have one vote. FRC shall be reconstituted and choose its
own Chairperson at the beginning of each academic year. FRC will meet in 15 days of
being informed in writing of the appeal. In this administrative hearing, the student and
the faculty member involved in the incident shall be present and have the right to be
represented by third parties of their own choosing. FRC will inform the student, the
faculty member, Chair of the Division and the Provost of its decision within 10 days of
the meeting.


The Provost shall implement the decision of the FRC.








12 University of the Virgin Islands


Academic Withdrawal

Withdrawal from Courses
Students may drop a course without penalty up to the beginning of October in the Fall
term and up to the beginning of March in the spring term. Check the Academic Calen-
dar on the UVI web site for specific dates. They must, however, secure a course with-
drawal form from the Office of the Registrar on St. Thomas or the Office of Academic
Services on St. Croix and obtain the signatures of their instructor and Chair of the
division. This form, containing the proper signatures, must be returned to the Office of
the Registrar or to the Office of Academic services. Students will then receive a grade
of W on their permanent record.

Special permission for late withdrawal may be granted only under extenuating circum-
stances. The Chair of the appropriate division may give a student special permission
for late withdrawal. This is designated AW (Administrative Withdrawal). In situations
where an administrative withdrawal from classes is necessary, students are required to
apply for the withdrawal when it becomes evident that they cannot complete the class.
Approval from the Chair is required.

Withdrawal from University
A student who withdraws from the University either during the term or between terms
must file a withdrawal form with the Registrar. Failure to comply with this regulation
may prejudice the student's standing. A student who has withdrawn from the Univer-
sity and who subsequently desires re-admission must apply to the Provost through the
Division Chair on the appropriate campus.

Transcripts

Transcripts of academic records at the University of the Virgin Islands are issued only
upon the authorization of the students or an appropriate education agency. Other re-
quests for transcripts will not be filled until written authorization has been secured
from the individual student.

When these requests can be anticipated, the student should send authorization in ad-
vance to avoid delay in the issuing of this transcript.

Privacy Act

The Federal Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (PL. 93-308) grants student
access to the records which the University keeps on their academic career, with certain
exceptions. It also limits access to all except those who have legitimate interests.

Parents or legal guardians have access to a student's records only if the student is
financially dependent on them as defined by the Internal Revenue Code of 1954.

The University is required to notify students of their rights under this law, either by








12 University of the Virgin Islands


Academic Withdrawal

Withdrawal from Courses
Students may drop a course without penalty up to the beginning of October in the Fall
term and up to the beginning of March in the spring term. Check the Academic Calen-
dar on the UVI web site for specific dates. They must, however, secure a course with-
drawal form from the Office of the Registrar on St. Thomas or the Office of Academic
Services on St. Croix and obtain the signatures of their instructor and Chair of the
division. This form, containing the proper signatures, must be returned to the Office of
the Registrar or to the Office of Academic services. Students will then receive a grade
of W on their permanent record.

Special permission for late withdrawal may be granted only under extenuating circum-
stances. The Chair of the appropriate division may give a student special permission
for late withdrawal. This is designated AW (Administrative Withdrawal). In situations
where an administrative withdrawal from classes is necessary, students are required to
apply for the withdrawal when it becomes evident that they cannot complete the class.
Approval from the Chair is required.

Withdrawal from University
A student who withdraws from the University either during the term or between terms
must file a withdrawal form with the Registrar. Failure to comply with this regulation
may prejudice the student's standing. A student who has withdrawn from the Univer-
sity and who subsequently desires re-admission must apply to the Provost through the
Division Chair on the appropriate campus.

Transcripts

Transcripts of academic records at the University of the Virgin Islands are issued only
upon the authorization of the students or an appropriate education agency. Other re-
quests for transcripts will not be filled until written authorization has been secured
from the individual student.

When these requests can be anticipated, the student should send authorization in ad-
vance to avoid delay in the issuing of this transcript.

Privacy Act

The Federal Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (PL. 93-308) grants student
access to the records which the University keeps on their academic career, with certain
exceptions. It also limits access to all except those who have legitimate interests.

Parents or legal guardians have access to a student's records only if the student is
financially dependent on them as defined by the Internal Revenue Code of 1954.

The University is required to notify students of their rights under this law, either by








12 University of the Virgin Islands


Academic Withdrawal

Withdrawal from Courses
Students may drop a course without penalty up to the beginning of October in the Fall
term and up to the beginning of March in the spring term. Check the Academic Calen-
dar on the UVI web site for specific dates. They must, however, secure a course with-
drawal form from the Office of the Registrar on St. Thomas or the Office of Academic
Services on St. Croix and obtain the signatures of their instructor and Chair of the
division. This form, containing the proper signatures, must be returned to the Office of
the Registrar or to the Office of Academic services. Students will then receive a grade
of W on their permanent record.

Special permission for late withdrawal may be granted only under extenuating circum-
stances. The Chair of the appropriate division may give a student special permission
for late withdrawal. This is designated AW (Administrative Withdrawal). In situations
where an administrative withdrawal from classes is necessary, students are required to
apply for the withdrawal when it becomes evident that they cannot complete the class.
Approval from the Chair is required.

Withdrawal from University
A student who withdraws from the University either during the term or between terms
must file a withdrawal form with the Registrar. Failure to comply with this regulation
may prejudice the student's standing. A student who has withdrawn from the Univer-
sity and who subsequently desires re-admission must apply to the Provost through the
Division Chair on the appropriate campus.

Transcripts

Transcripts of academic records at the University of the Virgin Islands are issued only
upon the authorization of the students or an appropriate education agency. Other re-
quests for transcripts will not be filled until written authorization has been secured
from the individual student.

When these requests can be anticipated, the student should send authorization in ad-
vance to avoid delay in the issuing of this transcript.

Privacy Act

The Federal Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (PL. 93-308) grants student
access to the records which the University keeps on their academic career, with certain
exceptions. It also limits access to all except those who have legitimate interests.

Parents or legal guardians have access to a student's records only if the student is
financially dependent on them as defined by the Internal Revenue Code of 1954.

The University is required to notify students of their rights under this law, either by








Graduate Bulletin 13

letter or by the University's catalogs. The University's guidelines for implementing
this law and a list of records maintained by various University offices are available at
the Registrar's Office. For additional information, contact the Registrar.

Thesis

Students may opt to write a thesis in partial fulfillment of their program requirements.
Academic requirements, in lieu of a thesis, are detailed in the description of the ma-
jors. An exception to this rule is the Master of Arts in Mathematics for Secondary
Teachers. For that program, a major paper based on classroom "action research" is
required of all candidates for the degree. Requirements for this paper are detailed with
that program.

Matriculated students who meet the requirements for a thesis in their program (see
specific division program guidelines) are eligible to enroll in the appropriate thesis
course of the respective division. Students are not permitted a thesis advisor and/or a
thesis committee until they are registered in the thesis course.

Students must re-register for Thesis 600 for one credit each semester following their
first thesis course registration until such time as the thesis is completed, the students
have passed the oral examination and the thesis document is submitted and accepted in
its final, corrected form. A grade of Z will be assigned each semester until the thesis is
accepted in its final form.

Copies of the procedural guidelines for thesis development are available in the
office of the appropriate Division Chairperson. The prescribed style for writing
the thesis is contained in Kate L. Turabian's A Manualfor Writers of Term Papers,
Theses, and Dissertations or the Publication Manual of the American Psychologi-
cal Association. The original of the thesis plus three original-quality copies are
required to be submitted.

In order for a student with a thesis to be a candidate for graduation at the end of the
spring term in any given year, the student must submit three copies of the thesis to his
or her principal advisor by spring mid-term, pass the oral examination, and complete
all necessary revisions by May 15.








14 University of the Virgin Islands


Programs


Master of Business Administration

The graduate program in Business Administration (MBA) is designed to prepare stu-
dents for leadership and management careers in all levels and functions of govern-
ment, in community service agencies and in the business community, and to provide
well-qualified graduates who are highly motivated to seek long-term leadership and
management careers in the public and private business sectors.

The program consists of core courses which are required for graduation and elective
courses. Students take specialized courses reflecting the concerns of their particular
area of interest.

The program consists of three basic academic areas:

1. Core courses which are required for graduation.

2. Elective courses.

3. A thesis option.

The Master of Business Administration program requires a total of 36 credit hours for
completion. If a thesis is written, the credits must be distributed as follows: 27 hours of
core courses plus Business 539 and Business 600.

If students elect not to write a thesis, the credit distribution must be as follows: 27
hours of core courses and 9 hours of graduate level elective courses approved by the
Division of Business Administration.

All MBA students are required to pass the MBA comprehensive examination in order
to qualify for graduation.

MBA Prerequisites
In addition to meeting the general requirements, applicants seeking admission to the
Business Administration program must have successfully completed the following
courses or their equivalents:

ECO 221, 222 Introduction to Macro- and Micro-Economics.

1. BUS 325 Statistics for Management Decisions, MAT 235 Introduction to Statis-
tics or SSC 327-328, Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences.


2. ACC 121, 122 Introduction to Accounting I/II.








Graduate Bulletin 15

MBA Course Summary

Core Requirements
Credits
BUS 520 Administrative Theories and Practices 3
BUS 521 Quantitative Methods in the Decision Sciences 3
BUS 522 Financial Administration 3
BUS 523 Accounting for Planning and Control 3
BUS 524 Marketing Management 3
BUS 525 Information Systems 3
BUS 527 Operations Management 3
BUS 534 International Business 3
BUS 537 Management Policy and Strategy 3

MBA Comprehensive Examination
All MBA students must pass a comprehensive examination. Guidelines and date of
administration are available from the Business Administration Division.

MBA Electives
Students who elect BUS 600 (Thesis) must enroll in BUS 539; all other students must
select 9 credit hours from the following courses (with the exception noted below):

Electives Credits
BUS 528 Small Business Ownership 3
BUS 531 Group Processes and Leadership 3
BUS 532 Government, Business and Society 3
BUS 533 Personnel Administration 3
BUS 536 Selected Topics in Business Administration 3
BUS 538 International Marketing 3
BUS 539 Management Research and Decision Analysis 3
BUS 600 Thesis 6

MBA students are permitted to take one MPA course in partial fulfillment of the MBA
elective requirements.








16 University of the Virgin Islands


Master of Arts in Education

The Master of Arts Degree in Education was established in direct response to the need
for increasing the effectiveness of teachers, counselors and educational administra-
tors, with baccalaureate degrees, who wish to further their education and improve their
teaching, counseling and supervisory potential, without the expenses and family dis-
ruptions necessarily involved in attending universities outside the region.

By pursuing Master's level studies, the graduate student may continue beyond the
baccalaureate level and concentrate on specialized areas of education. The student has
the opportunity to pursue, in greater depth than at the undergraduate level, the general-
ized areas of education, while at the same time becoming a specialist in a particular
area.

The Master's Program in Education consists of three basic areas:

1. Core courses which are required of all graduate students.

2. Courses in the student's concentration.

3. A thesis or non-thesis option.

The minimum credit requirement is 36 hours.

At the present time, graduate students will have a choice of one of three areas of
concentration:

1. Education administration.

2. Counseling and guidance.

3. Teaching.

Core Requirements Credits
EDU 500 Basic Research Techniques 3
EDU 501 Tests and Measurements 3
EDU 504 Educational Psychology 3
EDU 505 Anthropological and Sociological Foundations
of American Education with Reference to the
Virgin Islands 3
EDU 506 Foundations of Guidance 3
EDU 600 Thesis 6
or
EDU 530 Independent Study 3








Graduate Bulletin 17

No-Thesis Option
Students majoring in education who do not write a thesis must enroll in EDU 530,
Independent Study, and must pass a comprehensive examination, the guidelines and
administration date for which are available in the Division of Education. Students
who fail two retakes of the comprehensive exam will be dismissed from the program.

EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION

Required Courses Credits
EDU 547 Fundamentals of School Administration 3
EDU 548 Organization and Governance of American Education 3
EDU 549 Supervision of Instruction and Staff Development 3
EDU 550 Seminar on Issues in Educational Administration 3
EDU 551 Curriculum Development 3

Students in this concentration who do not write a thesis must additionally enroll in
three credits of electives chosen from among the graduate education courses.

COUNSELINGAND GUIDANCE CONCENTRATION

Required Courses Credits
EDU 542 Theories, Strategies and Techniques of Counseling 3
EDU 543 Group/Family Counseling and Consultation 3
EDU 544 Career Development Counseling 3
EDU 545 Seminar in Current Trends and Problems in
Counseling and Guidance 3
EDU 546 Practicum in Counseling 3

Students in this concentration who do not write a thesis must additionally enroll in
three credits of electives chosen from the graduate education courses.

TEACHING CONCENTRATION

Students in the teaching concentration must select 15 credits from among the follow-
ing courses. Within this concentration, sufficient credits for certification in reading,
educational technology and special education are offered.

Required Courses Credits
EDU 559 Issues in Elementary and Early Childhood Education 3
EDU 560 Issues in Middle Childhood and Adolescent Education 3

COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION

EDU 540 Special Project in Computer-Aided Instruction Development 2
EDU 541 Special Project in Computer-Aided Authoring 2
EDU 561 Introduction to Computers in Education 3
EDU 562 Introduction to Educational Technology 3
Continued on next page







18 University of the Virgin Islands
EDU 563 Computer Applications in the Schools 3
EDU 564 Educational Technology in the Learning Process 3
EDU 565 Practicum in Educational Technology 3
READING CONCENTRATION
EDU 519 Supervision of Reading Instruction 3
EDU 552 Fundamentals of Developmental Reading
Instruction 3
EDU 553 Reading Diagnosis and Remediation for Classroom
and Clinic 3
EDU 554 Literature for Children and Adolescents 3
EDU 555 Research and Trends in Reading and Writing 3

SPECIAL EDUCATION CONCENTRATION

EDU 520 Characteristics of Exceptional Children 3
EDU 523 Educational Diagnosis and Prescriptive Teaching 3
EDU 556 Special Education: Strategies and Design 3
EDU 557 Internship/Seminar in Special Education 3
EDU 558 Behavior Management in Educational Settings 3
EDU 574 Assessment in Special Education 3
Students in this concentration who do not write a thesis must additionally enroll in
three credits of electives chosen from among the graduate education courses.




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Graduate Bulletin 19


Education Specialist in School Psychology

The School Psychology Education Specialist degree program at the University of
the Virgin Islands is a cohort-driven program especially designed for persons who
are already in the field working as teachers, administrators, psychologists and thera-
pists. Its mission is to prepare individuals for a career in school psychology as
defined by the National Association of School Psychologist (NASP) and produce
practitioners and scholars whose activities promote the psychological and educa-
tional development and well-being of diverse children and youth in the Virgin
Islands and the larger Caribbean community. It is a part-time program designed to
cover the full range of content and skills in such professional school psychology
areas as assessment, intervention, research, evaluation, consultation and profes-
sional development.

The program consists of 67 graduate semester hours divided into three major blocks:
Academic course work will include 55 credits of professional training; practicum
will include 6 credits of supervised field experiences in specific skill areas that
correspond with courses; and a supervised internship consisting of 6 credits and a
minimum of 1,200 hours of supervised field experiences covering the range of
school psychological services.

Since the primary goal of the program is to develop exemplary practitioners for
work in schools, clinics or private settings, the students are prepared in the fol-
lowing areas:

1. Psychological and Educational Foundations. Students will acquire knowl-
edge of psychological and educational principles, theories, and practices
needed to understand and work with diverse children, youth and families.

2. Statistics and Research Methodologies. Students will acquire knowledge
and skills in statistics, research and evaluation.

3. Assessment. Students will become proficient in the selection, administration,
scoring, and interpretation of a variety of psychological and educational as-
sessment methods and instruments, and in using results to design interven-
tions.

4. Applications/Interventions. Students will develop the necessary knowledge,
skills, and competencies to design, implement, and evaluate interventions to
address cognitive, academic, behavioral, and social issues and problems that
children and youth often experience in education and other related settings.
Students will acquire consultation skills for working with teachers, other school
personnel, and parents for the benefit of children and youth. They will also
acquire skills in counseling, and related mental health services, behavior analy-
sis and intervention, and academic intervention.








20 University of the Virgin Islands

5. Professional School Psychology. Students will acquire knowledge of the his-
tory and foundations of school psychology and of the ethical, professional,
and legal standards of the field. They will become familiar with various mod-
els of service delivery and of public policy relevant to such services. They will
develop an identity with the profession and have the knowledge and skills needed
to both practice in ways consistent with applicable standards of best practice and
engage in professional development.

6. Field Experiences. Students will have the opportunity to practice, under supervi-
sion, the application of knowledge and specific skills taught under each applied
course. Practicum associated with key professional courses will help trainees de-
velop distinct skills in such areas as assessment, counseling, behavior modifica-
tion, and, and consultation. In the culminating 1,200 clock hour internship, interns
will practice, under supervision, a full range of school psychological services de-
signed to positively impact children, youth, families, and others they serve.

Education Specialist in School Psychology Prerequisite
EDU 501 Tests and Measurements. This course in tests and measurements is a prereq-
uisite that must be completed prior to admission to the Education Specialist degree
program or prior to the completion of 12 credits in the program.

Core Requirements Credits
EDU 500 Basic Research Techniques 3
EDU 505 Anthropological and Sociological Foundations of
American Education with Reference to the
Virgin Islands 3
or
EDU 531 Education in a Multicultural Society 3
EDU 520 Characteristics of Exceptional Children 3
EDU 542 Theories, Strategies and Techniques of Counseling 3
EDU 542A Practicum in Theories, Strategies and Techniques
of Counseling 1
EDU 543 Group and Family Counseling and Consultation 3
EDU 601 Foundations of School Psychology 3
EDU 602 Psychological Development in Childhood and Adolescence 3
EDU 603 Psychopathology of Childhood and Adolescence 3
EDU 604 The Psychology of Cognition and Learning 3
EDU 605 Statistics, Data Analysis and Program Evaluation 3
EDU 606 Psychoeducational Assessment for Intervention I 3
EDU 606A Practicum in Psychoeducational Assessment
for Intervention 1
EDU 607 Psychoeducational Assessment for Intervention II 3
EDU 607A Practicum in Psychoeducational Assessment
for Intervention II 1
EDU 608 Psychoeducational Assessment for Assessment
for Intervention III: Early Childhood and Low
Incidence Assessment 3








Graduate Bulletin 21


Practicum in Psychoeducational Assessment
for Intervention III and Low Incidence Assessment
Behavior Analysis and Intervention
Practicum in Behavior Analysis and Intervention
School Consultation Methods
Practicum in School Consultation Methods
Curriculum-Based Assessment and Academic Interventions
Advanced Seminar in School Psychology
Internship in School Psychology I
Internship in School Psychology II


Core Requirements, continued


EDU 608A

EDU 609
EDU 609A
EDU 610
EDU 610
EDU 611
EDU 612
EDU 614
EDU 614


Credits








22 University of the Virgin Islands


Master of Public Administration

The graduate program in Public Administration (MPA) seeks to increase the accessi-
bility to management education for able, motivated men and woman of various age
and educational backgrounds. The program is designed to prepare students for leader-
ship and management careers in all levels and functions of government, in community
service agencies and in the business community, and to provide well-qualified gradu-
ates who are highly motivated to seek long-term leadership and management careers in
the public service sector.

The programs consistsprogram consists of required core courses and elective courses.
Students take specialized courses reflecting the concerns of their particular area of
interest.

The Master of Public Administration Degree program consists of four basic academic
requirements:

1. Core courses which are required for graduation.

2. Elective courses with thesis option.

3. A comprehensive examination.

The Master of Public Administration program requires a total total of 36 credit hours.
All MPA candidates must take and pass all eight core courses (24 credits) and any four
elective courses (12 credits, six of which may be the thesis option).

MPA Prerequisites
In addition to meeting the general requirements, applicants seeking admission to the
Public Administration major must have successfully completed the following courses
or their equivalents:

1. ECO 221, 222 Introduction to Macro- and Micro-Economics.

2. BUS 325 Statistics for Management Decisions, or MAT 235 Introduction to Sta-
tistics, or SSC 327-328 Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences.

Demonstrated expertise in statistics acquired through job experience may fulfill the
MPA statistics prerequisite.

MPA Comprehensive Examination
All MPA candidates must take and pass the MPA comprehensive examination. The
examination will be offered during the Fall and Spring semesters. Students should take
the comprehensive examination as scheduled near the end of the semester when all
core courses have been completed.








Graduate Bulletin 23

MPA Thesis
The thesis will serve as an option to two elective courses, not as an option to the
comprehensive examination. The thesis will afford those students who so wish an op-
portunity to explore and express their research and writing abilities. Before signing up
for thesis, students must:

1. Have completed 30 graduate credits, including PUA 500, Introduction to Public
Administration and Public Affairs, and PUA 526, Quantitative Methods for Public
Administration.

2. Have been approved by the Coordinator of the MPAprogram as a potential candi-
date for thesis work through evaluation of graduate work, student workload, and other
factors.

3. Have discussed a potential topic and received the support of a faculty member to
be an advisor for the thesis.

Students must follow the existing rules pertaining to thesis requirements.

MPA Course Summary

Core Requirements Credits
PUA 500 Introduction to Public Administration and Public Affairs 3
PUA 520 Administrative Theories and Practices 3
PUA 521 Public Program Seminar 3
PUA 526 Quantitative Methods for Public Administration 3
PUA 527 Administrative Law Law 3
PUA 531 Group Processes and Leadership 3
PUA 533 Personnel Administration 3
PUA 534 Budget Management 3

MPA students must select six credit hours from the core elective courses listed below.
Students without these core elective courses must enroll in 12 additional elective credit
hours. MPA students are permitted to take one MBA course in partial fulfillment of the
MPA elective requirements.

Core Electives Credits
PUA 523 Recent Developments in Public Administration 3
PUA 524 Comparative Administration 3
PUA 528 Labor/Management Relations 3
PUA 532 Government, Business and Society 3
PUA 535 Public Program Planning 3
PUA 536 Selected Topics in Public Administration 3








24 University of the Virgin Islands


Master of Arts in Mathematics for Secondary
Teachers

The Master of Arts degree in Mathematics provides to teachers of mathematics at the
secondary level, or to prospective teachers with an undergraduate degree in Math-
ematics, an opportunity to deepen and broaden their knowledge of mathematics and
relate their study of mathematics to pedagogical issues and methods specifically con-
cerned with secondary mathematics learning.

The program is open to persons with a Bachelors degree in Mathematics. Persons with
a degree in a related field may also apply. Undergraduate transcripts must be submit-
ted upon application to the program. Applicants with an undergraduate Mathematics
major should have at least a 2.5 GPA. Applicants who did not major in Mathematics
must have a Baccalaureate degree and a minimum of two semesters of calculus at
university level and at least two other Mathematics courses at the level of calculus or
beyond with a minimum 2.5 average and a minimum of 2.5 in Mathematics courses.
Applicants who do not satisfy the requirements and other interested inquirers who will
be counseled regarding necessary prerequisites and assisted in satisfying these require-
ments.

A minimum of 36 credits, including a major paper based on classroom "action re-
search," are required for satisfactory completion of the program. The program will be
offered in cohorts, with a new cohort beginning approximately ever three years. If a
student fails to satisfactorily complete the requirements for graduation with his or her
cohort, she or he will be able to complete the missing requirements with the next
cohort.

Core Requirements Credits
MAT 501 Advanced Geometry for Mathematics Teachers 3
MAT 521 Mathematics Topics for Secondary Schools I 3
MAT 522 Mathematics Topics for Secondary Schools II 3
MAT 544 Probability for Mathematics Teachers 3
MAT 551 Discrete Dynamical Systems and Mathematical Modeling I 3
MAT 557 Action Research in the Mathematics Classroom
with Required Major Paper 1
MAT 561 Abstract Algebra for Mathematics Teachers I 3
MAT 567 Technology, Manipulatives, and Life Experiences
for Mathematics Learning 1
MAT 586 History & Philosophy of Mathematics 3
MAT 591 Seminar: Teaching Secondary Mathematics I 2
MAT 592 Seminar: Teaching Secondary Mathematics II 2
EDU 500 Basic Research Techniques 3








Graduate Bulletin 25

Electives Credits
MAT 511 Learning Theory for Mathematics Teachers 2
MAT 541 Real Analysis for Mathematics Teachers 3
MAT 552 Discrete Dynamical Systems and Mathematical Modeling II 2
MAT 562 Abstract Algebra for Mathematics Teachers II 3
MAT 565 Special Project in Mathematics or Mathematics Education 1-3
EDU 501 Tests and Measurements 3
EDU 520 Characteristics of Exceptional Children 3


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26 University of the Virgin Islands


Course Descriptions


(It should be noted that the following courses are numbered at the 500 level and
above. This 'ii;,. that they are graduate level courses. Courses in business, educa-
tion, science and mathematics, and social sciences, and other fields at the 400 level
and below can be found in the undergraduate catalog.)

Courses are listed alphabetically by academic field and, within each field, they are
listed numerically. A hyphen separating two course numbers for example, 513-514)
indicates that the course sequence must be taken in the order given, except where
indicated otherwise in the course descriptions. Before attempting to enroll in a course,
the student should read the course description carefully to determine that he or she has
met the stated prerequisites, if any.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BUS)

BUS 520. ADMINISTRATIVE THEORIES AND PRACTICES. The theories, tools, techniques,
and systems useful in the management process. Each student will present a managerial prob-
lem as a case for discussion. Also crosslisted as PUA 520. 3 credits

BUS 521. QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN THE DECISION SCIENCES. The structure of
human decisions is developed in a theoretical context followed by an overview of statistical
methods and their limitations, the nature of useful data, the calculus of maxima and minima,
linear algebra applied to business problems, and selected techniques for management taken
from the broad field of managerial economics. Prerequisite: BUS 325 or MAT 235 or SSC
327-328. 3 credits

BUS 522. FINANCIALADMINISTRATION. The responsibilities of finance managers, money
and banking and monetary policy of government serve as broad review background for public
finance, risk analysis, working capital policy, leverage, valuation, long and short term financial
markets, domestic and international problems with emphasis on Caribbean problems, owner-
ship and leasing, cash management the tax environment and bankruptcy. Prerequisites: ECO
221 and 222. 3 credits

BUS 523. ACCOUNTING FOR PLANNING AND CONTROL. The uses and limitations of
accounting data in the decision making process. Topics include profit planning systems design,
variance analysis, capital budgeting, inventory planning and control, cost behavior patterns,
and decision models. Prerequisite: ACC 121. 3 credits

BUS 524. MARKETING MANAGEMENT. Management functions incurred in product
planning and promotion, market analysis, marketing research, pricing and price policies,
planning marketing activities and control of marketing activities. Prerequisites: ECO 221
and 222. 3 credits

BUS 525. INFORMATION SYSTEMS. A study of systems analysis and design. The student is led
to view a business as an information system and to be aware of the skills and tools of systems
analysis. A background of management science is helpful but not essential. Systems analysis is the
profession of effective application of computers to business management. 3 credits









Graduate Bulletin 27

BUS 527. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT. The special skills of the manager; acquisition and
management of plant assets, planning and measurement of output, control of inventories, pur-
chasing scheduling, work-flow, quality control and cost controls. Prerequisites: ECO 221 and
222, BUS 325 or MAT 235 or SSC 327-328. 3 credits

BUS 528. SMALL BUSINESS OWNERSHIP. Personal characteristics of successful small busi-
ness owners, entrepreneurship, dangers of failure, startup versus buying, personnel, selling and
market research, finance, records, risk and insurance, inventory, and legal requirements give the
student practical information about himself and the opportunities in small business. Case studies are
emphasized. Prerequisites: ACC 121, ECO 221 and 222. 3 credits

BUS 531. GROUP PROCESSES AND LEADERSHIP. Small and large group processes, in-
cluding role theory, communication techniques, types of leadership, aspects of decision-mak-
ing, group maintenance and development as ongoing functions of group dynamics. (Also listed
as PUA 531.) 3 credits

BUS 532. GOVERNMENT, BUSINESS AND SOCIETY An analysis of the major issues with
important ramifications for public and private administrators, such as environmental concern,
equal opportunity requirements, unionism and collective, bargaining, white collar crime, and
ethics in government and business. (Also listed as PUA 532.) 3 credits

BUS 533. PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION. A comprehensive review of the principles and prac-
tices of personnel administration. The course will cover the legal, professional and ethical standards
of public and private personnel systems including: selection, motivation, labor relations, labor law,
equal employment opportunity, merit systems and job performance evaluation. Students will learn
the basic elements of job training classification, job enrichment and development, testing, human
relations, disciplinary matters, and contract negotiation on the rights and duties of employees and
managers. (Also listed as PUA 533.) 3 credits

BUS 534. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS. A survey of the major elements of the international
environment and their linkage to the functions and problems of the international business orga-
nization manager. Topics include structures and strategies of the firm in international business,
the firm and the nation, foreign exchange policies/problems and the national economy, inter-
governmental agreements on trade and investment and current issues in international business
operations. Special attention is given to regional and international institutions in the Caribbean
region and their impact on the international manager. 3 credits

BUS 536. SELECTED TOPICS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. Includes areas of spe-
cial and current interest in business. Individual topics will be announced at the beginning of
each semester. This course may be taken twice for credit subject to the approval of the Chair-
person of the Business Administration Division. 3 credits

BUS 537. MANAGEMENT POLICYAND STRATEGY Examination of overall business strategy
formulation from the perspective of top management. Principally through the use of case analyses,
the student will examine the management of change, competitive and environmental pressures and
organizational dynamics in both service-oriented and goods-producing firms. Prerequisites: BUS
520, 521, 522, 523, 524 and 527. (BUS 521 and 523 may be taken concurrently) 3 credits

BUS 538. INTERNATIONAL MARKETING Analysis of the basic elements for the development
of market plans for both entering new international markets and achieving goals for existing mar-
kets; evaluation of cultural, political and economic factors; and analysis of the separate elements
that lead to the market plan products, price, promotion, distribution, and sales and profit forecast-
ing. The international marketing manager's role in control and coordination. 3 credits









28 University of the Virgin Islands
BUS 539. MANAGEMENT RESEARCH AND DECISION ANALYSIS. The student exam-
ines the analytical methods as they relate to operational management research problems within
profit and nonprofit organizations. Emphasis is placed upon applied research techniques and
consultative-oriented decision making with extensive local and regional business community
involvement. Prerequisites: ECO 221, 222, BUS 325 or MAT 141, 232, or SSC 327-328, and
ACC 121. 3 credits

BUS 600. THESIS. A comprehensive written research project in the field of the student's con-
centration, planned and executed under the guidance of a thesis committee and subject to its
approval. Before credit is granted, the student must successfully orally defend the thesis before
a review committee. Prerequisite: 15 graduate credits, including BUS 539. 6 credits

EDUCATION (EDU)

EDU 500. BASIC RESEARCH TECHNIQUES. Study of historical, descriptive and experi-
mental research including research design, problem stating, hypothesis formulation and test-
ing, and research statistics. 3 credits

EDU 501. TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS. Designed to develop competencies in the con-
cepts, purposes, objectives, techniques and principles of educational evaluation as related to
test origins, types, administration, construction, interpretation and profiling. 3 credits

EDU 504. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Reviews the developments of theories of learn-
ing, cognition, motivation and memory, the experimental support for these theories and pro-
vides examples of their application to the classroom situation. 3 credits

EDU 505. ANTHROPOLOGICALAND SOCIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN
EDUCATION WITH REFERENCE TO THE VIRGIN ISLANDS. Designed to analyze the
impact of man his groups, institutions, culture and environment upon American educa-
tion, with special reference to the U.S. Virgin Islands. 3 credits

EDU 506. FOUNDATIONS OF GUIDANCE. Survey of guidance and personnel work, its
foundations and rationale; principles and practices of modem guidance. Provides a foundation
for guidance and counseling and discusses related problems. 3 credits

EDU 519. SUPERVISION OF READING INSTRUCTION. The supervisory and administra-
tive role in establishing and maintaining the direction, operation and improvement of a total
school reading program. Major topics include specialized personnel, school and classroom
programs, testing, evaluation, in-service education and public relations. 3 credits

EDU 520. CHARACTERISTICS OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN. Designed to acquaint the
student with exceptional children and youth. Areas surveyed include students mental, physical,
emotional and learning disabilities and the gifted and talented. A review of the theoretical and
research bases of special education will be included. 3 credits

EDU 523. EDUCATIONAL DIAGNOSIS AND PRESCRIPTIVE TEACHING. A course de-
signed to assist educational personnel in diagnosing children's academic and behavioral prob-
lems. A systematic approach to writing and implementing educational prescriptions is dis-
cussed in detail. Prerequisite: EDU 520. 3 credits









Graduate Bulletin 29

EDU 525. LITIGATION, LEGISLATION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION. Designed to provide
basic information about recent legislation and litigation as it relates to public education, particularly
special education. The information will be presented in the following manner: lectures, video cas-
settes, and distribution of copies of selected litigation cases and public laws. 1 credit

EDU 526. DIAGNOSTIC-PRESCRIPTIVE TEACHING Designed to acquaint educational per-
sonnel with the diagnostic-prescriptive process: the teacher as a diagnostician and an implementer
of prescriptive techniques. The role of school-based diagnostician is discussed. 1 credit

EDU 529. GIFTEDAND TALENTED STUDENTS: CHARACTERISTICS, IDENTIFICATION
AND EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS. Designed to provide basic and introductory information
about the gifted and talented: nature of giftedness, characteristics, methods and procedures for screen-
ing and identification and educational program options for public education. 1 credit

EDU 530. INDEPENDENT STUDY. An individualized program of consultation, reading re-
search and reporting on a problem related to the student's specialization. The study is to result
in practical information which is potentially useful to the Department of Education, a school
district, a particular school, a grade level, a curricula area, an academic function, a school
program, etc. Three copies of the final report are required. Students are urged to submit a
proposal for the independent study during the prior semester. The final report must be submit-
ted no later than mid-term of the following semester. The grade for this course will be pass or
fail. Prerequisites: 18 graduate credits, including EDU 500, 501 and three courses in the con-
centration area. 3 credits

EDU 531. EDUCATION IN A MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY The experience of this course
will be designed to assist educators in their development of multifaceted educational compe-
tencies especially related to multicultural and multiethnic educational settings. Emphasis will
be placed on helping educators develop both a knowledge base (theories and concepts) con-
cerning the area of multicultural and multiethnic education and a skills or action base (strate-
gies, methods and techniques) for application in various educational situations. 3 credits

EDU 540. SPECIAL PROJECT IN CAI DEVELOPMENT. Students will lead a team of au-
thors in the actual production of CAI software. Students must develop, with a team, a project
description for approval and implement that project demonstrating sound management control
and application of programming techniques. 2 credits

EDU 541. SPECIAL PROJECT IN CAI AUTHORING Students will participate in a team
comprised of a project leader (taking EDU 540) and possibly one other author student. Stu-
dents must develop with team a project description including goals of the project and ap-
proach, and participate in the implementation and final review. 2 credits

EDU 542. THEORIES, STRATEGIES AND TECHNIQUES OF COUNSELING A compre-
hensive overview of theories, strategies and techniques of individual counseling. Using case
studies and examples, various theoretical approaches to the counseling process will be exam-
ined. Prerequisite: EDU 506. 3 credits

EDU 542A. PRACTICUM IN THEORIES, STRATEGIES AND TECHNIQUES. Students
will receive supervised experience in counseling. Co-requisite: EDU 542. 1 credit

EDU 543. GROUPAND FAMILY COUNSELING AND CONSULTATION. A comprehensive
review of the principles and techniques of group counseling including issues with implications
for family counseling. Special attention will be given to the theories and processes of group
counseling in relation to the group leader and group members in a variety of settings. Prereq-
uisite: EDU 506, 542. 3 credits









30 University of the Virgin Islands
EDU 544. CAREER DEVELOPMENT COUNSELING. Provides a background in the theory
of career development and research in the field which will prepare the student for career coun-
seling including college placement. Career planning, vocational behavior, career education
and other related topics will be covered. Prerequisite: EDU 506. 3 credits

EDU 545. SEMINAR IN CURRENT TRENDS AND PROBLEMS IN COUNSELING AND
GUIDANCE. Focuses on intensive study of contemporary problems, issues, trends and develop-
ments in counseling and guidance through critical examination and evaluation of current literature
and exposure to specialists in the field. Enables students to become familiar with basic concepts of
counseling and guidance and to consider the social, cultural, philosophical and economic forces
which influence the field of counseling. Prerequisite: EDU 506. 3 credits

EDU 546. PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING. Designed to provide opportunities for direct
application of the basic concepts and skills related to individual and group counseling in vari-
ous supervised settings. Students are required to attend a weekly seminar and discuss their
field experiences. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all other required courses in the coun-
seling area. 3 credits

EDU 547. FUNDAMENTALS OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. Analysis of current theory
and practice in organization, education administration of elementary and secondary schools,
together with examination of administrative duties and responsibilities of the principal includ-
ing finance, plant personnel, services and school-community relations. 3 credits

EDU 548. ORGANIZATION AND GOVERNANCE OF AMERICAN EDUCATION. An over-
view of organization and governance in American education at the federal, state and local levels. It
includes an examination of the legal bases, structure and control of American education. 3 credits

EDU 549. SUPERVISION OF INSTRUCTION AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT. Consists of
the supervisory and administrative role in analyzing and evaluating the direction, operation
and improvement of the total school program. Attention is given to interpersonal and group
dynamics in the school, communication, conflict management and resolution, in-service edu-
cation, and general evaluation and improvement of staff. 3 credits

EDU 550. SEMINAR ON ISSUES IN EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION. Provides an
orientation to theoretical formulations, conceptual systems and research; emphasizes purposes,
roles, tasks and processes; examines current national and local trends and issues, relating these
to the practice of administration. 3 credits

EDU 551. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT. Designed to provide an overview of various
perspectives and theories of curriculum design and development, the forces and processes that
shape curricular decision-making in United States and Virgin Islands public schools, and the
leadership aspects of effecting educational change through various strategies and procedures
of curriculum development and planning. 3 credits

EDU 552. FUNDAMENTALS OF DEVELOPMENTAL READING INSTRUCTION. Study
and application of principles, methodologies and materials used in developmental reading in-
struction which provide for differential classroom instruction and foster reading comprehen-
sion in grades K-8. 3 credits

EDU 553. READING DIAGNOSIS AND REMEDIATION FOR CLASSROOMAND CLINIC.
Designed to prepare students to identify, diagnose and remediate reading difficulties with emphasis
on test selection, administration and interpretation. Corrective and remedial procedures will be
explored within the classroom and clinical setting. Prerequisites: EDU 501 and 552. 3 credits









Graduate Bulletin 31

EDU 554. LITERATURE FOR CHILDRENAND ADOLESCENTS. Using an eclectic approach,
this course will provide students with background knowledge in literature for children and adoles-
cents needed for the identification, discussion and application of major issues to elementary and
secondary school curricular areas and to current situations in today's world. 3 credits

EDU 555. RESEARCH AND TRENDS IN READING AND WRITING. Investigation of re-
search, trends and issues which impact on educators in the teaching of reading and writing
together with the identification and development of procedures for organizing and implement-
ing new knowledge and research into the school curriculum. 3 credits

EDU 556. SPECIAL EDUCATION:STATEGIES AND DESIGN. The skills of delivering indi-
vidual instruction in special and regular classroom settings will be emphasized. The selection,
adaptation and utilization of instructional methods and materials will be stressed, as well as
examination of the basic models for teaching children with special needs. 3 credits

EDU 557. INTERNSHIP/SEMINAR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. Designed to provide experi-
ences in the classroom with children who have special needs. Competencies to be demonstrated by
the student will be developed on an individual basis. Weekly seminars will cover issues in the
delivery of special education services. Prerequisites: EDU 520 and 556. 3 credits

EDU 558. BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT IN EDUCATIONAL SETTINGS. Designed to en-
able educators to understand and apply behavioral principles. The content will include class-
room and individual management plans, reinforcement in the classroom, and instructional
methods that will help expand the learner's repertoire of behaviors. The intent is to provide a
set of skill for ethically assisting learners in the management of their own behavior, thus maxi-
mizing their opportunities, not on the external manipulation of behaviors. 3 credits

EDU 559. ISSUES IN ELEMENTARYAND EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. Covers the founda-
tions of elementary and early childhood education focusing on the social, psychological, and orga-
nizational influences. Historical, philosophical, political, cultural, economic and legal issues will
also be included. 3 credits

EDU 560. ISSUES IN MIDDLE CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENT EDUCATION. Designed for
persons working in educational settings with your in the transition period between childhood and adult-
hood, this course focused on the total environment for learning, including the problems and concerns of
adolescents and the management of their academic and social behavior through organized subjects and
special services. 3 credits

EDU 561. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS IN EDUCATION. This hands-on course pro-
vides a computer education foundation for educators by exploring the variety of uses for com-
puters in the classroom and school offices. Through class exercises and discussion of current
research and literature, the course introduces the educational of word processing, spreadsheets,
drill and practice, simulation, problem solving, graphics, logical gaming, test generating, mini-
authoring, and programming-like activities. Students will also explore issues of equity, ethics
and economics as they relate to computer use in today's educational environment. 3 credits

EDU 562. INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY This course will cover
media and technology for education and training emphasizing non-computer educational tech-
nology. Areas of study include writing for educational media, basic instructional photography,
books, radio and television, audio and video tapes, designing instructional video, principles of
graphic production, compact disks, telecommunication. Integration of media into the class-
room, production and selection ofAV materials, preparation of inexpensive instructional mate-
rials and presentation of a multi-media lesson will also be part of this course. 3 credits









32 University of the Virgin Islands
EDU 563. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN THE SCHOOLS. Students will learn how to
teach database, word processing, spreadsheet, outlining and other application program skills.
Utilization of applications programs to give students experience in problem solving, coopera-
tion, logical thinking, and self-directed learning will be emphasized. The use of application
programs to help teachers with classroom administrative efforts will also be covered. The com-
puter is not an object of study but a tool to make instruction more effective in established
curriculum areas. Emphasis is on curricular issues, not the use of the computer or other tech-
niques. Prerequisite: EDU 561. 3 credits

EDU 564. EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN THE LEARNING PROCESS. This course
focuses on the higher-level thinking skills using appropriate educational technology. Students
will work with selected software to discover how the software functions as a tool for learning.
The process of the students' in-class work with educational technology will help them to model
and experiment with classroom strategies that teach skills with technology and thinking skills
in tandem. Students examine and discuss existing research on many types of educational tech-
nology to determine appropriate uses in education. The Logo programming language will be an
integral part of the course. 3 credits

EDU 565. PRACTICUM IN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY. Users of educational technol-
ogy are likely to be in a position to influence how this technology will be used in the school.
Through discussion, role-playing, and actually conducting workshops in the schools, students
will learn approaches to help them in their role as advisor to faculty and administrator. Stu-
dents will learn to effect individuals and institutional change and work in small groups to
develop realistic plans to support educational technology used in the school. Prerequisites:
EDU 561, 562, 563, and 564. 3 credits

EDU 566. SELECTED TOPICS. Includes areas of special and current interest in education.
Individual topics will be announced at the beginning of each semester. Prerequisites: (To be
announced with each topic). 1-3 credits

EDU 567. DIRECTED FIELD EXPERIENCE IN ADMINISTRATION. Designed to give pro-
spective educational administrator direct experience in the study of educational problems of con-
cern to administrators; whereby the student is provided with opportunities for assuming responsibil-
ity for decision making in both actual and simulated settings. Each student works under the supervi-
sion of a practicing administrator and a professor. At least 10 hours of work in the field and atten-
dance at the weekly seminar are required. Prerequisites: EDU 547 and 548. 3 credits

EDU 573. INTRODUCTION TO LEARNING DISABILITIES. This course is designed to
introduce education professionals to the nature of learning disabilities. Emphasis will be on the
definition, characteristics, etiology, classification and identification of learning disabilities.
Concepts and terminology used in the field will be addressed. 3 credits

EDU 574. ASSESSMENT IN SPECIAL EDUATION. Designed to acquaint practicing teachers
and educational personnel with methods and models of assessment. Emphasis will be on the use of
formal and informal assessment and the interpretation of evaluation data. 3 credits

EDU 575. SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES: STRATEGIES AND CURRICULUM DE-
SIGN. Designed to prepare education professionals to work with individuals with learning disabili-
ties in a classroom setting. The emphasis will be on preparing professionals to use a approach to
diagnosing student needs, designing curricula based on those needs, and using effective teaching
strategies and techniques to carry out individualized instructional programs. 3 credits









Graduate Bulletin 33

EDU 576. INTERNSHIP/SEMINAR: SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES (SLD). De-
signed to provide classroom experience with SLD students and in-depth study in selected pro-
gram competencies. Field student will select one program competency area, and conduct a
seminar session. 3 credits

EDU 586. PRE-PRACTICUM IN INTERPERSONAL SKILLS. This course is an introduc-
tion and application of basic counseling skills including: interviewing, clinical observation,
and a general orientation to counseling settings. Counselors and other helping professionals
will benefit from this action-learning course. Evaluation will be based on strengths and deficits
in intra and interpersonal skills and on demonstration of counseling skills in checkout role-
play and/or written situation. 3 credits

EDU 587. MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING. This course provides a theoretical, research-
based understanding of the cultural contexts of relationships, issues and trends in a multicultural
and diverse society related to factors such as culture, ethnicity, nationality, age, gender, sexual
orientation, mental and physical characteristics, values, customs, belief systems socio-eco-
nomic status, relation, language, and lifestyle. It covers the influence of views, multicultural
counseling theories, and professional competencies for counselors and practical examinations,
of cultural groups represented in the Virgin Islands. 3 credits

EDU 588. ADVANCED HUMAN DEVELOPMENT. This course covers the bases of human
development across the life span and the many layers of contexts that influence development.
Students will receive advanced coverage of recent empirical evidence, current theoretical per-
spectives on human development as well as emerging approaches, and learn how to keep abreast
of empirical research in this field. Traditional as well as authentic forms of assessments will be
used to evaluate student's learning. Prerequisites: EDU 500; EDU 542. 3 credits

EDU 600. THESIS. A comprehensive written research project in the field of the student's
concentration, planned and executed under the guidance of a thesis committee and subject to
its approval. Before credit is granted, the student must successfully orally defend the thesis
before a review committee. Prerequisites: 15 graduate credits, including EDU 500, 501 and
two courses in the concentration area. 6 credits

EDU 601. FOUNDATIONS OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY The first seminar in School Psychol-
ogy provides students with a broad overview of school psychology including history, models of
training and practice, the nature of the psychology specialty and its practice, and ethics and law
relevant to professional practice. In addition, students will become knowledgeable of the context
resource available to these professionals as well as the professional development support systems,
which enhance continuing effective functioning as a school psychologist. 3 credits

EDU 602. PSYCHOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE.
This course is designed to discuss current empirical evidence and theoretical perspectives on
human development. Emphasis will be on postnatal development during infancy, childhood,
and adolescence. Discussion will also include how development during the first 20 years im-
pacts outcomes in adulthood. 3 credits

EDU 603. PSYCHOPATHOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE. This course
provides an overview of systems for diagnosing psychopathology in children and adolescents.
Students will learn how to identify psychopathology and will gain an understanding of preven-
tion and intervention processes that are effective for particular problems or populations. Pre-
requisite: EDU 602. 3 credits









34 University of the Virgin Islands
EDU 604. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF COGNITION AND LEARNING. This course is designed
to provide students with an understanding of theories and concepts related to cognition and
learning relevant to the process of schooling. Students will become familiar with theories of
cognitive development, learning and motivation, instruction as related to school learning, mental
processes including areas such as perception, language, problem solving, reasoning and deci-
sion-making. Various types of memory (e.g. working memory, long-term memory) will also be
included. 3 credits

EDU 605. STATISTICS, DATA ANALYSIS AND PROGRAM EVALUATION. This course
will focus on calculating and understanding the statistics that a school psychologist will most
likely encounter and use in the field. It will provide the learner with an adequate review of,
exposure to, and interaction with a variety of statistical methods so students will be able to
conduct their own program evaluations and others analyses. Links between research methodol-
ogy and quantitative statistical procedures will be discussed. 3 credits

EDU 606. PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT FOR INTERVENTION I. This is the
first course in a three-course sequence in individual psychoeducational assessment for inter-
vention. The course introduces school psychology majors to foundations and principles needed
to understand and utilize individual psycho educational assessment. Students will learn to se-
lect, administer, score, interpret and report assessment instruments and to use results for plan-
ning interventions for children and youth. Co-requisite: EDU 606A. 3 credits

EDU 606A. PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT FOR INTERVEN-
TION I. Students will receive supervised experience in psychoeducational assessment, inter-
pretation, and report writing. Students will also use results to develop individualized plans and
interventions. Co-requisite: EDU 606. 1 credit

EDU 607. PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT FOR INTERVENTION II. This is the
second course of a three-course sequence in individual psychoeducational assessment for in-
tervention. This course will address the selection, administration, scoring and interpretation of
current assessment measures used with young school age children and adolescents. Prerequi-
site: EDU 606A. Co-requisite: EDU 607A. 3 credits

EDU 607A. PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT FOR INTERVEN-
TION II. Students will receive supervised experience in psychoeducational assessment, inter-
pretation, and report writing. Students will also use results to develop individualized plans and
interventions. Co-requisite: EDU 607. 1 credit

EDU 608. PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENT FOR INTERVENTION III: EARLY
CHILDHOOD AND LOW INCIDENCE ASSESSMENT. This is the third in a three-course
sequence in psychoeducational assessment. It prepares students to assess: young children and
infants; children with severe or low incidence disabilities; and culturally/linguistically diverse
children including those for whom English is a second language. Students will be prepared to
use assessment results for individualized program planning and intervention. Prerequisite: EDU
607. Co-requisite: EDU 608A. 3 credits

EDU 608A. PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOEDUCATIONALASSESSMENT FOR INTERVENTION
III. Students will receive supervised experience in psychoeducational assessment, interpretation,
and report writing with young children and low incidence disabilities. Students will also use results
to develop individualized plans and interventions. Co-requisite: EDU 608. 1 credit









Graduate Bulletin 35

EDU 609. BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION. This course is designed to pro-
vide graduate students with an opportunity to use prevention, intervention and behavioral strat-
egies to help teachers and parents meet and manage problems within the educational environ-
ment. School psychology majors will learn a variety of strategies and techniques designed to:
(1) facilitate optimal learning of all children using individual and group management methods;
(2) establish positive teacher-student and peer relationships, and (3) examine a wide range of
behavioral methods. 3 credits

EDU 609A. PRACTICUM IN BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS AND INTERVENTION. Students
will receive supervised experience in behavior analysis and intervention. Co-requisite:
EDU 609. 1 credit

EDU 610. SCHOOL CONSULTATION METHODS. This course will introduce students to
the indirect service delivery approach with school staff, parents and community agencies. Models
of consultation and collaboration with individuals and groups will be examined. The role of
teams as a decision-making tool and indirect service models will be examined. Co-requisite:
EDU 610A. 3 credits

EDU 610A. PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL CONSULTATION METHODS. Students will re-
ceive supervised experience in school consultation. Co-requisite: EDU 610. 1 credit

EDU611. CURRICULUM BASEDASSESSMENTANDACADEMIC INTERVENTIONS. This
course will provide a review of tests and curriculum-based methods for assessing reading, writing,
math, and other academic skills. It will cover a range of strategies and techniques which research
suggests are effective in improving student achievement in key academic areas. 3 credits

EDU 612. ADVANCED SEMINAR IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY This course will provide a
review and integration of knowledge related to school psychology and discussion of current
issues, standards, and trends in the field. The course also includes the presentation and evalu-
ation of a portfolio of cases derived from the school psychology internship, and helps students
to prepare for practice and continuing professional development as school psychologists. Pre-
requisites: Completion of all the required courses in Psychological and Educational Founda-
tions, Assessment, and Application/ Intervention. 4 credits

EDU 614. INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY I. This is the first part of a one-year,
1,200 hour, two-semester school psychology internship sequence. This first course requires a
minimum of 600 clock hours of field experience supervised by a credentialed school psycholo-
gist or (for non school settings) a credentialed psychologist. At least one-half of the total in-
tership hours must be completed in a school setting. Prerequisite: Completion of all the re-
quired courses in Psychological and Educational Foundations, Assessment, and Application/
Intervention. 3 credits

EDU 614. INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY II. This is the second part of a one-
year, 1,200 hour, two-semester school psychology internship sequence. This second course
requires a minimum of 600 clock hours of field experience supervised by a credentialed school
psychologist or (for non school settings) a credentialed psychologist. At least one-half of the
total internship hours must be completed in a school setting. 3 credits









36 University of the Virgin Islands

MATHEMATICS (MAT)

MAT 501. ADVANCED GEOMETRY FOR MATHEMATICS TEACHERS. Through discov-
ery and proof of a wide range of geometric properties and relationships, students will gain a
broadened perspective of geometry. Includes Euclidean geometry in two and three dimensions
and some work with non-Euclidean geometries. Prerequisite: MAT 522 or permission of in-
structor. 3 credits

MAT 511. LEARNING THEORYFOR MATHEMATICS TEACHERS. Various learning theo-
ries, with special attention to the work of Piaget, Bruner, Vygotsky, Gardner, the Van Hieles,
Greeno and Polya, will be analyzed and interpreted in terms of implications for mathematics
learning and mathematics education reform. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program in
Mathematics or permission of instructor. 2 credits

MAT 521. MATHEMATICS TOPICS FOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS I. This course, the first
of a two-course sequence, includes topics in real and complex numbers; functions; equations;
integers and polynomials; and number system structures. The purpose of the course is to deepen
teachers' understanding of topics in the secondary curriculum in an environment of challeng-
ing problems and investigations. Non-enrolled Mathematics teachers may attend advertised
sessions of each course which will be offered in workshop format, provided that they pre-
register for that session. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program in Mathematics or per-
mission of instructor. 3 credits

MAT 522. MATHEMATICS TOPICS FOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS II. This course, the
second in a sequence of two courses, includes topics in congruence; similarity; trigonometric
functions; area and volume; axiom systems and Euclidean geometry. Non-enrolled Mathemat-
ics teachers may attend advertised sessions of each course which will be offered in workshop
format, provided that they pre-register for that session. Prerequisite: MAT 521 or permission of
the instructor. 3 credits

MAT 541. REAL ANALYSIS FOR MATHEMATICS TEACHERS. This course is designed to
provide students with a fundamental understanding of the basic concepts of mathematical analysis
and the logical thinking, strategies and tactics used to prove analysis theorems. The focus will
be on how these concepts can be used to more effectively teach secondary level mathematics.
Prerequisite: MAT 521 and MAT 522. 3 credits

MAT 544. PROBABILITY FOR MATHEMATICS TEACHERS. Probability of events on dis-
crete and continuous sample spaces; random variables and probability distributions; expected
values; transformations; the central limit theorem and the law of large numbers. The theory
will be applied broadly to Caribbean environmental and social topics and issues. A focus will
be on how these concepts can be used to more effectively teach secondary level mathematics.
Prerequisite: MAT 242. 3 credits

MAT 551. DISCRETE DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING I. This
course and its sequel, 562, will develop mathematical models of situations that change over time
using discrete dynamical systems. Elementary dynamical systems modeling will be studied in the
context of situations of interest and relevance to those living on Caribbean islands so that teachers
will be able to develop appropriate lessons for students in high school algebra, geometry, pre-
calculus, and calculus courses using concepts from discrete mathematics. Teachers will develop
prototypes for such lessons for their grade 7-12 students within this course. Prerequisite: Admission
to graduate program in Mathematics or permission of instructor. 3 credits









Graduate Bulletin 37

MAT 557. ACTION RESEARCH IN THE MATHEMATICS CLASSROOM WITH REQUIRED
MAJOR PAPER. Using all phases of action research and emphasizing teacher-level factors and
student motivation, teachers will develop and implement action research plans for their own class-
rooms and their schools in an area of the school mathematics curriculum. Each student will produce
a major paper based on his/her own action research. Prerequisite: EDU 500. 1 credit

MAT 561. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA FOR MATHEMATICS TEACHERS I. This course is the
first of two providing an introduction to abstract algebra by using number theory as motiva-
tion. It includes properties of integers; residue classes; groups; theorems of Fermat, Lagrange
and Euler; decompositions; polynomials; primitive roots; Gaussian integers and primes;
Pythagorean triples; and quadratic Residues. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program in
Mathematics or permission of instructor. 3 credits

MAT 567. TECHNOLOGY, MANIPULATIVES, AND LIFE EXPERIENCES FOR MATH-
EMATICS LEARNING. Students will develop field trips and other experiences to bring data
from the "real world" into the secondary mathematics classroom. Careful attention will be
given to the use of data to enhance mathematics learning, including application of appropriate
technology and concrete models. Prerequisite: Admission to the Mathematics graduate program
or permission of the instructor. 1 credit

MAT 586. HISTORY & AND PHILOSOPHY OF MATHEMATICS. The course includes his-
tory of significant mathematical concepts and the mathematicians and cultures that produced
them, perspectives on mathematics in a wide variety of world cultures, and philosophical per-
spectives on mathematics. MAT 586 will include all of the topics of MAT 386; additional
requirements will include but not be limited to a more intensive consideration of the philo-
sophical issues that have guided the historic development of mathematics in the 19th and 20th
centuries and into the present and the implications these issues have for teaching. MAT 586
will also require development of materials that insert mathematics history into the mathematics
content in the secondary curriculum. Cross-listed with MAT 386. Prerequisites: MAT 242,
MAT 301 or MAT 522 or equivalents. 3 credits

MAT 591. SEMINAR: TEACHING SECONDARY MATHEMATICS I. These seminars are
intended to prepare students to apply a variety of strategies aligned with the professional math-
ematics teaching standards for planning, teaching, and assessing mathematics at the secondary
level. The course is intended to permit students to integrate new knowledge of content and
method into exemplary practice in the teaching of secondary mathematics. Pre-requisite MAT
522. Co-requisite: MAT 511. 2 credits

MAT 592. SEMINAR: TEACHING SECONDARY MATHEMATICS II. These seminars are
intended to provide students with in-depth knowledge appropriate for applying a variety of
strategies aligned with the professional standards for planning, teaching, and assessing math-
ematics at the secondary level. Key issues pertinent to providing mathematical experiences in
an inquiry-based learning environment will be explored through literature and web searches.
The course is intended to permit students to integrate new knowledge of content and method
into exemplary practice in the teaching of secondary mathematics. Prerequisite MAT 591 or
permission of the instructor. 2 credits

MAT 552. DISCRETE DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING II.
This is the second in a two-course sequence of work with developing mathematical models of
situations that change over time using discrete dynamical systems designed for secondary math-
ematics teachers. This course focuses on non-linear models. Prerequisite: MAT 551. 2 credits









38 University of the Virgin Islands
MAT 562. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA FOR MATHEMATICS TEACHERS II. This course is a
continuation of MAT 561. It includes fields, vector spaces, rings, and ideals. Prerequisite:
MAT 561. 3 credits

MAT 565. SPECIAL PROJECT IN MATHEMATICS OR MATHEMATICS EDUCATION.
Special project in mathematics education or in mathematics experience in science, industry or
government agencies. The teacher enrolled in the Masters program for Secondary Mathematics
Teachers may gain graduate credit through a project that advances and broadens knowledge of
mathematics teaching and/or mathematics. The course is intended to encourage teachers' expe-
rience in international mathematics education and/or the work of the professional mathemati-
cian. The student's advisor will determine amount of credit to be awarded for each project.
Prerequisite: Project must be approved by the student's advisor and by the Mathematics Mas-
ters Program Committee. Enrollment is restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Arts in
Mathematics degree program. 1 3 credits per project

PUBLICADMINISTRATION (PUA)

PUA 500. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS. An
introductory survey of the major concepts and theoretical perspectives in the field of public admin-
istration as well as the basic vocabulary. Students will also be initiated to an understanding of the
interaction between political and bureaucratic processes, and their impact on policy choices and
results. Note: PUA 500 and 524 may be taken concurrently. 3 credits

PUA520. ADMINISTRATIVE THEORIES AND PRACTICES. The theories, tools, techniques,
and systems useful in the management process. Each student will present a managerial prob-
lem as a case for discussion. (Also listed as BUS 520). 3 credits

PUA521. PUBLIC PROGRAM SEMINAR. Case studies of the application of administra-
tive processes to a major public problem. Students in the course are expected to produce
substantial research papers on selected public problems. Prerequisites: ECO 221 and 222
and PUA 500. 3 credits

PUA 523. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. Identifies and traces
major trends in selected areas including the study of public administration, the professionalization
of public administration, administrative organization and reorganization, intergovernmental
developments during the last two decades. Prerequisite: PUA 500. 3 credits

PUA 524. COMPARATIVE ADMINISTRATION. An overview of major trends and emphasis
in comparative public administration. Major topics are: theoretical approaches, bureaucracy as
a model for comparison, administration in developed and developing nations. Note: PUA 500
and 524 may be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: PUA 500. 3 credits

PUA 526. QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. Aimed at stu-
dents and practitioners in public administration who are interested in how research methodolo-
gies and statistical techniques are relevant to social and political problems administrators will
face in public agencies. It will also demonstrate the application of the knowledge of policy and
administrative situations by illustrated examples, exercises, writing research reports, gather-
ing, calculating, interpreting and analyzing statistical materials. Prerequisite: General Statisti-
cal Requirement. 3 credits

PUA 527. ADMINISTRATIVE LAW. Aimed at providing an understanding of the law con-
cerning the powers and procedures of administrative action. Although federal agency law and
procedures will be covered, attention will also be focused on agency procedures and judicial
review in the Virgin Islands. 3 credits









Graduate Bulletin 39

PUA 528. LABOR/MANAGEMENT RELATIONS. Covers the general applicable concepts in
the evolving field of public labor-management relations, recent developments in public em-
ployee relations, review of pertinent federal, state and local laws and court decisions, the art of
labor negotiations and handling of public employee grievances; comparisons of labor relations
in the private and public sectors. 3 credits

PUA 531. GROUP PROCESSES AND LEADERSHIP. Small and large group processes, in-
cluding role theory, communication techniques, types of leadership, aspects of decision-mak-
ing, group maintenance and development as ongoing functions of group dynamics. (Also listed
as BUS 531). 3 credits

PUA 532. GOVERNMENT, BUSINESS AND SOCIETY. An analysis of the major issues with
important ramifications for public and private administrators, such as environmental concern,
equal opportunity requirements, unionism and collective, bargaining, white collar crime, and
ethics in government and business. (Also listed as BUS 532). 3 credits

PUA 533. PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION. A comprehensive review of the principles and
practices of personnel administration. The course will cover the legal, professional and ethical
standards of public and private personnel systems including: selection, motivation, labor rela-
tions, labor law, equal employment opportunity, merit systems and job performance evalua-
tion. Students will learn the basic elements of job training classification, job enrichment and
development, testing, human relations, disciplinary matters, and contract negotiation on the
rights and duties of employees and managers. (Also listed as BUS 533). 3 credits

PUA 534. BUDGET MANAGEMENT. Covers all major aspects of budgeting: the public bud-
get cycle and process; income and revenue, projection of receipts and expenditures; budget
systems, objectives, outcomes, programs, activities and the line item budget. Emphasis will be
on the role of the budget as the central tool of management planning, execution and control of
public programs. Students will learn how to prepare a budget, balance accounts, control fed-
eral funds and other special funds. In addition, budget approval, administration and control
will be examined. Prerequisites: ECO 221 and 222. 3 credits

PUA 535. PUBLIC PROGRAM PLANNING. The design and management of governmental
administrative systems. Special attention is given to systems theory, methods of systems analy-
sis, communications, management controls and methods of program evaluation. 3 credits

PUA 536. SELECTED TOPICS IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. Includes areas of special
and current interest in public administration. Individual topics will be announced at the begin-
ning of each semester. Prerequisite: PUA 500. 3 credits

PUA 600. THESIS. A comprehensive written research project in the field of the student's con-
centration, planned and executed under the guidance of a thesis committee and subject to its
approval. Before credit is granted, the student must successfully orally defend the thesis before
a review committee. Prerequisites: 15 graduate credits including PUA 500 and 526. 3 credits







40 University of the Virgin Islands

Notes
















Accounting
Administration and Finance
Admissions
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Athletic Department
Board of Trustees


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(340) 69:
Phone
4160
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1008 1014
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4005 1140 1175


4026
4165

1543
4085
4008

4145
4115
4225
4165
4105


4027 1040
1010
4135 1367
4165 1516
1181
4165 1510
4005 1000
4025 1200
1057
4165 1480
4115 1160
1550
1062


Security 4444 4165
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4009
4009
4009
4015
4009


1142
1105

1085
1091
1025
1095
1227
1105
1405
1465

1049
1011
1365
1543
1185
1505
1005
1205
1055
1485
1167
1555
1065
1505
775-3756
1137
1405
1105
1105
1014
1105
1167
1131
1325


1311
1335
1345
1285
1245




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