• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Calendar
 Academic calendar
 Board of trustees
 Executive officers
 Administrative offices
 The university
 St. Croix campus
 St. Thomas campus
 Administration, research and public...
 Admissions
 Costs
 Financial aid
 Student support services and...
 Academic information and regul...
 General education requirements
 Associate of arts degree
 Associate of science degree
 Associate of applied science...
 Bachelor of arts degree
 Bachelor of science degree
 Course descriptions
 Faculty listing by division
 Emeritus faculty and administr...
 Faculty
 Executive, administrative and professional...
 Index
 Maps
 Services directory






Group Title: UVI catalog
Title: UVI catalog. 2005 - 2006.
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300601/00003
 Material Information
Title: UVI catalog. 2005 - 2006.
Series Title: UVI catalog
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of the Virgin Islands. Office of the Provost.
Affiliation: University of the Virgin Islands -- Office of the Provost
Publisher: University of the Virgin Islands
Publication Date: 2005
 Subjects
Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA01300601
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Front Matter
        Front matter
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
    Calendar
        Page vii
    Academic calendar
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
    Board of trustees
        Page xi
    Executive officers
        Page xii
    Administrative offices
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
    The university
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    St. Croix campus
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    St. Thomas campus
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Administration, research and public service
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Admissions
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Costs
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Financial aid
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Student support services and programs
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Academic information and regulations
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    General education requirements
        Page 66
    Associate of arts degree
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Associate of science degree
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Associate of applied science degree
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Bachelor of arts degree
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
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        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
    Bachelor of science degree
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
    Course descriptions
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
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        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
    Faculty listing by division
        Page 199
    Emeritus faculty and administration
        Page 200
        Page 201
    Faculty
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
    Executive, administrative and professional staff
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
    Index
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
    Maps
        Page 228
        Page 229
    Services directory
        Page 230
Full Text







































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www.uvi.edu


The University of the Virgin Islands is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States
Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, (215) 662-5606. The Com-
mission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Educa-
tion and the Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation. This catalog has been developed and
produced by the Catalog Review Committee which works under the auspices of the Office of the Provost.

















2005-2006 Catalog


UVI Mission Statement

The University of the Virgin Islands is a learner-centered institution dedicated to the
success of its students and committed to enhancing the lives of the people of the U.S.
Virgin Islands and the wider Caribbean through excellent teaching, innovative research,
and responsive community service.

UVI Vision Statement

The University of the Virgin Islands will be an exceptional U.S. institution of higher
education in the Caribbean dedicated to student success, committed to excellence, and
pledged to enhancing the social and economic transformation of the U.S. Virgin Is-
lands.


St. Croix Campus
RR1 Box 10000
Kingshill, St. Croix
U.S. Virgin Islands
00850-9781
(340)778-1620


St. Thomas Campus
#2 John Brewer's Bay
St. Thomas
U.S. Virgin Islands
00802-9990
(340)776-9200


http: //www.uvi.edu
















Page
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2005-2006 .................... yiii

BOARD OF TRUSTEES ................... ........ xi

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS .......................... xii

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES .................. ..... xiii

THE UNIVERSITY
History .... .............. ............... 1
Accreditation and Memberships ........................ 2
Location, Facilities and GlobalAccess ..................... 2
Special Programs . . . . .. . .. 3

ST. CROIX CAMPUS
Programs .. .. .. .. .. ......... ....... ...... 6
Campus Overview ................. ............ 7
Melvin H. Evans Center for Learning ...... . . . .. 7
The Great House ........... . . . 7
St. Croix Campus Library ........... . . . .. 8
Research and Extension Center ............. 9

ST. THOMAS CAMPUS
Programs .................. ....... .......10
Campus Overview ................ . . ..... 11
Ralph M. Paiewonsky Library .. . . . 11
Music Education Center ............ . . . 12
Sports and Fitness Center . . . . ..... 12
Off-Campus Facilities. .................. . .. 13

ADMINISTRATION, RESEARCH AND PUBLIC SERVICE
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT ......... . . . .....14
OFFICE OF THE PROVOST ........ ......... ....... 14
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND LIFELONG LEARNING .... .14
RESEARCHAND PUBLIC SERVICE . . . .... 16
Agricultural Experiment Station . .............. 16
CenterforMarine and Environmental Studies .. ........ 16
Cooperative Extension Service ...... . . 16
Eastern Caribbean Center ......... . . . .....17
Research Publications Unit .................. .... .. 17
Small Business Development Center .... . . . .17
WaterResources Research Institute . . . .. 18
OFFICE OF INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH AND PLANNING . 18
Academic Divisions ............ . . . .... 18




ii











ADMISSIONS
Admissions Policies ............. . . . .... 19
How to Apply. . . . . . . . 20
When to Apply ....... .......... ............. 21
Application Fee ................... .. .......... 21
Enrollment Confirmation and Deposit ..... . . .21
International Student Admission ........ . . . .... 21
Early Admissions Program .......... . . . .....22
Transfer Admission. .......... . . . .... 23
Transfer of Academic Credits to the University. . . . 23
Readmission to the University .................. ...... 24
Senior Citizen Education Program ...... . . 24
Additional Preparation and Testing ...... . . 25
Residency Regulations for Tuition Purposes . . . ..... 29
Categories of Students ............ . . . 32

COSTS
Tuition, Fees, Room and Board . . ......... ...... 34
Tuition and Fees for Part-Time and Summer Students .......35

FINANCIAL AID
FinancialAid 37
Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Continued FinancialAid Eligibility 38
Federal Financial Aid Withdrawal Policy .... . . ..... 39

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES AND PROGRAMS
Orientation ................. . . . 41
A dvisem ent . . . . . .. . . 41
The Freshman Center ............ . . . 42
Counseling and Placement Services ............. .. .. 42
Student Employment Services .................. ..... 43
Health Services and Insurance .................. ...... 43
Drug andAlcohol Prevention/Education Program . . 43
Students with Disabilities. .. . . . . 44
Student Activities and Convocations ...... . . 44
Student Government Association .................. ... .44
Varsity, Intramural and Club Sports ...... . .. 45
Student Housing ............... . . .... 45
Housing Procedures ............. . . . .... 46
Personal Property. . . . . . . 47
Off-campus Housing .............. . . . .... 47
Food Services .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . ... 48

ACADEMIC INFORMATION AND REGULATIONS
Freshman-Year Program . . . . . . 49
Prerequisites, Credits, Grades and Quality Points . . . 50
Registration Procedures ........... . . . .... 53
Withdrawal. .................. . . .... 53
Re-matriculation . . . . . . . 55
Transcripts . . . . . . . .. 55
Courses Taken at Other Institutions ..... . . .. 55
Privacy Act ................... .... ......... 55
Academic Standards .............. . . . .... 56

iii











English Proiciency Examination Requirement . . . 61
Computer Literacy Requirement .................. .. .... 62
Awards and Honors. .............. . . ..... 62
The Honors Program . . . . . . . 63
Multiple Majors and Second Degrees ...... . . 64

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS . . . 66

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE
General Education Requirements .................. ..... 67
Other Requirements . . . . . . . 68
Degree Majors and Programs
Business Administration Division .................. ..... 69
AccountingMajor . . ....... ....... 69
Business ManagementMajor ......... . . . .... 70
Computer I,, r..i i-r..,i Systems Major . . . ..... 71
Hotel and Restaurant Management Major . . . .72
Office I,,1- ..i.r-.ii ,i ..i Ceritii ateh Program . . . 73
Education Division
Inclusive Early ChildhoodEducation Major ...... . . .73
Humanities and Social Sciences Division . . . 74
Police Science andAdministration Major . . . 74

ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE
General Education Requirements .................. ..... 76
Other Requirements. ............. . . .....77
Degree Majors and Programs
Nursing Major. . . . . . . . 77
Computer Science Major. .......... . . .....79
Physics M major. . .. .. .. . . . 81

ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE
General Education Requirements .................. ..... 83
Other Requirements. ............. . . .... 83
Degree Program
Science andM/athematics Division .................. ..... 84
Process Technology Major . . . . . 84

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE
General Education Requirements .................. ..... 86
Other Requirements .............. . . . .... 87
Degree Majors and Programs
Business Administration Division .................. ..... 89
AccountingMajor .............. . . . 89
Business Administration Major... . . . 90
Education Division 92
ElementaryEducation Major . ..... ....... 93
Secondary Teacher Preparation ............. .. .94
Humanities .................94
Communication Major. .................. . .. .96
English Major ....... ........... ........... 98
Humanities Major ................. . .99
A/usic Education Major .......... . . . .....99











Speech Communication and I theatre Major. .... ................
Science and Mathematics Division . . . .
BiologyMajor. ............... . . .
Chemistry Major ................... . .
Marine Biology Major.... . . . .
Mathematics Major ........ . . . .
Pre-Medical Technology Program . . . .
Social Sciences. ................ . . . .
Psychology Major.... . . . .
Social Sciences Major... . . . .
Social Work Major. ................... . .


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE
General Education Requirements .....
Other Requirements ...........
Degree Majors and Programs
Nursing Education Division . .
Nursing Major ..........
Science and Mathematics Division .
Applied Mathematics Major . .
BiologyMajor . ....
Chemistry Major. . ....
Computer Science Major . .
Marine Biology Major .. . .
Mathematics Major. . ..


102
104
105
106
107
108
110
111
112
115
116


. .. 118
. .. 119

. . 119
. . 120
. . 122
. . 123
. . 125
. . 126
. . 127
S. . 130
. . 131


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 134
FACULTYLISTINGBYDIVISION 199
EMERITUS FACULTYANDADMINISTRATION . . .200
FACULTY ............................. 202
EXECUTIVE,ADMINISTRATIVEAND PROFESSIONALSTAFF ...... .211
INDEX ............. ........ ....... 224
ST. CROIX CAMPUS MAP ... ............. ............ 228
ST. THOMAS CAMPUS MAP ........... ... ........ 229


































Important Note


The information contained in this Catalog refers to the University of the Virgin Islands as of
July, 2005.
This catalog represents the current provisions of the University of the Virgin Islands at the time
of its preparation. These stipulations do not constitute an offer for a contract that may be
accepted by students through registration and enrollment in the University. The University
reserves the right to change any condition, offering, requirement, policies or processes at
anytime within a student's period of study at the University. While every effort will be made to
meet students' curricular needs, the University does not guarantee the availability of course
offerings at any particular time. In the event of any changes, appropriate mechanisms shall be
used to communicate this information to the University community. Such changes will be
published in the annual catalog, the website at www.uvi.edu, and other appropriate media.
However, students are ultimately responsible for adhering to polices, procedures, requirements
for courses and degrees offered by the University by obtaining current information. Although
every effort has been made to assure the accuracy of the information in this catalog, students
and others who use it should note that laws, rules, and policies change from time to time, and
that these changes may alter the information contained herein. Changes may come in the form of
statutes enacted by the Legislature, rules and policies adopted by the Board of Trustees of the
University, or by the President or designee of the institution. Further, it is not possible to
include all of the rules, policies and other information which pertain to the student and the
institution. More current or complete information may be obtained from the appropriate de-
partment, school, or administrative office. Nothing in this catalog shall be construed, operate as,
or have the effect of an abridgment or a limitation of any rights, powers, or privileges of the
Board of Trustees of the University of the Virgin Islands.

O Copyright 2005, University of the Virgin Islands

The University of the Virgin Islands is an equal opportunity, affirmative action, Title
IX, Section 504, PL 101-542 educator and employer.



















2005

September October
S M T WT F S S MT
1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 9 10 11
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 16 17 18
25 26 27 28 29 30 23 24 25


December
S MTW

4 5 6 7
11 12 13 14
18 19 20 21
25 26 27 28


2006


January
S M T
123
8 9 10
15 16 17
22 23 22
29 30 31


April
S M T W T F


T W T F S
1
4 5 6 7 8
11 12 13 14 15
18 19 20 21 22
25 26 27 28 29


February
S MT


May
S M


August
S M T
1
6 7 8
13 14 15
20 21 22
27 28 29


August
S M T
1 2
7 8 9
14 15 16
21 22 23
28 29 30


W T F S
1
5 6 7 8
12 13 14 15
19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29


November
S MTW
1 2
6 7 8 9
13 14 15 16
20 21 22 23
27 28 29 30


March
S MT


June
S M


2 3
9 10
16 17
23 24
30

July
S M

2 3
9 10
16 17
23 24
30 31


T W T
1
6 7 8
13 14 15
20 21 22
27 28 29


September
S MTW


T F
1
7 8
14 15
21 22
28 29














Fall Semester 2005


August
8 Last day to pay tuition & fees
15 Convocation
Faculty return
15 -18 New student orientation
16 New student advisement & registration
17- 19 Advisement & late registration
18 Classes begin
22-24 Add/Drop

September
5 Holiday LABOR DAY (University closed)
23 Final day to drop without WF, WP, or change from credit to audit or audit
to credit

October
7 Midterm low grade reports due
14 Final day to drop without Provost's permission
30 Admissions application deadline for Spring 2006
31 Advisement & registration for continuing students for Spring 2006

November
1 Holiday LIBERTY DAY (University closed)
2 -4 Advisement & registration for continuing students for Spring 2006
7 -10 Advisement & registration for continuing students for Spring 2006 con't
11 Holiday VETERANS'DAY (University closed)
24 Holiday THANKSGIVING (University closed)
25 Holiday FORTSBERG/DISCOVERYDAY (University closed)
26-27 University Recess (No classes)
30 Schedule adjustment for classes meeting on Fridays
Classes end

December
1-7 Final Exams
7 Fall semester ends for students
9 Last day to submit grades
Fall semester ends for faculty
16 Last day for returning students to pay tuition & fees for Spring 2006












Spring Semester 2006


January
9 Faculty return
9-12 New student orientation
10 New student advisement & registration
11- 12 Advisement & late registration
12 Classes begin
13 Add/Drop
16 Holiday MARTIN LUTHER KING' S Birthday (University closed)
17-18 Add/Drop con't

February
6 Last day to apply for graduation
17 Last day to drop without WP, WF, or to change from credit to audit or
audit to credit

March
3 Midterm low grade reports due
7 -10 University Spring Recess (No classes)
16 Charter Day
17 Last day to drop without Provost's permission

April
3 -7 Advisement & Registration for continuing students for Fall 2006
10 Advisement & Registration for Fall 2006 con't
14 University Recess (University closed)
15-16 University Recess (No classes)
27 Schedule adjustment for classes meeting on Fridays
Classes end
28 29 Holiday CARNIVAL RECESS (University closed)
30 Admissions Application deadline for Fall 2006

May
1-7 Final exams
7 Spring Semester ends for students
8 Last day to submit grades
Semester ends for faculty
9-10 Faculty professional development
11 Faculty meeting to certify graduates
15 Commencement St. Thomas Campus
16 Commencement St. Croix Campus











Summer Session 2006


Note: The Academic Calendar for Summer 2006 was not available at this printing.
The Calendar will be provided by addendum when it becomes available.















THE HONORABLE CHARLES W. TURNBULL
Governor of the Virgin Islands
Honorary Chair of the Board of Trustees


Members of the Board


AUGUSTE E. RIMPEL, Jr, Chair
Concord, Massachusetts


JUDY M. GOMEZ, ex-officio
Chair, Board of Education
St. Thomas, USVI


ROY D. JACKSON
St. Thomas, USVI


NOREEN MICHAEL, ex-officio
Commissioner of Education
St. Croix, USVI

ALEXANDER. MOORHEAD, Vice Chair
St. Croix, USVI

BERNARD PAIEWONSKY
Bethesda, Maryland

LAVERNE E. RAGSTER, ex-officio
President, University of the Virgin Islands
St. Thomas, USVI


LYNN ROSENTHAL
Faculty Trustee
St. Thomas, USVI

HENRY C. SMOCK
St. Thomas, USVI

AUDREY L. THOMAS
St. Thomas, USVI

YVONNE E. L. THRAEN
St. Thomas, USVI

ALEXANDER TOLEDO
Student Trustee
St. Thomas, USVI

JUANITAM. WOODS
St. Croix, USVI


DEANNAROGERS
Alumni Association Trustee
St. Thomas, USVI














PRESIDENT'S CABINET


LaVerne E. Ragster, President
B.S., University of Miami
M.Sc., San Diego State University
Ph.D., University of California, San Diego 1980

Joseph Boschulte, Vice President for Institutional Advancement
B.B.A., College of William and Mary
M.B.A., University of Virginia 1995

Deborah C. Fontaine, Special Assistant to the President
B.S., Hampton University
M.B.A., Hampton University
Ph.D., Walden University 1993

Al Hassan I. Musah, Provost and Professor of Biology
B.S., University of Ghana
M.S., Iowa State University
Ph.D., Iowa State University 1986

Tina M. Koopmans, Vice President of Information Technology and Learning Resources
B.A., University ofIowa
M.A., University ofIowa 1991

John A. D'Orazio, Campus Executive Administrator, St. Thomas
A.A., Springfield Technical Community College
B.A., TI, ri1, 1State College
M.Ed., Springfield College 1978

Vincent Samuel, Vice President forAdministration and Finance and Asssociate Professor
of Accounting and Finance
B.A., University of the Virgin Islands
M.S., Alelphi University 1986
M.B.A., University of Michigan 1992

Henry H. Smith, Vice Provost, Research and Public Service and Director of the Water
Resources Research Institute
B.A., College of the Virgin Islands
M.S., University of Maryland
Ph.D., Colorado State University 1985
J.D., University of Dayton 1993














OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
President ........................... .LaVerne E. Ragster
Administrative/Cabinet. .... . . ..... Utha 0. Williams
Board of Trustees. ................... ...... ..Gail T. Steele
Communications/Outreach . . . Velma A. Abramsen
Research and Technology Park . . . .. Malcolm C. Kirwan
Strategic Planning and Outcomes Assessment. .... .Deborah C. Fontaine
Summer Institute for Future Global Leaders
in the Caribbean .... . . . Solomon S. Kabuka

OFFICE OF THE PROVOST
Provost Al Hassan L Musah
Vice Provost Research and Public Service . ..... .Henry H. Smith
Agricultural Experiment Station . .... James E. Rakocy
Center for Marine and Environmental Studies . Richard S. Nemeth
Cooperative Extension Service . . .... Kwame Garcia, Sr.
Eastern Caribbean Center Frank L. Mills
Research Publications Unit. . . . MarvinWilliams
Small Business Development Center . . .. .Warren Bush
Water Resources Research Institute . . .... Henry H. Smith
Vice Provost- Student Affairs Office . . .... .Angela McGhee
Athletics Office, Management Sports and Fitness Center .. .. Peter Sauer
Office of Community Engagement and Lifelong Learning ..... .Ilene Garner
Office of Enrollment Management . . .... Carolyn Cook-Roberts
Admissions and New Student Services (STT). Carolyn Cook-Roberts
Admissions and Student Records (STX). . . .. TBA
Financial Aid Office. .. . . ...... Mavis Gilchrist
Registrar and Student Records . . .... Robert Fontaine
Student Recruitment Office . . . Karen Blyden
Office of Sponsored Programs . . . ..... Steve Goode
Office of Institutional Research and Planning. ...... .Mary AnnLaFleur
Title III Office................. ......... Dayle Barry
Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence
In Developmental Disabilities . . . .. Yegin Habtes
Division Chairs
Business Administration . . .... Aubrey D. Washington
Education .......... ......... .......Paul Abney
Humanities and Social Sciences . . .... Aletha Baumann
Nursing ..... . . . GloriaB. Callwood
Science and Mathematics .................. Adam Parr

OFFICE OF THE CAMPUS EXECUTIVE ADMINISTRATOR- St. Croix Campus
Campus ExecutiveAdministrator TBA
Associate Campus Administrator Student Affairs .... Claude C. Steele
Associate Campus Administrator Operations. . Peter Abrahams
Upward Bound .................. ...... ..Michelle Albany
continued, nextpage










OFFICE OF THE CAMPUS EXECU TIVEADMINISTRATOR- St. Thomas Campus
Campus ExecutiveAdministrator . . . ... John D'Orazio
Associate Campus Administrator Student Affairs ....... .Doris Battiste
Associate Campus Administrator Operations . ... Lily Mae Durante
Upward Bound. ........ . . ...... Rosalia Rohan
Chief Campus Security Officer . . . Robin Olson

OFFICE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGYAND LEARNING RESOURCES
Vice President .................. ..... TinaKoopmans
Learning Resources Center . . . ..... Debra Graulich
Distance Learning ................ . ......TBA

OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE
Vice President ................ .... .. Vincent Samuel
Accounting Supervisor. ............. .. .. Muriel Smith
Financial Reporting and Analysis . . . .. Kathleen Clark
Facilities Management/Capital Development/
Disaster Preparedness and Recovery. . ... .Patrick O'Donnell
Financial Planning, Budgeting, and
Management Services . . . Shirley Lake-King
Human Resources and Affirmative Action
Administration . . . ...... . ValenaV Richards
Special Assistant to the Vice President for
Administration and Finance . . . .. Shirley Lake-King

OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT
Vice President . . . ..... ........ Joseph Boschulte
Advancement Support/Alumni Affairs St. Croix Campus. .. Wendy Wheeler
Annual Giving and Alumni Affairs . . ... .Mitchell Neaves
Development Services . . . Ardrina Scott-Elliott
Public Relations. . . . . . Patrice Johnson
Reichhold Center for the Performing Arts. Pamela Sanes and Denise Humphreys
Special Events. ................. .... Raul Carrillo















History


The University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) was chartered on March 16, 1962, as the
College of the Virgin Islands a publicly funded, coeducational, liberal arts institu-
tion- by Act No. 862 of the Fourth Legislature of the U.S. Virgin Islands. According
to that law, UVI's cornerstone objective is to provide for "...the stimulation and utili-
zation of the intellectual resources of the people of the Virgin Islands and the develop-
ment of a center of higher learning whereby and wherefrom the benefits of culture and
education may be extended throughout the Virgin Islands."

The enabling legislation was the result of at least two years of preparation and plan-
ning. In 1960, the V.I. Legislature created a temporary body called the Virgin Islands
College Commission, comprised of interested island residents, to survey the need for a
territorial college. In April 1961, Governor Ralph M. Paiewonsky pledged to establish
such a college in his inaugural address. And in July 1961, Governor Paiewonsky hosted
a Governor's Conference on Higher Education, at which twenty educators observed
and analyzed the Virgin Islands' educational scene, and made recommendations for
the creation of the College of the Virgin Islands (CVI).

The first campus opened on St. Thomas in July 1963, on 175 acres donated by the
federal government. The first board of trustees took office in August 1963. In 1964,
the college founded a second campus on St. Croix, on 130 acres also donated by the
federal government.

CVI began by offering only associate of arts degrees. In 1967 it added bachelor's
degree programs in liberal arts and education. The first baccalaureate degrees were
awarded in 1970, and in 1976 the college awarded its first master's degrees in
education. Two years later, master's degree programs in business administration
and public administration were instituted on both campuses.

In 1972, the College of the Virgin Islands was awarded Land-Grant status by the U.S.
Congress. This allowed for the establishment of an Agricultural Experiment Station
and a Cooperative Extension Service. Since then, many other programs and services
have been added. These include the Reichhold Center for the Arts, the Eastern Carib-
bean Center, the William P. MacLean Marine Science Center, the Sports and Fitness
Center and the Virgin Islands Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Re-
search (VI-EPSCoR).

In 1986, the College of the Virgin Islands was renamed the University of the Vir-
gin Islands to reflect the growth and diversification of its academic curricula, com-
munity and regional services, and research programs. That same year, the United
States Congress named UVI one of America's Historically Black Colleges and
Universities (HBCU); therefore, it holds the distinction of being the only HBCU
outside of the continental United States.










111 zuuz, IU. La veire nr. tsagsLei was Ilameu [1e louriLl pieslueCIl 01 e uii versiLy
of the Virgin Islands, succeeding Dr. Orville E. Kean who became president in
1990. Dr. Arthur A. Richards served as the second president of UVI from 1980-
1990, while Dr. Lawrence C. Wanlass served as the first president from 1962-
1980, when UVI was the College of the Virgin Islands.

Another milestone in the historical development of the University was the Board of
Trustees' approval of a new framework for UVI's organization and governance, which
went into effect on October 1, 1999. The basis of the new administrative structure is a
Provost/Campus Executive Administrator system that separates campus-level and uni-
versity-level responsibilities in order to create an environment that better addresses
the changing needs of each campus, the University, and the Virgin Islands community.

UVI is a public liberal arts-based Masters II university, a Historically Black Col-
lege and University, and a Land-Grant institution. Today, UVI has a combined
enrollment of approximately 2,500 full-time, part-time and graduate students on
its two campuses. It continues to offer a high-quality, affordable liberal arts educa-
tion and professional programs in a culturally diverse environment. The University's
objective is to be recognized as the leading American institution of higher learning
in the Caribbean.

Accreditation and Memberships

The University of the Virgin Islands is accredited by the Commission on Higher
Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market
Street Philadelphia, PA 19104, (215) 662-5606. The Commission on Higher Edu-
cation is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of
Education and the Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation.
The University is also an active member of the American Association of State
Colleges and Universities, the American Council on Education, the Association of
Caribbean Information Systems, the Association of Caribbean Universities and
Research Institutes, the Association of Governing Boards, the National Associa-
tion for Equal Opportunity, and the National Association of State Universities and
Land Grant Colleges.

The bachelor and associate degree programs in nursing education are accredited
by the National League for Nursing, Accrediting Commission, 61 Broadway 33rd
Floor, New York, New York 10006 (800-669-1656 ext. 153). The Business Ad-
ministration Division is a member of the Assembly of the American Association of
Collegiate Schools of Business.

Location, Facilities and Global Access

The University of the Virgin Islands, located in the Eastern Caribbean, is 45 miles
east of Puerto Rico. The University is located on two campuses. On St. Croix, the
largest of the U.S. Virgin Islands, the campus includes academic facilities, a stu-
dent life complex, the V.I. Cooperative Extension Service and the Agricultural










Experiment Station. The St. Thomas Campus contains academic facilities, admin-
istrative and student service buildings, residence halls, the Reichhold Center for
the Arts and the William P. MacLean Marine Science Center. In addition to these
campuses, the University maintains the Virgin Islands Environmental Resource
Station on the island of St. John.

Microwave telecommunication facilities connect the two campuses for many
videoconference classes and university meetings. Access to the Internet and World
Wide Web supports distance learning course offerings as well as global informa-
tion and communication for students, faculty and staff. The UVI home page at
http: www. uvi. edu provides current UVI information and links to a wide range of
university documents and other information.

Special Programs

The University offers a number of special programs through the Academic Divi-
sions, the Community Engagement and Lifelong Learning (CELL) Center, the Ag-
ricultural Experiment Station, the Cooperative Extension Service, and the Water
Resources Research Institute. These include certificate programs such as the In-
clusive Early Childhood Education Program, special self-improvement courses,
and courses in a wide variety of subjects to improve the quality of life for resi-
dents. The St. Croix campus offers a Senior Reserve Officers Training Corps pro-
gram within the Division of Social Sciences. This 18 credit program is available to
students pursuing their bachelor's degrees. Admission to the program will be upon
approval of an application to the Military Science and Leadership (MSL) instruc-
tor. Any student may enroll in the MSL courses upon approval of the instructor.

The University of the Virgin Islands is a member of the National Student Exchange
program which offers undergraduate students an opportunity to study for up to one
year at one of 171 colleges and universities in the United States and its territories.
Students spend either their sophomore orjunior year in the exchange program and
return to the University of the Virgin Islands to graduate. Students from other NSE
membership schools also spend a year or semester studying at UVI. Additional
information is available from the Counseling and Placement Office. UVI is a mem-
ber of the Association of Caribbean Universities and Research Institute (UNICA)
and participates in the Caribbean Intercollegiate Student Exchange program. This
program allows UVI students to spend a semester or an academic year at a partici-
pating university and allows students from participating Caribbean colleges and
universities to spend a semester or academic year at UVI.

A cooperative agreement between the University of the Virgin Islands and Boston
University School of Medicine exists whereby University of the Virgin Islands
students, after meeting certain qualifications, may be accepted provisionally into
the medical school at the end of their sophomore year. These students spend two
summers and their senior year at Boston University and graduate with a bachelor
of science degree from the University of the Virgin Islands. The Science and Math-
ematics Division has developed an articulation program in engineering with Co-
lumbia University in New York and Washington University in St. Louis. These










articulation agreements allow students to begin their studies at U VI and then com-
plete requirements for graduation at one of the schools. Students who satisfy all
requirements receive one degree from UVI and a second degree in engineering
from one of the two schools. There are less formalized transfer programs in pre-
engineering, pre-pharmacy and pre-medical technology for students who wish to
study in these fields at the University of the Virgin Islands before transferring to a
specialized institution to complete their studies. Interested students should seek addi-
tional information from the Chair of the Division of Science and Mathematics.

UVI has entered into several special agreements and collaborative ventures within
the last few years. There will be joint collaborations on faculty and student ex-
changes, faculty research, and program development. Research will be conducted
at the Etelman Observatory, located on St. Thomas at an elevation of approxi-
mately 1,500 ft. The Observatory houses a state-of-the-art 16-inch American Opti-
cal refracting telescope. The telescope has been fitted with a CCD camera, a com-
puter controlled filter wheel, and optical encoders which allow the telescope to be
positioned with exceptional accuracy. The facility will be used both for instruc-
tional purposes and research, which is sponsored in part by the South Carolina
NASA Space Grant Consortium.

A cooperative student and faculty exchange agreement between Emory University
and the University of the Virgin Islands is currently in effect. The exchange agree-
ment provides for the regular exchange of students and faculty between the two
institutions in order to enhance the education and the mutual understanding of
both students and faculty.

The Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabili-
ties (VIUCEDD), previously known as the Virgin Islands University Affiliated
Program (VIUAP), was established in October 1994 to enhance the quality of life
for citizens with developmental disabilities and their families. VIUCEDD carries
out its mission by promoting independence, productivity and full integration into
the community through interdisciplinary training, exemplary service, technical
assistance and information dissemination.

Other Collaborative Agreements or Memoranda of Understanding have been es-
tablished between UVI and:

*Consortium for Caribbean Marine Studies
*Consortium of Caribbean Universities for Natural Resource Management
*Department of Commerce
*H. Lavity Stoutt Community College, British Virgin Islands
*National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
*Savannah State University
*The State University of New York at New Paltz
*U. S. Department of the Interior
*University of Alabama
*University of Ghana, Legon and the University of Copenhagen
*University of St. Maarten
*Virgin Islands National Park Service










Special Degree Program Offerings:
From time to time, the University develops special degree programs to provide
workforce training and to enhance the professional development of service pro-
viders. One such program is the Inclusive Early Childhood Education Associate in
Arts degree program. Designed to ensure that child care providers and early child-
hood professionals are trained to provide quality programs in which infants, tod-
dlers and pre-schoolers with differing abilities are nurtured, the degree program
admits students as a cohort based on community need.

Another such program is the Associate of Applied Science in Process Technology,
aimed at developing a workforce for the local petrochemical industry and other
similar industries in the Caribbean region and worldwide.















GRADUATE PROGRAMS


Education Specialist in School Psychology
Master of Arts in Education
Master of Business Administration
Master of Public Administration

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

Bachelor of Arts Degree
Accounting
Business Administration
Communication
Elementary Education
English

Bachelor of Science Degree
Computer Science

Associate of Arts Degree
Accounting
Business Management
Computer Information Systems
Inclusive Early Childhood Education
Police Science and Administration

Associate of Science Degree
Computer Science
Nursing

Associate of Applied Science Degree
Process Technology












Campus Overview


The 130-acre campus of the University of the Virgin Islands on St. Croix is located at
Golden Grove, midway between the towns of Christiansted and Frederiksted. Used by
the University since 1964, the land was deeded to the University for educational pur-
poses by the United States federal government in 1968. The entrance to the campus,
from Queen Mary Highway, is lined by royal palm trees leading to the Melvin H.
Evans Center for Learning, the residence halls and the Student Center. The main build-
ings include the Great House, which housed both classrooms and administrative of-
fices prior to 1975; the Melvin H. Evans Center for Learning (the main academic
building); the Northwest Wing, erected in 1989 and which houses the computer labo-
ratories; the Research and Extension Center which opened its doors in 1992 and houses
the land-grant programs, and the Nursing complex which has been home to the Divi-
sion of Nursing Education since 1996.

The Student Center houses a combination auditorium/cafeteria, the Snack Bar, the
Office of Student Activities, the Student Activities Lounge, a student mail room and
the Campus Bookstore. Behind the Student Center are recently constructed outdoor
basketball, volleyball and tennis courts used for physical education classes, intramural
athletics and recreation. The residence halls opened for student occupancy in January
1999. The residence hall complex is comprised of 17 three-bedroom suites, the Office
of Student Housing & Residence Life, a reception area, lounge, two study/seminar
rooms, laundry facilities and on-campus living quarters for the Student Housing Su-
pervisor.

With more than 1,000 students, the St. Croix campus is managed under the leadership
of a Campus Executive Administrator (CEA). The CEA is responsible for student af-
fairs (career services, counseling, food services, health center, judicial affairs, orienta-
tion, on-campus housing, student activities), business services (bookstore, cashier,
payroll, purchasing), campus security, grounds/facilities maintenance, and capital
projects.

Melvin H. Evans Center for Learning

Opened in 1975, the Melvin H. Evans Center for Learning is named for the U.S. Virgin
Islands' first elected governor. The architecturally unique Center is a modern air-con-
ditioned, multi-level complex constructed around a landscaped courtyard with open-
air walkways, galleries, attractive stonework, tropical foliage, miniature waterfalls and
manmade ponds. The building of modular design, provides for future expansion as the
higher education needs of St. Croix residents increase.

The Melvin H. Evans Center for Learning houses the Office of the Provost, the Li-
brary, classrooms, faculty offices, video conferencing facilities, and a 73-seat Theater.
It also houses some of the Student Support Services, such as the Academic Services,
Financial Aid and the Freshmen Center, as well as the Office of Business and Facilities
Services, Physical Plant and Campus Security.










The Great House


Prior to the construction of the Melvin H. Evans Center for Learning in 1975, all
classes on the St. Croix Campus were conducted in the Great House, a 19th century
historic building that was originally the main house of a sugar cane plantation. Com-
pletely renovated in 2001, the Great House now includes the Provost's Office, Health
Services Center, Counseling & Placement, Student Employment and the Student Gov-
ernment Association (SGA).

St. Croix Campus Library

The St. Croix Campus Library was founded in 1964 and was moved to its present
location in the Melvin Evans Center for Learning in 1975. Its primary function is
to support the educational mission of the University. Its holdings are oriented to-
ward such programs and are supplemented and updated on a continuous basis. Its
current holdings of about 53,000 volumes and over 167 periodical subscriptions
are complemented by those of the Ralph M. Paiewonsky Library on the St. Tho-
mas Campus. The library also subscribes to databases, which provide online full-
text access to over 1,100 journal and newspaper titles.

The St. Croix Campus Library features a special collection of Virgin Islands and
Caribbean materials and an extensive pamphlet file of conference papers and other
materials on the Caribbean. There are also more than 590,000 documents on mi-
crofiche in the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) collection. The
Library also serves as a depository for the publications of the Government of the
United States Virgin Islands.

In its dual role as media center, the St. Croix Campus Library houses a growing
collection of audiovisual material. It also maintains presentation equipment for
classroom and in-library use with audiovisual material. Instruction in the use of
this material and in all other library resources is offered to groups or individuals
upon request.

Both libraries offer Internet access from their computer labs. Links from the Li-
braries' web site (http://library.uvi.edu/) provide access to several academic and
other databases including Infotrac Web, FirstSearch, CINAHL, ERIC and Newsbank
as well as a link to UVIAL, the online catalog of library holdings. Through UVIAL,
students may search for listings of books, periodicals and government documents
housed in both campus libraries. A well developed system of inter-campus loans
allows students, faculty, and staff to borrow or otherwise have access to materials
from either campus library. Through the catalog, they may also search a growing
collection of electronic documents on Virgin Islands history and culture available
on the web. This recent collection was developed through a collaborative project
of the University Libraries and the Virgin Islands Division of Libraries Archives
and Museums. Documents cover the areas of education, biography, history and
culture.










The Library maintains membership to OCLC (Online Computer Library Center),
through SOLINET (Southeastern Library Network). Membership in this network
provides opportunities for additional interlibrary loans from and to libraries across
the mainland U.S. and around the world, as well as electronic access to cataloging
services.

Research and Extension Center

The Research and Extension Center contains several programs of the Agricultural
Experiment Station and the Cooperative Extension Service. This state-of-the-art facil-
ity is home to the Biotechnology Laboratory with its light and temperature-con-
trolled growth room and molecular biology equipment, the Plant Science labora-
tory where research is conducted in the areas of soil and plant analysis, a home
economics food laboratory and four seminar rooms, 16 research faculty and staff
offices, and a staff lounge.













GRADUATE PROGRAMS


Education Specialist in School Psychology
Master of Arts in Education
Master of Business Administration
Master of Public Administration

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

Bachelor of Arts Degree
Accounting
Biology
Business Administration
Chemistry
Communication
Elementary Education
English
Humanities
Marine Biology
Mathematics
Music Education
Psychology
Social Sciences
Social Work
Speech Communication and Theatre

Bachelor of Science Degree
Applied Mathematics
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Marine Biology
Mathematics
Nursing

Associate of Arts Degree
Accounting
Business Management
Computer Information Systems
Hotel and Restaurant Management
Inclusive Early Childhood Education
Police Science and Administration

Associate of Science Degree
Computer Science
Physics











Campus Overview


The 388-acre St. Thomas campus of the University of the Virgin Islands is located
three miles west of the town of Charlotte Amalie and overlooks John Brewer's Bay.
Currently the buildings include: The Ralph M. Paiewonsky Library; Residence Halls
housing approximately 230 students; Continuing Education, Business Administration,
Humanities, Nursing Education, Science and Mathematics, Social Sciences, and Teacher
Education buildings; the Music Education Center; the Sports and Fitness Center, the
William P. MacLean Marine Science Center, and the Leo M. Harvey Student Center
which includes the dining hall. Also, there is the Health Services Center; the Class-
room Administration Building which contains classrooms, a theatre, administration
and faculty offices and science laboratories; and The Reichhold Center for the Arts, an
open-air amphitheater seating 1,196 persons, including 356 covered seats.

The University campus includes the Herman E. Moore Golf Course, Brewer's Bay
beach, tennis courts and a basketball court for student use as part of the athletic and
recreation programs. Several areas are used as playing fields. The golf course is used
as a common area for diverse activities such as golf practice and special events. The
multi-purpose Sports and Fitness Center was officially opened and dedicated January
2001.

Ralph M. Paiewonsky Library

The Ralph M. Paiewonsky Library, one of the two main libraries of the University, was
founded in 1962. It was moved to its present location on the North Campus in January
1969, and was dedicated and named in honor of former governor, Ralph M. Paiewonsky
on March 15, 1969.

The Paiewonsky Library's primary function is to support the educational mission of
the University. Its holdings of about 110,000 volumes, including books, maps, and
pamphlets, and over 600,000 pieces of microform, are complimented by those of the
St. Croix Library. The Paiewonsky Library subscribes to over 300 periodicals with a
back file of over 14,000 bound periodical volumes. Additionally, the library subscribes
to electronic databases, which provide online full-text access to over 1,100 journal
and newspaper titles.

The Paiewonsky Library features several special collections: the Caribbean Collec-
tion has books, periodicals, photographs, and pamphlet files pertaining to the culture,
history and literature of the Virgin Islands and the wider Caribbean area; the Melchior
Center for Recent History is a developing collection of recent U.S. Virgin Islands
materials (since 1917); the Casper Holstein Collection on African culture and history;
and the circulating William Taussig Memorial Collection, which is focused on Afri-
can-American and Caribbean culture. The Library maintains the Educational Resources
Information Center (ERIC) documents on microfiche. Since 1973, the Library has
been a selective depository for U.S. Government materials, a collection that now to-
tals over 15,000 documents in print and electronic formats. The Library is also a de-
pository for the publications of the Government of the United States Virgin Islands.











Both libraries offer Internet access from their computer labs. From the UVI Libraries
website (http:/ i,!i n i ...in ,,), students and faculty access several online databases
including American Chemical Society Journals Online; CINAHL and a collection of
online nursingjournals; CQ Researcher; ERIC Documents; numerous FirstSearch gen-
eral, business, humanities, and science databases; Gale Group academic, business,
health and literature databases. Books, periodicals and government documents housed
in both campus libraries may be searched through UVIAL, the online catalog of li-
brary holdings. Materials located on either campus may be requested from the other
library. The libraries also provide access to a growing number of electronic journals
and digitized documents on Virgin Islands history and culture. This latter collection
was developed through a collaborative project with the Virgin Islands Division of
Libraries Archives and Museums.

The Library maintains membership to OCLC (Online Computer Library Center), through
SOLINET (Southeastern Library Network). Membership in this network provides op-
portunities for additional interlibrary loans from and to libraries across the mainland
U.S. and around the world, as well as electronic access to cataloging services.

Music Education Center

The Music Education Center was officially dedicated on February 11, 1999. The Cen-
ter provides a pleasant atmosphere for all who utilize the facility. It houses four private
practice rooms (each room contains a piano), a tiered band room, a room specially
configured for use by the University's steel band, an elegant concert choir room and a
computer lab/listening room.

Sports and Fitness Center

The Sports and Fitness Center (SFC), on the St. Thomas campus, officially opened in
January 2001. It is the largest indoor state-of-the-art facility of its kind in the Eastern
Caribbean. The center is built on the site of the old UVI Field House (gym), formerly
a 1930's seaplane hangar built by the U. S. Navy.

The center is used primarily for physical education classes, intramural sports, and
varsity athletics, including the men's and women's basketball and volleyball teams. It
is available for rental and utilized widely on a rental basis by a variety of groups and
organizations. The center has two levels which occupy over 64,000 square feet. The
seating capacity is 2,500 for basketball games and 4,000 for concerts and other events.

The center houses three large classrooms, along with conference rooms, an aerobics
room, a training room for sports injury treatment, dual cross courts, two volleyball
courts, locker rooms, a lighting and sound room for concerts and special events, and a
VIP viewing room overlooking the arena. The building also includes the offices of the
Director and Assistant Director of Athletics, the Office of the Vice Provost for Re-
search and Public Service, faculty offices and the bookstore.










Off-Campus Facilities


University facilities that are not on the main St. Thomas campus include Etelman House,
site of an astronomical laboratory which is located on Crown Mountain, and the Virgin
Islands Environmental Resource Station (VIERS). VIERS, located on the island of St.
John, provides unique outdoor and marine learning opportunities through environ-
mental education programs and research activities. Situated on the remote southern
shore of the Virgin Islands National Park, close to hiking trails and coral reefs, VIERS'
12 cabins can accommodate up to 48 overnight guests. A waterside laboratory, with
dock, is accessible to students and researchers. VIERS is also available for personal
enrichment and for group retreats. Clean Islands International, a non-profit environ-
mental education organization, currently manages VIERS.














OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT


The Office of the President is the lead component for executive management of the
institution. It is comprised of the office of the Liaison to the Board of Trustees and the
President's administrative and managerial staff. The President's Cabinet is comprised
of the Provost, the Vice President for Administration and Finance, the Vice President
for Institutional Advancement, the Vice President for Information Technology and
Learning Resources, the Vice Provost for Research and Public Service, the Executive
Director of the Research and Technology Park, and Special Assistant to the President. This
body meets bi-weekly to discuss and decide policies and develop strategies for the achieve-
ment of institutional priorities.

OFFICE OF THE PROVOST

The Provost is the chief academic officer, the second line officer, the policy staff of-
ficer and reports to the President. The Provost is responsible for all matters relating to
academic divisions, academic programs, academic policy development, implementa-
tion and review, academic and student support services, enrollment management, re-
search policy development, and research and public service. The units that report to
the Provost are the Office of the Vice Provost for Research and Public Service, the
Office of Institutional Research and Planning, the Office of Enrollment Management,
Graduate Studies, the Honors Program, and the Office of Community Engagement and
Lifelong Learning.

Community Engagement and Lifelong Learning (CELL)

UVICELL is primarily responsible for providing educational opportunities to assist in the
development of skills in the workforce and prepare individuals for high-demand career
fields. Through a broad range of innovative programs, CELL offers enhanced opportuni-
ties for training, continuing education, certification and career enhancement. In addition to
working with its students, CELL offers businesses a number of services that foster growth,
increase productivity and enhance effectiveness. CELL links the best of the University's
resources to provide expert consultation and delivers customized programs to suit the needs
of the organization. Programs are offered through a wide range of delivery methods, such
as face-to-face, self-paced study and on-line instruction.

Affiliations
UVICELL is an authorized provider of the International Association for Continuing Edu-
cation and Training (IACET). As an authorized provider, CELL grants IACET accredited
Continuing Education Units (CEUs). The IACET CEU is internationally recognized as a
measure of quality in continuing education and training.

UVICELL has also partnered with the American Management Association (AMA) to offer
a wide spectrum of management training, backed by AMA's more than 80 years of man-










agement education experience. CELL is the authorized AMA provider in a number of
Caribbean regions to include: Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, British Virgin Islands,
Dominica, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Maarten/St. Martin and the U.S.
Virgin Islands.

CELL offers a number of services which include:

Professional Development

CELL focuses on affording seasoned professionals with the knowledge and skills to pursue
a new career, advance in their current career, secure postsecondary certificates or prepare
for national certification exams. Programs are conveniently offered in the evenings and on
weekends for busy adults.

Workforce Development

Awell-trained workforce provides the competitive edge critical intoday's constantly chang-
ing and increasingly technical marketplace. Businesses require maximum productivity, ef-
ficiency and a workforce armed with a variety of skills and experiences to meet their needs.
CELL plays a vital role in shaping the future of its clients whether they are just starting
a career or re-entering the workforce by providing occupational skills and an opportu-
nity to increase earning potential.

Corporate Training

CELL assists in the growth and optimization of businesses by providing targeted and cus-
tomized training programs. Corporate training programs are designed to improve an
organization's effectiveness, efficiency and productivity in an evolving business climate.
Training can be conducted on-site, at the CELL Training Center or at any other location,
and is delivered in a format that best meets the needs of the organization.

Consulting and Professional Services

CELL supports businesses in aligning operations with pre-defined strategy and continu-
ously works with the organization to meet changing internal and external industry needs.
CELL works with the organizational team to understand the goals and culture of the orga-
nization and then develop solutions to help the business grow. Whether it is performance
improvement, technical services or conference and event management, CELL offers real-
world solutions to achieve desired goals.

Personal Enrichment

Learning is a lifelong endeavor that provides new challenges and experiences for self-
fulfillment. CELL provides a variety of learning experiences in an array of subjects de-
signed to improve the overall quality of life. Whether it is to learn a foreign language, make
beautiful floral designs, decorate cakes professionally or even master home computing, the
possibilities are endless.

For more information on the services offered by UVICELL, visit http: cell. uvi. edu.










Research and Public Service


The University of the Virgin Islands addresses two of the major elements of its Mission,
Research and Public Service, through the strategic efforts of the units in the Research and
Public Service Component. Collectively, the Agricultural Experiment Station (AES), the
Center for Marine and Environmental Studies (CMES), the Cooperative Extension Service
(CES), the Eastern Caribbean Center (ECC), the Research Publications Unit (The Carib-
bean Writer), the Small Business Development Center (SBDC), and the Water Resources
Research Institute (WRRI) are principally responsible for defining and solving prob-
lems through research and providing quality services that address needs identified by
the community.

Agricultural Experiment Station (AES)

The Agricultural Experiment Station is one of the two units that carry out the Land-
Grant functions of the University. AES, which is located on St. Croix, conducts basic
and applied research to meet the needs of local and regional Caribbean, as well as
international, agricultural communities. These needs are in the areas of increasing pro-
duction, improving efficiency of tropical plants and livestock, developing new enter-
prises, preserving and propagating endangered plant species, and protecting the natu-
ral resource base. The Station scientists are actively involved in projects in agronomy,
animal science, aquaculture, biotechnology, agroforestry, and horticulture. Results of
research projects are disseminated in scientific journals, research bulletins, fact sheets,
farmers' bulletins, seminars and workshops.

Center for Marine and Environmental Studies (CMES)

The Centerfor Marine and Environmental Studies addresses environmental problems unique
to tropical island communities and advances knowledge and learning in coastal marine
systems through research, education and outreach programs. Based in the McLean Marine
Science Center on St. Thomas, CMES collaborates with local organizations, other univer-
sities and governmental agencies to assess and monitor marine ecosystems and identify
methods of conserving fisheries and marine and coastal areas that provide support for
sustainable natural resource management. The Virgin Islands Marine Advisory Service
(VIMAS), a part of the national Sea Grant Program, collaborates with public and private
sector institutions to disseminate information on St. Thomas, St. Croix and St. John. The
Virgin Islands Environmental Resource Station (VIERS), located on St. John and managed
by Clean Islands International, provides unique learning opportunities through environ-
mental education and research programs and activities. CMES provides opportunities for
UVI students to gain research experience by participating in a variety of projects including
coral reef monitoring and mangrove habitat restoration.

Cooperative Extension Service (CES)

The Cooperative Extension Service is the second unit that carries out Land-Grant func-
tions. Through the federal network of the Land-Grant University System, the Coopera-
tive Extension Service is empowered as an agency for public education and informa-
tion dissemination. The function-sharing research-based information to help improve










the quality of lives gives CES a primary role in U Vls outreach activities and provides
a vital link between the Virgin Islands community and the university.

Furthermore, CES is an educational outreach unit whose mission is to aid in developing
Virgin Islanders and their resources. CES serves to guide children, youth and adults through-
out the Virgin Islands and wider Caribbean in coping with the challenges of everyday
living. Our current programs focus on topics of parenting, child care, adult sitter, money
management, clothing construction, 4-H and youth development, Children, Youth and Fami-
lies at Risk (CYFAR), Mini-Society, nutrition and food safety, water quality, environ-
mental education, farm safety, sustainable agriculture and pesticide safety education.

Eastern Caribbean Center (ECC)

The Eastern Caribbean Center is an outreach division that anticipates the social, eco-
nomic and environmental needs of the Virgin Islands and the region, and conducts
research programs to address those needs. It also facilitates collaboration in research
among local, national and regional institutions and organizations toward fulfilling the
mission of the University and improving the quality of life for people within these
areas. The ECC research unit compiles and analyzes social and economic data, and
also supports and extends the work of the U.S. Bureau of the Census. The unit designs
and carries out scientific sample household and telephone surveys. The Conservation
Data Center (CDC) systematically compiles, analyzes and disseminates natural re-
source data to make it readily accessible to government and non-governmental organi-
zations in making conservation and development decisions. The CDC also identifies
and evaluates threats to natural areas and makes recommendations for addressing these
threats through the utilization of the largest geographic information system in the Ter-
ritory that is dedicated to natural resource management. ECC also publishes Carib-
bean Perspectives, a cutting-edge annual magazine that speaks to the leadership through-
out the Caribbean.

Research Publications Unit

The primary publication of the Research Publications Unit is The Caribbean Writer.
The Caribbean Writer is an international literary anthology with a Caribbean focus,
published by UVI. The anthology premiered in 1987 to provide an outlet for writers in
the Caribbean and to encourage new writing. The editorial board consists of UVI hu-
manities division faculty, and the advisory editorial board is a distinguished group of
established Caribbean writers. The website, TheCaribbean Writer. com, has become a
global resource for Caribbean literature.

Small Business Development Center (SBDC)

The UVI Small Business Development Center provides small business owners and
aspiring entrepreneurs practical assistance to grow and prosper in a contemporary
economy. As an advocate for small businesses, UVI-SBDC delivers counseling ser-
vices, training, and technical support to the business community of the Virgin Islands.
Since its establishment in 1985, UVI-SBDC has played a vital role in the development
of local businesses and the reduction of failure among existing ones. It is part of a
close network of public and private business organizations committed to fostering the










economic stability and growth of small businesses in the territory. Stakeholders in-
clude the U.S. Small Business Administration, the V I. Government Development
Bank and the local Chambers of Commerce.

Water Resources Research Institute (WRRI)

The Water Resources Research Institute conducts research throughout the U.S. Virgin
Islands. Its meteorological observatory, which provides real time weather data that can
be accessed through the internet and a water quality laboratory on the St. Thomas
Campus serve as resources for the Virgin Islands community. Current WRRI research
includes investigating ways to reduce non-point source pollution to the critical nearshore
marine environment of the islands. This includes identifying methods of erosion con-
trol, development of methods for coastal water quality assessments and finding inno-
vative ways to treat domestic wastewater as alternatives to traditional septic tank sys-
tems. Other WRRI activities include dissemination of information promoting conser-
vation of the islands' water resources and providing environmental research training
experiences for students and others.

Office of Institutional Research and Planning

The Office of Institutional Research and Planning (IRP) gathers data on the University
and provides information useful for making strategic decisions. IRP produces an an-
nual Institutional Data Summary which contains the latest statistics on enrollment,
student and faculty characteristics, University income and expenditures, and related
topics. For some topics, historical data are provided to establish trends. Brief reports
are sometimes issued on topics of general interest, or in response to special requests of
other university units.

IRP keeps abreast of events and trends in the Virgin Islands, the Caribbean region and
beyond to note factors which might impact the future of the University. The results are
made available to persons planning for the future of the University. IRP provides an-
nual reports to the National Center for Education Statistics and the Commission on
Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, and par-
ticipates in surveys conducted by other external agencies. Linkage to other universi-
ties is maintained through the Internet and by membership in the Association for Insti-
tutional Research and in the Society for College and University Planning.

Academic Divisions

The University's degree programs are offered through five academic divisions: Busi-
ness Administration, Education, Humanities and Social Sciences, Nursing, and Sci-
ence and Mathematics. Each division is headed by a Chairperson who reports directly
to the Provost.















Admissions Policies


The University of the Virgin Islands is a public, liberal arts-based, coeducational,
multi-cultural Masters II university that welcomes applicants, without regard to
race, color or creed, to participate in a sound educational experience.

To be matriculated at the University of the Virgin Islands, a candidate must have
graduated from high school or have achieved the equivalent of high school gradu-
ation.

A candidate for admission from the United States Virgin Islands, the United States
or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico must have achieved at least a "C" average
(2.00 on a 4.00 scale) by the end of the junior year of high school and be maintain-
ing at least a "C" average during the senior year. In general, the basic requirement
for admission is four years of high school English, three years of mathematics,
three years of science, two years of history, foreign language and physical educa-
tion. One year of a foreign language is preferred. Individual programs may have
additional admissions requirements; applicants should consult the section of the
catalog describing the programs for those requirements.

Applicants who are home schooled are welcome to apply for admission to the
University of the Virgin Islands. The Admissions Office requires evidence of suc-
cessful academic preparation, completion and proficiency in the following areas:

*four years of English
*three years of mathematics
*two years of history
*three years of science
*two years of a foreign language

The University recognizes home-schooled students whose programs are certified
and approved by their state, as required. Home-school programs may also be rec-
ognized by national accrediting bodies, such as the American Council on Educa-
tion (ACE), the U.S. Department of Education or the Council on Recognition of
Post-secondary Accreditation (CORPA). All freshman applicants must submit tran-
scripts and SAT or ACT scores. The General Education Equivalency Diploma
(GED) may also be submitted to verify secondary school experience. Students are
expected to submit credentials, transcripts or their equivalent to demonstrate their
ability to achieve successful academic progress.

The University also recognizes nontraditional education experiences, including
distance education, online courses and alternative schooling programs approved
by national or international recognized certifying entities. Such entities include
ACE, CORPA, U.S. Dept. of Education, or institutions officially recognized within
their national systems. Credentials, official transcripts or their equivalent must be










provided as evidence of successful completion and academic preparation. Students
may be asked to submit additional information, including syllabi, recommenda-
tions and course descriptions, especially if seeking transfer credit.

Applicants who do not meet the University's admission requirements may be en-
rolled as non-matriculated students. These students may subsequently apply for
matriculated status after earning a minimum of 18 credits in degree courses with a
cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 on a 4.00 scale at the University of
the Virgin Islands. These credits must include the general education requirements
in English and the general education mathematics and science credits required by
the degree they intend to pursue.

Applicants from other countries should consult the section on International Stu-
dent Admission below. In general it should be assumed that the University will
expect, in addition to facility in English, the same preparation that would be re-
quired of students entering from the United States.

Students who have not completed secondary school may demonstrate equivalency
by presenting passing scores on the General Education High School Proficiency
Test (GED). Information on the GED is generally available from the Virgin Is-
lands Department of Education and from education departments in the United States.

Students with disabilities who have special needs should contact the Counseling
and Placement Office upon submission of the Enrollment Confirmation and De-
posit fee, at least one month prior to Orientation.

How to Apply

1. Request application forms from the Admissions Office, University of the Vir-
gin Islands, #2 John Brewer's Bay, St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands 00802-9990,
or Office of Academic Services, University of the Virgin Islands, RR1 Box 10000,
Kingshill, St Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands 00850-9781. Applications are also ac-
cessible via the UVI homepage at http: www.uvi.edu.

2. Students should submit completed application packages by the stated dead-
line, to include: SAT or ACT scores, the application, the $25.00 application fee,
and official high school and/or college transcripts.

3. Return to the Admissions Office the forms which the candidate is asked to
complete.

4. Arrange through the guidance counselor to take either the Scholastic Apti-
tude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination Board or the American
College Test (ACT) of the American College Testing Program. All candidates
for admission as freshmen must take either of these tests. Prospective candi-
dates are encouraged to take one of the tests for practice and guidance in their
junior year in high school and to repeat it in their senior year to better reflect
the student's ability.










Candidates are responsible for applying to take the College Board or ACT test
and for having their scores sent to the University by the Admissions deadline.
The College Board identification code for the University of the Virgin Islands
is 0879; the ACT number is 5288. Foreign students should check with their
local Ministry of Education to determine dates and times for the SAT tests, or
write to: College Board ATP, P.O. Box 6200, Princeton, NJ 08541-6200.

5. Read section on matriculated part-time students if interested in enrolling in
that category.

When to Apply

New students-both freshmen and transfers- should apply for admission by April
30 for fall semester classes and by October 30 for the spring semester. Note that
the application form and all supporting documents MUST be submitted by the
published deadline in order for an application to be considered complete.

Application Fee

All students are required to pay a non-refundable $25.00 application fee. The ap-
plication fee of $25.00 must be submitted in U.S. dollars by certified check or
money order. Students are urged to apply well in advance of stated deadlines. Offi-
cially authenticated copies of secondary credentials are to be submitted with the
application for admission.

Enrollment Confirmation and Deposit

Following a favorable decision on an application, the applicant will be notified to
confirm his or her intent to enroll by making a non-refundable enrollment deposit
of $100.00 towards the tuition costs for the upcoming semester. If the applicant
registers as expected, the deposit will be credited to the tuition charge for that
semester. Should the applicant decide not to register, however, the deposit will be
forfeited and cannot be used to offset any other charges the applicant may have
incurred. The $100.00 enrollment deposit is mandatory and should be submitted
by June 15 for the Fall semester and by December 1 for the Spring semester.

Applicants are encouraged to make their decision as early after notification as
possible so that they and the University can make plans for their enrollment and
first-semester program.

International Student Admission

1. For applicants from British-oriented systems, officially certified copies of
General Certificate of Education (GCE) examinations or Caribbean Examina-
tion Council (CXC) examinations should be submitted directly to the Office of
Admissions. Passes in five 'O' level GCE or CXC General Passes (Grades I and
II), or a combination of both, including English language, are acceptable for










admission. CXC General passes (Grade 111) will also be accepted if based on
the six-point grading scale. The British Virgin Islands Grade I certificate is
required for applicants from the BVI High School.

2. Applicants whose native language is not English must submit the Test of
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) test results. For information, write
directly to TOEFL, Educational Testing Service, Box 899, Princeton, NJ 08540
USA.

3. Applicants must demonstrate the ability to pay for at least the first year of
study. No scholarship or financial aid is available at this time for entering stu-
dents from other countries. The 1-20 Immigration Form will not be issued until
the applicant has been accepted by the Admissions Office and has submitted a
Certification of Finances form indicating how fees will be paid while attending
the University of the Virgin Islands.

Regulations of the U.S. Department of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization
Service governing non-immigrant "F-l" students require that all persons in this
category pursue a full-time course of study. This means that undergraduates
must register for a minimum of 12 credits per semester and graduate students a
minimum of 9 credits per semester.

4. All supporting documents, including the Certificate of Finance form, letters
from financial institutions, letters to verify room, board and living arrangements,
etc. must be submitted by the application deadline.

5. Applicants with "A" level certificates should see the section on "Transfer
Admission."

Early Admissions Program

The Early Admissions Program was established to encourage superior and mature high
school students to attend the University either on a full-time or part-time basis upon
completion of the eleventh grade. Eligibility for entry into the program is based on the
following criteria: 1) successful completion of the tenth and eleventh grades in a U.S.
Virgin Islands high school; 2) minimum academic average of 3.00 on a 4.00 scale,
based on grades received in grades 9, 10 and 11 (first semester); 3) students must also
submit SAT scores in order to facilitate placement. A minimum of 490-Math and 500-
Verbal is required. Candidates must be recommended from their respective schools.

Four-year renewable scholarships may be available to resident students. In order to
remain eligible for a scholarship a student must maintain a cumulative grade point
average of 3.0 earning no grade less than "C" on a 4.0 scale, except for the first semes-
ter. Depending upon the availability of funding, the scholarship may include tuition,
room, board, fees and a book stipend. Inquiries concerning the program may be ad-
dressed to the Admissions Office on the St. Thomas campus and to the Academic
Services Office on the St. Croix campus.










Transfer Admission


A candidate for admission by transfer from another university or college must submit
all information required by a regular applicant. In addition, the director of student
affairs of the institution from which the student is transferring will be requested to
submit a confidential report on the student's conduct. To be admitted as a transfer
student, the candidate must have completed at least 12 semester credits and achieved
at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average, on a 4.00 scale, at the colleges) at-
tended. Applicants who do not meet the cumulative average requirement may be en-
rolled as non-matriculated students. These students may subsequently apply for ma-
triculated status after earning a minimum of 18 credits in degree courses with a cumu-
lative grade point average of at least 2.00 on a 4.00 scale at the University of the Virgin
Islands. These credits must include the general education requirements in English and
the general education mathematics and science credits required by the degree they
intend to pursue. Students with less than 12 semester college credits must submit all
high school and college transcripts. Students who transfer fewer than 24 credits must
complete required Freshman Year courses. Those transfer students who will be re-
quired to take placement exams will be so informed. Students will be notified when to
appear for testing.

Students seeking admission with advanced standing must have official transcripts of
all the previous college or university work mailed directly to the Admission's Office,
University of the Virgin Islands, from the college or university previously attended.

Students from a British-patterned school system, who receive "pass" or above in
the G.C.E. Advanced ("A") Level Examinations, may receive credit toward ad-
vance standing. A certified copy of the "A" level certificate bearing the official
stamp of the high school attended or the signature of the principal must be submit-
ted in order to receive credit.

Transfer of Academic Credits to the University

1. Transfer credits will be accepted only for matriculated students.

2. No grade lower than "C" may be accepted.

3. Full credit may be assigned for degree courses taken at institutions accredited
by institutional accrediting groups recognized by the Council on Recognition
of Postsecondary Accreditation (CORPA).

4. Full credit may be assigned for degree courses taken at institutions not accred-
ited by accrediting groups recognized by CORPA, after the matriculated stu-
dent has completed his or her first semester at the University with a grade point
average of 2.00 or better in the University of the Virgin Islands course work.

5. The minimum cumulative grade point average of a transferring student shall
be 2.00.










6. Transfer students must meet the general education requirements and the
major requirements of University programs. The general education equivalen-
cies will be shown on the evaluation form approved by the Director of Admis-
sions. The applicability of any transferred major courses or electives to the
major requirements must be approved by the Division Chair.

7. Thirty of the last 36 credits toward a degree must be earned at the University
of the Virgin Islands. This requirement may be waived by the Provost only in
cases where the student must complete the final years) of studies at another
institution recognized by the University of the Virgin Islands.

8. Courses completed within the preceding ten years may be accepted in trans-
fer. Course work more than ten years old must be reviewed on a case-by-case
basis to determine its appropriateness to the current University course require-
ments. Appeals should be directed to the Provost.

9. Credits earned by successful completion of certain CLEP, ACT and National
League for Nursing examinations are generally accepted. Courses for which
credit by examination is accepted are listed elsewhere in this catalog.

10. Credits from foreign institutions are accepted on a case-by-case basis. The
student may be required to have courses evaluated by an agency acceptable to
the University.

11. Appeal from any decision concerning the above policies shall be made to the
Provost.

12. The Director of Admissions shall act as reporting officer for the publication
Transfer Credit Practices of Selected Educational Institutions.

Readmission to the University

Matriculated students (admitted students who enrolled and began attendance at
the University) who are not in attendance during two or more consecutive semes-
ters (excluding summer session) must apply to be readmitted to the University.
Submit the application for readmission, and a $15.00 readmission fee, to the Ad-
missions Office, along with official final transcripts from any institutions attended
since previous enrollment at UVI. Readmission forms are filed by October 30 for
the spring semester; by April 30 for the fall semester. A minimum 2.0 cumulative
grade point average is required in order to be readmitted and enroll full time. Stu-
dents who have a grade point average below 2.0 may attend part time, only.

Senior Citizen Education Program

The Virgin Islands Legislature, by Act No. 5358 has provided that certain senior citi-
zen residents of the U.S. Virgin Islands may enroll in regularly scheduled courses at
the University of the Virgin Islands free of charge to the student. Regularly scheduled
courses are those that appear in the fall, spring or summer schedule of classes.










Proof of Status: To be eligible tor waiver of tuition and tees, a person must meet
the following criteria:

1. Be at least 60 years of age, as verified by the senior citizen ID card issued by
the V.I. Department of Human Services, and

2. Be a resident of the Virgin Islands for at least one year, as verified by rent
receipts, utility bills, data on ID card, or other such proof of residence.

Qualifications for Registration: Students may be enrolled as matriculated stu-
dents or non-matriculated students. In order to qualify as matriculated students,
individuals must apply for admission and must meet the admissions requirements
contained in this catalog. Non-matriculated students may take courses for which
they meet the prerequisites. Non-matriculated students are limited to part-time study.

Registration Procedures for the Senior Citizen Education Program

1. Prospective students will register during the late registration period. They
may enroll in courses for which they qualify that have space open at that time.
Priority will be given to those persons enrolled in programs administered by the
Department of Human Services.

2. All prospective students will present verifying documents to the Registrar's
Office on St. Thomas or the Office of Academic Services on St. Croix. A form
will be provided which eligible students will present to the Business Office so
that payment may be waived.

3. Prospective students will present proof of prerequisites for courses for which
they wish to receive credit. Those who wish to audit need not present such
evidence. Auditors attend class regularly, do all work that is not graded, but do
not earn grades or credits.
NOTE: As for all students, those making use of this benefit are required to observe
the University i..,ii .,. 'i, published in the catalog and other University publica-
tions.

Additional Preparation and Testing

Summer Session: Students who need additional preparation in one or more basic
skills-English, mathematics, reading-before enrolling as degree candidates may
attend the University's summer sessionss. The session provides the opportunity to
enhance essential skills required for further study. Completion of skills courses
prior to enrollment in the University prepares students for degree-level work in the
freshman year. Students may enroll in up to six credit hours of classes per session.

Placement: Initial placement in college-level courses is based upon SAT/ACT
scores and/or college transcripts.










Guidelines for placement in college level courses:


1. Students who score 490 on the SAT-Math, or 20 ACT-Math, may enroll in col-
lege level math classes.

2. Students who score 500 on the SAT-Verbal, or 21 ACT-English, may enroll in
college-level English.

3. Students who have completed acceptable college courses in English composi-
tion and/or mathematics may enroll in appropriate courses on the recommenda-
tion of their advisors.

4. Students who have completed an earned associate or higher degree may enroll
in college level courses.

5. Students who complete basic level course in math and/or English with a grade
of "C" or better.

6. Students who score between 480 and 499 on the SAT-Verbal, or 20-ACT En-
glish, and pass a placement test administered by the Humanities Division.

The guidelines for placement in development level courses are the following:

1. Students who do not meet any of the criteria indicated in the guidelines above.

2. Students who do not provide SAT or ACT scores.

3. A Math placement test will be administered to students in the developmental
courses. Outcomes may allow for placement into a college level math course
for degree credit.

College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP): Credits will be awarded for
matriculated students who have participated in the College Board Advanced Place-
ment Program in high school and have earned scores of three or higher only in the
areas listed below. The University of the Virgin Islands courses and requirements
waived and credits will be determined by the Admissions Office.

American History German
Art History Mathematics (Calculus AB)
Biology Mathematics (Calculus BC)
Chemistry Music
Classics Physics (C)
English Spanish
European History Studio Art*
French (Language)
French (Literature) *Studio Art credit is received after portfo-
lio evaluation, not examination.












College Level Examination Program: Students who have acquired sufficient skill
and knowledge in an area of study tested by the College Level Examination Pro-
gram (CLEP) may contact the Division of Enrollment Management on the St. Tho-
mas Campus or the Academic Services Office on the St. Croix campus to arrange
for testing. The University of the Virgin Islands is an official limited center for the
CLEP examinations. There is a fee of $55.00 per examination, and a $10.00 ad-
ministration charge for CLEP examinations. In general, credit at the University of
the Virgin Islands will be awarded for CLEP scores at or above the level recom-
mended by the College Board for the following areas only:


CLEP TEST
Introductory Accounting
General Biology
Principles of Marketing
Principles of Management
Introductory Business Law
General Chemistry
Information Systems and
Computer Applications
Principles of Macro-Economics
Principles of Micro-Economics
Analysis and Interpretation
of Literature
English Literature
American Literature

French

American History I: Early
Colonization to 1877 and
American History II: 1865
to the Present
College Algebra



Trigonometry
College Algebra and Trigonometry

Calculus with Elem. Functions

Introductory Psychology
Introductory Sociology
Spanish


COURSE EQUIVALENT
ACC 121-122: Introduction to Accounting
BIO 141-142
BUS 231: Principles of Marketing
BUS 241: Principles of Management
BUS 251: Business Law
CHE 151-152: General Chemistry I-II
CIS 210: Business Information Systems

ECO 221: Introduction to Macro-Economics
ECO 222: Introduction to Micro-Economics
ENG 261-262:World Literature I-II

ENG 321, 322: British Literature
ENG 361-362: American Literature-Major
American Writing
FRE 131-132-231: Elem. & Intermediate French


HIS 320: History of the United States
MAT 140: College Algebra with Applications
or
MAT 143: Pre-Calculus Algebra
MAT 142: College Trigonometry
MAT 143-142: Pre-Calculus Algebra- College
Trigonometry
MAT 241-242: Intro to Calculus and
Analytical Geometry I-II
PSY 120: General Psychology
SOC 121: Introduction to Sociology
SPA 131-132-231: Elem. & Intermediate Spanish


All psychology, sociology and English examinations have an additional essay sec-
tion that is required by the University of the Virgin Islands and must be passed to
merit a credit award. Students who take CLEP Spanish and French exams must
take a departmental oral as part of the test(s). Students must wait six months be-
fore retaking a CLEP examination.


CREDITS
6
8
3
3
3
10
3











Nursing Advanced Placement


Advanced Placement in the Associate Degree Program in Nursing for Licensed
Practical Nurses: Licensed practical nurses may earn ten credits by advanced place-
ment in the associate degree nursing program. Credit for Nursing 100 (Medical Termi-
nology), 131 (Nursing Skill Acquisition) and 132 (Introduction to the Nurse-Client
System) will be placed in escrow and granted upon successful completion of Nursing
142 (Adult I). In order to enroll in this course, the student must have met all other
requirements for entry into the associate degree nursing program.

For Graduates of Non-NLN Accredited Nursing Programs

Advanced Placement in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) Program:
Students who are licensed as registered nurses or who possess the equivalent cre-
dentials and who are pursuing a B.S.N. degree may challenge the 200 and 300
level courses of the nursing major. The mechanism for challenging the courses is a
combination of testing and clinical evaluation. To accomplish the challenge pro-
cess, the student is assigned a faculty member for structured guidance. Credit for Nursing
208 will be granted to Registered Nurses who are accepted into the Advanced Place-
ment Program. Students must enroll in Nursing 121, Concepts of Nursing, prior to
commencing the challenge process. The exams may be taken a maximum of two times.
A clinical evaluation will be conducted following successful completion of the theory
challenge. Students will receive credit for the courses upon satisfactory completion of
both theory and clinical evaluation. Science and mathematics prerequisites must be
completed before credit is granted. Students must have approval of the Division Chair
in order to sit for the examinations. Interested persons should contact the Division
Chair. There is an established fee for each of the following tests and evaluations.
TEST COURSE EQUIVALENT CREDITS
NLN Normal Nutrition NUR 207: Human Nutrition 2
Faculty prepared NUR 209: Health Assessment 2
NLN Care of the Client during
Childbearing NUR 228: Nursing Roles with the Childbearing Family* 6
NLN Care of the Adult NUR 229: Pharmacology in Nursing and 3
NUR 308 Nursing Roles in Adult Care I and 5
NUR 319 Nursing Roles in Adult Care II* 5
NLN Care of the Client
with Mental Disorder NUR 318: Nursing Roles in Mental Health* 5

The above NLN tests are from the NLN Nursing Mobility Profile II.
*One comprehensive clinical evaluation will be conducted following the successful challenge of
the theory component of the above listed courses.

TEST COURSE EQUIVALENT CREDITS
NLN Chemistry CHE 111-112: Principles of Chemistry
for the Life Sciences I-II 8
NLN Anatomy and Physiology BIO 261-262: Human Structure and Function I-II 8
NLN Microbiology BIO 301: Microbiology for the Health Sciences 4










Advanced Placement in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) Program
for graduates of programs accredited by the National League for Nursing
Accrediting Commission: Advanced placement students from Associate Degree
programs accredited by the National League for Nursing will be granted a maxi-
mum of 35 credits in consideration of nursing courses completed in the course of
obtaining an associate degree. Credit for NUR 208, NUR 228, NUR 229, NUR
308, NUR 309, NUR 318 and NUR 319 will be granted with evidence that the
student is a registered nurse. All registered nurses seeking the baccalaureate de-
gree must seek advisement from a nursing faculty member to plan their individual
programs of study. All students will be required to complete NUR 121, Concepts
of Nursing, as the first course in the B.S.N. Advanced Placement Sequence.

Education Advanced Credit

Advanced Credit for Teacher Education Courses: Students will receive advanced
credit upon successful completion of the following ACT proficiency examination:
TEST COURSE EQUIVALENT CREDITS
Reading Instruction in the
Elementary Schools EDU 353: Teaching the Language Arts 3

The minimum passing score on the history test is C; the minimum passing grade
for the reading instruction test is a 50 standard score. Interested persons should
contact the Enrollment Management Office on St. Thomas or the Academic Ser-
vices Office on St. Croix.

Residency Regulations For Tuition Purposes

Questions regarding residency status upon initial application to UVI should be di-
rected to the Office of Admissions. For a change in residency status after enrollment,
contact the Office of the Registrar. Residency for tuition purposes is established by
providing evidence of fulfilling several conditions, including: (1) you must be a citi-
zen of the United States, permanent resident alien, or a legal alien who has been granted
indefinite stay by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS); and (2)
living continuously in the United States Virgin Islands for 12 continuous months im-
mediately preceding registration and/or application for admission.

Living or attending school in United States Virgin Islands is not equated to establish-
ing legal United States Virgin Islands residence. Students are required to provide docu-
mentation to support a request for United States Virgin Islands residency status, which
shows their presence in United States Virgin Islands is for purposes other than to at-
tend school. Full time students working part-time jobs may have difficulty in establish-
ing residency. Please note that documentation must reflect maintenance of twelve months
of continuous residency in the United States Virgin Islands. No single document will
be sufficient to provide conclusive evidence of establishing United States Virgin Is-
lands residence. The burden of proof of permanent residence lies with the student.










Reclassification of Residency Status


A student requesting reclassification as a United States Virgin Islands resident for tu-
ition purposes must demonstrate by clear and convincing evidence that his/her domi-
cile is in the United States Virgin Islands. The burden of proof lies with the applicant to
establish, beyond a doubt, his or her permanent and fixed legal ties to the United States
Virgin Islands and separation of ties to any other state. An approved change in resi-
dency will take effect the next regular (Fall and Spring) semester. All requests for a
change in residency should be submitted to the Office of the Registrar by November
15 for the Spring semester; and by April 30 for the Fall semester.

A. Resident for Tuition Purposes

A United States Virgin Islands "resident for tuition purposes" is a person who (or a
dependent person whose parent or legal guardian) has established and maintained le-
gal residence in the United States Virgin Islands for at least twelve months prior to the
semester in which there is the intent to register. Residence in the United States Virgin
Islands must be as a bona fide domiciliary, rather than for the purpose of maintaining
a residency merely for enrollment at an institution of higher education.

To qualify as a United States Virgin Islands resident for tuition purposes, the student
must meet the criteria indicated:

-be a citizen of the United States, permanent resident alien, or a legal alien who has
been granted indefinite stay by the U.S. Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Ser-
vices (INS).

- Students who depend on out-of-state parents for their support are presumed to be the
legal residents of the same state as their parents.

-Non-resident students who marry a bona-fide resident of the U.S Virgin Islands may
be reclassified to residency status for tuition payment purposes not sooner than 12
months after the date of marriage. Official documents to verify marriage should be
submitted to support request.

-No contrary evidence exists which may reflect established residence elsewhere.

B. Independent Students

An independent student who provides more than 50% of his or her own support and
who is able to substantiate a claim of independence by producing documents to estab-
lish United States Virgin Islands domicile, may be eligible for reclassification.

C. Residency Documentation

The applicable documents, listed below, may be accepted and considered as evidence
of establishing legal residence and permanent ties in United States Virgin Islands.
Official documents should be submitted in the original, wherever possible, or provide
certified/ notarized copies, where applicable. Documents from Category I are consid-










ered permanent ties and must be dated twelve (12) months pnor to the first day of
classes for the term for which residency reclassification is sought. Documents from
Category II may be submitted to further substantiate a claim of United States Virgin
Islands residency. No single document may be used to substantiate a request for a
change of residency classification documentation from Category I and Category II,
together, provide appropriate documentation for consideration of residency reclassifi-
cation.

Category I

1. United States Virgin Islands Voter's Registration.
2. Proof of marriage to a resident (marriage certificate) along with proof of the spouse's
U.S. Virgin Islands resident status.
3. Declaration of Domicile may be obtained from the Clerk of the Territorial Court
of the United States Virgin Islands.
4. The most recent Virgin Islands Income Tax returns and W2 forms; parent's most recent
tax returns (if student is under the age of 25); and a letter stating independent status from
the Financial Aid Office (if receiving financial aid and under the age of 24).

Category I

1. United States Virgin Islands Drivers License.
2. Official I.D card issued by agencies within the United States Virgin Islands.
3. Full time permanent employment, or part time permanent employment, or accep-
tance thereof in the United States Virgin Islands (an official letter on company sta-
tionery and paycheck stubs are required.)
4. United States Virgin Islands vehicle registration and/or Title.
5. Lease agreement, deed, rent receipts or canceled rent checks, proof of purchase of
permanent home (deed, tax receipts, purchase of real property)
6. United States Virgin Islands Business Incorporation and/or License.
7. Professional or Occupational License obtained in the United States Virgin Islands,
(e.g. membership in the USVI Bar Association).
8. Accounts at a local financial institution (Savings and/or Checking), utility state-
ments (e.g. power, telephone), cable statements. The applicant's name must appear
on the documents.

D. Dependent Students

A student who does not meet the 12-month legal resident requirement may qualify for
United States Virgin Islands residency for tuition purposes through one of the following
categories:

1. Parents who are full-time employees of state agencies or political subdivisions of the
state when the student fees are paid by the state agency or political for the purpose ofjob
related law enforcement or corrections training.
2. Active duty members of the armed services stationed in the USVI (and spouse/depen-
dent children), military personnel not stationed in the USVI, but whose home of records
or states of legal residence recorded on the certificate DD Form 2058 is United States
Virgin Islands. Present copy of parent's DD 2258 form, military orders and proof










of relationship as applicable.
3. Dependent children who reside in the United States Virgin Islands for at least 5
years may provide documentation of dependent status according to the Virgin Is-
lands Income Tax code, or other legal documentation to demonstrate guardianship.
The adult guardian must demonstrate they have resided in the United States Virgin
Islands for the previous 12 months with the intent of establishing a permanent home
(see documentation categories I and II).

Requests for residency re-classification are reviewed on a case-by-case basis. There-
fore, immediate responses are not always possible and requests for reclassification
must be submitted by the stated deadline. Additional documents and explanation of
documents submitted may be requested. Submission of fraudulent documents to ob-
tain residency will result in expulsion from the University of the Virgin Islands. Ob-
tain additional information by contacting the Office of the Registrar on the St. Thomas
campus, the Academic Services Office on the St. Croix campus.

Categories of Students

The University of the Virgin Islands divides its students into two categories, ma-
triculated and non-matriculated, according to the students' goals and progress. The
academic standards described later in this catalog apply to all students, regardless
of category.

Matriculated Student: A student who has been formally accepted into a degree pro-
gram of the University and has subsequently registered for courses. A matriculated
student must meet the criteria for admission to a degree program and must maintain
academic standards as described in the chart specifying minimum cumulative grade
point average per credits attempted in the section on Academic Standards.

Non-Matriculated Student: A student who has not been accepted into a degree pro-
gram but has been permitted to register for courses with the goal of pursuing a limited
program of study or of achieving matriculation. A non-matriculated student must meet
the standard for matriculation and must apply for matriculation in order to take more
than 30 credits at the University.

Full-Time Student: A student carrying at least 12 credits, or the equivalent in non-
credit remedial courses, each semester.

Part-Time Student: A student carrying fewer than 12 credits each semester.

Special Student: A non-matriculated student who has been admitted to courses on a
full-time basis to undertake a special program of study.

Student Classification by Class: The number of credits required for each class is as
follows:
1 Freshman 0 23.5
2 Sophomore 24 59.5
3 Junior 60 89.5
4 Senior 90 and above



























'Jb "










dJ3


33














Tuition, Fees, Room and Board*


Compared to other institutions with similar faculty and facilities, the cost of attending
the University of the Virgin Islands as a regular student is very reasonable. Since the
institution is substantially supported by funds from the Government of the Virgin Is-
lands, it is the University's intention to bring higher education within the reach of
every qualified high school graduate in the Virgin Islands and to encourage promising
non-residents to enroll in its programs.

Because no two individuals are alike in their needs and spending habits, no two col-
lege budgets are the same. However, if students are realistic about their personal ex-
penses, the following information should enable them to estimate their annual costs
quite accurately:


Full Time Tuition and Fees


Per Semester
Tuition
Registration Fee
Property Fee
Technology Fee
Medical Insurance Fee
Student Activity Fee
Student Association Fee
Health Services

Room and Board

Per Semester
Room
Board Plan A
Board Plan B
Total Room and Board
charges per semester
depending on meal plan


Resident
$1,650.00
30.00
50.00
50.00
28.00
15.00
20.00
20.00


Double
$1,100.00
$2,675.00
$1,875.00


$2,975- $3,775.00


Non-Resident
$4,950.00
30.00
50.00
50.00
28.00
15.00
20.00
20.00


Single
$1,375.00
$2,675.00
$1,875.00


$3,250 $4,050.00


NOTES:
1. A refundable room damage and key deposit of $100.00 is required of all students residing on campus.
2. An estimated $500.00 per semester for books and supplies is not included in the approximate annual
cost. Non-residents should include transportation in estimating the total cost.
3. Both room and board charges are required of all students residing on campus.
4. A dormitory room deposit of $100.00 is required to be paid by all students applying to live on campus
in a given semester This deposit will be apphed towards payment of room and board charges. Ifdormi-
*Subject to change by the Board of Trustees.










tory reservations are cancelled up to 21 days before the beginning of the semester, the deposit less an
administrative charge of $5.00 -will be refunded. Dormitory room deposits will not be refundable
within the 21-day period preceding the start of the semester
5. New students pay a $75.00 non-refundable orientation fee.
6. All non-tuition fees are non-refundable. Likewise, the Nursing Laboratory, Science Laboratory, Prac-
tice Teaching, and Computer Fees are non-refundable.

Tuition and Fees for Part-Time and Summer
Students

Per Semester Resident Non-Resident
Tuition (per credit) $110.00 $330.00
Registration Fee $30.00 $30.00
Property Fee $50.00 $50.00
Technology Fee $50.00 $50.00
Health Services Fee (per visit) $20.00 $50.00
Student Activity Fee $8.00 $8.00
NOTE: Depending upon course registration, additional laboratory fees may be assessed as hsted below.

LABORATORY FEES:
Computer Lab Fee. . .. $40.00
Nursing Lab Fee . ... $50.00
Science . Fee. $50.00
Practice Teaching Fee. . .. $50.00
Physical Education Lab Fee $25.00

Student Deposits: The damage and key deposit are refundable at the end of the student's
academic career at the University of the Virgin Islands providing there has been no loss,
library fine or breakage charged against the deposit.

If the deposit is reduced during the time of the student's attendance at the University, the
Business Office will request that the deposit be returned to its original amount.

Payment: Students are responsible for paying their bills at the Business Office at any time
prior to the published "due date." Registered students' failure to do so will result in their
course selections being cancelled. If this occurs, students wishing to register may do so
during the late registration period.

A student who owes money to the University, other than on student loans not yet due, will
not receive their diploma and a hold will be placed on their record. Transcripts will not be
issued for students with outstanding financial obligations.

Late Registration Fee: A $75.00 non-refundable fee is assessed for late registration.

Graduation Fee: A non-refundable fee of $75.00 (and $25.00 for an additional degree) is
charged each candidate for a baccalaureate or associate degree. It is payable at the time of
application for graduation. If the requirements for the degree are not completed, the student
is re-assessed in the next year he or she becomes a candidate for a degree.










Institutional Refund Policy: The Umversity arranges its services well in advance of each
academic year. Consequently, when a student withdraws, the University's cost is not re-
duced, nor can the student be replaced. For these reasons, the University refunds only a
portion of its charges, thereby sharing with the student the loss caused by the withdrawal.
The schedule of refunds of tuition is as follows:

During first week of classes . ... 90%
During second week of classes ..... 70%
During third week of classes . .. 50%
During fourth week of classes . .. 25%
After fourth week of classes . .. none

Students must formally withdraw through the Office of the Registrar on the St. Thomas
campus or the Academic Services Office on the St. Croix campus by completing a with-
drawal form. The withdrawal date as shownby the Registrar's records will be the date used
in the computation of any tuition refunds due to students. Refunds of tuition due to students
because of withdrawal from the University will not be paid during the first two weeks
following registration. Students who withdraw during this period should leave their names
and forwarding addresses with the Business Office. Requests for refunds should be accom-
panied by the student's registration receipt.

All students residing onthe St. Thomas and St. Croix campuses are required to pay forboth
room and board. Meals are from the snack bar on a cash basis. Should a student residing in
a University residence hall move off campus during a semester, the student may be entitled
to a room and board refund if he or she adheres to the following procedures: The office of
Student Affairs must be notified in writing in advance. Check-out procedures, as estab-
lished by that office, must be followed. The date of the actual move as shown in Housing
Office records will be the date used in the computation of any board and room refund due
to a student.

Meal tickets will be issued to students in accordance with the selected meal plan option.
The maximum room refund is 50% if a student withdraws or housing contract is terminated
before mid-term. No refunds for room will be issued after mid-term. Meal tickets are valid
only for the semester in which they are issued. Unused meal tickets may not be carried
forward from one semester to another.

All refunds due to students for any reason whatsoever will be forfeited unless called for on
or before June 30 of the University year in which they are due. Should June 30 fall on a
Sunday or on a day when the Business Office is closed, the refund will be made on the next
business day.

The appeal process for exceptions to this published policy on refunds is through the
Office of the Provost for tuition and Student Affairs for room and board.














Financial Aid


The primary purpose of the University's financial aid program is to provide finan-
cial assistance to its students who, without such aid, would be unable to further
their educational goals. The financial assistance offered may not always meet the
student's total financial need. It is the student's and family's responsibility to pay
the difference between the student's cost of education and available financial aid.
This financial assistance may be in the form of scholarships, grants, loans or work-
study employment.

Eligibility: U.S. citizens and permanent residents are eligible to apply for finan-
cial assistance. Applicants must be matriculated students of the University and
must be making satisfactory academic progress toward a degree. International stu-
dents may apply for University of the Virgin Islands work-study after they have
completed a full year at the University. Financial aid eligibility is determined
through the use of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid form (FAFSA).
This form is available on both campuses of the University, in local secondary schools
and on the Internet at www.fafsa.ed.gov. In completing this form, the students are
expected to provide information on their own income and assets, family income
and assets, and non-taxable income (Social Security benefits, veteran's benefits,
etc.). The need analysis formula used in analyzing the information on the financial
aid application measures the ability (not the willingness) of students and their fami-
lies to contribute toward educational costs. The financial aid application priority
deadlines are March 1 for the Fall semester and November 15 for the Spring se-
mester. The Title IV Institution Code numbers of the University of the Virgin Is-
lands are: 006989 for the St. Croix Campus and 003946 for the St. Thomas Cam-
pus.

Scholarships: University of the Virgin Islands scholarships are available for in-
coming local high school students and currently enrolled University students. Schol-
arships are awarded on the basis of demonstrated scholastic ability. The minimum
required grade point average is a "B." Scholarship announcements are generally
made during the month of March for the upcoming academic year, at which time
scholarship applications will be available in the Financial Aid Office and at local
high schools.

Veterans/National Guardsmen: Veterans who attend the University may apply
for federal benefits in the Office of the Registrar on the St. Thomas campus and
the Office of Academic Services on the St. Croix campus. A program of special
tuition allowances for Virgin Islands veterans is administered by the Division of
Veterans Affairs, Office of the Governor. A similar program is also available for
qualified members of the National Guard.

Over-awards: Federal regulations and Institutional policy mandates that students'
total financial assistance cannot exceed students' cost of attendance. If this occurs,










students' awards will be reduced within the confines of their budget to prevent an
over-award situation.

Loan Entrance/Exit Interviews: All students must receive entrance counseling
before the first loan disbursement and exit counseling prior to graduating, trans-
ferring or withdrawing from the University. Counseling sessions are administered
by loan officers at the University

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy For Continued
Financial Aid Eligibility

Federal regulations require that all schools participating in any Federal Financial
Aid program must adhere to a Satisfactory Academic Progress policy. These are
the standards by which students' progress toward the completion of their program
of study at the University of the Virgin Islands will be measured to determine
continued eligibility for financial aid. The records of all financial aid recipients
will be reviewed at the end of each academic year to determine compliance with
this policy. Records will be further reviewed for students enrolled in the Summer.
The review of students' satisfactory academic progress commences at the point
when students have attempted 12 degree credits, but includes students' complete
academic history, including periods in which the student did not receive financial
aid. In order to remain eligible for financial aid, continuing students must meet all
of the requirements of the Qualitative and Quantitative standards outlined below.

Grade Point Average Requirement (Qualitative Standard)

Students are expected to achieve a minimum cumulative Grade Point Average as
outlined below.

Degree Credits Attempted Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average
12 29 1.70
30 44 1.80
45 and above 2.00


Completion Rate Requirement (Quantitative Standard)

Students must successfully complete at least 70% of all degree credits attempted.
Financial aid eligibility is limited to 180 degree credits attempted for students
enrolled in a bachelor's degree program and 90 degree credits attempted for stu-
dents enrolled in the Associate's degree program. Students enrolled full-time are
expected to complete a bachelor's degree within 6 years and an associate's degree
within 3 years; part-time students are allowed 12 years for a bachelor's degree and
6 years for an associate's degree.

Non-Degree Remedial courses: Students cannot receive financial aid for more
than 30 credits of non-degree remedial courses.










Withdrawals, Audits & Incomplete courses: These courses are included in cal-
culating attempted credits but are not included in the calculation of grade point
average.

Repetitions: For repeated courses, only the highest grade is counted. However all
credits are included in calculating attempted credits.

Change of Majors: Credits attempted and grades earned that do not count toward
the new major will not be included in the determination of Satisfactory Academic
Progress.

Probationary & Ineligible Status: Students who fail to meet the Satisfactory Aca-
demic Progress policy requirements will be placed on financial aid probation. Stu-
dents continue to be eligible for financial aid while on financial aid probation.
Students who fail to meet the minimum Satisfactory Academic Progress policy
requirements by the end of their probationary period automatically become ineli-
gible for financial aid.

Appeal: Students in an ineligible status may submit an appeal in writing if the
student has extenuating circumstances such as personal or family illness or injury.
All appeals must be substantiated by appropriate documentation and submitted to
the Financial Aid Office. Appeals are reviewed by the Financial Aid Appeals Com-
mittee.

Reinstatement: Students who have been placed in an ineligible status may be
reinstated once all Satisfactory Academic Progress deficiencies have been met.
Students' records will be reviewed at the end of each academic year to determine
eligibility for reinstatement. Reinstatement will be effective at the beginning of
the academic year following the review. It is the students' responsibility to reapply
for financial aid to initiate the reinstatement process.

Federal Financial Aid Withdrawal Policy

When a student withdraws from all courses during a semester for which federal
financial aid was received, the student may no longer be eligible for the full amount
of the Federal Financial Aid award (excluding Work-Study) that he/she was origi-
nally scheduled to receive. In this case, a determination of the amount of Federal
Financial Aid the student earned must be made and the unearned portion of the aid
must be returned by the student and/or the University to the Federal Financial Aid
programs from which the aid was paid. The procedures and formula to determine
the amount of federal aid to be returned is mandated by federal statute and is
available for review, on request, in the Financial Aid office.

The withdrawal date used in the calculation will be the date the student begins the
withdrawal process or otherwise notifies the University of his/her intent to with-
draw. If the student did not begin the withdrawal process or otherwise notify the
University of his/her intent to withdraw, then the midpoint of the semester would
be used as the withdrawal date.










Unearned financial aid funds must be returned to the programs from which the
student received aid in the following order, up to the amount of the aid disbursed
from each source.


1. The Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan Program
2. The Subsidized Federal Direct Loan Program
3. The Federal Perkins Loan Program
4. Federal Direct Plus Loan Program
5. The Federal Pell Grant Program
6. The Federal SEOG program
7. Other Title IV programs














Academic and student support services and programs are provided to enhance stu-
dents' acclimation to the University, foster professional growth and development, aug-
ment leadership skills, complement classroom instruction, promote wellness, and fa-
cilitate the attainment of students' personal and career goals and aspirations. This is
achieved through orientation programs, advisement, the services of the Freshman Center,
counseling and placement, student employment, health services, student governance,
student activities and residence life programs. Many services and programs are aca-
demic in nature while others may be social, cultural, athletic or recreational.

Orientation

All newly matriculated students are required to come to campus a few days before the
fall or spring semester begins for program planning, development of their class sched-
ules, and participation in orientation. Some segments of the orientation program are
designed to acquaint students with rules and regulations of the University, to explore
the campus, and to meet faculty, administrators, and fellow students, while others are
designed to enhance students' academic and social adjustment to college life. Atten-
dance at all orientation programs and activities also facilitates the registration process
for new students as well as for transfer students.

Advisement

The University, throughout its teaching, advising, and other relationships with stu-
dents, expresses its concern for students as individual not to do for them what they
should do for themselves -but to help them assume responsible management of their
own affairs.

Because college-age adults must make many decisions of relevance to their future,
students at the University of the Virgin Islands are given professional assistance in
solving educational, vocational, social and personal problems. This service starts with
the students' applications for admission and continues even beyond the period in which
they are enrolled in the University. By the act of admitting students, the University is
expressing its considered judgment that students can succeed in one of the programs
of the University. During advisement and registration, students and their faculty advi-
sors, with assistance from the counseling staff or Freshman Center staff, may examine
their goals and aspirations. Throughout the freshman year, students may explore emerg-
ing interests, using the resources of the Counseling and Placement Office and the Fresh-
man Center staff to determine the career choices open to them. Such systematic inves-
tigation, together with any summer work or on-campus work-study experiences, should
enable students to select satisfying careers in which they can succeed.
In the normal course of events, students may face crises of a personal, social or eco-
nomic nature. In such circumstances, freshmen should seek assistance from the Fresh-
man Center staff, while upperclassmen are encouraged to consult the counseling staff
or other appropriate personnel for counseling. It is not uncommon for students to en-










counter academic difficulties. At these times, students should first consult the instruc-
tor of the class in which difficulties are being experienced or their faculty advisor who
maintains office hours for these and other purposes. Additionally, assistance in im-
proving study and test-taking skills is provided through enrollment in the Freshman
Development Seminar class, by Freshman Center staff, and by Counseling and Place-
ment staff. Tutorial services are also available. In most cases, if students do not delay
action, a means of overcoming their academic difficulties can be found.

The essential point for the students to keep in mind is that they should take the initia-
tive in taking full advantage of the Academic and Student Support Services and other
advisory resources provided by the University.

The Freshman Center

Freshman centers on both campuses provide peer and professional tutorial services,
academic advisement, video-assisted learning, and computer-aided instruction. Stu-
dents are strongly urged to utilize the Freshman Center to augment their progress in
skill development courses, accelerate their proficiency levels in specific areas, and
develop computer skills through use of the Freshman Center Computer Lab. The Fresh-
man Center is located on the first floor of the Classroom Administration (CA) building
on St. Thomas and on the 700 level of the Evans Center on St. Croix. Consult the
Coordinator of Freshman Development for more information on the Freshman Center.

Counseling and Placement Services

Personal, academic and career guidance counseling services are available for full-time
and part-time students. As a community service, academic and career advisement are also
made available to prospective students on a limited basis.

The Counseling and Placement Office is unique with respect to services offered. Ser-
vices provided are specifically designed to facilitate the interpersonal, personal, social
and cognitive development of the student outside of the classroom.

To assist students with this process, the office sponsors a variety of programs and
services including career counseling, on- and off-campus employment, graduate and
professional school recruitment and advisement, career fairs, workshops on resume
preparation, interviewing skills and job search techniques, credential and file services.
There are also workshops on values clarification, interpersonal relationship skills, con-
flict resolution, and much more.

The Counseling and Placement Office also coordinates the National Student Exchange
Program and the Who's Who Among Students inAmerican Universities and Colleges Pro-
gram. A resource library provides a wealth of information on preparing for graduate study,
career choices and other life skills processes.

The counseling and placement office, by federal mandate, is required to maintain ajob
bank which is used to facilitate employment searches for UVI graduates. For compli-
ance purposes and to aid students in securing post-graduation employment, all pro-










spective graduates must subnut an up-to-date resume to the counseling and placement
office prior to graduation.

Student Employment Services

Student employment services are available through the Counseling and Placement Office
on both campuses. Students seeking off-campus, as well as on-campus employment,
should contact the Counseling and Placement Office for further information. U.S. citi-
zens and permanent residents who qualify for federal College Work-Study (CWS) as
part of their financial aid package, and would like to work on-campus, should report to
the Counseling and Placement Office. Student employment coordinators will assign
work-study placements as soon as possible in the beginning of the first semester of
student eligibility. To promote community service, some CWS placements are off-
campus, usually in an educational setting or non-profit agency. To qualify for CWS,
students must be enrolled full-time and meet the March 1 deadline date for submission
of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). U.S. citizens, permanent
residents, and international students on F-l Visas, who do not qualify for CWS, may
apply for on-campus employment through the Institutional Work-Study (IWS) pro-
gram. Application under IWS, however, does not guarantee employment as placement
is based on the availability of funds. International students on F-1 Visas are eligible to
apply for IWS after the completion of one year of full-time study at the University. Many
departments of the University also hire students for on-campus employment. Student em-
ployment programs allow students to work, on average, between 12-15 hours per week.

Health Services and Insurance

The University Health Center provides first-aid, health counseling and instruction,
referrals to other community health facilities, and health education in the form of mini-
courses, seminars, dissemination of literature and informal individual or group discus-
sions. The campus nurse maintains regular office hours and is on call in case of emer-
gencies. A licensed physician is available at the Health Center at regular intervals.
Emergency care that cannot be handled on campus is referred to the local hospitals. All
full-time students are required, during registration, to pay health services and medi-
cal insurance fees. All on-campus summer residents are also required to pay a
health services fee. Insurance claim forms are available from the Health Services
Center located in Gordon House on the St. Thomas campus and in the Great House
on the St. Croix campus.

Drug and Alcohol Prevention/Education Program

The main goal of the Drug and Alcohol Prevention/Education Program (DAPEP) is to
develop programs that reach all segments of the University community in order to
educate and help prevent drug and alcohol abuse. The DAPEP attempts to create a
healthy, drug-free environment in order to enhance learning, professional develop-
ment, job performance and safety. In carrying out its mission, the DAPEP promotes
healthier life-styles for all members of the University community, sponsors on-going
drug prevention and education programs, and provides referral services to community










agencies for persons in need of further counseling or treatment (see the Umversity's
Drug-free Work Place Policy in the Academic Information and Regulations section).
The St. Thomas campus' Mentorship Program, which pairs UVI student mentors with
elementary school-aged youth, is one of DAPEP's major prevention education pro-
grams.

Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities should contact the Counseling and Placement Office prior
to registration and advisement. Counselors will be available to provide personal,
career and academic counseling services. Additionally, counselors facilitate the
coordination of services with other departments of the University in order to ac-
commodate students' special needs. No student will be discriminated against be-
cause of disability. To ensure this, grievance committees in each academic divi-
sion will include, in their area of concern, any grievances raised by the student that
relate to academic programs and practices.

Accommodations made for students with disabilities may include, but not be limited
to, facilitation of testing and registration processes, scheduling of back-to-back classes,
scheduling of classes within the same building and other services as needed. Long-
range academic program planning is essential in order for counselling staff to commu-
nicate course needs with the Academic Divisions and personnel in charge of develop-
ing the schedule of classes. It is also recommended that students familiarize them-
selves with the services of the Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in De-
velopmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD), which serves students and families of students
with disabilities.

Student Activities and Convocations

The office of Student Activities assumes major responsibility for the implementation
of social, recreational, cultural enrichment, and student leadership development pro-
grams as well as other extracurricular activities. It also serves as a facilitator for the
development of clubs and organizations in response to student needs and interests.
Convocations are scheduled each semester for the entire University community to pro-
vide cultural and intellectual enrichment; members of the faculty and staff, students,
and outside speakers assume leadership in stimulating thought and discussion. Be-
cause the University functions as a cultural center, many activities, lectures, musical
performances and theatrical performances are open to the public as a means of draw-
ing together the University community and the larger community. UVIsion, a student
newspaper produced by Journalism and Mass Communication majors, welcomes con-
tributions from all students on both campuses.

Student Government Association

The Office of Student Activities works closely with the Student Government Associa-
tion (SGA) and student leaders in planning their own programs and activities. All full-
time students belong to SGA, which provides a channel for the expression of student










opimon and representation of student concerns and interests. Part-time matrculated
students who wish to become members of the SGA may do so by paying the student
association and activities fees.

Varsity, Intramural and Club Sports

The University maintains an active varsity, intramural and club sports program that
emphasizes student development and leadership through sports competition, physical
fitness and the development of recreational skills which can be enjoyed after leaving
the University. Intramural games are held between various components of the Univer-
sity community, including students, faculty, staff and alumni. Club teams compete in
local amateur leagues and varsity teams participate in leagues and invitational tourna-
ments with teams from other universities in the Eastern Caribbean, Puerto Rico, Cen-
tral America and, occasionally, the U.S. mainland. Consequently, there is a diverse
program of outdoor activities and individual and team sports at the University. Varsity
teams compete in basketball, track and field, tennis and volleyball. Both campuses
offer outdoor athletic and recreational facilities including volley/basketball courts, tennis
courts, and grounds for track and field, softball, baseball, and soccer. With the sea at
the edge of the campus, the St. Thomas Campus provides an ideal setting for water
sports and also offers a golf course for physical education classes and golf enthusiasts.
The University is a member of the Caribbean Universities Sports Association (CUSA),
La OrganizacionDeportiva Inter-Universitaria (ODI) de Puerto Rico, the Organizacion
Deportiva Universitaria Centroamericanay del Caribe (ODUCC), and is a corresponding
member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

Student Housing

Residence hall living promotes the interaction of students from various places, ethnic
backgrounds, and cultures. While most students living on campus come from the U.S.
Virgin Islands, British Virgin Islands, the Eastern Caribbean and the continental United
States, students from as far away as Africa, Asia and Europe have lived on campus. In
addition to the benefits of experiencing cultural diversity and cross-cultural exchange,
the University has adopted a co-ed visitation policy on both campuses. Campus resi-
dents will find academic resources and student support programs and services, includ-
ing tutoring, the library, the Freshman Center, computer labs, counseling and many
others readily accessible. Resident Assistants offer a variety of residence life programs
designed to provide a comprehensive living-learning environment. Only full-time stu-
dents are eligible to live on campus. To maintain eligibility to reside on campus, stu-
dents must comply with all rules and regulations of the University, adhere to the Stu-
dent Housing Contract, and maintain full-time status (12 or more credits) at all times.

The St. Croix Campus

The Residence Hall Complex on the St. Croix Campus is comprised of 17 three-bed-
room suites; on-campus living quarters for housing supervisor; a reception area; lounge;
the Office of Student Housing & Residence Life; seminar/study rooms; and laundry
facilities. The Student Center, adjacent to the residence hall, houses a cafeteria/audito-










num, snack bar, the OUfice of Student Activities, a Student Activities Lounge, student
mailroom and the campus bookstore.

The St. Thomas Campus

Student Housing on the St. Thomas Campus is comprised of four residence halls with
a capacity of approximately 230 students. Residence Halls South and East provide
double occupancy bedrooms for females. East Hall also provides double occupancy
bedrooms for males; North Residence Hall for males and Middle Residence Hall for
females provide single bedroom occupancy.


Housing Procedures

1. Each student desiring on-campus housing is required to submit an Application
for Student Housing and a signed Student Housing Contract by the deadline date
listed below. The Application for Student Housing must be accompanied by a $50
room deposit (certified check or money order) made payable to the University of
the Virgin Islands. The application and payment (no cash) must be submitted to the
Student Housing Office. New students should not submit an Application for Stu-
dent Housing until they have received an acceptance letter from the Admissions
Office. New students who do not register for the academic year in which they were
admitted should not assume that original acceptance into the University meets the
Housing Office's requirements for placement or that a room assignment is carried
over into the next semester or the next year. Newly admitted students who do not
register within the academic year of admission must formally submit an application
for readmission to the University. (See section on Readmission to the University )

2. Applicants will be mailed a room assignment notice or will be notified in writing if
space is unavailable. A room assignment will be made only after a student has been
officially admitted to the University; has met the deadline for submission of the
Application for Student Housing; has signed the Student Housing Contract; and has
paid the $50 room deposit fee.

3. The completed Application for Student Housing and Student Housing contract
for room and board must be received by the Student Housing Office by the dates
below:
For fall semester . not later than June 1
For spring semester . not later than November 15

4. The Student Housing Contract is binding for the academic year (fall and spring
semesters) in which students are enrolled. The contract terminates at the end of the
spring semester.

5. The Student Housing Contract and room assignment notice may be cancelled
and a refund of $50 (less a $5 administrative charge) will be made provided the
Student Housing Office is informed in writing at least 21 days prior to the opening
date of the residence hall. No refund of the deposit will be made for cancellation
after this date.










6. Students who have applied for housing but have not been assigned a room,
may transfer their $50 reservation deposit to the next semester by indicating on
the housing application their desire to be placed on the waiting list. Students
who have not received official confirmation of a room assignment should seek
off-campus housing.

7. Off-island students who have applied for housing but have not received a room
assignment and have not been able to secure off campus housing accommodations
should call the Housing Office before arriving on campus.

8. The assigning of special students who are working on special projects with the
University will be determined by availability of space.

9. Residence Hall Changes, Room Changes, Length of Stay: Students assigned to
University housing are required to abide by the terms of the Student Housing Con-
tract and the Student Handbook. The Housing Office reserves the right to make
residence hall and room changes for the benefit of all. Students assigned on-campus
housing may reside on-campus for up to and no more than eight semesters.

10. Termination of Student Housing Contract: For all campus residents who drop
to part-time status (less than 12 credits), withdraw, are suspended, dismissed, or
otherwise cease studies at the University, the Student Housing Contract will be
terminated and they must return keys to the Housing Office and vacate the premises
within 24 hours.

11. All campus residents, visitors and overnight guests are required to observe ac-
cepted standards of social conduct at all times and to adhere to all rules and regulations
governing the residence halls. Policies and procedures for visitors and fees for over-
night guests are outlined in the Student Handbook.

12. Opening and closing of the Residence Halls: University housing facilities are
not available for occupancy prior to the opening dates as posted by the Housing
Office. Residence Halls are closed at the conclusion of each semester.

13. Summer Housing: Summer housing is provided for matriculated UVI students
who are enrolled for at least 6 credits during the summer session. Applications for
housing for the summer session must be filed in the Housing Office by April 15
along with the Student Housing Contract and $50 room deposit.

Personal Property:

The University cannot be responsible for, and does not insure, student property at any
time. If concerned, students should investigate individual or family property insurance
which would provide adequate protection.

Off-campus Housing:

The University does not assume the responsibility for placing students in off-campus
accommodations. However, the Housing Office keeps a list of available housing for










students wishing to seek off-campus accommodations. The University assumes no
control over off-campus rates.

Food Services

All students residing in campus housing are required to select a Meal Plan Option for
each semester, and must pay for each plan at the time they pay for their room:

Plan A- $2,675: Seven (7) day meal plan with three (3) meals per day Monday through
Saturday and two (2) meals on Sunday; 20 meals weekly.

Plan B $1,875: Seven (7) day meal plan with two meals per day Monday through
Sunday, 14 meals weekly.

Fees are outlined in the Cost section of the catalog.















Freshman-Year Program


The freshman-year curriculum offers a comprehensive program of educational experi-
ences to first-year students. Designed to encourage intellectual growth and personal
empowerment, students participate in common learning experiences, inter-disciplin-
ary study, and career planning activities while developing skills necessary for aca-
demic success. The program incorporates two semesters of full-time study consisting
of basic skills and general education courses, academic advisement and academic sup-
port services.

Basic Skills Courses

The following basic skills courses are required only of students who demonstrate aca-
demic need in reading, writing or mathematics, based upon information from SAT/
ACT scores, placement test scores and/or transcript evaluations:

WAC 011/ENG 100 Writing Across the Curriculum*
RCA 021/ENG 101 Reading in the Content Area
MAT 023 Introductory Algebra Concepts and Skills with Applications: Course A
MAT 024 Introductory Algebra Concepts and Skills with Applications: Course B

Si- n,,1 Across the Curriculum and Reading in the Content Area should be taken
with their linked general education science (SCI 100) and/or social science (SSC
100) courses.

Recognizing that students may need to enhance basic skills prior to pursuing degree-
level work in one or more subjects, the University offers developmental level courses,
numbered 011 to 099, which are designed to help students strengthen their preparation
for learning at the college level. Credit for such courses cannot be used to meet degree
requirements. Placement in preparatory courses depends upon SAT/ACT performance,
or by class examination. A grade of"P" must be received in preparatory courses, indi-
cating readiness for college level work. Students registered for these courses may not
withdraw during the semester without permission from Freshman Center Coordinator.
Developmental courses are normally offered and may be taken during the summer
session.

1. Full-time students are allowed a maximum of three semesters plus one summer from
the date of entrance to complete all basic skills requirements

2. Failure to earn a passing score for each basic skills course within this time frame
will result in the student being placed on part-time status.

3. A student may petition the Provost for an exception to this regulation. The student
placed on part-time status due to failure to complete basic skills requirements within
the allowed time may reapply for full-time status.











4. Full-time status can be reinstated if the student has maintained a minimum cumula-
tive grade point average of 2.00 ("C") for all courses taken at the University, and
has successfully completed the skills courses.

General Education Courses

All freshman-year courses must be completed by the time a student has amassed 24
credit hours at UVI. The three general education courses required by all students ma-
triculating at UVI with fewer than 24 degree-credit hours are:

FDS 100. Freshman Development Seminar
SCI 100. The Natural World: The Caribbean
SSC 100. An Introduction to the Social Sciences: A Caribbean Focus

Academic Advisement: Students are encouraged to establish a major of interest upon
matriculation. Matriculated students are assigned a faculty advisor in their respective
division of interest. Faculty advisors will recommend courses as needed in fulfillment
of general education and degree requirements. Students should meet with their advi-
sors regularly.

Academic Support: A program of academic support is provided for all freshman stu-
dents at UVI. These services are available through the offices of The Freshman Center.
Individual tutoring sessions, academic advisement, video-assisted learning, use of The
Freshman Center computer lab, support texts and various other services are available
free of charge to freshmen.

Prerequisites, Credits, Grades, and Quality Points

Many courses require the fulfillment of prerequisites prior to enrollment. Prerequisites
refer to courses, examinations, or other conditions students must meet and receive
passing grades before registering for any of the follow up courses. In general, satisfac-
tory completion of a prerequisite means that students receive a grade of at least "D" or
"P." However, nursing courses require a minimum of "C." For program planning pur-
poses, students should familiarize themselves with course prerequisites which are listed
in the Course Description section of this catalog.

When requirements for each course are completed satisfactorily, credit is assigned on
the basis of a combination of time spent in class and time spent in study. One unit of
credit is usually assigned for 50 minutes class lecture-discussion plus two hours of
study, or for three hours of laboratory activity, each week during a university term.

The quality of performance in a course is indicated by a grade given at the close of
each term. Grade points are granted on the basis of grades earned. The following grades
may be assigned.













A Superior 4.00
A- Excellent 3.67
B+ Very High 3.33
B High 3.00
B- Good 2.67
C+ Above Average 2.33
C Average 2.00
C- Below Average 1.67
D+ Passing 1.33
D Low passing 1.00
F Failure 0.00
W Withdrawn 0.00
WP Withdrawn passing 0.00
WF Withdrawn failing 0.00
AW Administrative Withdrawal 0.00
I Incomplete 0.00
AUD Audit 0.00

In the skills courses which carry non-degree credit and are numbered 001 to 099 in this
catalog, the following evaluations are given:

P indicates that the student is promoted to a credit course.
NP indicates that the student must continue in the skills course.

A failing grade in a course and/or a course that must be repeated does not count toward
graduation. Many colleges do not honor "D" grades for transfer purposes.

Auditors receive no grades, credits or quality points. Auditing a course requires regu-
lar attendance in class and completion of all required work except that which is graded.
An audit will be entered upon a student's transcript only if these requirements are
fulfilled. In the event requirements are not fulfilled, a grade of "W" will be entered.
Tuition and fees will be charged at the same rate as for credit.

The deadline for a student to change from regular status to audit and vice-versa coin-
cides with the deadline for student withdrawal from a course without prejudice to
grade. A matriculated student may normally audit one course per semester without
permission from the Provost.

A student planning to withdraw from a course should first refer to the section on With-
drawal. Administrative withdrawals may be approved by the Provost for reason of
illness or other serious documented circumstances.

The University maintains a transcript record of all courses taken by each student. A
grade report is provided to all students at the end of each semester and summer ses-
sion. Copies of the complete transcript may be obtained upon written request to the
Registrar's or Academic Services Office and payment of the requisite fee.


Grade


Standard


Grade Points










Incomplete: Grades of "" are expected to be used only when, in the opimon of the
instructor, there is likelihood that the student can satisfactorily complete the missing
work which will substantially influence the final grade. The grade of must be removed
by mid-term of the semester following the one in which the grade of I was earned.
Failure to remove the grade of I by this time will result in a conversion of the I to an F.
The instructor must file a "Change of Grade" slip with the final grade, at the Registrar's
Office on the St. Thomas campus or the Academic Services Office on the St. Croix
campus.

Change of Grade: Changes of grades other than incomplete are normally allowed for
computational errors only and must be approved by the Provost. A request to change a
grade after official grades have been deposited in the Registrar's or Academic Ser-
vices Office may be made by an instructor by filing a "Change of Grade" slip with the
Provost. Requests must be made by mid-term of the semester after the grade was sub-
mitted.

Repetition of Courses: Undergraduate students may repeat credit courses for which
grades of C-, D+, D, or F were earned. If a student wishes to repeat a grade of C or
better, the approval of the appropriate Division Chair is required before the course is
repeated. In general, no course may be repeated more than once and no more than four
courses may be repeated. Students who fail the EPE twice must register for ENG 051.
ENG 051 shall be an exception to the policy that students are allowed to repeat a
course only once. Only the highest grade earned will be used in computing the grade
point average; all grades will be shown on the transcript. Any exception to this policy
requires approval by the Provost on the respective campus.

Quality Points: To compute the quality points earned in a course, multiply the number
of credits of that course by the grade points earned. To compute the grade point aver-
age (GPA) for a semester, divide the total quality points earned that semester by the
number of credits attempted that semester. To compute the cumulative grade point
average, divide the total quality points earned at UVI by the number of credits at-
tempted at UVI. Twice the number of quality points as registered credits (equivalent to
a C grade average) is required for graduation.

Reports on work of less than degree-standard (C) quality are issued to students at mid-
term. Final grades are issued at the end of the term. Only final grades are recorded on
the student's permanent record.

Banking Credits: Part-time students who do not wish to pursue studies toward a de-
gree may enroll as non-matriculated students. Any credits earned will be "banked"
until the students have been formally matriculated. Upon matriculation, any credits
earned by the students, which are applicable to their degree program, will be counted.

It is recommended that part-time students who intend eventually to matriculate receive
advisement on course selection from the chair and/or faculty of the academic division
in which they plan to pursue a degree.

Individuals may be admitted formally as matriculated students to the University's de-
gree programs for part-time study if they meet admission requirements. Non-matricu-

52










lated students may register for non-degree credit courses, or they may take credit courses
to earn a maximum of thirty credits as part-time students before being required to
matriculate. For admission procedures, see page 20 of this catalog.

Registration Procedures

All students are required to register on the dates announced.

A student is regularly registered for a course only when in registering, the student has
conformed to all applicable University regulations and requirements.

Students not properly registered in a course may not receive credit for the course.

All students registering for courses in any term shall submit their programs of study to
their advisors for approval before officially registering in the courses.

All prerequisites to courses listed in the catalog must be met by students prior to reg-
istering in those courses. Students must document that they have completed the pre-
requisites. Questions concerning prerequisites should be addressed to faculty advi-
sors, or the Registrar's Office, orAcademic Services Office prior to registration. Sub-
stitution of a program course requirement can be made only if approved by the Pro-
vost. Students seeking such approval must make their request to the Division Chair
who will submit a written recommendation to the Provost for consideration.

Changes of Registration: In no case may a course be added or a change of section be
made after the date indicated in the current semester schedule.

To make any change of registration, the student must complete the Change of Registra-
tion form from the Registrar's or Academic Services Office. The deadline for adding a
course is posted in the current semester schedule. The deadline for dropping a course
without penalty is also listed.

Following the formal registration period, a non-refundable fee of $10.00 will be charged
for each Petition for Change of Registration form unless the course change is necessi-
tated by a change in the University's course offerings, other needs of the University, or
a student's performance on placement exams.

Change of Major: Students who wish to change their major must obtain a Change of
Major form from the Registrar's or Academic Services Office. The Change of Major form
must be signed by the student, faculty advisors, division chairs and the Provost.


Withdrawal

Withdrawal from Courses: Students may withdraw from a course without penalty up
to about six weeks after the course begins. They must, however, secure a course with-
drawal form from the Office of the Registrar on the St. Thomas campus or the Aca-
demic Services Office on the St. Croix campus and obtain the signatures of the instruc-
tor and advisor. This form, containing the proper signatures, must be returned to the










Office of the Registrar on the St. Thomas campus or the Academic Services Oflice on
the St. Croix campus. The students will then receive a grade of W on their permanent
record. The last date to receive WP or WF is specified on the academic calendar.

WP means that the student is doing passing work at the time of withdrawal. WF means
that the student is doing failing work at the time of withdrawal. A course dropped by
any other means will result in the student automatically receiving an "F" for the course.

After mid-semester and in case of unusual circumstances, such as extended illness, the
Provost may give a student special permission for a late withdrawal. This is designated
AW (administrative withdrawal). In situations where an administrative withdrawal from
a class is necessary, students are required to apply for the withdrawal when it becomes
evident that they cannot complete the course. Students are required toprovide documen-
tary evidence in support ofrequestsfor administrative withdrawal Applications will not
be accepted after the last day of instruction within that semester.

The policy for withdrawing from courses which are given out of the normal academic
calendar sequence is as follows:

1. The last day to withdraw from a course will be at the conclusion of 40 percent of the
total instructional period, or at the end of three weeks for an eight-week course and
two weeks for a six-week course.

2. The last day to withdraw from a course without special permission from the Provost
will be at the conclusion of 50 percent of the instructional period, or at the end of
four weeks for an eight-week course and three weeks for a six-week course.

3. Students who withdraw between the end of the third or fourth weeks for an eight-
week course, or between the end of the second and third weeks for a six-week
course (or another analogous period for courses of duration other than six or eight
weeks) will receive either a WP or WF.

4. Students seeking to withdraw after 50 percent of the instructional period can do so
only by means of an administrative withdrawal (AW) which will be governed by the
same policy as stated above.

Withdrawal from the University: A student who withdraws from the University ei-
ther during the term or between terms must initiate the process with a withdrawal form
in the Office of the Registrar on the St. Thomas campus or the Academic Services
Office on the St. Croix campus, and the completion of the process outlined therein.
The official withdrawal date is considered to be the date of the first authorized signa-
ture on the form. In addition, to protect her/his academic standing, the student must
complete specific course withdrawal procedures above. Failure to comply with these
requirements may adversely affect the student's grades and academic standing.

A student not attending full-time for two consecutive semesters who desires readmis-
sion to full-time status at the University must apply to the Admissions Office for con-
sideration. Application must be received by April 30 for the fall semester and by Octo-
ber 30 for the spring semester, with the appropriate readmission fee.










Re-matriculation


Students who have been awarded one degree from the University and who wish to
pursue a second degree must apply for re-matriculation. Such students must complete
the catalog degree requirements in effect at the time of re-matriculation. Applications
for re-matriculation should be sent to the Admissions Office on the campus the student
plans to attend with the accompanying re-matriculation fee.

Transcripts

Official transcripts of academic records at the University of the Virgin Islands are
issued only upon the authorization of the student. Requests for transcripts will not be
filled until written authorization has been secured from the individual student. When
these requests can be anticipated, the student should send authorization in advance, to
avoid delay in the issuing of the transcript.

The charge for each copy of a student's transcript is $10.00. All checks and money
orders should be made payable to the University of the Virgin Islands.

Courses Taken at Other Institutions

Matriculated students who expect to take courses at another institution for transfer to
the University of the Virgin Islands must obtain a Permit to Attend Another Institution
from the Registrar's Office or Academic Services Office. The appropriate division
must certify that the course will fulfill the University of the Virgin Islands degree
requirements and the permit must be signed by the Registrar or Director of Academic
Services before the student enrolls. Students are responsible for ensuring that an offi-
cial transcript will be sent to the Registrar's Office or Academic Services Office after
the completion of the off-campus course work. No credit will be evaluated until an
official transcript has been received.


Privacy Act

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. 1232g; 34 CFR
Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. The
disclosure or publication of student information is protected by FERPA and insures
every student is afforded certain rights with respect to their education records.

Amongst these are: 1) the right to inspect and review the student's education record; 2)
the right to request the amendment of the education records that the student believes
are inaccurate or misleading by writing the University official responsible for the record
to clearly identify their concern for review; 3) the right to consent to disclosures of
personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, ex-
cept to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. Schools may
disclose, without consent, "directory" information, unless otherwise notified by stu-
dents not to disclose information about them. Disclosure is permitted without consent










to school officials with legitimate educational interests. Parents or legal guardians
have access to students' records only if the student is financially dependent on them, as
defined by Internal Revenue Code and Tax statements.

The University is required to establish guidelines for implementing FERPA and a list
of records maintained by various University offices are available in the Registrar's
office. For additional information about student privacy, filing complaints and right-
to-know concerns, contact the Office of the Registrar.

Academic Standards

The following attitudes are important for success in the academic programs of the
University:

*A willingness to go beyond the minimum required in an assigned task, and dissat-
isfaction with superficial work.

* Intellectual curiosity, integrity and responsibility. In university studies, the stu-
dents are expected to contribute as well as to receive, to cooperatefully with what is
asked of them in courses, and to take an interested and active part. Instructors are
expected to make clear the specific demands and procedures of their courses.

*A critical spirit that recognizes the relationship among the differentfields of knowl-
edge and their relevance to the needs and problems of our time.

Students are expected to maintain an academic record which will qualify them for
graduation. It is the responsibility of the students to complete all assigned work, to
strive for the best performance of which they are capable, to meet graduation require-
ments, and in many other ways to take charge of their own academic welfare. Instruc-
tors, faculty advisors, the University counselors, the Registrar and the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs, are available for consultation and assistance, but this in no way dimin-
ishes the responsibility of students for familiarizing themselves with the contents of
the University Catalog, satisfying the requirements of the degree they are pursuing,
and adhering to those rules and regulations which pertain to them.

Most students are able to judge their own progress through periodic grades and reports
from instructors. At the end of each semester, the Registrar will review the academic
records of all students and forward, to the Provost, a list of students whose perfor-
mance did not meet the established standards. The Provost also issues an Academic
Honors List comprised of students who were registered for at least 12 degree credits,
maintained a semester grade point average of 3.20 or higher and earned no grade less
than C. Students who have demonstrated excellence also will be appropriately recog-
nized by the faculty (see Awards and Honors)

Credit Load: A full load is considered to be from 12 to 16.5 credits. A load of 15.5
credits ordinarily is sufficient to complete the associate degree in two years and the
baccalaureate degree in four. Any student proposing to take more than 16.5 credits
must have the approval of the faculty advisor and the Provost. In general, overloads










are granted only to students with cumulative grade point averages of 3.00 or higher in
accordance with the following guidelines for overload approvals.

GPA: 3.00- 3.49 3.50- 3.74 3.75- 4.00

FR up to 17.0 crs up to 17.5 crs up to 18.0 crs
SO up to 18.0 up to 18.5 up to 19.0
JR up to 19.0 up to 19.5 up to 20.0
SR up to 20.0 up to 20.5 up to 21.0


Academic Grievance: There is, in each academic division, a Grievance Committee to
which a student has recourse. The committee consists of a faculty member and a stu-
dent. All grievances must be submitted in writing. The student has the right to appeal
from the Grievance Committee, to the Division Chairperson and through him/her, to
the Provost.

Academic Probation, Suspension, Dismissal: Students are expected to remain in
good academic standing. For those who do not, there is a three-step procedure which
may lead to dismissal from the University if the student's academic performance does
not improve. All full-time and part-time enrolled students are subject to these stan-
dards and procedures. Once a student has attempted 12 degree credits, these proce-
dures become applicable.

Academic Probation: Academic probation is essentially a warning to the student to
show scholastic improvement in order to remain at the University. A student on proba-
tion status is not considered in "good standing" at the University and eligibility to
continue under scholarship or other financial aid programs, to participate in extracur-
ricular activities, or to run for certain offices may be affected. A student placed on
academic probation will be limited to taking 12.5 hours of course work and will re-
main on probation until the cumulative GPA equals or exceeds the standards set forth
in the chart below.

A student who does not achieve the minimum cumulative grade point average for the
corresponding number of degree credits attempted is placed on academic probation.
Also, a student is placed on academic probation for failing to achieve a semester grade
point average corresponding to the cumulative grade point average required for de-
gree credits attempted, as set forth in the chart on page 57.

A student placed on academic probation will be limited to taking 12.5 credits. If a
student achieves a semester GPA of at least 2.0 but the cumulative GPA remains below
the standard, the student will remain on probation.

Degree Credits Attempted 1-29 30-44 45 and above
Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average 1.70 1.80 2.00

Academic divisions may set higher standards for courses related to their majors.










Academic Suspensions: A student on academic probation will be suspended it, at the
end of the probation semester, the cumulative GPA is below the standard in the above
chart and the most recent semester's GPA is less than 2.0. A student on suspension may
take up to six credits (6) during one semester with the intention of improving their
grade point average. Students are advised to discuss their progress and academic diffi-
culties with an academic advisor, seek tutoring or counseling, as needed. At the end of
that semester, the student will be automatically reinstated on probation. If the student
remains away for more than one regular semester, the student must reapply for admis-
sion. At the end of that semester the student will be automatically reinstated on proba-
tion. If the student remains away for more than one regular semester, the student must
reapply for admission.

Academic Dismissal: When a suspended student returns, the student must maintain a
grade point average of 2.00 for the semester of reinstatement. Failure to do so will
result in academic dismissal, which will be permanent unless the student is readmitted
under special consideration. A student who contests academic dismissal may appeal to
the Provost, whose decision will be final.

Student Conduct (Disciplinary Warning, Probation, Suspension and Dismissal):
The Student Handbook includes a statement adopted by the Board of Trustees of the
University entitled "Rules and Regulations for the Maintenance of Public Order at the
University of the Virgin Islands" and a statement entitled "Channels of Communica-
tion Available to Students at the University of the Virgin Islands for the Consideration
of Problems, Proposals and Grievances."

Disciplinary actions which may be used in response to violations of the University's
standards of conduct include: disciplinary warning, disciplinary probation, suspension
or disciplinary dismissal. Disciplinary warning is issued when behavior is unaccept-
able or when repetition will most likely result in more serious action. The student is
officially warned that further unacceptable behavior could result in more serious ac-
tion. Disciplinary probation is a warning that a student's conduct must be improved
over a stated period if the student wishes to remain at the University. It means that the
student is not considered in "good standing" at the University with resulting restric-
tions as described for academic probation.

Suspension is a disciplinary action which results in the separation of the student from
the University, normally for a stated period of time. Disciplinary dismissal normally
means permanent separation from the University and is used only in the most serious
cases of misconduct. No student who is suspended from the University or who is dis-
missed for disciplinary reasons for student misconduct may register for any courses at
the University.

In addition to the above, and with reference to student misconduct as well as failure to
maintain academic standards, the University of the Virgin Islands assumes that a stu-
dent who cannot handle important responsibilities in any part of the University pro-
gram will consider voluntary withdrawal. Following due process procedure, the Uni-
versity may suspend or dismiss students, at any time, when their academic standing,
conduct, financial responsibility, or any combination of these, is not in compliance
with standards set forth by the University catalog and the Student Handbook.










It is the responsibility of every new student to obtain a Student Handbook upon admit-
tance to the University. Each student is responsible for compliance with the rules and
regulations contained therein. The Student Handbook can be obtained from the Office
of Student Affairs on both campuses.

Drug-Free Workplace Policy: It is the policy of the University of the Virgin Islands
that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession or use of a con-
trolled or illegal substance is prohibited in and on the University of the Virgin Islands'
owned or controlled property. Additionally, the misuse or abuse of legal drugs, includ-
ing alcohol, is prohibited. Any University employee or student determined to have
violated this policy shall be subject to disciplinary action for misconduct, which action
may include termination or expulsion. No employee or student is to report to work or
class while under the influence of illegal drugs or influenced by the abuse of legal
drugs. Violation of these policies by any employee or student will be reason for evalu-
ation or treatment for a drug use disorder or for disciplinary action up to and including
termination or expulsion in accordance with University policies and procedures.

In order to comply with the Federal law, the University requires that an employee or
student notify the University of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation
occurring in the workplace or classroom no later than five days after such conviction.
The University must notify any Federal contracting agency within ten days of having
received notice that an employee or student engaged in the performance of such con-
tract or grant has had a criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring in the
workplace or classroom. The University will discipline any employee or student who
is so convicted or require the employee's or student's satisfactory participation in a
drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program in accordance with University policies
and procedures.

Sexual Harassment: Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination and is prohib-
ited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended.

University students and employees have the right to enjoy a workplace free from all
forms of harassment, including sexual harassment. Accordingly, the University is com-
mitted to creating and maintaining a community in which students, faculty, and staff
can work together in an atmosphere free of all forms of harassment, exploitation or
intimidation. The University is strongly opposed to sexual harassment and will take
whatever action is necessary to prevent, correct, and, if necessary, discipline behavior
that violates this policy.

Sexual harassment includes unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors,
and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature. Students who believe that they
have been sexually harassed in violation of the University's policy should notify the
Counseling Manager in Rouppe House on the St. Thomas campus or the Counseling &
Placement Supervisor in the Great House on the St. Croix campus.

Academic Integrity: Philosophy: Among the purposes of colleges and universities
are scholarly and personal growth for all members of the academic community and
open communication among members of this community. Such growth requires an
atmosphere of honesty and trust. It is for this reason that the University of the Virgin










Islands stnves to maintain an environment of mutual trust among its students and fac-
ulty and will not tolerate academic dishonesty.

Definitions: Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following ex-
amples of offenses, committed or attempted:

Collaboration allowing another student to see an examination paper.

Copying obtaining informationby looking at the answers on another student's
paper or in any source that has not been specifically approved for
that purpose by the instructor.

Cribbing taking and or using material, which has not been specifically ap-
proved, into an examination or using books, notes or other resources
during on examination without the instructor's specific approval.

Plagiarism presenting the ideas, works, words or artistry of another as one's
own without appropriate acknowledgment of the source. Note that
this includes sources on the Internet (world wide web, e-mail, etc.)

Sabotage destroying the work of another student, such as laboratory experi-
ments or computer programs.

Substitution taking an examination or writing a paper for someone else or induc-
ing another person to perform such acts.

Theft stealing an examination.

Penalties: For a first offense, the penalty will be an F in a credit course, an NP in a
skills course or failure in any non-course exercise such as the English Proficiency
Examination, CLEP tests, etc., plus disciplinary probation for the remainder of the
student's undergraduate career and notification by the Provost to all current instructors
of the student. For a second offense, the penalty will be suspension from the University
for an academic year and notification to the student's instructors by the Provost. The
penalty for a third offense will be dismissal from the University, with notation of dis-
missal and notification to the student's instructors by the Provost.

Procedures: In cases of suspected academic dishonesty, the faculty member making
the charge will meet privately with the student suspected of the action to discuss the
charge within 10 days of the detection of the incident. Within five days, the faculty
member shall decide if disciplinary action is to be taken and, if so, shall notify the
appropriate Division Chair and Provost in writing of:

1. The name of the student.
2. The course or activity where the infraction is alleged to have occurred.
3. The date and time of the alleged infraction.
4. The circumstances of the stated infraction with supportive information.
5. The action taken.










Within 10 days of the meeting with the instructor, the student may appeal, in writing, to
the appropriate divisional grievance committee, which will hold a hearing within 10
days of receiving the written appeal. The instructor making the charge of academic
dishonesty and the student will be present at the hearing and may be represented by
third parties of their own choosing. The committee will send its findings to the student,
the faculty member and the Provost within 10 days of the hearing.

Within 10 days of being informed of the decision of the divisional grievance commit-
tee, the student may appeal the decision to the Academic Appeals Committee on the
campus in which the student is enrolled. Each campus committee shall be composed of
one member from each academic division elected by the faculties of each division on
the respective campus and one student appointed by the President of the Student Gov-
ernment Association. Each member shall have one vote. Each committee shall be re-
constituted by the Provost of that campus and choose its own chair at the beginning of
each academic year. The committee will meet within 15 days of being informed in
writing of the appeal. In this administrative hearing, the student and the faculty mem-
ber involved in the incident shall be present and have the right to be represented by
third parties of their own choosing. The committee will inform the student, the faculty
member and the Provost of its decision within 10 days of the meeting.

The Provost shall implement the decision of the Academic Appeals Committee.

English Proficiency Examination Requirement

The purpose of the English Proficiency Requirement is to ensure that all UVI gradu-
ates have demonstrated a required level of proficiency in using English as an effective
means of written communication.

Students must satisfy the English Proficiency Examination (EPE) requirement before
graduating from the University of the Virgin Islands. The successful completion of the
requirement applies to all matriculated students in the associate of arts, associate of
science, bachelor of arts and bachelor of science programs. All students must take the
EPE upon successful completion of ENG 201 or its equivalent. If a student is not
required to take ENG 201 or its equivalent, he/she must consult with his/her advisor,
who will submit written notification of approval to the Office of Enrollment Manage-
ment.

Students should satisfy the EPE requirement no later than theirjunior year in order to
avoid a delay in graduation. It is ultimately the student's responsibility to begin the
process of satisfying this requirement in adequate time to do so before his/her pro-
jected graduation date.

Students may meet this requirement in one of two alternate ways. They may opt to
either:
*Take and pass the English Proficiency Exam,
or
*Successfully complete ENG 051 Functional Writing, a course designed to meet En-
glish proficiency goals and objectives.










Students who opt to take the examination alternative, and who tail the EPE twice, must
register for ENG 051 the semester following the examination, and each semester fol-
lowing until they have passed ENG 051. ENG 051 shall be an exception to the policy
that students are allowed to repeat a course only once.

The English Proficiency Examination is administered on both campuses in November,
and in April of each academic year, and again during the summer session. Specific
EPE administration dates are listed in the Academic Calendar.

Computer Literacy Requirement

The University believes that all students must be familiar with computer concepts and
the use of computers in order to work effectively in today's high-technology world.
Therefore, all students who matriculate for the fall 1994 semester or later must fulfill
the Computer Literacy Requirement during the freshman year. Transfer students may
complete up to 24 credit hours before fulfilling the Computer Literacy Requirement.

Students to whom this requirement applies and who have completed 24 or more credit
hours at UVI and who fail to meet the requirement, will not be allowed to register for
additional credit courses until the Computer Literacy Requirement has been fulfilled.
Exceptions to this requirement must be approved by the Science and Mathematics
Division Chair and the Provost.

To fulfill the Computer Literacy Requirement, students must pass the Computer Lit-
eracy Examination, which is administered on both the St. Croix and St. Thomas cam-
puses. Students should contact the Science and Math Division to register for the exam.
Exam dates are listed under CLE in the Class Schedule for each semester. The student
may prepare for the Computer Literacy Examinations using self-taught learning mod-
ules, which are available in the bookstore and computer laboratories. Students may
enroll in CSC 111 or CIS 021 to prepare for the examinations. However, completion of
these courses does not fulfill the Computer Literacy Requirement.


Awards and Honors

Superior student achievement is recognized in a number of ways during each academic
year. The Academic Honors List recognizes full-time students (carrying 12 or more degree
credits) who have earned a grade point average of 3.2 or higher for the previous semester,
with no grade lower than C.

The University of the Virgin Islands is a chapter member of Golden Key National Honor
Society. Full-time and part-time matriculated students who have earned at least 60 credits
at UVI and a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.3 may be invited to join.

Full-time and part-time students receiving a baccalaureate degree who have earned at least
60 credits at the University are eligible for commencement honors. For the purpose of
computing averages for honors, all grades earned, including transfer grades, will be con-
sidered. Honors are based on the following cumulative grade point averages: Cum Laude,
3.25 to 3.49; Magna Cum Laude, 3.50 to 3.74; Summa Cum Laude, 3.75 to 4.00.











The academic divisions and the St. Croix campus of the University may award annu-
ally a Trustee Graduate Fellowship/Loan which seeks to highlight academic achieve-
ment, encourage post-graduate study, honor outstanding students and help increase the
number of highly trained University of the Virgin Islands alumni. Each recipient re-
ceives $1,000, with half of that amount to be returned to the University when the
student is no longer in graduate school.

To be eligible for the Trustee Graduate Fellowship/Loan, a student must normally be a
graduating senior who has been accepted into a graduate school for a master's or doctoral
program and who has earned at least 60 credits at the University of the Virgin Islands.
Students are eligible to receive the fellowship/loan only in the division which advised them
while at the University.

The following criteria will be used in selecting recipients of the Trustee Graduate Fellow-
ship/Loan: cumulative grade point average, potential for scholarly or professional achieve-
ment, full-time attendance in a graduate program, financial need and the likelihood of
return to the Virgin Islands.

A number of awards are made on both campuses at annual Awards Day ceremonies. Infor-
mation on these awards is available from the Office of the Provost.

The Honors Program

Mission: The UVI Honors Program seeks to produce exceptional scholars and citizens by
providing participants with enriched intellectual, leadership and outreach experiences de-
signed to cultivate thoughtful, deliberative, articulate, ethically grounded, globally con-
nected and actively contributing members of society.

Admission: Students will be admitted to the Honors Program through approval of their
application to the Honors Council upon matriculation into the University and satisfaction
of the Honors Program entrance requirements in mathematics and English. The Honors
Council will take into consideration for admission a combination of the following factors:
SAT/ACT scores, previous academic records including grades and academic rank, evi-
dence of creative and/or scholastic ability, recommendations from previous instructors
and/or mentors, interviews, and such other factors as the Honors Council finds appropriate
in evaluating the potential of the applicant to successfully complete the program. Students
may also be admitted to the Honors Program after completion of up to two years of univer-
sity level course work at UVI or other institutions. Students applying for such late admis-
sion to the program must have a GPA of 3.3 or its equivalent in their university level
courses and must still complete all program requirements.

Applications for admission to the UVI Honors Program will be accepted no later than
February 1 of each year.

Program Requirements: In order to remain in the program and graduate with Honors,
student participants must:

*Maintain a GPA of 3.3.










*Accept a leadership role in ensuing adherence to the U VI student code of conduct and
demonstrate their personal adherence to that code.

*Receive a grade of B or better in each of three required Honors courses and in two addi-
tional Honors designated courses, one of which must be in their major.

*Complete and report on a structured educational experience outside of the territory, plan-
ning for which must be developed with their Honors advisor/mentor and approved by the
Honors Council, by the end of their junior year.

*Complete and report on a professional outreach experience, planning for which must be
developed with their Honors advisor/mentor and approved by the Honors Council, by the
end of their junior year.

*Complete and satisfactorily defend a thesis or project in their senior year

Honors students may be granted probationary status for only one semester by the Honors
Council if their overall grade point average falls below 3.3.

'..... ,g,,i. ,, Participation in the Honors Program and successful completion of its re-
quirements will be included in student transcripts and acknowledged on degrees.


Multiple Majors and Second Degrees

The University of the Virgin Islands grants the following undergraduate degrees: B.A.;
B.S.; B.S.N.; A.A.; A.S.; and A.A.S. The preceding undergraduate degrees are the avail-
able options for a second degree. A major is a discipline within a given degree (e.g. busi-
ness administration or education within the B.A. degree).

Multiple Majors: Students may pursue up to three majors within the same degree. Stu-
dents seeking to pursue more than three majors must receive the approval of the Provost.
The prospective student must apply through the office of enrollment management, register
the intention of pursuing an additional majors) and fulfill all the requirement of the addi-
tional majorss. The pursuit of a second or third major in the same degree area will not
result in the conferring of a second or third degree. The completion of the coursework for
the additional majors) will be noted on the student's official transcript.

Second Degree: Students may pursue two degrees concurrently in different degree areas
(e.g. B.A. and B.S.). Courses from one degree may be used to satisfy requirements of the
other degree; however, a minimum of 30 additional credits must be completed in order for
both degrees to be awarded. UVI will not award a second degree in the same discipline. All
divisional and university requirements for the two degrees must be satisfied. There will be
one transcript with both degree areas recorded.

Any student who has previously earned a degree from a regionally accredited institution
(including UVI) may pursue a second degree. Transfer credits that have not expired (see
policy on Expiration of Credits) from other institutions and prior credits from UVI may be
used to satisfy requirements for the second degree; however, a minimum of 30 resident










credits must be accumulated beyond the number of credits completed at the time the
first degree was awarded. All divisional and university requirements for the two de-
grees must be satisfied. All courses completed will be recorded on a separate tran-
script. Students seeking a second degree must apply for admission through the Office
of Enrollment Management.

UVI will not concurrently or subsequently award an associate's degree to a student
who holds a baccalaureate degree in the same discipline. A student may, however, be
awarded an associates degree in a discipline and subsequently receive a baccalaureate
degree in the same discipline.














All students, regardless of their degree program and major field of study, must com-
plete certain general education requirements. These do not include any requisite courses
of skills remediation or Freshman Year courses.

The University of the Virgin Islands' General Education curriculum has been reformed
and revitalized recently and is subject to continual refinement. The General Education
curriculum is intended to prepare students for today's competitive world as well as for
productive and fulfilling lives and responsible citizenship. Students completing these
requirements are expected to have gained the following:

* Knowledge of the history, geography, and demographic characteristics of the U.S.
Virgin Islands, the Caribbean, the United States, and the world.
* Knowledge ofnaturalphenomena and ofthe earth in itsplace in the universe as well
as an appreciation ofscientific inquiry.
* Highly developed communication skills.
* Quantitative and c. ,mj 'ii',, skills.
* Personal health and wellness skills.
* Critical ;i,, ,, -i.. logic, and moral reasoning skills.
* Self-awareness, interpersonal, leadership, and team skills.
* Second language skills, multi-cultural and inter-cultural skills, and an understand-
ing of aesthetic expression in literature and art.
* Information management and research skills.

General education requirements vary with degree programs but have the following
categories in common:

A. The English Proficiency Examination (EPE) Please review its entry prerequi-
sites on page 61.

B. The Computer Literacy Examination (CLE) Please review its entry prerequisites
on page 62.

C. General Education Courses. These are specified for each degree program and in-
clude courses in:
Humanities
Mathematics
Natural Sciences
Social Sciences
Physical Education, Fitness and Wellness.

The University reserves the right to change its course offerings and rules and regula-
tions at any time.














To qualify for an associate of arts degree, students must successfully complete a mini-
mum of 62 credits (exclusive of physical education) including the general education
requirements, the required courses in the major field, and such additional courses as
they may select with the assistance of their faculty advisors to meet the requirements
of the major.

General Education Requirements

The General Education requirements for graduation in the associate of arts degree
programs are listed below. Specific guidance about the courses that are available to
meet General Education requirements will be provided to students in advance of reg-
istration. Students are required to meet with their advisors in the selection of their
courses.

I. GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES Credits

A. FRESHMAN DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR (FDS)* 0-1

B. HUMANITIES 15

COM 119 Interpersonal Communication and Leadership Skills 3
ENG 120 English Composition 3
ENG 201 Research and Applied Writing 3
Additional humanities electives 6

C. MATHEMATICS AND/OR SCIENCE 8-10

SCI 100* The Natural World: The Caribbean* 3
and
Two approved science or math courses

D. SOCIAL SCIENCES 6-9

SSC 100* An Introduction to the Social Sciences: A Caribbean Focus* 3
and
Two other courses in the Social Sciences:
Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science,
Psychology, or Sociology

TOTAL CREDITS 29-36

*Requirement of the Freshman Year Program for all students ii ior, ,hiiri,,i into the
University with fewer than 24 credits.












Freshman Development Seminar 0-1
Humanities 15
Mathematics/Science 8-10
Social Sciences 6-9

TOTAL 29-36

III. OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Students are required to take 0.5 credit hour in Physical Education for every semester they
are full-time students up to the required two credit hours. PLS 200 may also be used to
meet this requirement.

Also, students must earn at least 30 of the last 36 credits at the University of the Virgin
Islands. This particular requirement may be waived by the Provost only in cases where the
student must complete the final years) of studies in another institution recognized by the
University of the Virgin Islands. Course work more thantenyears old must be reviewed on
a case-by-case basis to determine its appropriateness to the current University course re-
quirements. Appeals should be directed to the Provost. In order to graduate, students must
earn a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.00. This requirement is also
applicable to courses required in their major.

Additionally, students must successfully pass the following examinations:

1. ENGLISH PROFICIENCY EXAMINATION (EPE)
2. COMPUTER LITERACY EXAMINATION (CLE)

Please review entry prerequisites for EPE and CLE on pp. 61-62.

Degree Majors and Programs -A.A. Degree

Students will ordinarily choose an associate degree program because they want to prepare
for employment after only two years of study beyond high school, and because they are
attracted to the work for which the program will train them. The programs are designed to
prepare graduates for positions as technicians, supervisors, and managers in business, in-
dustry, service organizations, and government.

The course requirements for graduation in each of the fields of specialization are out-
lined in the pages that follow.

It is to the student's advantage to enter one of these programs in the freshman year. It
is possible for a student to change from a four-year program to a two-year program,
but such a change may delay graduation because of the sequence of basic courses. A
student may change from a two-year program to a four-year program but, again, it may
then require additional time to complete the new program.


II. SUMMARY


Credits










Students may choose one of the following associate of arts degree programs.


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DIVISION


Accounting St. Croix and St. Thomas campus
Business Management St. Croix and St. Thomas campus
Computer Information Systems St. Croix and St. Thomas campus
Hotel and Restaurant Management St. Thomas campus

EDUCATION DIVISION

Inclusive Early Childhood Education St. Croix and St. Thomas campus

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION

Police Science and Administration St. Croix and St. Thomas campus


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DIVISION


Accounting Major

The associate of arts program in accounting is designed to prepare students for careers
in the fields of accounting and financial administration.

In addition to the general education requirements (see pp. 67-68), the following courses
are required:

A. Required courses in Freshman Studies (required for anyone admitted into the program
with fewer than 24 credits): Credits

SCI 100 The Natural World: The Caribbean 3
SSC 100 An Introduction to the Social Sciences: A Caribbean Focus 3
FDS 100 Freshman Development Seminar 1

B. Required courses in Accounting: Credits

ACC 121-122 Introduction to Accounting 3-3
ACC 221-222 Intermediate Accounting 3-3
ACC 253 Tax Accounting 3
ACC 440 Cost Accounting 3

C. Required courses in other fields: Credits

BUS 112 Introduction to Business 3
BUS 224 Business Communication 3
BUS 251* Business Law 3










CIS 101 Business Software Applications 3
CIS 210 Business Information Systems 3
ECO 221* Introduction to Macro-Economics 3
ECO 222* Introduction to Micro-Economics 3
MAT 140 College Algebra with Applications
or MAT 143* Precalculus Algebra 4
and one of the following:
MAT 232* Calculus For Business and Social Sciences
MAT 235* Introductory Statistics with Applications 4

* Partially fulfills the general education requirements.

Business Management Major

The associate of arts degree program in Business Management is designed to pre-
pare the student for a career in management or small business ownership. It will
help the student understand how businesses are operated and financed. The func-
tions of marketing, selling, accounting, and advertising are considered. A graduate
of this curriculum will be prepared to enter a variety of business positions.

In addition to the general education requirements (see pp. 67-68), the following courses
are required:

A. Required courses in Freshman Studies (required for anyone admitted into the program
with fewer than 24 credits): Credits

SCI 100 The Natural World: The Caribbean 3
SSC 100 An Introduction to the Social Sciences: A Caribbean Focus 3
FDS 100 FreshmanDevelopment Seminar 1

B. Required courses in Business Management:
Credits

BUS 112 Introduction to Business 3
BUS 213 Small Business Management 3
BUS 224 Business Communication 3
BUS 231 Principles of Marketing 3
BUS 234 Advertising and Promotional Strategy 3
BUS 241 Principles of Management 3
BUS 242 Personnel Management 3
BUS 251* Business Law 3

C. Required courses in other fields: Credits

ACC 121-122 Introduction to Accounting 3-3
CIS 101 Business Software Applications 3
CIS 210 Business Information Systems 3
ECO 221* Introduction to Macro-Economics 3
ECO 222* Introduction to Micro-Economics 3
70











MAT 140 College Algebra with Applications
or MAT 143* Precalculus Algebra 4
and one of the following:
MAT 232* Calculus For Business and Social Sciences
MAT 235* Introductory Statistics with Applications 4

* Partially fulfills the general education requirements.

Computer Information Systems Major

The associate of arts degree program in Computer Information Systems is designed
to 1) train students for professional careers in information systems, 2) prepare
students for advanced study, 3) provide opportunities for students in other areas of
study which relate to information systems, and 4) meet the computer information
systems needs of the University and the community.

In addition to the general education requirements (see pp. 67-68), the following courses
are required:

A. Required courses in Freshman Studies (required for anyone admitted into the program
with fewer than 24 credits): Credits

SCI 100 The Natural World: The Caribbean 3
SSC 100 An Introduction to the Social Sciences:
A Caribbean Focus 3
FDS 100 FreshmanDevelopment Seminar 1

B. Required Courses in Computer Information Systems: Credits

CIS 101 Business Software Applications 3
CIS 121 Data Management Concepts 3
CIS 210 Business Information Systems 3
CIS 250 Introduction to Operating Systems 3
CIS 270 Computer Systems Development 3
CIS 280 Systems Development Project 3
CIS 300 Process Design and Evaluation 3
CIS 310 Advanced Business Software Applications 3
CIS 357 Business Information Networks 3
or
CIS 238 Introduction to COBOL Programming 3

C. Required courses in other fields: Credits

BUS 112 Introduction to Business 3
BUS 224 Business Communication 3
BUS 251* Business Law 3
ECO 222* Introduction to Micro-Economics 3
PSY 120* General Psychology 3










MAT 140 College Algebra with Applications
or MAT143* Precalculus Algebra 4
and one of the following:
MAT 232* Calculus for Business and Social Sciences
MAT 235* Introductory Statistics with Applications 4

*Partiallyfulfills the general education requirements.

Hotel and Restaurant Management Major

The associate of arts program in Hotel and Restaurant Management is designed to
prepare the graduate for middle management responsibility in large establishments or
for greater responsibility in smaller enterprises. Students may elect to obtain interna-
tionally recognized certificates awarded by the American Hotel and Motel Association
through examination at the completion of selected HRM courses. Graduates will have the
basic preparation needed for positions as stewards, purchasing agents, banquet man-
agers, club managers, resort managers, front office managers, resident auditors, and food
and beverage managers. It is offered forpart-time study only. The program is also designed
to serve as an intermediate step towards acquiring a baccalaureate degree.

In addition to the general education requirements (see pp. 67-68), the following courses
are required:

A. Required courses in Freshman Studies (required for anyone admitted
into the program with fewer than 24 credits): Credits

SCI 100 The Natural World: The Caribbean 3
SSC 100 An Introduction to the Social Sciences:
A Caribbean Focus 3
FDS 100 FreshmanDevelopment Seminar 1

B. Required courses in Hotel and Restaurant Management: Credits

HRM 132 Fundamentals of Tourism 2
HRM 133 Introduction to Resort Hotel Management 2
HRM 134 Introduction to Restaurant Management 2
HRM 232 Hospitality Services Marketing 3
HRM 233 Hospitality Industry Computer Systems 3
HRM 234 Hospitality Industry Accounting 3
HRM 242 Hospitality Industry Personnel Training Systems 3
HRM 250 Internship 3

C. Required courses in other areas: Credits

ACC 121-122 Introduction to Accounting 3-3
BUS 112 Introduction to Business 3
PSY 120* General Psychology 3










D. The student must choose one of the following concentrations:

ROOMS DIVISION MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION


Credits


HRM 243 Front Office Management 3
HRM 244 Housekeeping Management 3

FOOD AND BEVERAGE CONCENTRATION

HRM 245 Food and Beverage Cost Control 3
HRM 246 Bar and Beverage Management 3

*Partiallyfulfills the general education requirements.

OFFICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

A four-course certificate program in Office Information Systems is suspended. This
program provides a foundation in computer concepts and techniques with emphasis on
microcomputer applications. The requirements for this program are detailed in a program
brochure that is available from the Office of the Division of Business Administration.

EDUCATION DIVISION


Inclusive Early Childhood Education Major

This program is designed to provide opportunities for early childhood personnel who wish
to develop competencies for entry level positions in inclusive early childhood programs
through participation in an associate degree program. Abroad knowledge of development
and learning across the birth through eight age range is necessary for educators to provide
appropriate curriculum and assessment approaches. As a result, the IECE Program is
designed to ensure that students learn about the variability of young children and the adap-
tations and modifications that can be made to ensure typical developmental and learning
experiences for all children. The program stresses the importance of natural environments,
play support, and the integration of developmental/learning experiences into the curricu-
lum. Students are trained to assume the primary role of facilitators of child development
and learning and parent-child relationships. The IECE Program utilizes principles of adult
learning in its teaching strategies which involves learning by doing, reflecting, analyzing
and synthesizing through structured, as well as, open-ended activities and sharing and in-
teracting with others. Students learn through a combination of coursework, creation of
portfolios, and guided and supervised fieldwork that teach about and demonstrate
inclusionary early childhood educational models and principles.

In addition to the general education requirements (see pp. 67-68), the following courses
are required: Credits

EDU 108 Early Childhood Development I 3
EDU 109 Inclusive Early Childhood Environments I 3










EDU 113 Early Childhood Development 11 3
EDU 114 Inclusive Early Childhood Environments II 3
EDU 214 Family and Community Relationships 3
EDU 215 Guiding Children's Early Behavior 3
EDU 216 Inclusive Early Childhood Curricula 3
EDU 217 Ethical and Legal Issues in Early Childhood Education 3
EDU 218 Supervised Field Experience 3
EDU 219 Promoting Language and Literacy in Early Childhood 3
EDU 220 Seminar in Supervised Field Experience 2

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION

Police Science and Administration Major

The associate of arts program in police science and administration is open to all men and
women seeking a comprehensive education for a career in law enforcement or its allied
fields. The program offers a broad liberal arts and science background through the general
education program and required courses in the field of police science and administration. It
offers the transfer student a basis for upper division work and at the same time offers career
preparation at the entrance level.

The nature of modem society requires much more than a technical approach to police
work. The work of administration ofjustice is people work, and the greater the understand-
ing of human behavior by law enforcement and allied fields, the better the service. For this
reason the student who specializes in the field of police science and administration will be
exposed to the behavioral sciences as well as courses in applied technology.

Students who plan to transfer to another four-year institution should make sure they are
following a program that will meet the specific requirements of that school.

The following courses are required and should be taken in the listed year.

FIRST YEAR Credits

PSA 120 Introduction to Law Enforcement 3
PSA 121 Administration of Justice 3
PSA 122 Criminal Law 3
PSY 120 General Psychology 3
PSY 202 Lifespan Development 3

SECOND YEAR Credits

PSA 221 Contemporary Corrections 3
PSA 222 Law Enforcement-Community Relations 3
PSA 223 Juvenile Delinquency/Justice 3
PSA 224 Security Concepts 3
PSA 232 Criminal Procedure and Evidence 3
BIO 141-142 General Biology I-II 4-4










or MAT 140 College Algebra With Applications
and MAT 235 Introductory Statistics withApplications 4-4
SPA 131-132 Functional Elementary SpanishI-II 4-4














To qualify for an associate of science degree, students must successfully complete a
minimum of 62 credits (exclusive of physical education) including the general educa-
tion requirements, the required courses in the major field, and such additional courses
as they may select with the assistance of their faculty advisors to meet the require-
ments of the major.

General Education Requirements

The General Education requirements for graduation in the associate of science degree
programs are listed below. Specific guidance about the courses that are available to
meet General Education requirements will be provided to students in advance of reg-
istration. Students are required to meet with their advisors in the selection of their
courses.

I. GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES Credits

A. FRESHMAN DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR (FDS)* 0-1

B. HUMANITIES 9

C. MATHEMATICS AND/OR SCIENCE 9-12

SCI 100* The Natural World: The Caribbean** 3

D. SOCIAL SCIENCES 6-9

SSC 100* An Introduction to the Social Sciences:
A Caribbean Focus 3
and
Two other courses in the Social Sciences:
Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science,
Psychology, or Sociology

II. SUMMARY Credits

Freshman Development Seminar 0-1
Humanities 9
Mathematics and/or Science 9-12
Social Sciences 6-9

TOTAL 24-31

*Requirement of the Freshman Year Program for all students i,,i ioi, il,, into the Uni-
versity with fewer than 24 credits.
**Nursing students are exempt from this course.










111. OTHER REQUIREMENTS


Students are required to take 0.5 credit hour in Physical Education for every semester
they are full-time students up to the required two credit hours. PLS 200 may also be
used to meet this requirement.

Also, students must earn at least 30 of the last 36 credits at the University of the Virgin
Islands. Course work more than ten years old must be reviewed on a case-by-case
basis to determine its appropriateness to the current University course requirements.
In order to graduate, students must earn a minimum grade point average (GPA) of
2.00. This requirement is also applicable to courses in their major.

Additionally, students must successfully pass the following examinations:

1. ENGLISH PROFICIENCY EXAMINATION (EPE)
2. COMPUTER LITERACY REQUIREMENT (CLE)

Please review entry prerequisites for EPE and CLE on page 61-62.

Degree Majors and Programs -A.S. Degree

NURSING DIVISION

Nursing St. Croix campus

SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS DIVISION

Computer Science St. Croix and St. Thomas campuses
Physics St. Thomas campus

Nursing Major

The associate of science program in nursing is designed to prepare graduates to assess,
plan, implement, manage and evaluate nursing care competently for clients with common
predictable health problems. The program is accredited by the National League for Nurs-
ing Accrediting Commission, 61 Broadway 33rd Floor, New York, New York 10006 (800-
669-1656 ext. 153). In order to enroll in the first course of the clinical nursing sequence,
students must have completed, or be exempt from, Freshman Studies Courses (MAT 023,
RCA 021/ENG101, WAC11/ENG 100, FDS 100, SSC 100, MAT 024), PSY 120 and the
computer literacy exam. Students must also have completed NUR 100, BIO 151 and BIO
152 with a grade of"C" (2.0) or better, NUR 104 with a grade of A- (90%) or better, and
have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0. In order to enroll in clinical courses, students must
submit documentation of current certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR- Health
Care Provider) to the Division of Nursing Education. Additionally, documentation of physical
examination and up to date immunization status must be provided to the Campus Nurse.

Applicants to the ASN degree program with a background in health sciences may be
able to successfully challenge NUR 100 and NUR 104 by exam. Failure of either
77










challenge exam after one attempt requires that students enroll and successfully com-
plete NUR 100 and NUR 104.

In order to enhance student success in the program, two pre-nursing courses are of-
fered. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in NUR 011: Basic Science Concepts
for Nursing, prior to entering BIO 151: Human Anatomy and Physiology I, and NUR
021: Strategies for Success in Nursing prior to entering NUR 131/132. These non-
degree courses are designed to equip students with skills needed to be successful in
completing the nursing curriculum.

In order to progress in the clinical nursing sequence, students must achieve at least a
"C" (2.0) grade in all required nursing courses and BIO 240 and maintain a cumulative
GPA of 2.0. Nursing students must show satisfactory achievement of clinical objec-
tives and a grade of 75 percent or better in theory in order to receive an overall course
grade of "C." Students may not re-enroll in nursing courses without recommendation
by the Course Re-enrollment Committee. Students who do not receive a favorable
recommendation from the Course Re-Enrollment Committee will be dismissed from
the program. After one year, students may petition the Committee for re-enrollment. A
nursing student who earns less than a "C" (2.0) in Biology 240 (Microbiology) may
not continue in the nursing sequence until the deficiency is made up.

The associate degree in nursing requires 39 semester credits of nursing courses. Atotal of
72 credits is needed to obtain an associate of science degree in nursing. Prerequisite courses
require at least two semesters of study and the clinical nursing sequence requires four
semesters to complete for full-time students. Students wishing to progress on a part-time
basis may complete the clinical nursing sequence in six semesters as follows:

NUR 131/132 Semester 1
NUR 142 Semester 2
NUR 242 Semester 3
NUR 244 Semester 4
NUR 243 Semester 5
NUR 245/246 Semester 6

In addition, the student must pass the English Proficiency Examination. Upon success-
ful completion of the associate of science degree, the graduate is eligible to apply to
take the NCLEX-RN Examination for licensure as a registered nurse. In addition to
successful completion of the NCLEX-RN Exam, licensure requirements vary. Stu-
dents should contact the Board of Nursing in the state or territory in which they plan to
practice. Contact information can be retrieved at the National Council of State Boards
of Nursing website. (http: www.ncsbn.org).

The following courses are required for the associate of science degree in nursing:

A. Required courses in Freshman Studies (required for anyone admitted into the program
with fewer than 24 credits): Credits

SSC 100 An Introduction to the Social Sciences: A Caribbean Focus 3
FDS 100 FreshmanDevelopment Seminar 1










B. Required courses in the Humanities: Credits

ENG 120 English Composition
ENG 201 Research and Applied Writing
Humanities elective

C. Required courses in the Science and Mathematics Division:


BIO 151-152
BIO 240


Credits


Human Anatomy and Physiology I-II
Microbiology


D. Required courses in the Social Sciences Division:


Credits


General Psychology
Life Span Development


Self Management: Wellness and Risk


F. Required courses in the Nursing Education Division:


Credits


Medical Terminology
Drug Dosage Calculation
Nursing Skill Acquisition
Introduction to the Nurse/Client System
NCS: Adult I
NCS: Adult II
NCS: Childbearing Family
NCS: Mental Health
NCS: Child
NCS: Management


Students entering the nursing program need to plan for the additional costs involved in
pursuing a career in nursing. The following is an estimate of costs:


Uniform/lab coat, shoes
Clinical Accessories
Nursing Textbooks
NCLEX Application
V.I. Board of Nursing Fee
Nursing Pin (optional)
HESI Entrance Exam
HESI Exit Exam


$150.00
$50.00
$880.00
$200.00
$97.00
$43.00 $236.00
$28.00
$33.00


Computer Science Major

The associate of science degree in computer science is intended to provide a sound
foundation in computer science and to develop professional skills in programming and
networks. It is also designed to serve as an intermediate step towards acquiring the
baccalaureate degree in computer science. Depending upon previous educational back-


PSY 120
PSY 202

E. PLS 200


NUR 100
NUR 104
NUR 131
NUR 132
NUR 142
NUR 242
NUR 243
NUR 244
NUR 245
NUR 246










ground, this associate degree can be completed in two to three years on either the St.
Thomas or St. Croix campus.

In addition to the general education requirements (see pp. 76-77), the following courses
are required:


A. Required courses in Freshman Studies (required for anyone admitted
into the program with fewer than 24 credits):


SCI 100
SSC 100*

FDS 100


Credits


The Natural World: The Caribbean
An Introduction to the Social Sciences:
A Caribbean Focus
Freshman Development Seminar


*Partiallyfulfills Social Science Requirements

B. Required Computer Science courses:


CSC 117
CSC 118
CSC 119
CSC 197,198
CSC 239
CSC 240
CSC 241

CSC 242
CSC 243
CSC 250


Credits


Introduction to Programming I
Introduction to Programming II
Computer Graphics Applications
Computer Science Seminar
Scientific Computer Applications
Human Computer Interface Design
Introduction to Computer Architecture
and Digital Systems
Data Structures
Digital Communications and Networks
Principles of Operating Systems


C. Required Mathematics courses:


MAT 143*
or MAT 140*
and MAT 142*
or MAT 235*
or MAT 241*
or MAT 233*
or MAT 215*
or MAT 232


Precalculus Algebra
College Algebra with Applications
College Trigonometry
Introductory Statistics with Applications
Introduction to Calculus I and Analytical Geometry
Discrete Mathematics
Introduction to Number Theory
Calculus for Business and Social Science


*Partiallyfulfills the general education requirements

D. One of the following Science courses is required:

BIO 141 General Biology I
CHE 151 General Chemistry I
PHY 211 Introduction to Physics I
PHY 241 General Physics I


4
4
4
3

Credits

4
4
4
4
4
3
3
4


Credits










Note: It is recommended that students intending to pursue a baccalaureate degree
elect to take MA4T 143: PrecalculusAlgebra, MA4T 142: College Trigonometry, MA4T
241: Introduction to Calculus I, and PHY 241: General Physics I. Some baccalaure-
ate programs expect students to take MA4T 233: Discrete Mathematics in the lower
division. Baccalaureate students should review their academic planning beyond the
A.S. degree with their advisor.

Students who do not intend to pursue a baccalaureate degree may wish to take MA4T
140: College i2 ii.,' .. '1l. applications, MA4T235: Introductory Statistics withAppli-
cations, A4T 233: Discrete Mathematics, and any one ofthe following courses: PHY
211: Introduction to Physics I, or BIO 141: General Biology I.

E. Required Humanities Courses: Credits

COM 119 Interpersonal Communication and Leadership Skills 3
ENG 120 English Composition 3
ENG 201 Research and Applied Writing 3

F. Two other courses in the Social Sciences from:
Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, or So-
ciology

G. Physical Education

Full-time students must enroll for 0.5 credit hour of P.E. for each full-time semester up
to 2 credits, or enroll in Personal Life Skills 200.

H. Passing Score on the English Proficiency Examination

I. Passing Score on the Computer Literacy Examination

Physics Major

The associate of science program in physics is intended to develop an acute awareness
of our physical environment on a conceptual level through rigorous mathematical
manipulation of the fundamental laws of physics and through utilization of the tech-
niques of the modem physical scientist. It is also designed to serve as an intermediate
step towards acquiring the baccalaureate degree in engineering, physics, or similar
science. Depending upon previous educational background, this associate degree can
be completed in two to three years.

In addition to the general education requirements (see pp. 76-77), the following courses
are required:

A. Required courses in Freshman Studies (required for anyone admitted into the program
with fewer than 24 credits): Credits

SCI 100 The Natural World: The Caribbean 3










SSC 100" An Introduction to the Social Sciences:
A Caribbean Focus 3


FDS 100 FreshmanDevelopment Seminar

*Partiallyfulfills the general education requirements in the Social Sciences

B. Required courses in the Science and Mathematics Division:


1


Credits


CHE 151-152
or
BIO 141-142
CSC 117
CSC 333
or MAT 261
MAT 241-242

MAT 341-342
PHY 241-242
PHY 311
or PHY 321
PHY 341
PHY 351


General Chemistry I-II

General Biology I-II
Introduction to Programming I
Programming Languages
Linear Algebra
Introduction to Calculus and
Analytical Geometry I-II
Intermediate Calculus I-II
General Physics I-II
Classical Mechanics
Electromagnetism
Modem Physics
Modem Physics Laboratory


Note: A4T 346: Differential Equations is a recommended elective for students who
have space in their programs of study. However depending on their career plans,
students may elect to take engineering drawing, engineering graphics, or other labo-
ratory science courses to broaden their science base.














To qualify for an associate in applied science degree, students must successfully com-
plete a minimum of 62 credits (exclusive of physical education) including the general
education requirements, the required courses in the major field, and such additional
courses as they may select with the assistance of their faculty advisors to meet the
requirements of the major.

General Education Requirements

The minimum General Education requirements in each discipline for graduation in the
associate in applied science degree programs are listed below. Specific guidance about
the courses that are available to meet General Education requirements will be pro-
vided to students in advance of registration. Students are required to meet with their
advisors in the selection of their courses.

I. GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS Credits

A. FRESHMAN DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR (FDS)* 0-1

B. HUMANITIES 9-12

C. MATHEMATICS AND/OR SCIENCE 7-11

D. SOCIAL SCIENCES 3

* Requirement of the Freshman Year Program for all students iii,,,. .il,,is into the Uni-
versity with fewer than 24 credits.

II. SUMMARY Credits

Freshman Development Seminar 0-1
Humanities 9-12
Mathematics and/or Science 7-11
Social Sciences 3

TOTAL 19-27

III. OTHER REQUIREMENTS

Students must earn at least 30 of the last 36 credits at the University of the Virgin Islands.
Course work more than ten years old must be reviewed on a case-by-case basis to deter-
mine its appropriateness to the current University course requirements. In order to gradu-
ate, students must earn a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.00. This require-
ment is also applicable to courses in their major.

Additionally, students must successfully pass the following examinations:










1. ENGLISH PROFICIENCY EXAMINATION (EPE)
2. COMPUTER LITERACY REQUIREMENT (CLE)


Please review entry requirements for EPE and CLE on pp. 61-62.

Degree Program A.A.S. Degree


SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS DIVISION

PROCESS TECHNOLOGY St. Croix campus

Process Technology

The associate of applied science degree program in Process Technology is a technical
program that will allow students to acquire the necessary skills, concepts, and experi-
ences to be employed in a variety of positions within the refinery industry. The pro-
gram blends essential elements of refinery training with General Education courses
needed by refinery employees such as reading, writing, communication, and math-
ematics.

In addition, it is a collaborative program designed by the technical and operations
managers of HOVENSA and professors within the Division of Science and Mathemat-
ics. The objectives of this program are to (1) prepare graduates to enter industrial
employment, (2) maintain up-to-date curriculum and industry standards, (3) assist lo-
cal industries in providing up-to-date training for their present and future employees,
and (4) provide an atmosphere and the facilities to stimulate students toward maxi-
mum intellectual growth in technology.

FIRST YEAR

First Semester Credits

COM 119 Interpersonal Communication and Leadership Skills 3
MAT 140 College Algebra with Applications 4
PRT 101 Introduction to Process Technology 3
PRT 110 Basic Electricity Theory 3
PRT 121 Instrumentation I 3
Total 16

Second Semester Credits

ENG 120 English Composition 3
MAT 235 Introductory Statistics with Applications 4
PRT 122 Instrumentation II 3
PRT 125 Industrial Process 3
PRT 130 Process Technology I- Equipment 3
Total 16




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