Group Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 8. No. 1.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300566/00008
 Material Information
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 8. No. 1.
Series Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of the Virgin Islands.
Affiliation: University of the Virgin Islands
Publisher: University of the Virgin Islands.
Publication Date: 12/26/2005
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Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean
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Bibliographic ID: CA01300566
Volume ID: VID00008
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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RESEARCH AND


PUBLIC SERVICE


NEW


LETTER


UNIVERSITY OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


Volume 8, No. 1 News from the UVI Research and Public Service Component

AES BRINGS GREENWATER

TILAPIA FARMING TO ST )OHN


The completed tank will be filled with well water for the production of 5,000 tilapia
The completed tank will be filled with well water for the production of 5,000 tilapia


A greenwater tank for tilapia production was
constructed this fall at the Coral Bay Organic Gar-
den Center on St. John. The Garden Center is
working in conjunction with the UVI-AESAquacul-
ture Program in the development of aquaculture
as part of an integrated farming system.
Greenwater tank culture is a technology de-
veloped at the UVI St. Croix campus over the past
10 years. The fish rearing tank in the commercial-
scale system is 52 2 ft. in diameter and 4 ft. deep.
It holds approximately 55,000 gallons of water and
is stocked with up to 5,000 fish. The system also
consists of a circulating pump, a cone-bottom clari-
fier, a base addition tank and four aerators.
One advantage of greenwater tank culture is
that it can produce nearly 30 times more tilapia
than the production from typical pond culture. This


increase in production helps conserve the limited
farmland in the Virgin Islands. Farmers can diver-
sify their farms into fish culture without using large
plots of their land, which can be kept in vegetable
or livestock production. Tilapia can be produced in
these tanks at a high production rate because the
aerators provide oxygen, solid waste is removed
by the clarifier and metabolic waste is removed by
actively growing populations of algae and nitrify-
ing bacteria.
Second advantage of this system is that wa-
ter from the culture tank can be used to irrigate
vegetable crops. The water contains sufficient
amounts of nitrogen and phosphorous that can
substitute for the use of other fertilizers that a
farmer may use on his crops. Approximately 500
Continued on p. 7


February 2005


INSIDE
2 RPU Publishes
Literary Anthology
2 CES Partners in the
Development of the
Magens Bay
Arboretum Master
Plan. Booklet
3 Haitian Student
Spends Time with
Animal Science
Program
4 SBDC and New
Image Foundation's
WNET Roundtable
Sponsor Arts and
Crafts Extravaganza
5 Get the Sea Scoop!
8 CES Financial
Record Keeping
Course 'A Big Hit'
with Farmers
9 World Food Day
Activities 2004
10 St. Croix Small
Livestock Farmers
Complete Six-Week
Production Course
10 SBDC STAFF
Receive Key Award
Recognitions
TuJ)










2 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE NEWSLETTER


NEW RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE

BOOKS PUBLISHED


THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
RESEARCH & PUBLIC
SERVICE (R&PS)
NEWSLETTER
IS AN INFORMATIONAL
NEWSLETTER ON THE UNITS
THAT MAKE UP THE
R&PS COMPONENT.
HTTP://RPS.UVI.EDU/
ACTING VICE PROVOST
JAMES E. IAKOCY PH.D.
EDITORIAL BOARD
VELMA ABRAMSEN,
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO
THE PRESIDENT
LORNA CHESTERFIELD,
ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PROVOST
CLARICE C. CLARKE,
PUBLIC INFORM TION SPECIALIST
HELEN DOOKHAN,
ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST
MANUEL PALADA, PH.D.
AES RESEARCH ASSOCIATE
PROFESSOR
RAQUEL SANTIAGO SILVER,
ADMINISTRATOR
JACQUELINE SOMERSALL-
BERRY,
FORMER ASSISTANT TO THE
ECC DIRECTOR
PATRICE JOHNSON,
DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS
MARVIN WILLIAMS,
EDITOR, THE CARIBBEAN WRITER

LAYOUT& DESIGN
ROBIN STERNS, PH.D.

DISTRIBUTION
KIMA GATON
MAIL LETTERS OR COMMENTS TO:
LORNA CHESTERFIELD
UVI RESEARCH & PLIBLIC SERVICE
#2 JOHN BREWERS BAY
ST. THOMAS, VI 00802
TELEPHONE: (340) 693-1061
FAX: (340) 693-1065
LCHESTEgUVI.EDVU

THE UNIVERSITYOF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
ISAN EOLAL OPPORTUNITY,
AFFIRMATIVEACTION,
TITLE IX, SECTION 504,
PL 101-542 EDUCATOR
AND EMPLOYER.


RPU PUBLISHES LITERARY ANTHOLOGY

The Research Publication Unit recently published an anthol-
ogy of Virgin Islands authors entitled Seasoning for the Mortar:
Virgin Islanders Writing in The Caribbean Writer Volumes 1-15.
The text consists of poetry, fiction, drama, and personal es-
says which treat a wide variety of themes that recur in the litera-
ture of the territory and our region.
Among several dozen writers are Arnold Highfield, Althea
Romeo-Mark, S,B. Jones-Hendrickson, Patricia Harkins-Pierre and
Winston Nugent.
Seasoning for the Mortar is designed to showcase the writers
in the territory and, like its parent text, continue to encourage quality
writing in the region. The anthology will soon be available at our
usual outlets: Education Central, Memories of St. Croix, Under-
cover Books, Dockside Bookshop, and both University of the Vir-
gin Islands bookstores. Copies can also be ordered directly from
The Caribbean Writer's office by calling (340) 692-4152, e-mail-
ing qmars@uvi.edu or orders@thecaribbeanwriter.com or from our
secure server website at www.The CaribbeanWriter.com.


CES PARTNERS IN THE

DEVELOPMENT OF THE MAGEN
BAY ARBORETUM MASTER PLAP
BOOKLET

The Cooperative Extension Services CES staff has
been working closely with Magens BayAuthority (MBA)
as project consultant to develop a master plan for the
maintenance and restoration of the Magens Bay Ar-
boretum. This project, funded by a gift from an anony-
mous donor, was initiated when MBA followed the rec-
ommendations of CES staff to seek the assistance of
professional landscape architects and planners, Para-
digm Design Inc., to help develop the master plan.
CES worked closely with Paradigm Design Inc.
to develop a booklet, The Magens Bay Arboretum, A
Nature and Culture Showcase, that outlines a com-
prehensive master plan for managing the five-acre
arboretum behind Magens Bay. The master plan rein-
terprets the spirit and original purpose of the arbore-
tum by promoting programmatic strategies that deal
with current conditions and demands, and this plan
could also serve as a model for managing natural ar-
eas incorporated into the V.I. Territorial Park System.
The booklet is colorfully designed to appeal to poten-
tial private donors and funding agencies that could
sponsor efforts to restore and develop the arboretum.
Past sporadic interventions and capital investment
have proved to be unsuccessful without a master plan
and a management strategy to guide and regulate
long-term resource use, maintenance, and funds al-
location. As an outcome of this project, MBA has en-
dorsed the master plan and booklet. After reviewing
the booklet, MBA also recognized the need to develop
a broader master plan for Magens Bay including the


57 acres managed by MBA, as well as adjacent prop-
erties owned by the V.I. government and the Nature
Conservancy. In November, MBA began implement-
ing one of the recommendations outlined in the mas-
ter plan by clearing debris and weedy plant species
from the coconut grove adjacent to the Arboretum.
Based on Paradigm Design's research, the coconut
grove served as the original entrance to the Arbore-
tum, and efforts are now being made to re-establish
the coconut grove as the Arboretum entrance and as
an area for gatherings and public events.


SEASONING
for Ow
MORTAR











Viu Iu~ 1 1 d toWO In
The Cnrltblan Writer
f.uOinu q q
dtfbmrraft 16 W









FEBRU ARY 2005 3


HAITIAN STUDENT SPENDS TIME WITH


ANIMAL SCIENCE PROGRAM


SRAYNALDSIME, A
THIRD-YEARSTUDENT
ATTHEAMERICAN
UNIVERSITY OFTHE
CARIBBEAN IN HAITI,
SPENTTH REE WEEKS ON
ST. THOMAS AND TWO
WEEKS ON ST. CROIX,
TAKING INALLTHE
IN FO RMATIO N HE
COULD TO SHARE IT
WITH OTHERS BACK IN
H IS COUNTRY.
RAYNALDSPENTTIME
WITH THE ANIMAL
SCIENCE PROGRAM AT
AES TO OBSERVE THE
ANIMAL
MANAGEMENT
PRACTICES USED WITH
THE HAIR SHEEP FLOCK
AS WELL AS OTH ER
RESEARCH PROJ ECTS
THAT WERE BEING
CONDUCTED. RAYNALD
WAS HERE FOR
WEANI NG OF LAMBS,
DEWORMINGAND
VACCINATING."


Raynald Sime (right) andA.J. Weis, UVI Research Analyst weigh sheep at the AES sheep research facility on St. Croix


Raynald Sime, a third-year student at the Ameri-
can University of the Caribbean in Haiti, spent three
weeks on St. Thomas and two weeks on St. Croix,
taking in all the information he could to share it with
others back in his country. While on St. Croix,
Raynold was hosted by Dr. Robert Godfrey, Asso-
ciate Professor and Assistant Director of the Agri-
cultural Experiment Station (AES) on the University
of the Virgin Islands' St. Croix campus.
Raynald spent time with the Animal Science pro-
gram at AES to observe the animal management
practices used with the hair sheep flock as well as
other research projects that were being conducted.
Raynald was here for weaning of lambs, deworm-
ing and vaccinating.
Raynald also spent time on St. Thomas where
he assisted Dr. Bethany Bradford, veterinarian for
the V.I. Dept. Of Agriculture St. Thomas-St. John
district. He helped her tag animals and deworm
goats and assisted in surgeries. He also did plant
grafting and nursery work at the V.I. Agriculture
Station, worked with small animals at the Impe-
rial Animal Hospital, learned about flowering and
landscaping plants at Bryan's Plants, visited lo-
cal farms and spent time at the abattoir learning
about meat inspection.


Lack of trees is a big problem in Haiti and
Raynald was very impressed with how green St.
Thomas is and how many trees there are. He wanted
to take back ideas on fighting soil erosion and grow-
ing, planting and saving trees.
Raynald also went back to Haiti with publica-
tions on tropical agriculture available in UVI's col-
lection. This experience benefited Raynold because
he got to see livestock production practices that
would have direct application to Haiti due to similar
climate and conditions. The information he took
back will be applicable with very little modification.
Raynald's visit was a joint effort among the V.I.
Dept. Of Agriculture, University of the Virgin Islands
and the American University of the Caribbean, where
Dr. Paul Rudenberg is Dean and also coordinator for
the local Heifer Project International (HPI). The visit
grew out of a project in November 2003 donating lo-
cal sheep and goats to Haiti's HPI program. Dr.
Bradford conceived that project, pitched it to HPI and
worked with Dr. Godfrey to make it happen.
While Raynald's career goal is to teach college
agriculture courses, he is also interested in young
people. He started the Children's Relief and Care Ser-
vice in Haiti, which offers education, health care and
clothing to orphaned and poverty-stricken children.


H1TP://RPS. UVI. EDU/









4 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE NEWSLETTER


SBDC AND NEW IMAGE FOUNDATION'S WNET


ROIVNDTABLE SPONSOR ARTS AND CRAFTS


EXTRAVAGANZA


Inset top: Attendees listen attentively to SBDC instruction regarding "Turning Passion into Profits"
Above: Evette Turnbull displays her vanity sets and bathroom accessories during the St Thomas Roundtable Session


The Small Business Development Center (SBDC) and collabo-
rator, New Image Foundation, sponsors of the Women's Network for
Entrepreneurial Training (WNET) Roundtable Program, presented
an Arts and Crafts Extravaganza in Fall 2004. This program was
promoted to recruit, encourage, support, and reinforce the many tal-
ented and skilled local artists, craft makers, culinary specialists, farm-
ers and hobbyists here in the territory.
The first phase of this promotion was centered on inviting all
such artisans to the SBDC's Nisky Center/Sunshine Mall facilities to
have the opportunity to formally present their products/produce to
other craft makers in a roundtable session. Many of the vendors
brought samples of their products/produce as part of a showcase
that was centered in the facility. All participants were also afforded
helpful tips and instruction on the topic of "Turning Hobbies/Pas-


sions Into Profits."
Approximately 25 local hobbyists participated in the roundtable
session and provided impressive displays that covered the gamut
from custom-made hats, place mats, jewel boxes, candles, baskets,
ornaments, interior home accessories, to bridal accessories and more.
To further augment the success of this initial phase, WNET and
SBDC scheduled a broaderArts and Crafts Fair that was held at Tutu
Park Mall's Center Court. This fairwas presented with an even greater
emphasis on U.S. Veterans who are aspiring hobbyists/artists/entre-
preneurs. SBDC and the WNET Program are very supportive of the
veterans of this territory who have entrepreneurial aspirations. This
fair was also a tremendous success. SBDC and WNET intend to
offer future programs and expositions that will continue to highlight
and promote these highly skilled craft makers.









FEBRU ARY 2005 5



GET THE SEA SCOOP!


UVI's Virgin Islands marine advisory ser-
vice has started a regular column, "Sea
Scoop!" in the Virgin Islands Source online
newspaper. The column answers people's
questions about the marine environment in
an accessible, easy-to-understand manner.
The column also includes a section called
"Today's Tip" and links to related online re-
sources.
So far "Sea Scoop!" has included three
"Scoops" on topics ranging from the deepest
part of the ocean to dolphin behavior. An ex-
cerpt from the first column follows (reprinted
from the VI. Source with permission):

Dear Sea Scoop,

Do dolphins sleep?

Clayt Lauter, Erie, Pa.

Dear Clayt,

Dolphins are part of the group of ani-
mals called Cetaceans (se-TAY-shuns),
and yes, they do sleep, but they do it in a
remarkable way. Dolphins are capable of
"unihemispheric slow-wave sleep," which
means they can sleep with one eye open
and one hemisphere of the brain awake.
Several times throughout the day and
night, a pod of dolphins (dolphins that live
and travel together) will sleep with half of
their brains and swim in a circle together.
The entire group rests the same half of
their brains and swims in the same direc-
tion. They swim with one eye open and
one eye closed.


Photos.com image


(To read the rest of this column orthe other
recent "Sea Scoop!" articles, please go to
the VI. Source (www.visource.com), click
on the island of your choice (St. Thomas,
St. Croix or St. John) and look for the "Sea
Scoop!" box near the top left to click on).
The column continues to get a strong
response and is receiving questions from
all over the country. One of the benefits
of an online column is that it is not lim-
ited to people who get the newspaper


delivered. Anyone with an Internet con-
nection around the world can access it.
Most recently, several elementary schools
- one in St. Thomas, one in Georgia and
one in Illinois have tapped into "Sea
Scoop!" to supplement their marine cur-
riculum.
If you, or someone you know has a
question about the marine world, go to
"Sea Scoop!" online or e-mail Ms. Eliza-
beth Ban directly at eban@uvi.edu.


SBDC GIVES WASTEWATER
TREATMENT TRAINING
Decentralized Waste Water Treatment
Training was held Dec. 6-7, 2004, at the Small
Business Development Center (SBDC). The
training was attended by representatives of
private companies and government agencies.
The first day there were 45 participants, with
32 from government departments and agen-
cies. The second day there were 33 persons
with 14 representing the private sector.
The workshop was conducted by seven
members of the consortium of on-site waste
management, a group of 15 universities
which do research and extension education
in relation to on-site waste water disposal.
There was local input from Rudy O'Reilly and
Bill Rohring. It was conducted primarily by
Dr. George Loomis from the University of
Rhode Island.
Topics included decentralized waste wa-
ter initiatives, local regulatory updates, soils
of the Virgin Islands, conventional septic sys-


SBDC's Decentralized Waste
and government agencies


ter Treatment Training was attended by representatives of private companies


tem overview, waste water treatment in soils,
introduction to alternative and innovative tech-
nology which featured pumps and controls,
media filters, extended aeration, structured
wetlands, final treatment dispersal, and in-
troduction to waste water management.
This workshop was part of the regional
water quality grant among Cornell University,
Rutgers University, University of Puerto Rico,
and the University of the Virgin Islands Co-


operative Extension Service. Attending the
conference besides the seven members of
the consortium were Debra Grantham of
Cornell University Extension Service and
Katie Buckley from Rutgers University
The participants and presenters all rated
the conference very highly. All participants re-
ceived certificate of completion signed by Dr.
George Loomis on behalf of the on-site con-
sortium.








6 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE NEWSLETTER



AES ST. )OHN AQUACULTURE

WILL HELP FARMERS CONSERVE,

Continued from p. 1

ION ADVANTAGE
OFGREENWATER
TANK CULTURE IS
THAT ITCAN
PRODUCE NEARLY 30
TIMES MORETILAPIA
THAN THE
PRODUCTION FROM
TYPICALPOND
CULTURE. TH IS. .
INCREASE IN ..
PRODUCTION HELPS
CONSERVETH E
LIMITED FARMLAND
IN THE VIRGIN .
ISLANDS. FARMERS
CAN DIVERSIFYTHEIR .
FARMS INTO FISH
CULTURE WITHOUT .
USING LARGEPLOTS
OFTHEIR LAND,
WHICH CAN BE KEPT
INVEGETABLEOR .
LIVESTOCK Above: The greenwater tanks site is adjacent to the existing vegetable gardens. The land was cleared and leveled before the
PRO DUCTION. block walls were constructed
Below: The tiers of block were stacked to form the circular tank walls


H1TP://PPS. UVI. EDU/









FEBR IARY 2005 7


PROJECT


DIVERSIFY



gallons can be removed each day and used
for irrigation. The solid waste removed by
the clarifier also contains nutrients that can
be recovered by incorporating the dried
sludge as an amendment to the farm soil.
The greenwater tank at the Garden
Center was constructed by first removing
the topsoil and leveling the tank site. Then,
concrete cistern blocks were laid in a level
circle around the perimeter. Six tiers of
blocks make up the tank wall. Steel rein-
forcing bars were tied horizontally in each
tier and vertically in each block. The block
was then core filled with concrete to make
a wall. A liner of high density polyethylene
(HDPE) was installed to hold the water in
the tank. This was placed in the tank bot-
tom and up the sides and then attached to
the top of the walls. The circulating pump,
clarifier and base addition tank were placed
adjacent to the culture tank. Plumbing was
fitted to draw water from the tank by the
circulating pump and diverted to the base
addition tank and the clarifier, each of which
have separate water return pipes. Water can
also be diverted at this point to the vegetable
crops for irrigation.
The Coral Bay Organic Garden has
been an ongoing farming operation for over
10 years. The owners and managers, Hugo
and Josephine Roller, produce microgreens,
cucumbers, tomatoes and several other
vegetable and fruit crops. The UVI Aquac-
ulture Program will assist the Rollers with
stocking and management of the tilapia
through their first crop.
Tilapia fry will be shipped to the farm
and stocked in the tank for growout. The
fish are fed twice each day. Solid waste is
removed from the clarifier and the pH is
adjusted with base once each day. It will take
approximately 10 months for the fish to
reach market size. During the production pe-
riod, water from the rearing tankwill be used
to irrigate vegetable crops.
The Rollers hope to reduce the need
for other organic fertilizers on their farm by
incorporating nutrients from the fish waste
and culture water on their vegetable crops.
The greenwater tank will also diversify their
farm income with the addition of marketable
tilapia.
Funding for this project was provided
through a USDASustainableAgriculture Re-
search and Education (SARE) grant.


Top: The HDPE liner holds the water in the tank
Above: The water intake for the pump supplies water to the
base addition tank (light-colored barrel) and the clarifier(black
cylinder)
Inset left: The base addition and clarifier tanks greatly improve
water quality and are critical components of the greenwater
tank culture system


N- I









8 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE NEWSLETTER


RISE STUDENTS DO PROJECTS IN


AES ANIMAL SCIENCE LAB


/ FIVE-MONTH-
OLD LAMBS WERE
EVALUATED FOR
TH ElR
TEMPERAMENT
WHILE STANDING
IN THECHUTE
USINGA NUMERIC
SCALE (1 = CALM TO
5 = BERSERK).
UPON BEING
RELEASED FROM
TH E CHUTETHEI R
EXITVELOCITYWAS
MEASURED USING
ELECTRONIC EYES
ANDATIMER.
BASED ON HER
RESULTS, MS.
MCSWEEN FOUND
THAT LAMBS WITH
HIGHER CHUTE
SCORES HAD
HIGHER EXIT
VELOCITIESAND
THAT LAMB
WEANINGWEIGHT
ANDAVERAGE
DAILY GAIN WERE
RELATED TO CH UTE
SCORE, WITH THE
CALMERANIMALS
HAVING HIGHER
WEIGHTSAND
RATE OF GAIN.


Two undergraduate students, ShanaAugustin
and Verleen McSween, conducted research
projects in the lab of Dr. Bob Godfrey, Animal
Science Program Leader at the Agricultural Ex-
periment Station, during the summer of 2004. The
students were supported by the Minority Biomedi-
cal Research Support Research Initiative for
Scientific Enhancement (MBRS-RISE) grant from
the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
Ms. Augustin's project involved measuring
scrotal surface temperatures of hair sheep rams
using digital infrared thermal imaging (DITI). The
equipment was on loan to Dr. Godfrey from Dr.
Scott Willard of Mississippi State University as
part of a cooperative project they are conducting
on dairy cattle heat stress.
Ms. Augustin measured scrotal temperatures
of rams with dark- or light-colored scrotums us-
ing the DITI infrared camera and captured the
images on a laptop. By using software specific to
the camera she was able to determine the tem-
perature of regions of the scrotum as well as an
overall mean temperature.
Her results showed that rams with dark-col-
ored scrotums had lower scrotal surface tempera-
tures than rams with light-colored scrotums. She
also found that the dark-colored scrotums did not
have as large a temperature gradient from the top
to the bottom as the light-colored scrotums. Even
though the results are counter intuitive, they agree
with previous studies conducted in our lab by other
RISE students over the past three years.
Ms. McSween's project was an offshoot of a
project that is being conducted in cattle as part of
a multi-state research project. She measured tem-
perament and chute exit velQcity of hair sheep and
evaluated their relationship with each other and
with growth rates. Five-month-old lambs were
evaluated for their temperament while standing


Black and white thermal image showing a light-colored scrotum
(left) and a dark-colored scrotum (right). The light-colored
scrotum has a temperature gradient, indicated by the different
shades of gray with the darker areas being cooler, but the dark-
colored scrotum has no gradient as seen by the uniform shade
ofgray
in the chute using a numeric scale (1 = calm to 5
= berserk).
Upon being released from the chute their exit
velocity was measured using electronic eyes and
a timer. Based on her results, Ms. McSween found
that lambs with higher chute scores had higher
exit velocities and that lamb weaning weight and
average daily gain were related to chute score,
with the calmer animals having higher weights and
rate of gain. She also evaluated mature ewes
within two weeks prior to and two weeks after giv-
ing lambing, but found no relationship between
temperament and exit velocity in these animals
at either point in time.
Both students analyzed their data and pre-
sented posters of their results at the Fall Student
Research Symposium on St. Thomas in Septem-
ber 2004 and at the Annual Biomedical Research
Conference for Minority Students in Dallas, Texas,
in November 2004.
They have also submitted abstracts of their
results for oral presentation at the Southern Sec-
tion of the American Society of Animal Science
meeting in Little Rock, Arkansas, in February
2005.


CES FINANCIAL RECORD KEEPING COURSE A BIG HIT' WITH FARMERS


Can 12 weeks make a difference in people's lives?
It certainly can if it is the Cooperative Extension Ser-
vices' Computer Skills and Record Keeping Training
Course. During the training, 10 farmers, theirspouses
and one child learned basic computer maintenance
and repair as well as record keeping.
At the closing program in November 2004, CES
personnel congratulated the participants and encour-
aged them to use their newly-acquired skills to im-
prove their effectiveness as farmers. In feedback, the
farmers thanked and praised the trainer, Mr.
Marthious Clavier, Extension Agent I, whotaughtthem
the valued skills.
Mr. Anderson Williams, who accompanied his
wife to the program, said the training helped to im-
prove his skills. Before the program, he would "turn
the computer on or off and play games." Since he
started the class, he learned to "go on the 'net, to


make bills and write receipts." He also learned to
"type a little faster."
Another satisfied attendee was Mr. Renaldo
Vasquez who said the program "opened a window"
for him, because it "will help with" his billing.
The youngest member of the class was Tashima
Tuitt, 8 years old, who accompanied her mother, Ms.
Violet Drew, to the training. Ms. Drew said she had
used the computer for word processing and surfing
the Internet, but during the training, she learned the
parts of the computer, and "how to maintain it." She
was pleased with the training which, she said, will
help her as she collects receipts and puts them on
the computer. Tashima learned the farm family course
and excelled, said her mother. She does input re-
ceipts, and successfully applies all the skills thatwere
taught. Congratulations to those who have acquired
newskills and have certificates to document that fact.


HTTP-//PPS. UVI. EPU/









FEBRUARY 2005 9


WORLD FOOD DAY


ACTIVITIES 2004


ENSURING THAT VIRGIN ISLANDERS HAVE
ACCESS TO HIGH QUALITY FOOD WAS FOCUS

15 Va :r
I ii n LBMWK 8 WK


World Food Day participants packed the classrooms of the UVI Research and Extension Centerto participate in the food demonstration
workshops


October 16, 2004, marked the 24th worldwide
observance of World Food Day. Established at
the Biennial Conference of the Food and Agricul-
tural Organization of the United Nations in 1979,
World Food Day aims to increase awareness of
the problems of hunger, malnutrition, and pov-
erty. Here in the territory, the University of the
Virgin Islands' Cooperative Extension Service in
partnership with the V.I. Department of Agricul-
ture and the University's Agricultural Experiment
Station sponsored a fun-filled day on October 17,
with educational workshops and guided tours of
the research facilities.
The activity, which was attended by approxi-
mately 1,500 people, focused on the theme
"Biodiversity for Food Security." The organizers
used produce such as eggplant, passion fruit, and
beef to stress that a variety of crops grown lo-
cally will help to ensure that there is enough high
quality food that will lead to a healthier lifestyle
for the residents of the territory.
At the opening ceremony, Dr. Henry Smith, Vice
Provost of Research and Public Service, said that staff
had worked hard to ensure that the observation of
World Food Day was a success and that people who
attended the workshops and demonstrations left with


a renewed interest to make a difference in the lives
of those who do not have enough to eat.
Perhaps no one brought the message closer
to home than the Commissioner of Agriculture, Dr.
Lawrence Lewis, when he said that "everyone in
the Virgin Islands when eating their next meal
should recognize how fortunate they are to have
enough to eat." He continued by pointing out that
"the recent hurricanes that struck the region, par-
ticularly Grenada and Haiti, brought the issue of
food shortages to the forefront."
This year's event featured for the first time
a petting zoo, where children got an opportunity
to feed and interact with ducks, calves, puppies,
and donkeys. Also featured was the distribution
of 2,000 tomato, basil, pepper, and passionfruit
seedlings; there were also ice cream demonstra-
tions, food demonstrations, food vendors' courts,
and farmers' markets.
Additionally, several local elementary
schools collected 2,500 pounds of canned, non-
perishable food items which were donated to
various local charities and to the Haitian Relief
effort. Music provided by the Central High School
Jazz Band and Trey's Production entertained the
crowd throughout the day.


._ __. '


ITH ACTIVITY,
WHICH WAS
ATTENDED BY
APPROXIMATELY1,500
PEOPLE, FOCUSEDON
THE THEME
'BIODIVERSITY FOR
FOOD SECURITY.' THE
ORGANIZERS USED
PRODUCESUCH AS
EGGPLANT, PASSION
FRUIT, AND BEEFTO
STRESS THAT
VARIETY OF CROPS
GROWN LOCALLY
WILL HELP TO ENSURE
THATTH ERE IS
ENOUGH HIGH
QUALITY FOOD THAT
WILL LEAD TO A
HEALTHIER LIFESTYLE
FOR THE RESIDENTS OF
THE TERRITORY.


HTTP://RPS., UVI. EDU/









10 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE NEWSLETTER


ST CROIX SMALL LIVESTOCK FARMERS

COMPLETE SIX-WEEK PRODUCTION COURSE


R&PS UNITS INCLUDING THE COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
SERVICE, AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION AND SMALL
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER COLLABORATED WITH THE
V.I. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND ST CROIX FARMERS
IN ACTION TO CONDUCT EXTENSIVE PROGRAM


Small livestock farmers in the territory
are facing a number of problems that con-
tinue to reduce the productivity and profit-
ability of their farms. Some of these prob-
lems include overgrazing of pastures, im-
proper sanitation and handling, poor nutri-
tion of their animals, high cost of supple-
mental feed, and poor record keeping.
In an effort to address these prob-
lems, the Cooperative Extension Service,
in collaboration with the Agricultural Ex-
periment Station, V.I. Department of Ag-
riculture and St. Croix Farmers in Action,
Inc., conducted a six-week small livestock
short course to provide these producers
with scientific and applicable information
which could bring about changes in atti-
tudes and behavior pertaining to the
adoption of recommended production
management practices to enhance the ef-
ficiency and profitability of their farms.
Several professional staff, primarily
from our sponsoring agencies, provided
vital information on such topics as the
business of small livestock management;
small animals for small farms; identify-


ing small livestock through tagging; the
production and management of sheep,
goats, poultry and swine; forage estab-
lishment and management; abattoir pro-
cedures, rules and regulations; health,
sanitation and handling; financial man-
agement; and marketing of small live-
stock.
The sessions were very interactive as
farmers asked many thought provoking
questions pertaining to their particular prob-
lem or situation. The short course also pro-
vided an opportunity for producers to net-
work and share information among them-
selves as well as with the presenters and
Extension personnel.
In helping to provide small business
management skill to local farmers in the
territory, the Small Business Development
Center was asked to make a presentation
to a group of 15-20 farmers on "Financial
Management of Small Livestock." The
SBDC workshop provided an overview on
the understanding and preparation of finan-
cial statements, costs reduction, and man-
aging the risks associated with a farm or


Josette Lopez (center) proudly displays her certificate
of completion from CES Director Kwame Garcia, Sr.
(left), and VI. Department ofAgriculture Commissioner
Dr. Lawrence Lewis (right)

livestock operation.
The highlight of this short course was
the closing program where 19 of the 25
farmers attending the course were
awarded certificates of completion. Be-
fore receiving their certificates, the par-
ticipants shared their experiences and
expressed their gratitude for being able
to participate in this intensive program.
According to the short course evalu-
ation results, the overwhelming majority
(95%) of the participating farmers signifi-
cantly increased their level of knowledge.
Also, the vast majority (90%) of farmers
plan to adopt and add at least one new
technique/practice learned to their exist-
ing farm operation.


SBDC STAFF RECEIVE KEY AWARD RECOGNITION


Association of Small Business De-
velopment Centers (ASBDC) President
Donald Wilson announced that Karen C.
Jones has been selected as the 2004
State Star of the University of the Virgin
Islands Small Business Development
Center (SBDC) network.
The recognition ceremony occurred
at the recent ASBDC Fall Conference
held at the Sheraton Hotel in New Or-
leans, Louisiana.
"I am pleased to make this an-
nouncement, and to recognize Karen C.
Jones for extraordinary contributions to
the work of the SBDC network and small
business in the U.S. Virgin Islands," said
Wilson.
Ms. Jones was recently named the
Regional Director at the UVI-SBDC's St.
Croix office.
She was chosen by the SBDC net-
work for being an exemplary performer,
making a significant contribution to the


UVI-SBDC program, and showing a
strong commitment to small business
in the Virgin Islands.
America's Small Business Devel-
opment Center Network is a partner-
ship uniting private enterprise, gov-
ernment, higher education and local
nonprofit economic development or-
ganizations. It is the Small Business
Administration's largest partnership
program, providing management and
technical assistance to help Ameri-
cans start, run and grow their own
businesses.
With more than 1,000 centers
across the nation, the SBDC network
assists about 600,000 small busi-
nesses every year in face-to-face coun-
seling and training, in addition to as-
sisting hundreds of thousands more
small businesses through fax-on-de-
mand and e-mail.
SBDC's Mr. Daryl U. Edwards was


one of three recipients of the
University's 2004 RPS Employee Rec-
ognition Awards in a presentation
made at the RPS Annual Fall Retreat.
Mr. Edwards currently serves as a
Business Counselor II out of the
SBDC's St. Thomas office.
Mr. Edwards has made invaluable
contributions to the SBDC and is to be
commended for successfully taking a
lead in the various counseling, training,
and outreach initiatives that have origi-
nated out of the St. Thomas office.
SBDC is particularly pleased to have
had its employees recognized for a fifth
consecutive year.
State Director Warren T. Bush, and
Associate Director Linroy E. Freeman
led the staff in offering their congratu-
lations to Ms. Jones and Mr. Edwards.
SBDC's management is looking forward
to even greater things from them in the
future.









FEBRUARY 2005 11


SBDC BRIEFS

SBPC IN COLLABORATION
WITH GOVERNMENT
AGENCIES PRESENT
'CHECKLIST FOR 'STARTING
A BUSINESS' SEMINARS

The Small Business Development Cen-
ter (SBDC) started FY 2005 with a number
of seminars focused on providing training and
education on how to effectively start a busi-
ness in the USVI. These St. Thomas-based
programs, offered in succession in an attempt
to provide symmetry between the subject
matters, were presented with collaborative
participation of many of the government agen-
cies which effectively help authorize and le-
galize business entities in the territory.
The collaborative seminars were:
-Forms of Business Ownership: w/collabo-
rative instruction by The Office of the Lieu-
tenant Governor: Corporation and Trade-
marks Division;
-Business Registrations: w/collaborative in-
struction by The Office of the Lieutenant Gov-
ernor: Corporation and Trademarks Division;
-Business License and Zoning: w/collabora-
tion by The Department of Licensing and Con-
sumer Affairs and Department of Planning
and Natural Resources; and
-Tax Compliance & Record Keeping: w/col-
laboration by The Bureau of Internal Revenue.
Other checklist programming offered exclu-
sively by SBDC personnel were:
-Choosing a Business;
-Writing a Business Plan: Narrative Section;
and
-Writing a Business Plan: Financial Section.
SBDC extends appreciation to all the
partners and collaborators who provide im-
measurable instruction, participation, and
leadership to the SBDC with in-kind services.

SBDC REACHING OUT TO
V.I. YOUTH AND THE
COMMUNITY

The SBDC is continuing its mission of
educating and promoting entrepreneurship
through our territory's schools and commu-
nity organizations. During the first quarter of
fiscal 2005, SBDC presented to more than
100 young men and women in both the aca-
demic and vocational areas of high school
on such topics as "Starting a Business" and
"Marketing Your Skills" in St. Croix.
Special interest groups like AmeriCorps
and Lutheran Social Services of the Virgin
Islands also solicited the assistance of the
SBDC to speak on entrepreneurship to their


volunteers on who were interested in starting
their own business. Volunteers received in-
formation on the business start-up process
(i.e. licensing, capital needs, etc), and suc-
cessful business practices/strategies.
SBDC also gained some mileage from its
work with Addelita Cancryn Jr. High School
and Bertha C. Boschulte Middle School for
having participated in customized training
sessions and Career Fairs, respectively.
In 2005, SBDC intends to promote some
very exciting projects for the youth to partici-
pate in. For more information on the SBDC's
Youth Outreach program initiatives, please
contact the SBDC offices at 692-5270 (STX)
and 776-3206 (STT).

SBDC SET TO WORK WITH
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
RESOURCE CONSERVATION
& DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL,
INC. ON ITS PLOT SIGN
PROJECT

The SBDC has been asked by Ms. May
Cornwall, President of V.I. Resource Conser-
vation & Development Council, Inc. (VI
RC&D), for assistance in providing counsel-
ing, training, and technical assistance on an
after-school program design to educate stu-
dents about economic development, entre-
preneurship, and community service.
The program would afford woodworking
and business students the opportunity to ac-
quire knowledge, skills, and abilities to be-
come successful entrepreneurs while provid-
ing the residents of St. Croix with plot num-
ber signs for easy and rapid location by emer-
gency service providers as required by fed-
eral law.
Through a $25,000 grant from the USDA
Forest Service, the project proposes to have
local students in both the junior high and high
schools work together in producing 300 plot
signs using forest-based materials.
VI RC&D, with the help of the SBDC, will
assist woodworking students from the John
H. Woodson Junior High School and FBLA
students from the St. Croix Central High
School in developing a business plan for the
Plot Sign Project. The plan will enable stu-
dents to determine the production costs, sale
price of the signs, and conduct market sur-
veys of customers, and provide an opportu-
nity for them to showcase their skills. The
goals of this project are to: 1) develop a sus-
tainable program, which would rotate stu-
dents through the manufacturing, planning,
and management of a business; and 2) serve
as an after-school program model to provide
other production and services that will fulfill
a community need. SBDC looks forward to
playing a significant role in the development
of this initiative.


SBDC PROVIDED SMALL
BUSINESS COUNSELING AND
TRAINING TO OVER 2,000
USVI RESIDENTS IN FY 2004

Annually, the Small Business Develop-
ment Center establishes performance mile-
stones under the guidelines of its coopera-
tive agreement, established between the Uni-
versity of the Virgin Islands and the U.S. Small
Business Administration. SBDC is pleased
to announce that in combining the goals and
objectives for its small business counseling,
training, and outreach programs, the Center
provided services to 2,198 residents across
the territory.
Of this total, 768 received business coun-
seling assistance in a myriad of areas includ-
ing, but not limited to, business law, market-
ing, finance, cash flow management, inven-
tory control, starting a business, expanding
a business, writing and implementing a vi-
able business plan, personnel issues and
procurement opportunities. Among the re-
sults of the SBDC's business counseling ef-
forts is the over $1 million being awarded in
small business funding to V.I. entrepreneurs
who received technical assistance by the
SBDC.
SBDC's business counseling also con-
tributed immensely to the ability of dozens of
businesses to engage in significant small
business job creation and retention. Simi-
larly, 1,422 USVI residents participated in the
Center's 64 fiscal training/outreach programs.
These programs, all tailored around various
small business principles, professional and
personal enrichment topics, and financial
empowerment, were met with tremendous re-
views on the basis of measured program
evaluation feedback.
SBDC exceeded its overall program mile-
stones by 11%, representing one of the wider
margins in the SBDC network. Over 90% of
all business counseling evaluations revealed
an "excellent" overall rating for the confiden-
tial and professional services rendered.
Similarly, during FY 2004, the SBDC's
training programs received over 90% com-
bined ratings of "good to excellent." SBDC
hopes to advance the program's mandates,
business counseling, and outreach offerings
to even higher and broader levels in an effort
to further assist with the territory's economic
development improvement initiatives.


HTTP://RPS.UVI. EP'U/











12 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE NEWSLETTER


RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE

UPCOMING EVENTS

FEBRUARY APRIL 2005


FEBRUARY
2 PERSONNEL HANDBOOK/SBDC*
2 YOUTH OUTREACH PROGRAM/SBDC
3 SUPERVISION OF PERSONNEL/SBDC
3 SMALL BUSINESS OBLIGATIONS/SBDC
7 PERSONNEL EVALUATIONS & APPRAISALS/SBDC
8-APRIL26 SCIENCE SEMINAR SERIES/VI-EPSCOR & CMES
9 EMPLOYMENT LAWS/SBDC
10 TERMINATION OF EMPLOYEES/SBDC
10 FARMERS AND FISHERMEN SEMINAR WITH SBDA/SBDC
15 WNET ROUNDTABLE BANKING/SBDC
24 WATER RESOURCES CONFERENCE/WRRI

MARCH
2 WOMEN IN BUSINESS/SBDC
2 YOUTH OUTREACH: FBLA-BUSINESS PLAN/SBDC
3 IF YOU WANTA SUPERIOR WORKFORCE/SBDC
9 FILING YOUR 2004 BUSINESS TAXES/SBDC
16 SBAS COMMUNITY EXPRESS LOAN PROGRAM
ORIENTATION/SBDC
17 SBAS EXPRESS MICRO LOAN PROGRAM ORIENTATION
29 WNET ROUNDTABLE/SBDC
31 IT'S NOT W H AT YOU SAY/SBDC

APRIL
3-9 NATIONAL SMALL BUSI N ESS WEEK ACTIVITIES/SBDC
4 EDC'S ELIGIBLE SUPPLIERS FORUM/SBDC

*For more information on these events, contact the sponsoring department.





UVI RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE

o #2 )OHN BREWERS BAY

ST. THOMAS, VI 00802


5&6
6
7
20&21


FIRSTBANK OPEN HOUSE/SBDC
YOUTH OUTREACH: FBLA-BUSINESS PLAN/SBDC
THE BUSINESS PLAN/SBDC
VETERAN'S OUTREACH PROGRAM/SBDC


MAY
4 GRANT WRITING/SBDC
5 WORKING WITH THE CUSTOMER
13 YOUTH OUTREACH: BASIC BUSINESS
EXPOSURE/SBDC
17 WNET ROUNDTABLE: TAXES/SBDC
18&19 SBA'S 8A PROGRAM ORIENTATION/SBDC
18-20 9TH VIRGIN ISLANDS NONPOINTSOURCE
POLLUTION CONFERENCE/CMES
20 WNETTRAINING

JUNE
5-11 AQUAPONICS AND TILAPIA AQUACULTURE
SHORT COURSE/AES
7-9 PROCUREMENT/PRONET SBA PRODUCTS &
SERVICES/SBDC
14 WNET ROUNDTABLE-UNEMPLOYMENT
INSURANCE & GOVERNMENT INSURANCE
FUND/SBDC
17 WNETTRAINING/SBDC
23 USING QUICKBOOKS/SBDC




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