Group Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 7. No. 3.
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 Material Information
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 7. No. 3.
Series Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of the Virgin Islands.
Affiliation: University of the Virgin Islands
Publisher: University of the Virgin Islands.
Publication Date: 12/26/2004
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Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean
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Bibliographic ID: CA01300566
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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RESEARCH AND


PUBLIC SERVICE


NEWSLETTER


UNIVERSITY OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


News from the UVI Research and Public Service Component


CARIBBEAN FOOD CROPS

SOCIETY MEETS ON ST. )OHN

THEME WAS 'STRENGTHENING PARTNERSHIPS

FOR SUSTAINING CARIBBEAN AGRICULTURE'


Kwame Garcia, Sr., CES State Director and President of this
year's CFCS conference accepting award from Dr. Alberto
Beale, Chairman of the Board of Directors, Caribbean Food
Crops Society

The 40th meeting of the Caribbean Food Crops
Society (CFCS) was convened on St. John, USVI, July
19-23,2004, atthe Westin Resort and Villas. The CFCS
is an independent, professional organization of agri-
cultural scientists representing 22 countries. Hosted
by the University's Extension Service, the annual meet-
ings of the society provide an opportunity for research-
ers, producers, extension personnel and other profes-
sionals to discuss and share information pertaining to
the production, processing and distribution of food com-
modities in the Caribbean. The theme of this year's
conference was "Strengthening Partnerships for Sus-
taining Caribbean Agriculture."
The five-day conference was attended by 175 par-
ticipants, and it consisted of technical sessions, field
tours and a farmers' forum. The technical or scientific


"HOSTED BY THE UNIVERSITY'S EXTENSION
SERVICE, THE ANNUAL MEETINGS OF THE
SOCIETY PROVIDE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR
RESEARCHERS, PRODUCERS, EXTENSION
PERSONNEL AND OTHER PROFESSIONALS TO
DISCUSS AND SHARE INFORMATION
PERTAINING TO THE PRODUCTION,
PROCESSING AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD
COMMODITIES IN THE CARIBBEAN. "

presentations covered topics on Information Technol-
ogyApplication, Crop Production, Integrated Pest Man-
agement, Agronomy, Livestock Production, Soils and
Water, Marketing/Economic Development and Capacity
Building for Developing Caribbean Agriculture. These
presentations were delivered by a broad representa-
tion of scientists from the region and generated mean-
ingful interaction and information exchange. Regional
countries and islands represented at the conference
included Puerto Rico, St. Martin, Trinidad, Jamaica,
Costa Rica, Grenada and St. Vincent. Technical pa-
pers were also presented by participants from the U.S.
mainland.
Two optional field tours were offered to provide
conference participants with an overview of local agri-
cultural production systems. The first tour introduced
participants to an integrated crop and livestock farm in
Coral Bay, St. John, owned by the Roller family. This
farm features a wide variety of organically grown veg-
etables and culinary herbs which are sold fresh to lo-
cal restaurants and hotels. It also consists of a small
flock of sheep, a pond for the production of tilapia fish,
and an active compost operation to recycle all organic
waste products generated by the farm. This tour con-
tinued with a visit to the farm of Mr. Randy Laplace, a
full-time farmer on St. Thomas, who owns a success-
Continued on p.2


Volume 7, No. 3


November 2004


INSIDE

2 New Caribbean
Writer Published
3 SBDC Collaborates
on Small Business
Resource Guide for
USVI and Puerto
Rico
4 CMES: Is the
Nassau Grouper
Coming Back?
5 SBA Administrator
Visits USVI

6 Aquaculture Holds
6th Annual Fish
Short Course
7 CDC Science Briefs

7 CES' Charles Smith
Retires

9 CES Hosts Urban
Forestry Conference

10 CES Co-recipient of
$60,000 EPA Grant

11 UVI Helps St. Croix
Celebrate Mango
Melee



( -j










2 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


CFCS MEETS ON ST. )OHN
Continued from p. 1 I


THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
RESEARCH & PUBLIC
SERVICE (R&PS)
NEWSLETTER
IS AN INFORMATIONAL
NEWSLETTER ON THE UNITS
THAT MAKE UP THE
R&PS COMPONENT.
HTTP://RPS.UVI.EPU/
VICE PROVOST
HENRY H. SMITH, PH.D.
EDITORIAL BOARD
VELMA ABRAMSEN,
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO
THE PRESIDENT
LORNA CHESTERFIELD,
ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PROVOST
CLARICE C. CLARKE,
PUBLIC INFORMATION SPECIALIST
HELEN DOOKHAN,
ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST
MANUEL PALADA, PH.D.
AES RESEARCH ASSOCIATE
PROFESSOR
RAQUEL SANTIAGO SILVER,
ADMINISTRATOR
JACQUELINE SOMERSALL-
BERRY,
FORMER ASSISTANT TO THE
ECC DIRECTOR
PATRICE JOHNSON,
DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS
MARVIN WILLIAMS,
EDITOR, THE CARIBBEAN WRITER

LAYOUT & DESIGN
ROBIN STERNS, PH.D.

DISTRIBUTION
KIMA GATON
MAIL LETTERS OR COMMENTS TO:
LORNA CHESTERFIELD
/VI RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
#2 JOHN BREWERS BAY
ST. THOMAS, VI 00802
TELEPHONE: (340) 693-1061
FAX: (340) 693-1065
LCHESTEgUVI.EPU

THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VRGIN ISLANDS
15 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY,
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION,
TITLE IX, SECTION 504,
PL 101-542 EDUCATOR
AND EMPLOYER.


*moIot c. pa
on Tortola



Dr. LaVerne Ragster, UVI President, giving the keynote
address at the opening of the 40thAnnual Meeting of the
Caribbean Food Crops Society on St. John

ful intercropping operation of rare fruits, vegetables,
medicinal and culinary herbs. On the final stop of
the tour, Mr. Myron Henneman and Mr. Arthur
Hartman hosted our group at their sheep and goat
farm on St. Thomas, the largest livestock farm on
the island.
The second optional tourwas conducted on our
sister islands in the British Virgin Islands where con-
ference attendees visited several crop and livestock
farms in Tortola and Virgin Gorda. This tour was
sponsored by the BVI Department of Agriculture and
served to strengthen the professional ties between
our territories.
The week-long meeting concluded with a Farm-
ers' Forum which focused on the economic develop-


The Caribbean Writer, an international
literary anthology published in the summer I Arl
of each year by the University of the Virgin I
Islands, has recently released Volume 18 in |
its series. The anthology retains a Caribbean |
focus and features the work of writers in the
region and abroad.
Among the highlights in the current vol-
ume are a special section on the renowned
Haitian writer, Edwidge Danticat, and on two "
cultural icons from the U.S. Virgin Islands,
the semi-mythical Butty and the influential artist Charles
Abramson.
The poetry and fiction components include work
by Virgil Suarez, Thomas Reiter, Garfield Ellis and Kei
Miller. Finally, the journal highlights art by Virgin Is-
landers and book reviews by an international gather-
ing of critics and intellectuals.
Prize winners of the previous volume include the


(tricipafls I s1t d small pineapple plot at toe uiepartmet O fAgriculture


nment of the territory l throIugh agriLiltliral initiati e, ,-,r-
ganizalions represented at the Farmers Forum In-
cluded the St. Croix Farmers inAction, We Grow Food,
Inc., and the V.I. Institute forAgricultural Development.
Representatives of the local organizations deliv-
ered presentations on their respective organizations'
plans forthe development of agricultural initiatives, and
subsequent economic benefits for the territory. Ideas
and comments from farmers included:
* the development of a farm land tax
* the construction of farmers' market facilities
* the construction of processing facilities
* the re-instatement of an agriculture curriculum in
grades K-12, and atthe University of the Virgin Islands.
As a result of this conference many professional
and institutional partnerships were strengthened and
new linkages were formed for future regional collabo-
rations. Sponsors of the conference were the V.I. De-
partment of Agriculture, the V.I. Port Authority, the De-
partment of Tourism, the West Indian Company, Ltd.,


* U Daily News Prize for poetry awarded to
i nh, I Berkley Wendell Semple, The Canute A.
1-i ITF I Brodhurst Prize for short fiction won by Opal
SPalmer Adisa, The Charlotte and Isidor
I Paiewonsky Prize for first-time publication
Earned by Michael Winston Bachoo, The
David Hough Literary Prize for an author re-
siding in the Caribbean awarded to Willi
Chen, and The Marguerite Cobb McKay Prize
for a Virgin Islands author received by Win-
ston Nugent.
Volume 18 of The Caribbean Writeris available at
Education Central, Memories of St. Croix, Undercover
Books, Dockside Bookshop on St. Thomas and both
UVI bookstores. Copies can also be ordered directly
from The Caribbean Writers office by calling
(340) 692-4152, e-mailing qmars@uvi.edu or
orders@thecaribbeanwriter.com or from our secure
server website at www.TheCaribbeanWriter.com.


NEW CARIBBEAN WRITER PUBLISHED









NOVEMBER 2004 3


CES EXPANDS TO CARIBBEAN AREA


On June 9-10, 2004, the Cooperative Extension
Service, in collaboration with the University of Florida
Extension, held the first of three workshops as part
of a National Initiative of Internationalizing Exten-
sion. Funded by CSREES- United States Depart-
ment ofAgriculture (USDA), these new initiatives are
designed to assist land-grant universities in bring-
ing an international focus to extension programming.
Funded for the first year with a $9,000 grant, the
program involves collaborative work with institutions
in Grenada, Dominica and the British Virgin Islands.
Greetings were extended by Mr. Kwame Garcia,
CES State Director; Mr. Kofi Boateng, Associate Di-
rector; and Ms. Jennifer Jackson, Chancellor of the
St. Croix Campus.
Dr. Peter Vergott and Ms. Monica Brinkley from
the University of Florida opened the session, lay-
ing the foundation for understanding the interna-
tionalizing of extension efforts. Mr. Alex Bolques
further expanded the discussion on extension by
sharing information regarding Florida A & M Uni-
versity. A former 4-H Program employee at UVI-
CES, Mr. Bolques, who is now employed with the
University of Florida, presented a valuable, unique
perspective.
Over 25 participants engaged in two days of in-
formation sharing, experiences, and expertise rela-
tive to the Extension Service. Presentations were
made by representatives from the British Virgin Is-
lands, Mr. Urban Martin, Chief Agriculture Officer;
Dr. Malachy Dottin from Grenada who is the Direc-
tor of Research; and Mr. Kwame Garcia, UVI Exten-
sion Director.
Cross-cultural Communication and Participatory
Methodologies presentations were made by UVI's
Dr. Jeannette Lovern and Dr. Aletha Baumann, re-
spectively, to assist in putting the varied complexi-


Participants in the workshop included Kwame Garcia, Sr., CES
State Director (3rd left), Sommer Sibilly, Extension Assistant
(center) and Lois Sanders, CES Assistant Director (right)


ties and issues in perspective as internationaliza-
tion occurs.
The next session, on Global Exchange and In-
terdependence presented by Dr. Solomon Kabuka,
focused on globalization and its implications related
to agriculture and consumer consumption and other
issues inextricably related to the interdependence
of varied facets within society.
The final session allowed for professional ex-
change and questions and answers. Participants
also had an opportunity to visit a local farm to view
an animal production and horticulture production
site.
Participants were asked to complete a workshop
evaluation and to make suggestions regarding the
next workshop on internationalization and global-
ization.
For more information on the internationalizing
extension effort go to www.msue.msu.edu/intext/
natinit.htm, or to speak with the CES contact, Mr.
Kofi Boateng, call (340) 692-4066, or e-mail:
kboaten@uvi.edu.


"THESE NEW
INITIATIVES ARE
DESIGNED TO ASSIST
LAND-GRANT
UNIVERSITIES IN
BRINGING AN
INTERNATIONAL FOCUS
TO EXTENSION
PROGRAMMING.
FUNDED FOR THE FIRST
YEAR WITH A $9,000
GRANT, THE PROGRAM
INVOLVES
COLLABORATIVE WORK
WITH INSTITUTIONS IN
GRENADA, DOMINICA
AND THE BRITISH
VIRGIN ISLANDS.


SMALL BUSINESS RESOURCE GUIDE FOR USVI AND PUERTO RICO


Recently, UVI-SBDC, in collaboration with the
United States Small Business Administration,
Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands District Office
and RENI Publishing, produced a comprehensive
Small Business Resource Guide for the USVI and
Puerto Rican districts.
This guide is targeted for use by emerging,
existing and expanding entrepreneurs who may
need assistance with understanding the various
resources and procedures inherent in doing busi-
ness in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
The contents of the guide include the following
key points:
* Getting Started: everything you need to know about
setting up, marketing and managing the revenue of
a business;
* Regulations: what local and federal authorities want
from you and the best way to meet the requirements;
* Websites of Interest: the best business resources
that cyberspace has to offer;
* Entrepreneurial Development: resources, like the
UVI-SBDC and others, who can help guide an en-
trepreneur through the process;


* Financing: where to look for it and what to do to
get the financing you need. This section also in-
cludes the various types of SBA loan programs,
business financing requirements and a listing of the
Territory's business lending institutions;
* Government Contracting: find out how to become
a partner with local and federal agencies;
* Minority Business Development: outlines federal
programs that are designed specifically to help mi-
norities with starting their own business.
The uniqueness of this guide is that it is pre-
sented in English and Spanish which accommo-
dates the English- and Spanish-speaking resi-
dents in both districts.
It is also free and will help to foster inter-is-
land business exchange. Residents in Puerto Rico
who are interested in doing business in the Virgin
Islands and vice versa will have all of the neces-
sary contact information at their disposal to facili-
tate that process.
For more information on the guide and for a
copy, please contact the SBDC offices at (340) 776-
3206 (STT) and (340) 692-5270 (STX).


HT-TP://1PS. UVI. EDU!









4 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER



IS THE NASSAU GROUPER COMING BACK?


Perhaps one of the most popular fish in the Bahamas and the
northern Caribbean is the Nassau grouper (Epinephelus striatus). A
large and very striking fish, the once prolific Nassau grouper has been
historically dominant both culturally and economically in Caribbean
fisheries. In a book written in 1900 on the fish of Puerto Rico and the
Virgin Islands, the Nassau grouper is described as "a common and
very important food fish, reaching a weight of 50 pounds or more."
Today the fish is virtually extinct over most of its historical range. Of
over 150 large tropical groupers worldwide, of which most are se-
verely over-harvested and threatened, the Nassau is considered one
of the most endangered.
Besides being an extremely palatable fish, several of the
Nassau grouper's behaviors and life history characteristics have
contributed to its decline. It is a naturally curious and aggressive
fish and approaches spear fishers and traps without hesitation.
The fish occurs in shallow water close to shore during much of its
lifetime and is fairly omnivorous, making it easily caught by both
traps and hook and line. Probably most instrumental in its demise,
however, is the fact that Nassau grouper aggregates in huge groups
each year in order to spawn.
During the non-reproductive time of the year, the Nassau grou-
per is a solitary and territorial fish, exhibiting a strong affinity for a
particular home site. One month prior to spawning, fish abandon
their territories and swim sometimes over 100 miles to an estab-
lished aggregation site. It is unknown how the grouper find the
site, but it is believed to be at least partly learned behavior. Typi-
cally the aggregation builds up for a period of days prior to spawn-
ing. In healthy aggregations, thousands of fish may be present by
the time reproduction finally occurs. Most known spawning aggre-
gations in the Caribbean coincide with the full moon of two con-
secutive months between November and March. Because of their
predictability and the sheer density of fish, spawning aggregations
of Nassau grouper in the Caribbean have been targeted by fisher-
men for generations. Over the past 30 years, severe overfishing of
these sites has led to the collapse of stocks in Puerto Rico and the
Virgin Islands, mandating a federal closure of the fishery in the
1990's. In 1996 the Nassau grouper was listed as endangered on
the IUCN (the World Conservation Union) and it is currently a can-
didate under the United States Endangered Species Act.
The historical spawning site of the Nassau grouper in the USVI
lies approximately 10 miles south of St. Thomas on a relatively small
deep-water coral reef, at the edge of the Puerto Rican shelf. Thou-


Nassau grouper in its natural habitat


"-

Dr. Rick Nemeth holding a Nassau grouper which was tagged and released on the
grouper bank in March 2004

sands of pounds of Nassau were harvested annually from this one-
mile-long bank in the 1980's. By 1990 the stock had collapsed. Since
then the bank is fished by only a few fishermen who are now targeting
the yellowfin grouper (Mycteroperca venenosa), a species that also
uses the site to spawn. In March of 2003 researchers from UVI's Cen-
ter for Marine and Environmental Studies (CMES), headed by Dr. Ri-
chard Nemeth, surveyed the deep-water bank using scuba as part of
an investigation into the status of the yellowfin grouper spawning ag-
gregation that reportedly occurs there. A small number of Nassau
groupers were seen on the bank along with other large groupers,
including the yellowfin, tiger (Mycteroperca tigris) and yellowmouth
(Mycteroperca interstitialis). In 2004 the bank was surveyed again
and fished more extensively by the CMES research team. They were
surprised to find many more fish, measuring and tagging over 70
Nassau grouper in March and April. Although no actual spawning was
observed, it appeared that the grouper were again using the site for
that purpose. Pre-spawning behavior and coloration were observed,
and the majority of fish tested with ultrasound equipment contained
ripe ovaries and testes.
Based on this data, CMES biologists have recommended that
the spawning bank be closed to fishing during the months of Febru-
ary through May Although illegal for possession or sale, the Nassau
grouper is still in danger on the unprotected bank because it arrives
to spawn at the same time of year as the yellowfin grouper and is a
bycatch of that fishery. The Caribbean Fisheries Management Coun-
cil has agreed, and the area will be temporarily closed to all fishing
from February through April beginning in 2005. Although the num-
bers are still relatively very small, with careful management of the
species and the aggregation site, perhaps the waters of the Virgin
Islands can again become the home of the Nassau grouper.









NOVEMBER 2004 5


ADMINISTRATOR OF U.S. SMALL


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION VISITS USVI


"THE JULY 2004 TRIP BY HONORABLE HECTOR V. BARRETO, THE 21ST
ADMINISTRATOR OF THE UNITED STATES SMALL BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION, WAS THE FIRST OFFICIAL U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS VISIT
BY THE ADMINISTRATOR SINCE HE WAS UNANIMOUSLY CONFIRMED
BY THE U.S. SENATE IN JULY 2001.'


ricrurear rom ierrT rognrare warren i. ousn, uv-iO-Ou
Hon. Hector V. Barreto, Administator, U.S. SBA; Carmen C
SBA's District Manager; Carl Christensen, U.S. SBA's
Charge

The University of the Virgin Islands
Small Business Development Center, in col-
laboration with corporate sponsors,
FirstBank Virgin Islands and the St. Tho-
mas/St. John Chamber of Commerce,
played host to the Honorable Hector V.
Barreto, the 21stAdministrator of the United
States Small Business Administration
(SBA). The July 2004 trip was the first offi-
cial U.S. Virgin Islands visit by the Adminis-
trator since he was unanimously confirmed
by the U.S. Senate in July 2001. Mr. Barreto
was accompanied by a traveling delegation
of SBA executives which also included
SBA's District Manager, Ms. Carmen
Culpepper; USVI Project Officer, Carl
Christensen; and SBA's Assistant Adminis-
trator (Office of Public Communications),
Mr. Raul Cisneros.
To commemorate the occasion, UVI-
SBDC and co-sponsors FirstBank Virgin Is-
lands and the St. Thomas/St. John Chamber
of Commerce, coordinated a private USVI
welcoming reception at the Marriott
Frenchman's Reef and Morningstar Beach
Resort.
Invited public and private sector partners
and stakeholders had this opportunity to meet
and interact with the Administrator and his
delegation in a very relaxed, social atmo-
sphere.
UVI-SBDC also sponsored a Bankers'
Roundtable at the SBDC's Training Facility
(Nisky Center, St. Thomas), where Mr. Barreto
delivered the keynote address to the Territory's
banking community and other stakeholders.
Mr. Barreto's position, and his lifetime of
involvement with the small business commu-


nity, has also made him
America's highest-ranking
small business advocate.
In his capacity as SBA's
Administrator, he meets daily
with small business owners
and trade associations that
represent them. This affords
state Director; him the opportunity and privi-
'ulpepper, u.S. lege of keeping in constant
USVI Officer in touch with the needs and pri-
orities of America's small
businesses and sharing
those priorities with the President of the
United States.
President Bush has said that Barreto
is "a fine leaderwho cares deeply about the
small businesses of America...and he and
I know that small businesses are the back-
bone of our economy." The President has
also pointed out that Barreto "understands
that the role of government is not to create
wealth, but to create an environment in
which entrepreneurs from all walks of life
have a chance to succeed."
Barreto has received special recogni-
tion for his contributions to America's small
business community from the U.S. Con-
gress, the California Legislature, theAmeri-
can Heart Association and the American
Red Cross. Recognized by Hispanic Busi-
ness magazine as one of America's "100
Most Influential Hispanics," he has also
been praised by the Latino Coalition for be-
ing a role model to Latino youth, and the
Hispanic College Fund has also com-
mended his leadership in advancing His-
panic businesses.
The Management and Leadership of
the University of the Virgin Islands Small
Business Development Center, FirstBank
Virgin Islands and the St. Thomas/St. John
Chamber of Commerce are particularly
proud of the opportunity to have hosted the
SBA's Administrator. With a portfolio of di-
rect and guaranteed business loans worth
more than $45 billion, SBA is the largest
single financial backer and facilitator of tech-
nical assistance and contracting opportuni-
ties for the nation's small businesses. Admin-
istrator Barreto's commentary was centered


on the premise that small businesses drive
the economy. The 25 million small businesses
in the United States, he said, employ 50 per-
cent of the workforce.
"They are the engine that fuels the
economy," and the SBA provides much of the
capital $220 billion since its inception in the
1950s that Barreto called "the oxygen that
small businesses breathe."
Barreto added that in the USVI, there is
a definite opportunity to capitalize on the
SBAs 504 Guaranty Program, a program spe-
cifically earmarked for real estate or large
equipment purchases by what Barreto called
"certified development companies." "I have $5
billion I can put in the hands of small busi-
nesses for buildings and large equipment,"
he said.
The SBDC, SBA, and the USVI's com-
munity lending partners are all encouraged
to continue collaborating with and assisting
the small business owners in every way fea-
sible. Warren Bush, UVI-SBDC State Direc-
tor, was very pleased to have had the oppor-
tunity for the SBDC (and co-sponsors) to be
a part of this historic visit.
Mr. Bush added, "it is an honor and dis-
tinct privilege fortheAdministrator and his del-
egation to visit the United States Virgin Is-
lands. There is also a deep sense of appre-
ciation for the vast support and cooperation
received by the primary co-sponsors,
FirstBank Virgin Islands and the St. Thomas/
St. John Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Cassan
Pancham, First Vice President and General
Manager of FirstBank Virgin Islands, as well
as President of the STT/STJ Chamber of
Commerce, has always demonstrated a com-
mitted dedication to the upward mobility of the
Territory's economic development initiatives.
FirstBank's and the Chamber's invaluable co-
operation and contribution were a true testa-
ment of their continuing support of the U.S.
Small Business Administration, the UVI-
SBDC, and the USVI community in general."
Mr. Barreto made a similar visit to neigh-
boring Puerto Rico to attend similar activities
before returning to the U.S. mainland. He has
visited 55 of the 77 Small Business Develop-
ment Center facilities in the United States and
its territories as part of his commitment to the
entrepreneurs he serves.









6 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


AQUACULTURE


HOLDS 6TH


ANNUAL FISH SHORT COURSE


JUVI'S GREENWATER
AND AQUAPONIC
SYSTEMS REPRESENT A
WINNING
COMBINATION OF
LOADS OF FISH, SMALL
LAND REQUIREMENT,
WATER REUSE,
NLTRIJENT RECOVERY
AND VALUABLE
PLANT BYPRODUCTS.
IN THE AQUAPONIC
SYSTEM THE PLANTS
NOT ONLY RECOVER
NUTRIENTS BLT ALSO
PURIFY THE CULTURE
WATER. WHAT
STARTED OT AS A
SMALL PROJ ECT TO
ADDRESS A LOCAL
PROBLEM HAS GROWN
INTO A POPULAR
TOPIC WITH
WORLDWIDE APPEAL."


AESAquaculture Short Course Class of 2004
The Agricultural Experiment Station's Aquaculture
Program hosted another successful "Aquaponics and
Tilapia Aquaculture Short Course," June 20-26, 2004.
For the second straight year, attendance reached full
capacity of 33 students. The students came from three
territories (U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and Ameri-
can Samoa), 12 states (Alabama, Arizona, California,
Florida, Georgia, Illinois, New York, Oregon, Pennsyl-
vania, Texas, Washington and West Virginia) and five
countries (Canada, Dominican Republic, Grand Cay-
man, St. Martin and South Africa). In six offerings, the
course has attracted 141 students from 26 states, four
territories and 25 countries.
The popularity of the course is due to the two
unique and relevant technologies that have been de-
veloped by theAquaculture Program. Greenwatertank
culture and aquaponics are very attractive production
systems for many regions because they produce fish
very intensively, conserve water and recycle nutrients.
As a result, these systems use very little land and wa-
ter resources and produce valuable plant crops from
nutrients that normally are discharged into water bod-
ies where they may cause pollution.
UVI's greenwater and aquaponic systems repre-
sent a winning combination of loads of fish, small land
requirement, water reuse, nutrient recovery and valu-
able plant byproducts. In the aquaponic system the
plants not only recover nutrients but also purify the cul-
ture water. What started out as a small project to ad-
dress a local problem has grown into a popular topic
with worldwide appeal. It turns out there are many other


areas in the world with limited land and water resources
and the need for locally grown fish and vegetables.
As stated in the June 26 St Croix Avis, student
Joel Francis from the Cayman Islands said he took
the course to explore the benefits of combining aquac-
ulture with hydroponics. He said one "tremendous" ben-
efit of aquaponics is that it is ideal for regions where
water is scarce and the soil is not fit for farming.
Another attractive feature of the UVI greenwater
tank culture and aquaponic systems is that they are
relatively simple to construct and easy to manage. They
represent appropriate or intermediate technology, and
the systems have proven to be reliable and robust.
The course was team-taught by James Rakocy,
Donald Bailey, Eric Thoman and Charlie Shultz. Help
was also provided this year by Gaetan Gentius, a UVI
undergraduate student in math and science. With 24
hours of classroom instruction and 24 hours of hands-
on fieldwork, it is a challenge to provide a seamless
educational experience to students ranging from Ph.D.s
in aquaculture to entrepreneurs with no fish culture
experience at all. The goal is to train everyone to a
level where they will be able to design and construct a
commercial operation, raise tons of fresh fish and veg-
etables, and then sell their products at a profit. Stu-
dents are encouraged to keep in touch, continue to
ask questions and communicate their successes.
It is a pleasure to report the recent news that there
is a new UVI aquaponic system producing tilapia and
fresh vegetables for the citizens of Beirut, Lebanon.
The Aquaculture Program is truly "globally interactive."


HTTP://RPS. UVI. EDU/









NOVEMBER 2004 7


CDC SCIENCE BRIEFS


CORAL BAY WATERSHED ASSOC.
Through a USGSNVRRI grant of $38,000,
the Conservation Data Center is assisting the
residents of the Coral Bay Watershed, St. John,
to organize a Residents Association to address
pressing environmental and social concerns.
One of the largest and fastest growing areas in
the Virgin Islands, more than 150 residents and
volunteers have joined the non-profit Coral Bay
Community Council. The group is hosting infor-
mational meetings, working with DPNR/CZM and
V.I. Police to protect the quality of life and ad-
dress emerging issues. The grant is providing
funds for organization, printing, an informational
brochure, a preliminary Stormwater Management
Plan, a GIS Watershed Atlas for planning,
stormwater chemistry sampling and a road/home
locater system for emergency services.

V.I. STATE OF THE REEFS REPORT
The CDC has partnered with Nicolas
Drayton of The Ocean Conservancy and
Caroline Rogers of USGS to complete the tech-
nical editing of a publication funded by the Na-
tional Fish and Wildlife Federation. The report,
being published by The Ocean Conservancy, is
meant to be used to inform the public, decision
makers and visitors about coral reef resources
and issues that threaten their health. Scientists
from around the Territory have assisted with pre-
paring individual sections. Publication and local
unveiling is scheduled for January 2005 when
Dr. Sylvia Earle will introduce the booklet.

WETLANDS AND RIPARIAN
AREAS FINAL REPORT
The CDC Chief Scientist, Principal Investi-
gator for the project, has completed the final re-
port for Phase I. Stevie Henry, CDC Data Man-
ager, and Pedro Nieves, Assistant Data Man-
ager and field scientist, helped produce the final
deliverables for the project. Partnered with Is-
land Resources Foundation, the two groups com-
pleted a pilot study of 18 priority watersheds and
the wetland systems they contain. These data
will help to characterize the rare wetland com-
munities of the V.I. and provide the first compre-
hensive data about ecological health, water qual-
ity, vegetation communities and sedimentation
history for use in DPNR management efforts.
Phase II of this project will refine these methods
and complete the inventory and assessment of
many of the 600+ wetlands in the Territory.

DISNEY CONSERVATION FUNDS
CORAL DISEASE RESEARCH
In late July, aboard the cruise ship "Disney
Magic," a $14,000 donation from the Disney
Conservation Fund was made to Friends of the
Virgin Islands National Park. CDC, partnering with
Caroline Rogers of USGS, prepared a grant re-
quest to Disney for continuing research into the
health of Elkhorn Coral Reefs around St. John.


The funds will allow CDC and USGS to map the
incidence of White Band Disease and White Pox
around the island. Data on the patterns of dis-
ease can be used to determine outbreak loca-
tions and possible sources of pathogens deci-
mating valuable nearshore reefs.

YACHT HAVEN WATER TESTING
The CDCwas hired by Island Development
and IN-USVI to provide the field team to monitor
water quality during the restoration of the Yacht
Haven site. In May 2004, preliminary testing on
dissolved oxygen, fecal coliform and turbidity
were done to establish baseline values for Char-
lotte Harbor. In July, over water and dredging
work began. CDC is monitoring water quality
twice weekly and providing records and reports
to DPNR and CZM inspectors.

RECENT DEPOSITIONAL HISTORY
OF ST. THOMAS AND ST. JOHN
The CDC, partnering with Eckerd College,
St. Petersburg, Fla., has completed a field study
and report entitled "Detecting Anthropogenic
Impacts in the Sedimentary Record." More than
20 sediment cores were taken from 13 coastal
wetlands surrounding St. Thomas-St. John,
some pristine and some highly disturbed. The
cores, when analyzed, record the natural coastal
development of the islands during the last sea-
level rise and show a final disturbing phase of
human impact from the excesses of develop-
ment. The record of human impact is most evi-
dent in wetlands below heavily developed ar-
eas along the west coast of St. John and the
east and southeast coasts of St. Thomas. These
data will assist DPNR in setting priorities for
management efforts in preserving and protect-
ing coastal environments.

COASTAL AREA IMPACT
MAPPING FOR PRIORITY BAYS
CDC has been notified of the approval of a
$24,500 grant from the V.I. Non-Point Source
Committee to complete sediment core work
primarily in St. Croix and St. Thomas in prior-
ity watersheds and bays. Working with Eckerd
College Marine Laboratory, CDC will sample
many bays for the first time and use an X-
Ray Diffraction (XRD) technique to determine
the extent of the marine impact area for
coastal watersheds. While watersheds are
easily defined, the size ofthe marine area they
can influence is largely unknown. The data
will be applied by DPNR in its Watershed Res-
toration Action Strategies.

ADDITIONAL PROJECTS
-Comprehensive Land and Water Use Plan
maps
-Lameshur Bay Mangrove Restoration As-
sessment
-VIERS Laboratory Renovation and Permitting


Charles Smith (left) at his retirement party. Stafford
Crossman (right), Deputy Commissioner ofA agriculture,
gives remarks. Kwame Garcia (center), UVI Extension
Director

CES' SMITH RETIRES
After working 22 years at UVI, Charles
Smith, who had been an Extension Assis-
tant IV with the Cooperative Extension Ser-
vice, retired. He was instrumental in sell-
ing the concept of box gardening to Virgin
Islanders, particularly those on St. Croix.
"When we think of theAgriculture and
Food Fair, Mango Melee, World Food Day,
Box Gardening in the Schools and the
Farmers' Committee," said Kwame Garcia,
Sr., Extension State Director, we think of
Charles Smith. "When we look at the let-
ters of appreciation and the certificates
awarded by schools, Virgin Islands' Hous-
ing Authority, and institutions like the Uni-
versity of the West Indies, we applaud
Charles Smith. When, at CES, we cel-
ebrated birthdays, births, and when we
offered condolences and grieved with col-
leagues, we thank Charles Smith, because
he was a member of CES' Sunshine Com-
mittee."
Smith received awards for his urban
gardening exhibit for World Food Day. A
very resourceful person, Smith usually an-
ticipated problems, knew how to overcome
them, and resolved them successfully.
Smith worked with the Young Farm-
ers and Beautification Club of the St.
Patrick Catholic School, with the REACH
Gardening Cluster Activity at the Ricardo
Richards Elementary School, the Flamboy-
ant Gardens for the Elderly and introduced
organic farming to participants in the Vir-
gin Islands' Housing Authority's After-
School Tutorial Program.
He was commended for his participa-
tion in the Organic Farming and Extension
Workshop on St. Vincent and the Grena-
dines, sponsored by the University of the
West Indies, and he also worked exten-
sively with the small livestock program.
"The Extension staff extends sincere
gratitude to Charles Smith for his invalu-
able contribution to the University, to the
community and to the Caribbean region.
We will fill your place, but we can never fill
your shoes," Mr. Garcia said.










8 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


Pictured above: Cassan Pancham (left), First Vice
President and General Manager of FirstBank Virgin
Islands accepts FirstBank's 2004 SBDC's V.I.
Community Advocate of the Year A ward from Warren
T. Bush, SBDC 's State Director and Carl Christensen,
U.S. SBA's USVI Officer in Charge.
Pictured at right: STX honorees assemble for a group
picture including (from left) Banco Popular de Puerto
Rico's Abraham Edwards; Gertrude Restaurant's
Gertrude Gumbs; Two Plus Two Owner Elsworth
Jones; Angela Weber, 2004 UVI-SBDC Business
Advocate of the Year Award Recipient; Dive
Experience's Michelle Pugh; and Beatrice Ramos of
Wild Orchid and Gifts

SBDC, SBA RECOGNIZE VI ENTREPRENEURS AT AWARDS BANQUETS


In recognition of the small business
community's contributions to the American
economy and society, the President of The
United States designates one week each year
as National Small Business Week. The U.S.
Small BusinessAdministration (SBA) celebrated
National Small Business Weekthe week of May
9, 2004.
The highlight of the week is the presenta-
tion of awards in recognition of the outstanding
contributions of small business persons and ad-
vocates at the territorial and national levels.
The 2004 SBDC Awards were presented
in St. Thomas as part of the St. Thomas/St. John
Chamber of Commerce's Business After Hours
Reception. This eventwas hosted bythe SBDC
from its lead office in Nisky Center. It was a re-
sounding success, attended by an estimated 100
guests and supporters.
A similar SBDC awards banquet was held
on the island of St. Croix the following day in
collaboration with the St. Croix Chamber of Com-
merce. SBDC is pleased once again to recog-
nize and congratulate the following honorees:

2004 UVI-SBDC Small Business Person of
the Year Award Recipients
-Mariel, Akinyemi, and Felicia Blake, co-owners,
Ital Ase Botanica and Wedding Services (STT)
-Mr. Jason Budsan, owner, Caribbean Herbals
& Candles (STT)
-Ulysess and Ulric Pilgrim, co-owners, Pilgrim
Terrace (STT)
-Ms. Beatrice Ramos, owner, Wild Orchid Gift &
Flowers (STX)
-Ms. Gertrude Gumbs, Gertrude's Restaurant
(STX)
-Mr. Elsworth Jones, owner, Two Plus Two Night
Club & Restaurant, Inc. (STX)


2004 UVI-SBDC Citizen Award -V.I. Commu-
nity Advocate of the Year
-Dr Alexander Randall V (STT)

2004 UVI-SBDC CorporateAwards -V.I. Com-
munity Advocates of the Year
-FirstBank VI, Mr. Cassan Pancham, First Se-
nior Vice President/General Manager
-V.I. Economic DevelopmentAuthority, Mr. Frank
Schulterbrandt, Chief Executive Officer

2004 UVI-SBDC Entrepreneurial Success
Award Recipient
-Ms. Michelle Pugh, Dive Experience (STX)

2004 UVI-SBDC Business Advocate of the
Year Award Recipient
-Ms. Angela-Weber (STX)

Mr. Carl Christensen, USVI Officer in Charge of
the U.S. SBA, presented awards to the follow-
ing USVI honorees:

SBDC'S THI RD-QUARTER.
TRAINING AND BUSINESS
COUNSELING RESULTS
The SBDC is pleased to report that for the
third quarter of fiscal year 2004, the Center con-
ducted 63 training programs territorywide, serv-
ing approximately 412 attendees. The Center
also has received a highly favorable approval
rating on these programs as verified from stake-
holder evaluations. The training conducted in-
cluded collaborative programming with the Fam-
ily Life Center (Basic Business Exposure), U.S.
SBA(St. John and St. Thomas informational ses-
sion), Women in Business (featuring USVI fe-
male entrepreneurs Yvette deLaubanque, Joan


U.S. Small Business Administration's Small
Business Persons of the Year
-Anton and Kelly Kuipers, Frederiksted Hotel
(STX)
-Allison and Beverly Petrus, Subway Franchise
Owners (STT)

U.S. Small Business Administration's USVI
Bank of the Year
-Banco Popular de Puerto Rico

Warren Bush, State Director, applauded
the efforts of the deserving entrepreneurs
and institutions recognized at these cer-
emonies: "To their credit, they have all per-
severed and have attained major mile-
stones that they, and all of their supporters,
should be extremely proud of." Mr. Bush
went on to thank the STT/STJ Chamber of
Commerce and his (SBDC) staff for their
efforts in helping to establish first-rate cer-
emonies.

Lynch, Lorna Webster), New Image Foundation
(Grant Writing), and St. Croix Credit Bureau (Credit
Report).
In addition, approximately 162 client cases
were handled territorywide via the Center's free
business counseling services. Atotal of 862 hours
were spent providing business counseling assis-
tance, an average of 5.32 hours spent per case.
The SBDC will continue to sponsor innova-
tive and cutting-edge training and counseling to
address the entrepreneurial and economic devel-
opment potential of aspiring and existing business
owners and their employees. For more informa-
tion on these past programs and upcoming events,
please contact the SBDC at (340) 776-3206 (STT)
or (340) 692-5270 (STX).









NOVEMBER 2004 9


UVI EXTENSION HOSTS


CARIBBEAN URBAN FORESTRY


CONFERENCE

The 9th Annual Caribbean Urban and Commu-
nity Forestry Conference was held June 14-18, 2004,
at the beautiful Westin Resort and Villas in St. John,
U.S. Virgin Islands. Approximately 100 individuals
participated in the five-day event which included
poster and oral presentations, a working field trip
and an awards ceremony and banquet. There were
three keynote addresses centering on the confer-
ence theme "Managing the Caribbean Urban and
Community Forest."
The conference officially opened with Dr. Louis
E. Petersen, Jr., District Supervisor of UVI Coop-
erative Extension Service, followed by remarks by
Mr. Kwame Garcia, State Director of Cooperative Ex-
tension Service. The other speakers were Mr. Terry
Hueth, S.P.F. Manager, USDA Forest Service; Hon.
Lawrence Lewis, Ph.D., Commissioner of the V.I.
Department of Agriculture; Dr. Henry Smith, UVI Vice
Provost for Research and Public Service; and Hon.
Louis P Hill, Chair of Planning and Environmental
Protection Committee of the Virgin Islands Legisla-
ture.
The keynote addresses on the opening day were
given by Mark Buscaino who spoke on the "National
Program for Urban and Community Forestry."
Eleanor Gibney, who has lived on St. John for many
years, spoke on "The St. John Forest Through Time:
An Overview of the Climate and Human Influences
That Have Shaped the Forest Vegetation Today." The
final keynote address was given on Wednesday by
John Pipoly III and was entitled "Organization of the
Caribbean Vegetation Monitoring Network."
Over the course of three days, participants lis-
tened to presentations in four general categories:
Agency Program Overview which dealt with gov-
ernment agencies that produce urban forestry pro-
grams, Management of Urban Forest, Community
Initiative and Hazard Assessment Workshop. The
latter presentations highlighted the efforts of non-
profit and community-based groups that manage
the urban forest in their neighborhood or region.
One of the more interactive sessions was the Haz-
ard Tree Assessment Workshop. The presenters
helped the audience to access three actual ex-
amples where trees were involved in hazardous
situations.
Each year, the conference planners include a
field trip or technical tour to an urban forest or
botanical garden or some related site as a means
of adding an "in the field" experience for the par-
ticipants. Thomas Brandeis and a team from the
U.S. Forest Service conducted a Tree Inventory
demonstration at the Cinnamon Bay campground
trails. For three hours, participants were involved
in measuring tree height and diameter, sampling
soil and characterizing the understudy of small
shrub trees. It involved the use of tools and equip-


UVI's Cooperative Extension Service State Director Kwame Garcia bestows the
conference's "Outstanding Professional"award on Carlos Robles, CES Extension
Specialist


James fclen dasplayig items maae rrom st. uroix mahogany

ment necessary for such a job. This type of activ-
ity was a first of its kind for the conference.
Another highlight was the annual banquet and
awards ceremony. What made this event very spe-
cial was that UVI received two of the seven awards
given that evening. The St. Croix campus received
the "Project Award" for its grounds restoration and
Extension Specialist Carlos Robles received the
"Outstanding Professional" award for his work in Ur-
ban Forestry in the Virgin Islands.
By all accounts the conference was a success,
and participants benefited not only from the presen-
tations but from the networking that occurred
throughout the five days. For further information re-
garding the conference, please contact Dr. Louis
Petersen at (340) 693-1071 or at Ipeters@uvi.edu.


HTTP://RPS. UVI. EPU/









10 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


LOCAL COMMUNITY, RC&D COUNCIL

AND UVI EXTENSION TO BENEFIT

FROM $60,000 EPA GRANT


"THE EPA GRANT WILL
HELP REVITALIZE VIRGIN
ISLANDS 'BROWNFIELDS,'
REAL PROPERTY, THE
EXPANSION,
REDEVELOPMENT, OR
REUSE OF WHICH MAY BE
COMPLICATED BY THE
PRESENCE OR POTENTIAL
PRESENCE OFA
HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE,
POLLUTANT OR
CONTAMINANT.
CLEANING UP AND
REINVESTING IN THESE
PROPERTIES TAKE
DEVELOPMENT
PRESSURES OFF OF
UNDEVELOPED, OPEN
LAND AND BOTH
IMPROVE AND PROTECT
THE ENVIRONMENT. "


Kwame Garcia, Sr., CES State Director, left, accepting the $60,000 EPA check that CES will use along with RC&D to keep the St. Croix
community informed and develop and maintain a repository of environmental information


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regional
Administrator Jane M. Kenny visited the St. Croix cam-
pus of the University of the Virgin Islands and an-
nounced the awarding of federal grants that will ben-
efit the local community and help revitalize Virgin Is-
lands "brownfields." Brownfields are real property, the
expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be
complicated by the presence or potential presence of
a hazardous substance, pollutant or contaminant.
Cleaning up and reinvesting in these properties take
development pressures off of undeveloped, open land
and both improve and protect the environment.
The first grant of $417,000 was presented to the


Department of Planning and Natural Resources. Kenny
also announced that the Virgin Islands Resource Con-
servation & Development Council, Inc. (RC&D) was
selected to receive a $60,000 grant. The University of
the Virgin Islands Cooperative Extension Service is a
collaborator with RC&D and along with RC&D will use
the grant to keep the St. Croix community informed
and develop and maintain a repository of environmen-
tal information.
"The two grants will benefit local communities by
promoting the revitalization of abandoned or underused
properties and by enhancing the environmental infor-
mation available to the citizens," Kenny said.


HTTP://RPS. UVI. ElU/


SBDC'S COMPUTER TRAINING HELPS BUSINESS OWNERS COMPETE
The UVI Small Business Development Center has hosted sev-
eral computer based training sessions over the past months, with
special emphasis in the St. Croix District. SBDC conducted sessions
on QuickBooks Pro, Microsoft Excel, Word, Publisher and Power
Point. Many of these modules were introductory. Intermediate and
advanced modules will be offered in later sessions and on an as-
needed basis.
The community has responded quite favorably to the these ses-
sions and has expressed interest for continued programming since
these applications play such a pivotal role in a business owner's
ability to aggressively compete in today's market.









NOVEMBER 2004 11


UVI HELPS ST. CROIX


CELEBRATE ANNUAL


MANGO MELEE FESTIVAL


Left: Children compete in the mango-eating competition; the contests a major highlightof the festival Right, Carlos Robles, Extension
Specialist, and Errol Chichester, Horticulturist from the VI. Department ofAgriculture, assist with workshop on grafting tropical fruit
trees during Mango Melee


In an effort to continue the promotion of mango
and other tropical fruits production as a potential vi-
able industry for the Virgin Islands, the UVI Coop-
erative Extension Service in partnership with the UVI
Agricultural Experiment Station, the St. George Vil-
lage Botanical Garden, the V.I. Department of Agri-
culture, the V.I. Department of Tourism, and
Biolmpact, Inc., celebrated the 8th Annual Mango
Melee and Tropical Fruits Festival July 11, on St.
Croix.
Over 3,000 community residents and visitors
strolled throughout the beautiful setting of St. George
Village Botanical Garden grounds to observe and
partake of some of the most sumptuous mangoes,
other tropical fruits and related value-added prod-
ucts that are available in the Virgin Islands.
The one-day celebration offered family enjoy-
ment with games for our youth, lots of local food
and drinks to sample, lively music, nursery plants


OVER 3,000
COMMUNITY RESIDENTS
AND VISITORS STROLLED
TH ROUGHOLT THE
BEAUTIFUL SETTING OF
ST. GEORGE VILLAGE
BOTANICAL GARDEN
GROUNDS TO OBSERVE
AND PARTAKE OF SOME
OF THE MOST
SUMPTUOUS MANGOES,
OTHER TROPICAL FRUITS
AND RELATED VALUE-
ADDED PRODUCTS THAT
ARE AVAILABLE IN THE
VIRGIN ISLANDS.I


for sale, and a farmers' market. Taking center stage
was a colorful display of over 40 varieties of man-
goes, as well as a large assortment of exotic tropi-
cal fruits that are grown on St. Croix.
This year's activities included a "mango dis and
dat" competition, mango tasting and evaluation,
tropical fruits identification, a silent auction of tropi-
cal fruits, and a mango eating contest.
As a result of a previous year's workshop on
the processing of tropical fruits delivered by a food
technologist from the Caribbean Industrial Research
Institute in Trinidad, our farmers and their families
displayed and sold a significantly greater amount of
processed fruit products at this year's event.
Other educational activities included hands-on
demonstrations on how to make mango and tropi-
cal fruits ice cream and on the propagation of tropi-
cal fruits.


YOUTH OUTREACH AND CASE WORKER TRAINING SBDC FOCAL POINTS


The SBDC continues to assist our islands' youths
by increasing their awareness and potential regard-
ing financial, business and other issues. To help re-
inforce this mission, the SBDC has put on presenta-
tions in the Youth Outreach Program for the high
schools on St. Croix and St. Thomas regarding "Steps
to Starting a Business in the USVI." SBDC has also
been asked to assist the schools in their programs
of Life Skills. As a result, the SBDC has been instru-
mental in helping various groups with the concept of
money management. By showing the students how
to save, when to save and what they can do with
saved money, over 35 students at the St. Croix Edu-
cational Complex learned the basics of money man-
agement during the two-day module. Through this


type of program, the SBDC is providing the students
with the full educational value of basic money man-
agement and ethics.
The Department of Human Services, Office of In-
take and Emergency Services, and the SBDC collabo-
rated in the same basic skills sets for training case
workers. This session helped case workers/counse-
lors learn how to stress to their clients the importance
of understanding revenue and expenses and how to
"make ends meet" financially The Department has a
growing concern that too many of their clients do not
have a complete understanding of the concept. There-
fore, with the SBDC's assistance, an immediate, posi-
tive impact can be registered on the residents regard-
ing their overall financial management skills.










12 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE

UPCOMING EVENTS

NOVEMBER DECEMBER 2004


r --
NOVEMBER
1-DEC 8 SMALL LIVESTOCK COURSE/CES
3 YOUTH OUTREACH PROGRAM: FBLA BUSINESS PLAN
DEVELOPMENT SERIES/SBDC
4 INSURANCE PLANNING BASICS FOR BUSINESSES/SBDC
8 CHECKLIST FOR STARTING A BUSINESS CHOOSING A
BUSINESS/SBDC
9 CHECKLIST FOR STARTING A BUSINESS FORM OF
OWNERSHIP/SBDC
14 TURKEY CARVING DEMONSTRATION & PUMPKIN
WORKS H OP/CES
15 CHECKLIST FOR STARTING A BUSINESS WRITING A
BUSINESS PLAN-NARRATIVE/SBDC
16 WNET ROUNDTABLE/SBDC
16 CHECKLIST FOR STARTING A BUSINESS WRITING A
BUSINESS PLAN-FINANCIALS/SBDC
17 PRICING YOUR GOODS AND SERVICES/SBDC
17 & 18 PUMPKIN WORKSHOP/CES
19 WNET TRAINING/SBDC
29 CHECKLIST FOR STARTING A BUSINESS WRITING A
BUSINESS PLAN-BUSINESS REGISTRATIONS/SBDC
30 CHECKLIST FOR STARTING A BUSINESS WRITING A
BUSINESS PLAN-BUSINESS LICENSES & ZONING/SBDC
*For more information on these events, contact the sponsoring department.


DECEMBER
1-2 HOLIDAY BAKING WORKSHOP/CES
1 YOUTH OUTREACH PROGRAM: FBLA BUSINESS PLAN
DEVELOPMENT SERIES/SBDC
2 CHECKLIST FOR STARTING A BUSINESS WRITING A
BUSINESS PLAN-TAX COMPLIANCE & RECORD-
KEEPING/SBDC
3 HOW TO EFFECTIVELY ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS/
SBDC
6-7 ALTERNATIVE SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN/CES
9 MARKETING STRATEGIES THAT GET RESULTS/SBDC
10 HOME DECORATION & GIFT IDEAS DISPLAY/CES
12 ECO-HIKE TRAINING WORKSHOP/CES
14 YOUTH OUTREACH/SBDC
14-16 HOLIDAY BAKING WORKSHOP/CES


UVI RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
#2 )OHN BREWERS BAY
ST. THOMAS, VI 00802




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