Group Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 8. No. 2.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300566/00009
 Material Information
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 8. No. 2.
Series Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of the Virgin Islands.
Affiliation: University of the Virgin Islands
Publisher: University of the Virgin Islands.
Publication Date: 12/26/2005
 Subjects
Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA01300566
Volume ID: VID00009
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

6-2005newsletter ( PDF )


Full Text





RESEARCH


PUBL


NEW


AND


C SERVICE


LETTER


Volume 8, No. 2 News from the UVI Research and Public Service Component

34TH ANNUAL ST. CROIX

AGRICULTURE & FOOD FAIR
OVER 35,000 PEOPLE ATTEND WHAT GOVERNOR
CALLS 'THE STATE FAIR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS'


Left: Ms. Miriam Greene and Ms. Blanche Mills distribute
healthy nutritious food samples to fairgoers
Right: Ms. Rosalind Browne (behind table) and home
decorating display
Touted as the State Fair of the Virgin Islands by
Governor Charles W Turnbull, the 34th Annual Agri-
culture and Food Fair of the U.S. Virgin Islands, held
on St. Croix, was host to over 35,000 residents and
visitors as the territory celebrated the event. The an-
nual Fair which was held over Presidents' Day week-
end, February 19 21, 2005, was jointly sponsored by
the VI. Department of Agriculture and the University of
the Virgin Islands Cooperative Extension Service, and
was a tremendous success.
At Agrifest 2005, the University of the Virgin Is-
lands Research and Public Service components show-
cased their wide variety of community outreach pro-
grams and research. This year, the focus was "From


the Farm to the Table." Emphasis was placed on the
growth and preparation of agricultural food products
for use in the home by the consumer. Areas of informa-
tion were: gardening, foods and nutrition, new technol-
ogy, varietal selection, livestock production and natu-
ral homemaking.
Displays ranged from animals on the farm to a pizza
garden, and into an actual house under the tent. Tips
on growing plants, preparing healthy and nutritious
dishes for the table (including recipes and tastings)
and home decorating ideas were also presented to
fairgoers.
The focal point of UVI's exhibit was a round cen-
terpiece garden planted like pizza slices with toma-
toes, onions and other ingredients needed to make that
favorite treat. Youth got an opportunity to look at the
Continued on p. 2


U ivfrteYVirginIslands
HISTORICALLY AMERICAN.
UNIQUELY CARIBBEAN.
GLOBALLY INTERACTIVE.


June 2005










2 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


AGRICULTURE & FOOD FAIR 'A HIT'
Continued from p. 1


.. ....... ...







THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
RESEARCH & PUBLIC
SERVICE (R&PS)
NEWSLETTER
IS AN INFORMATIONAL
NEWSLETTER ON THE UNITS
THAT MAKE UP THE
R&PS COMPONENT.
HTTP://RPS.UVI.EDUI/
ACTING VICE PROVOST
JAMES E. RAKOCY, PH.D.
EDITORIAL BOARD
VELMA ABRAMSEN,
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO
THE PRESIDENT
LORNA CHESTERFIELD,
ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PROVOST
CLARICE C. CLARKE,
PUBLIC INFORMATION SPECIALIST
HELEN DOOKHAN,
ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST
MANUEL PALADA, PH.D.
AES RESEARCH ASSOCIATE
PROFESSOR
RAQUEL SANTIAGO SILVER,
ADMINISTRATOR
JACQUELINE SOMERSALL-
BERRY,
FORMER ASSISTANT TO THE
ECC DIRECTOR
PATRICE JOHNSON,
DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS
MARVIN WILLIAMS,
EPITOp, THE CARIBBEAN WRITER

LAYOUT & DESIGN
ROBIN STERNS, PH.D.

DISTRIBUTION
KIMA GATON

MAIL LETTERS OR COMMENTS TO:
LORNA CHESTERFIELD
UVI RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
#2 JOHN BREWERS BAY
Sr. THOMAS, VI 00802
TELEPHONE: (340) 693-1061
FAx: (340) 693-1065
LCHESTEgUVI.EDU

THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
1S AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY,
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION,
TITLE IX, SECTION 504,
PL 101-542 EDUCATOR
AND EMPLOYER.


raw ingredients and understand the role each played
in giving the pizza its flavor and appearance. Empha-
sis was also placed on the rewards and pleasure in-
herent in "growing one's own food." Through this dis-
play, fairgoers understood that the ingredients start in
the field with seeds and plants. The theme helped to
reinforce the importance of agricultural sciences, food
production and related topics in the school curriculum.
Inside the house under the tent, an assortment of
handmade crafts and furnishings were on display They
ranged from place-settings on the table to miniature
dolls in native costumes that hid secret compartments
forjewelry, etc. Other articles included potholders, pon-
chos, crocheted flowers and pillows. Of special inter-
est were the items made of recycled paper, such as
toilet paper, egg cartons, inner parts of boxes and car-
tons. These household products are attractive, yet cost
effective.
A pictorial display of agricultural activities from the
early 1800s and 1900s lined the inside of the ginger-
bread trimmed house. Fairgoers were able to collect
several Extension publications and posters.
Also, keeping with the overall theme of the fair,
"Keeping Agriculture Alive Through Technology in
2005," computer technology was highlighted through
demonstrations of programming and robotics. Youth
were given the opportunity to test their skills at build-
ing and programming mini robots to do their bidding.
The exhibit was a resounding hit.
Computer applications for farm financial


Youth were given the opportunity to build and program mini
robots to do their bidding atAgrifest 2005

recordkeeping were also demonstrated to the public.
In addition to all of this, there were also displays on
environmental issues such as the development of na-
ture trails, sediment and soil erosion, water conserva-
tion, marine resources and organic farming methods.
The general consensus of all fairgoers was that
the 2005 Agriculture and Food Fair saw the best UVI's
exhibits in many years.


SEASONING FOR THE MORTAR LAUNCHED


On February 18, 2005, the Research Publica-
tion Unit held a lunching for its new anthology, Sea-
soning for the Mortar: Virgin Islanders Writing in The
Caribbean Writer, Volumes 1-15, in the Evans
Center's little theater on the St. Croix campus of the
University of the Virgin Islands.
The program, which featured readings by con-
tributors to the anthology, was well received by the
audience. Seasoning brings together the best writ-
ing of Virgin Islanders which appeared in the parent
text over the first decade and a half of publication.
Currently, volume 19 of The Caribbean Writeris
well into production. Among its highlights are spe-



cial sections focusing on recent writing by award win-
ning writer Velma Pollard from Jamaica and on new
writing from Bermuda.
The manuscript also includes the prize winners
from volume 18: Rohan Preston-The Daily News
Prize for Poetry; Garfield Ellis-The Canute
Brodhurst Prize for Short Fiction; Calvin Mills-Char-
lotte and Isidor Paeiwonsky Prize for first-time pub-
lication in The Caribbean Writer, Loretta Collins-
The David Hough Literary Prize to an author pub-
lished over a number of years; and Edgar Lake-
The Maguerite Cobb-McKay Prize to a Virgin Islands
author.









JUINE 2005 3


AES AQUACULTURE PROGRAM PRESENTS


GREENWATER TANK CULTURE WORKSHOP

,iiI~'I1 .


Charlie Shultz (back left) and Dr. James Rakocy (center back, white shirt) were among the presenters at the February greenwater tank culture workshop on St. Croix.


The AES Aquaculture Program pre-
sented a workshop on February 26 to ten
farmers from the local community. Dr. James
Rakocy and his staff, Donald Bailey and
Charlie Shultz, presented information on the
potential and practice of greenwater aquac-
ulture.
The program began with a tour of the
commercial-scale greenwater fish culture
tank system located on the St. Croix cam-
pus. The tank consists of a 52.5 ft. diameter
by 4 ft. high block wall that is lined with a
polyethylene liner. The tank holds approxi-
mately 50,000 gallons of water and is
stocked with 5,000 tilapia.
The greenwater system also consists
of an external pump, a clarifier, a base ad-
dition tank, three aerators and a horizontal
mixer. The tank is capable of producing
15,000 Ibs. of tilapia annually.
The tilapia were being fed at the time
of the tour, which allowed for observation
of the tasks required by farmers to manage
a crop of fish under standard production
practices.
The fish are fed twice daily, in the morn-
ing and late afternoon, and they are given
as much feed as they can consume in a 40-


minute period. Other daily tasks, which were
discussed with workshop participants dur-
ing the feeding period, include removal of
solid waste from the external clarifier and
addition of calcium hydroxide, as needed,
to maintain a pH of 7.5.
The aerators, horizontal mixer, and ex-
ternal pump operate continuously to provide
oxygen, enhance biofiltration/nitrification
and remove solids.
Following the tour, the participants met
in a campus classroom for presentations
and discussion of the principles of
greenwater tank culture systems.
Four concepts directed the develop-
ment of the system: reduced land use, wa-
ter conservation, nutrient recovery and eco-
nomics. The greenwater system concen-
trates production on 1/20-acre of land com-
parable to the production achieved in a 1.5-
acre pond. Settling and removing solids and
returning the water to the production tank
reduce wastewater volume.
Nutrients are recovered by applying the
solid waste as a soil amendment to garden
vegetable plots, and economics are ad-
dressed by low construction costs, efficient
feeding and operation and marketing. Dr.


Rakocy presented these concepts to the
workshop followed by Charlie Shultz dis-
cussing water quality and fish health issues
and Don Bailey teaching construction and
economics of the system.
The participants, from St. Croix and
Puerto Rico, left the class with an excellent
base of knowledge about the greenwater
tank system. They will be able to incorpo-
rate these systems on their own farms and
can receive assistance from the Aquacul-
ture Program staff with planning and devel-
opment.


HTTP-:/RIPS. VI. E[LJ/









4. RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


SBDC AND SBA RECOGNIZE USVI


ENTREPRENEURS, ADVOCATES


AND INSTITUTIONS AT


ANNUAL AWARDS BANQUETS


In recognition of the small business community's
contributions to the American economy and society,
the President of The United States designates one
week each year as National Small Business Week.
The United States Small Business Administration
(SBA) celebrated National Small Business Week
earlier during the week of April 3, 2005.
The highlight of National Small Business Week
is always the presentation of awards in recognition
of the outstanding contributions of small business
persons and advocates at the territorial and national
levels. The 2005 SBDC Awards were presented in
St.Thomas as part of the St. Thomas/St. John Cham-
ber of Commerce's Business After Hours Reception.
This event was
hosted by the
SBDC from its Lead
Office in Nisky Cen-
ter. It was a re-
sounding success


and was attended by over 100 guests and support-
ers.
A similar SBDC awards banquet was held on
the island of St. Croix the following day at Gertrude's
Restaurant. That ceremony was equally as success-
ful and received tremendous support from the sup-
porters and stakeholders in that district. SBDC is
pleased to once again recognize and congratulate
the honorees listed below.
Warren Bush, State Director, applauds the efforts
of the very deserving entrepreneurs and institutions
recognized at these ceremonies.. "To their credit, they
have all persevered and have attained major milestones
that they, and all of their supporters, should be ex-
tremely proud of." Mr. Bush went on to thank the STT/
STJ Chamber of Commerce, Gertrude's Restaurant,
the various sponsors, partners and friends of the SBDC
for their fabulous contributions and door prizes and his
SBDC staff for their efforts in helping to establish first-
rate ceremonies.


THE AWARDS


2005 UVI-SBDC Small Business Person of the
Year Award Recipient (STT)
Ms. Shaun A. Pennington, Publisher
V.I. Source

2005 UVI-SBDC Small Business Persons of the
Year Award Recipients (STX)
Robert and Kathleen Mackay
Reliable Rentals

2005 UVI-SBDC Entrepreneurial Success
Award Recipient
Judy Patalidis
Patalidis Design

2005 UVI-SBDC Home-Based Business Person
of the Year
Ms. Diane Butler
Diane Butler Photography

2005 UVI-SBDC Accountant Advocate of the
Year
Francisco Depusior, CPA

2005 UVI-SBDC Citizen Award -VI Community
Advocate of the Year
Mr. Edward E. Thomas, President & CEO
West Indian Company Ltd.


2005 UVI-SBDC Corporate Award VI
Community Advocate of the Year
First Bank VI
Mr. Cassan Pancham, First SeniorVice President/
General Manager

2005 UVI-SBDC Financial Institution oftheYear
Banco Popular de Puerto Rico
Mr.Valentino I. McBean, Regional Manager/Senior
Vice President

Mr. Carl Christensen, USVI Officer in Charge of
the U.S. Small Business Administration, also pre-
sented the distinguished SBA's Annual Small
Business Week Awards to the following USVI hon-
orees:

United States Small Business Administration's
Small Business Persons of theYear
Neil Theodule & Micah Dorsett
Fast Shipping & Communications-STT
and
Gloria P Coursey President
St. Croix Clinical Lab

United States Small Business Administration's
USVI Bank of the Year
Banco Popular de Puerto Rico


SBDC proudly displays its
prestigious 2005 awards


HTTP://RPS. UVI. EDU/










JUNE 2005 5


Top left: At the St. Thomas Awards Banquet, UVI-SBDC State Director Warren T.
Bush presents the SBDC's 2005 Citizen Award, VI Community Advocate of the
Year to Mr. Edward E. Thomas, President & CEO of West Indian Company, Ltd.
Bottom left: U.S. SBA's Carl Christensen addresses the audience as honorees
FirstBank (represented by John D. McDonald); WICO's Edward E. Thomas; VI
Source's Shaun A. Pennington; and State DirectorWarren T. Bush look on


Top right: 2005 UVI-SBDC Entrepreneurial Success A ward Recipient Judy Patalidis,
Patalidis Design (STX), accepts congratulations from Warren Bush andAnn Golden
Bottom right: Banco Popular de Puerto Rico accepts the 2005 SBDC's Financial
Institution of the Year Award from Warren T. Bush, SBDC State Director, and Carl
Christensen, U.S. SBA's USVI Officer in Charge, at the STXA wards Banquet. Banco
Popular was also named the Virgin Islands Bank of the Year by the U.S. Small
Business Administration. Pictured from left to right: Ann Golden (Sen. Lorraine
Berry's Office), Abraham Edwards, Darren Browne, and Stanley Olive (Banco
Popular), Warren T. Bush (SBDC), and Carl Christensen (U.S. SBA).


CES RECEIVES NEARLY $200,000 IN FUNDING FOR COMMUNITY OUTREACH


Two competitive grants to implement educational programs
for the local community were received by the University of the Vir-
gin Islands Cooperative Extension Service's Agriculture and Natural
Resources Program.
The Southern Region Sustainable Agriculture Research Edu-
cation Program was granted a $137,000 award for the implemen-
tation of a joint initiative between the UVI-CES and the University
of Arkansas.
The objectives of the project are aimed at increasing and en-
couraging growth in the organic and sustainable agriculture sec-
tor, particularly through enhancing linkages with the existing tour-
ism sector and other appropriate agencies and organizations.
The implementation of this project will involve the develop-
ment of survey instruments to collect data regarding outcomes to
the development of agriculture in the Virgin Islands.
Important outcomes of this project will include a territory-wide
sustainable agriculture conference and a publication to document


project findings and policy recommendations.
Additionally, CES, in partnership with the V.I. Resource Con-
servation and Development Council, Inc., UVI Conservation Data
Center and St. Croix Environmental Association, received a grant
of $60,000 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to imple-
ment environmental outreach activities.
The goals of this project are to increase environmental aware-
ness on St. Croix, to identify the community's environmental con-
cerns, to communicate those concerns to the EPA, and to estab-
lish a repository at CES, Building D, West Campus, on St. Croix.
Staff at the repository will collect environmental information
that will be accessible to residents, researchers and visitors.
A CES Extension Specialist will assist the community in as-
sessing environmental information that will be stored at the re-
pository. Staff will also offer field trips and nature walks to resi-
dents and community groups interested in environmental issues
of St. Croix.









6 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


LIGHTS! CAMERA! ACTION!


FILM DOCUMENTARY ON SPAWNING


AGGREGATIONS IN THE USVI BEGINS


"ALTHOUGH
RESEARCH SHOWS
SEASONAL AREA
CLOSURES AND YEAR-
ROUND NO-TAKE
MARINE RESERVES ARE
EFFECTIVE IN
PROTECTING AND IN
SOME CASES
ENHANCING
PREVIOUSLY
EXPLOITED SPAWNING
AGGREGATIONS,
USING AREA CLOSURES
AS A MANAGEMENT
TOOL TO PROTECT
FISH STOCKS HAS BEEN
MET WITH MIXED
EMOTIONS BY
COMMERCIAL FISHERS
AND THE GENERAL
PUBLIC AROUND THE
CARIBBEAN.'


Videographer Tim Kelly, of Friday's Films tries to capture spawning red hind on Lang Bank St. Croix


The production of a video documentary focusing on
grouper and snapper spawning aggregations in Virgin Is-
lands waters, initiated by CMES, was started in January
of this year.
The project is being coordinated and managed by
CMES director Dr. Rick Nemeth and funded by NOAA,
The Nature Conservancy and The Ocean Conservancy
It will focus on research currently being conducted by
CMES scientists on spawning aggregation sites off St.
Thomas and St. Croix as well as fisheries issues and
controversies surrounding the research and the sub-
sequent fisheries management questions that it raises.
Grouper and snapper aggregation sites have been
found around the world in tropical waters, and their
indisputable importance in the sustainability of fish
stocks has been recognized globally In the USVI, heavy
fishing pressure at aggregation sites has contributed
to the collapse or near collapse of several fisheries
species, including the Nassau grouper, yellowfin grou-
per and red hind grouper.
The most productive multi-species aggregation site
known in the USVI today, the Grammanik Bank, was


temporarily closed to fishing for three months begin-
ning February 1, 2005, and will probably be season-
ally closed every year henceforth during the grouper
spawning season, February through April. One red hind
grouper aggregation site in the USVI is currently pro-
tected seasonally (Lang Bank, east of St. Croix) and
another site year round (the Marine Conservation Dis-
trict, south of St. Thomas).
Although research shows seasonal area closures
and year-round no-take marine reserves are effective
in protecting and in some cases enhancing previously
exploited spawning aggregations, using area closures
as a management tool to protect fish stocks has been
met with mixed emotions by commercial fishers and
the general public around the Caribbean.
Distrust of government policies as well as lack of
knowledge of the significance of spawning aggregation
processes to the sustainability of fish populations alien-
ate many potential supporters of these fishery conserva-
tion measures.
The premise of the spawning aggregation documen-
tary being produced by UVI will be to educate the public


HTTP://RPS. UVI. EDU/









/JNE 2005 7


"THE SPAWNING
AGGREGATION
DOCUMENTARY,
SLATED FOR
COMPLETION BY
SEPTEMBER 2005, WILL
BE AVAILABLE FOR
VIEW BY THE GENERAL
PUBLIC. CMES
RESEARCHERS HOPE
THAT IT WILL EXPLAIN
AND ANSWER
QUESTIONS
REGARDING THE
PRIMARY FISHERIES
RESEARCH BEING
CONDUCTED AT UVI,
AND THAT IT WILL
RAISE THE
AWARENESS OF
VIRGIN ISLANDS
CITIZENS OF THE
BENEFITS OF MARINE
CONSERVATION AND
MANAGEMENT TO
FUTURE
GENERATIONS."


on the biology and the sensitivity of grouper and snapper
spawning aggregations and to explore the issues of mis-
trust and miscommunication between the people and
government regarding fisheries management policies.
Friday's Films, a small video production com-
pany based out of San Francisco, California, has
been contracted to produce the documentary.
Friday's Films was chosen for the project because
of their expertise in documenting fisheries issues
in developing island nations and in successfully il-
lustrating general problems in the current state of
declining fisheries. The company has specifically
worked on projects filming and documenting spawn-
ing aggregation sites and has recently produced
DVD's of the Bahamas and Fiji.


A boi e: A female yellotlin grouper iGramannik I tilh belly
lull of eggs heads into a large school of dog snapper
Lef: CAFES scientists Shaun Kadison films a
large school of dog snapper on the Gramannik Bank

'V.,ideographers F'Perry. I'iCkert and Tim Yell,
tra -eled to St Thomal. and St Crol. in .Ianuiar.
to .ork ,th C.lES staff scientists and to film
aggregations of red hind grouper in the P..arine
Conser action Cistrict and on Lang E.ank They'
returned in March and again worked with scien-
tists on the Grammanik Bank documenting large
numbers of yellowfin grouper, Nassau grouper, tiger
grouper and dog snapper that had aggregated on the
site to spawn.
In addition, Pickert and Kelly interviewed numerous
fishers, government officials, scientists and marine man-
agers for the film and even showed some of their footage
to the St. Thomas Fisherman's Association.
The spawning aggregation documentary, slated
for completion by September 2005, will be available
forview by the general public. CMES researchers hope
that it will explain and answer questions regarding the
primary fisheries research being conducted at UVI,
and that it will raise the awareness of Virgin Islands
citizens of the benefits of marine conservation and
management to future generations.









8 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


UVI-CES HOSTS LIVESTOCK FARMERS,


UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL FROM P.R.


CES Associate Director Kofi Boateng (second from left- front row) and Livestock Agent Sue Lakos (fifth from left -back row) pose with livestock farmers from Puerto Rico
during their visit to Annaly Farms where they saw a beautiful herd of breeding heifers with their calves


A group of farmers and University per-
sonnel from Puerto Rico visited St. Croix
to tour local livestock farms. Their goal was
to observe what Virgin Islands farmers are
doing in the areas of management and
selection in order to carry that knowledge
back with them to Puerto Rico. The trip was
organized through their Livestock Associa-
tion and the Cooperative Extension Ser-
vice (CES) at the University of the Virgin
Islands.
The group arrived by private charter
on Friday morning, April 1st. Assisted by
Extension personnel Ms. Sue Lakos and
Mr. Edgar Austrie, they then made their
way to the Research and Extension Cen-
ter at UVI.
Dr. Robert Godfrey gave an overview
of the livestock projects and research be-
ing done here at the University and Mr. Kofi
Boateng, CES Associate Director, pre-
sented an overview of farming on St. Croix.
They were also given an opportunity to
meet representatives of the newly formed


St. Croix Livestock Farmers' Cooperative.
The tour then started at Annaly Farms
where they saw a beautiful herd of breed-
ing heifers with their calves, as well as a
herd of young bulls. The Lawaetz family is
a premier breeder of the St. Croix Senepol
cattle.
The visitors, many of them cattle farm-
ers themselves, were very impressed with
the docility and conformation of the ani-
mals presented. Some even expressed a
desire to purchase some of them to take
to Puerto Rico, seeing the potential for im-
proving their own herds. Cameras busily
snapped as the farmers mingled among
the animals. After the visitors viewed the
cattle in the pens, the tour continued to
the Annaly Farms meat market, where they
discussed the aspects of marketing the
product that they saw being raised in the
pastures.
The next stop was Echo Valley Farm,
owned by Mr. Henry Schuster. There they
saw the Virgin Islands White Hair Sheep.


They were given a brief history of the white
hair sheep on St. Croix and were able to
observe a nice flock of ewes with young
lambs.
After lunch at Villa Morales, the tour
continued with a stop at the St. Croix Ab-
attoir. Mr. Cardinal Richardson gave a syn-
opsis of how the abattoir runs and the
steps and procedures animals go through
when they come there.
Although the abattoir was not operat-
ing that day, the farmers were able to get
an up-close idea of how things work. Many
had never been inside a facility such as
this, so they were quite impressed.
Following that stop, the group contin-
ued on to the Gasperi's Castle Nugent
Farms, another Senepol cattle breeder on
St. Croix's south shore. They were pre-
sented with the sight of a herd of young
female cattle that took their collective
breath away. The cattle were uniform in
color and conformation, and several farm-
ers stated that they wouldn't hesitate to









JUNE 2005 9


CES HOSTS HACCP WORKSHOP

FOR POULTRY FARMERS


The Puerto Rico group was impressed with the quality and
confirmation of our Senepol breed of cattle. Here, a Senepol family
at a recent Agricultural & Food Fair
take them home with them.
The final stop of the day was at Solitude Farm,
owned by Mr. Reuben Roebuck, St. Croix's own
farmer of the year 2005. Here they saw an inten-
sive system of raising Boer goats and Dorper
sheep where the quality of the livestock produced
takes priority.
The following day, the group got a tour of the
projects currently on-going at the Agriculture Ex-
periment Station of the University of the Virgin Is-
lands. Ms. Raina Dodson-Eimer gave a tour of the
sheep facility and explained what the current
projects are. The farmers were able to observe not
only the animals, but also the management sys-
tems used and the facilities and setup.
From there, the group proceeded to the aquac-
ulture facility and was given an extensive tour by
Dr. James Rakocy. They were given the opportu-
nity to see both small and large aquaponic sys-
tems and meet some of the fish "up close and per-
sonal." Several farmers expressed an interest in
setting up systems of their own and Dr. Rakocy
invited them to return in June for the annual short
course in aquaponics.
After the tour was completed, Sr. Francisco
Inostroza Laboy, the group coordinator from the
University of Puerto Rico Extension Service, stated
that the farmers felt the livestock industries on St.
Croix were outstanding and the aquaculture facili-
ties had left them speechless.
The farmers' group was very excited with what
they saw and returned to Puerto Rico with many pho-
tos, phone numbers, ideas and memories. They
stated that this will not be the last time they come
overto St. Croix to collaborate with the farmers here.


St. Croix poultryproducers listen with great interest as Food Safety Institute personnel present
information on HACCP regulations on safe poultry production and practices

Recently, the University of the Virgin Islands Cooperative Ex-
tension Service, in collaboration with the University of Puerto Rico
Mayaguez, Food Safety Institute, and the Virgin Islands Depart-
ment of Agriculture, held a two-day workshop on the UVI campus
for local poultry producers.
The workshop, entitled "Educational Program for the Estab-
lishment of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP)
Compatible Animal Production Practices in Poultry Farms," was
designed to provide relevant information to the poultry producers
of St. Croix.
The three presenters, Dr. Edna Negron, Dr. Jose R. Latorre, and
Dr. Carol Harper from the University of Puerto Rico's Food Safety
Institute, provided producers with a wide variety of information
and resources to be used in improving their operations and mate-
rials determined to be critical to safe and profitable poultry pro-
duction.
In this age of drug resistant diseases and potential
bioterrorism, strong efforts are essential to ensure the safety of
the food supply.This workshop was designed to highlight areas of
concern in the poultry industries and outline methods of preven-
tion, control and treatment of potential problems.
Topics covered by the presenters included poultry biosecurity,
cleaning and disinfection of poultry facilities, personal hygiene,
microbiology, and proposed new regulations regarding meat and
egg production.
Farmers who attended felt that the information they received
from this collaboration was very important and that it helped them
become more aware of ways to produce safe, high-quality food for
the people of the Virgin Islands.
A total of 15 small poultry producers received certificates of
completion from the University of Puerto Rico Food Safety Insti-
tute for their participation in the two-day event.


HTTP-:/RIPS L)VI. E[LJ/









10 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


SBDC AND FIRSTBANK VIRGIN

ISLANDS CELEBRATE NATIONAL

SMALL BUSINESS WEEK 2005


"EACH YEAR,
REPRESENTATIVES FROM
THE BANK'S
COMMERCIAL LENDING
UNIT AND COMMUNITY
REINVESTMENT DIVISION
JOIN FORCES WITH THE
SENIOR MANAGEMENT
AND STAFF OF THE SBDC
TO PROVIDE INSIGHT
AND DIRECTION TO
EMERGING AND
EXISTING
ENTREPRENEURS
REGARDING STRATEGIES
TO HELP START OR
ENHANCE A BUSINESS.
ADDITIONALLY, THE
OPEN HOUSES AFFORD
TH E COMMUNITY TH E
CHANCE TO QUERY THE
BANK AND THE SBDC
PERSONNEL DIRECTLY
AND SHARE
INFORMATION
REGARDING CONSUMER
NEEDS, CONCERNS, AND
RECOMMENDATIONS. "


Above: SBDC's Dary'l U. Ed~iards is seen closing the "deal"
\tith a participant at Open House during National Small
Business Week
Left: Karen Sprau e. Community) Rein estment Officer.
FirsBank VI. introduces some residents to the product and
sert ice offerings of FirslBank at the St. Thomas Open House


The Small Business Development Center
(SBDC) and partner FirstBank VI held open houses
on St. Thomas and St. Croix as part of their out-
reach initiatives in celebration of National Small
Business Week 2005.
These open houses have been presented an-
nually for over four years to help educate the V.I.
community to the various products and services
available at the SBDC and FirstBank.
Each year, representatives from the bank's com-
mercial lending unit and community reinvestment di-
vision join forces with the senior management and
staff of the SBDC to provide insight and direction to
emerging and existing entrepreneurs regarding strat-
egies to help start or enhance a business.
Additionally, the open houses afford the com-
munity the chance to query the bank and the SBDC
personnel directly and share information regarding
consumer needs, concerns, and recommendations.
Anyone who needed to better identify with stan-
dard procedures for obtaining bank financing, mer-


chant services, depository options, business plan-
ning, loan packaging, marketing strategies, and other
pertinent small business/bank related concerns was
able to obtain handouts, brochures, and other re-
lated material to help reinforce a full understanding
of the product/service offerings.
SBDC and FirstBankVI held these open houses
at FirstBank Plaza on St. Thomas and FirstBank at
Orange Grove, St. Croix, and took tremendous plea-
sure in interfacing with the residents who partici-
pated.
Some of the participants walked away with some
fabulous door prizes, offered as an extended com-
pliment of FirstBank VI, SBDC, and various commu-
nity partners and stakeholders.
SBDC thanks all of the sponsors and attendees
and looks forward to partnering with FirstBankVI in
a continuous effort to highlight the tremendous ben-
efits and advantages associated with the products
and services that are available to the entrepreneurs
of this community.


HTTP,.//PPS. UVI.E[)DV/









JUNE 2005 11


$100,000 CYFAR GRANT AWARDED


TO UVI COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
The University of the Virgin Is- .. ,, ,.
lands Cooperative Extension Ser- ... ......,. THE CYFAR NEW COMMUr
vice was recently notified of the DESIGNED TO FURTHER THE
award of a $100,000 grant from the SERVING CHILDREN, YOUTH
United States Department TERRITORY, TO 'BRIDGE THE
ofAghriculture (USDA). l l i ; I PROVIDE MARKETABLE ANI
According to UVI-CES State Di- RESIDENTS."
rector Kwame Garcia, Sr., the Chil-
dren Youth and Families At Risk
(CYFAR) New Communities Pro- computer skills development
gram grant is designed to furtherthe national enrichment and oth
efforts of the agency in serving chil- turally-infused activities. Als
dren, youth and families at risk in the rental involvement is a very
territory component of the program
Although the CYFAR Program The two program sites
has been in operation for several .... ,,,,,1 Candido Gualalupe and K
years, the recent award is designed i. Terrace housing developer
to further expand that effort to St. Croix and St. Thomas, re
"bridge the computer divide" and tively.
provide marketable and other skills For further information re
to low-income residents. ing CYFAR/NCP, please c
The New Communities Ms. Lois Sanders, CES Ass
Program, entitled "Helping Families Director, at 692-4096.
Help Themselves," will also focus on


CITIES PROGRAM GRANT IS
EFFORTS OF THE AGENCY IN
AND FAMILIES AT RISK IN THE
COMPUTER DIVIDE,' AND
OTHER SKILLS TO LOW-INCOME


H1TP://RPS. UVI. EDU/


SBDC AND SBA INTRODUCE

MICRO-LOAN PROGRAM UP TO

$25,000 TO THE V.I. COMMUNITY


The U.S. Small Business Administration has
partnered with a preferred SBA lender, Business
Loan Express, of Panama City, Florida, to offer
direct micro-loans to the residents of the U.S.
Virgin Islands.
In orientation sessions held by the SBA and
the loan program's technical assistance provider,
UVI-SBDC, individuals were introduced to a dy-
namic, convenient, accessible micro-loan pro-
gram that offers unsecured loans from $5,000 to
$25,000. The benefits of the loan program include
the following:
-Unsecured loans (no collateral)
-No prepayment penalty
-No business plans required
-No tax returns required
-Start-up businesses allowed
-All industries considered
-Customer service/fast turn-around time
-Serves minorities, women, veterans
-Loan payments drafted from business account
Associate Director Linroy E. Freeman ad-
vised that these micro-loans are essentially char-
acter-based loans. In other words, the main pre-
requisite for approval underthis program is hav-
ing a good personal credit history. With a favor-


able overall history, emerging and existing en-
trepreneurs may be able to attain financing to
address business start-up, expansion, or gen-
eral operating needs.
According to State Director Warren T. Bush,
these orientation programs were specifically de-
signed to help small businesses flourish and ob-
tain a full understanding of the program and pre-
requisites. He added that these loans are an ex-
cellent venue for business people in the terri-
tory to improve cash flow without having to sub-
mit long, involved business plans.
These sessions were attended by over a
combined 100 USVI residents (STT and STX) and
the SBA and SBDC are very pleased to announce
that since this direct loan program was recently
introduced, several loans have been approved,
closed and funded. In the program's first two
weeks, there were already 10 loans approved ter-
ritorially.
SBDC is the official technical assistance pro-
vider for the program and anyone who is inter-
ested in obtaining or processing an application
is invited to contact the St.Thomas and St. Croix
offices at 776-3206 and 692-5270, respectively,
for information and assistance.


, edu-
er cul-
o, pa-
strong
nodel.
will be
irwan
its, on
ispec-

egard-
ontact
distant










12 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE

UPCOMING EVENTS

)UNE SEPTEMBER 2005


r
JUNE
5-11

7
13
18

23

JULY
7
12

15
15
18
19

21
28


AQUAPONICSAND TILAPIAAQUACULTURE SHORTCOURSE/
AES'
PROCUREMENT/PRONET-SBA PRODUCTS & SERVICES/SBDC
ESTATE PLANNING STRATEGIES FOR BUSINESSES/SBDC
WNET TRAINING-UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE &
GOVERNMENT INSURANCE FUND/SBDC
USING QUICKBOOKS FOR YOUR SMALL BUSINESS/SBDC


LABOR & EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES/SBDC
SBA'S COMMUNITY EXPRESS LOAN PROGRAM
ORI ENTATION/SBDC
SBA EXPRESS LOAN PROGRAM/SBDC
YOUTH OUTREACH: BASIC BUSINESS EXPOSURE/SBDC
INSURANCE PLANNING STRATEGIES/SBDC
EDUCATION PLANNING AND INVESTMENT STRATEGIES/
SBDC
PREVENTING & MANAGING STRESS/SBDC
DETAILS OF BUSINESS: INVENTORY CONTROL/SBDC


AUGUST
3-4 VETERANS' OUTREACH PROGRAM/SBDC
10 DETAILS OF BUSINESS: MARKETING STRATEGY/
PRICING PRODUCTS & SERVICES/SBDC
17 DETAILS OF BUSINESS: BUSINESS ETIQUETTE/SBDC
18 HOW TO BUY OR SELL A BUSINESS/SBDC

SEPTEMBER
1 LEADERSHIP: THE DRIVING FORCE OF HIGH
PERFORMANCE IN PEOPLE/SBDC
8 HOW TO WORK WITH PEOPLE: UNDERSTANDING
TEAM DYNAMICS/SBDC
14-15 SBA'S 8A LOAN PROGRAM ORIENTATION/SBDC
20 YOUTH OUTREACH: BASIC BUSINESS EXPOSURE/
SBDC
24 CUSTOMER SERVICE EXCELLENCE/SBDC


*For more information on these events, contact the sponsoring department.








Univ ersty TirginIslands
of the i a d


(Y THE I,






1962


UVI RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
#2 )OHN BREWERS BAY
ST. THOMAS, VI 00802




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs