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 The ECC completes study on VI youthful...
 The Caribbean Writer receives prestigious...
 CMES promotes fisheries management...
 SBDC introduces new customized...
 Model farm opening ceremony
 CMES receives NSF funding to renovate...
 UVI transfers aquaculture technology...
 CES receives grant to train agricultural...
 AES program mentors exchange...
 Upcoming events






Group Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 7. No. 2.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300566/00006
 Material Information
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 7. No. 2.
Series Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of the Virgin Islands.
Affiliation: University of the Virgin Islands
Publisher: University of the Virgin Islands.
Publication Date: 12/26/2004
 Subjects
Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA01300566
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    The ECC completes study on VI youthful offenders
        Page 1
    The Caribbean Writer receives prestigious honorable mention
        Page 2
    CMES promotes fisheries management with BVI partnerships
        Page 3
        Page 4
    SBDC introduces new customized business counseling series - CYFAR awards computer training certificates
        Page 5
    Model farm opening ceremony
        Page 6
        Page 7
    CMES receives NSF funding to renovate VIERS laboratory
        Page 8
    UVI transfers aquaculture technology to American Samoa
        Page 9
    CES receives grant to train agricultural providers
        Page 10
    AES program mentors exchange student
        Page 11
    Upcoming events
        Page 12
Full Text







RESEARCH AND


PUBLIC SERVICE



NEWSLETTER



UNIVERSITY OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


Volume 7, No. 2 News from the UVI Research and Public Service Component


THE ECC COMPLETES STUDY


ON VI YOUTHFUL OFFENDERS


The University of the Virgin Islands' Eastern Carib-
bean Center has released the findings from A Study of
Juvenile Offenders in St. Thomas and St. Croix, USVI.
The study, which was conducted by support of a $120,000
grant from the Law Enforcement Planning Commission
(LEPC), collected and examined data on youthful offend-
ers who had passed through the Virgin Islands juvenile
correctional unit and the Department of Human Services
from 1987 to 1997.
The data items collected and examined in the study
included demographic attributes of juveniles such as age,
race, gender, education, school enrollment, place of birth,
and employment. The psychological assessment of the
juveniles, the number of children living in the household,
characteristics of the parents of juveniles (age, place of
birth, employment, and marital status) were also consid-
ered. Finally, the study explored several characteristics of
delinquent activities such as the number of offenses com-
mitted, type of offenses committed, outcome or disposi-
tion of the offense, and, when applicable, the type of
weapon used and duration between first and second of-
fense.


Table 1 Presence of Risk Indicators St Croix
S| Yes | No
S Total! Number s Percent Numbero Percent
Felt like a failure or worthless 448 163 36.4 285 63.6
Had trouble controlling anger 498 313 62.9 185 37.1
Had frequent arguments & fights 495 291 58.8 204 41.2
Ever been suspended from school 460 306 66.5 154 33.5
Ever been expelled from school 465 23 4.9 442 95.1
Used drugs or alcohol 415 199 48.0 216 52.0
Getting hurt (physically abused) 347 100 28.8 247 71.2
Examination of the data on youthful offenders who
passed through the St. Croix Youth Investigation Bureau
indicated that just over 70 percent of the youthful offend-
ers were male and 80 percent were born in the Virgin
Islands. The data also suggested that 96 percent of the
juveniles were enrolled in school at the time of their first
offense. The majority of the youthful offenders (79 per-
cent) lived with their mother only Further, examination of
the St. Croix Department of Human Services youthful of-
fender cases indicated that nearly 30 percent of the juve-
niles had reported being physically abused (Table 1). Ap-
proximately 50 percent ofthe youth reported they had used
Continued on p. 4


UVI LEADS THE WORLD IN EVALUATION

OF GENETICALLY ENHANCED CASSAVA
The UVI-AES-Biotechnology & Agroforestry program has been con-
ducting research to improve the starch quality of the fleshy storage roots of
cassava (Manihot esculentum), also known as yucca, tapioca or manioc.
Through collaboration with two European entities, AVEBE, a farmer's coop-
erative based in the Netherlands, and Wageningen University of the Neth-
erlands, genetically enhanced cassava has been developed and is being
field grown at UVI. This is the first time that genetically engineered cassava
has been grown under field conditions.
Prominent cassava researchers Drs. Nick DeVetten (AVEBE) and Krit
Raemakers (Wageningen University), who are also collaborators on the
project, visited UVI-AES in February 2004 to view the field trial of genetically
engineered cassava being grown by Dr. Tom Zimmerman, Biotechnology
&Agroforestry Program Leader. They also presented seminars to the cam-
pus community on the tissue culture and development of transgenic cas-
sava (Dr. Krit Raemakers) and starch modification in potato (Dr DeVetten).
Continued on p. 4
From left, Drs. Zimmerman, Reamakers and DeVetten evaluating the 22 pounds of
cassava roots from a year-old plant


JUNE 2004


INSIDE

2 The Caribbean
Writer Receives
Prestigious Honor-
able Mention

3 CMES Promotes
Fisheries Manage-
ment with BVI
Partnerships

5 SBDC Introduces
New Customized
Business Counsel-
ing Series

5 CYFAR Awards
Computer Training
Certificates

6 Model Farm
Opening Ceremony

8 CMES receives NSF
funding to renovate
VIERS laboratory

9 UVI Transfers
Aquaculture
Technology to
American Samoa

10 CES Receives Grant
to Train Agricultural
Providers

11 AES Program
Mentors Exchange
Student


:,, CH '










2 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
RESEARCH & PUBLIC
SERVICE (R&PS)
NEWSLETTER
IS AN INFORMATIONAL
NEWSLETTER ON THE UNITS
THAT MAKE UP THE
R&PS COMPONENT.
HTTP://RPS.UVI.EDU/
VICE PROVOST
HENRY H. SMITH, PH.D.
EDITORIAL BOARD
VELMA ABRAMSEN,
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO
THE PRESIDENT
LORNA CHESTERFIELD,
ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PROVOST
CLARICE C. CLARKE,
PUBLIC INFORMATION SPECIALIST
HELEN DOOKHAN,
ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST
MANUEL PALADA, PH.D.
AES RESEARCH ASSOCIATE
PROFESSOR
RAQUEL SANTIAGO SILVER,
ADMINISTRATOR
JACQUELINE SOMERSALL-
BERRY,
FORMER ASSISTANT TO THE
ECC DIRECTOR
PATRICE JOHNSON,
DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS
MARVIN WILLIAMS,
EDITOR, THE CARIBBEAN WRITER

LAYOUT & DESIGN
ROBIN STERNS, PH.D.

DISTRIBUTION
KIMA GATON
MAIL LETTERS OR COMMENTS TO:
LORNA CHESTERFIELD
/VI RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
#2 JOHN BREWERS BAY
ST. THOMAS, VI 00802
TELEPHONE: (340) 693-1061
FAX: (340) 693-1065
LCHESTEgUVI.EPU

THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
15 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY,
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION,
TITLE IX, SECTION 504,
PL 101-542 EDUCATOR
AND EMPLOYER.


THE CARIBBEAN WRITER


RECEIVES ANOTHER PUSHCART


HONORABLE MENTION

HONOR GIVEN TO STORY IN VOLUME 16
The Caribbean Writer, an annual literary anthology published by the University of the
Virgin Islands, has received another honorable mention from the Pushcart Prize: Best of
the Small Presses. Indeed prestigious, this honor was given to the story "Cadillacs and
Thunderbirds" by Melissa Lugo, which appeared in Volume 16.
Each year, the editor of The Caribbean Writer nominates six poems or short stories
from the current issue of its anthology for The Pushcart Prize. A board of established
editors and writers based in New York selects those works they think are most worthy to
be included in the annual Pushcart anthology. Additionally, several pieces are chosen for
honorable mention in the publication.
The Pushcart Prize is the most praised literary series in America. The volume has been
named a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times Book Review and has been
picked for several Book-of-the Month Club selections. It has been called "the single best
measure of the state of affairs in American literature today" by the New York Times Book
Review. It should be noted that about 5,000 nominations are received each year from vari-
ous high-powered publications across America.
Melissa Lugo is a Harvard graduate currently teaching at Manhattan College. She is
also the editor of Inkwell Magazine, and her work has appeared in several anthologies.
The Caribbean Writer has received two Pushcart Prizes and an honorable mention in
the past. The Pushcart Prizes were received in 1994 and 2001, respectively and the first
honorable mention was received in 1996. For more information on The Caribbean Writer
please visit its website at www.TheCaribbeanWriter.com.







CES:"FROM GARDEN TO TABLE" SCHOOL PROJECT


The University of the Virgin Islands Coopera-
tive Extension Service (UVI-CES) in collaboration
with the V.I. Department of Education received a
grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to
implement a school-based program entitled "From
Garden To Table." This program will enable teach-
ers to develop and teach an agricultural science
curriculum in the classroom. This curriculum will
supplement other classroom instruction, espe-
cially relating to nutrition, biology, and general sci-
ences.
Three public elementary schools per district
will be awarded mini grants on a competitive ba-
sis to implement this project during the 2004 2005
school year. The curriculum will consist of theo-
retical presentations as well as practical, hands-
on exercises, with technical support provided by
the UVI-CES. Schools will also develop garden
plots to reinforce concepts taught in the classroom.
Requests for proposals will be issued during
the Spring 2004 semester; and the successful ap-
plicants will be announced by the end of May 2004.
Awards ranging between $1,000.00 and $2,000.00
will be granted for program implementation in the
Fall 2004 semester.


This project addresses the need to reinstate
a curriculum in agricultural science in the public
school system. Most of our students are unaware
of the wide field of agricultural science, related
career opportunities, and the professional disci-
plines that contribute to food production.
The UVI-CES will assist in the preparation of
the project application package, program promo-
tion, and the review and screening of applications.
The Cooperative Extension Service will also pro-
vide technical support to participating schools.
As a result of the "From Garden To Table" pi-
lot project students will have increased awareness
of agricultural science, food production issues,
and careers in agriculture. Students will have also
acquired practical experience in food production
techniques through box gardening projects.
Through this project, the UVI Cooperative Exten-
sion Service will work in partnership with the V.I.
Department of Education to address a need to
enhance the public school educational program
by including an agricultural curriculum.
For more information, please call the Coop-
erative Extension Service at (340) 693-1071 (STT)
or (340) 692-4071 (STX).









JUNE 2004 3


COMES PROMOTES FISHERIES


MANAGEMENT THROUGH


PARTNERSHIPS IN THE BVI


Research expedition to study the redhind spawning aggregation on Lang Bank, St. Croix. Scientific crewincluded
members from the British Virgin Islands Conservation and Fisheries Department (CFD) and H. Lavity Stoutt
Community College (HLSCC), The Nature Conservancy (TNC), and UVI's Center for Marine and Environmental
Studies (CMES). From L to R: Joel Martinez (TNC), Albion Llewellyn (CFD), Gerson Martinez (TNC), Orville Phillips
(HLSCC), Steve Herzlieb (CMES), Anthony Ortiz (TNC) and Rick Nemeth (CMES not pictured)


During the past year, CMES scientists
and outreach staff were very active in the Brit-
ish Virgin Islands establishing partnerships
with local scientists and promoting fisheries
management. In November2003, the Univer-
sity of the Virgin Islands was well represented
by six CMES scientists at the 56thAnnual Gulf
and Caribbean Management Council meet-
ing in Tortola which was hosted by the BVI
Ministry of Natural Resources and Labour.
Over 200 participants from all over the
Caribbean, the US, and Central and South
America attended the conference and gave
presentations on a range of topics from man-
agement and socioeconomics of commercial
and recreational fisheries, marine protected
areas, human impacts on essential fish habi-
tat, aquaculture, and emerging technologies
in fisheries research. CMES staff attending
the conference, including Dr. Richard Nemeth,
Dr. Elizabeth Whiteman, Steve Herzlieb,
Shaun Kadison, Kenny Turbe and Mayra
Suarez, contributed oral presentations and
presented three posters on current CMES
research, spoke on historical aspects of com-
mercial fishing in the Virgin Islands, and at-
tended a special roundtable session to dis-
cuss marine science education in the Gulf and
Caribbean regions.


From December through February, BVI
researchers joined CMES marine biologists
in two studies for the purpose of collabora-
tion and to receive technical training in fisher-
ies techniques. Both projects were designed
to locate and characterize red hind grouper
spawning aggregations in USVI and BVI wa-
ters and combined local knowledge, exper-
tise and human resources by involving local
scientists and commercial fishermen. Dr.
Nemeth has been studying the red hind grou-
per spawning aggregation in the Marine Con-
servation District (MCD) south of St. Thomas
intensively for the past four years. BVI re-
searchers, now working with aggregations in
the BVI, were interested in learning new meth-
odologies used by Dr. Nemeth such as ultra-
sound imaging of live fish for gender and re-
productive information and tag and release
techniques for identifying migratory patterns.
During the week around the full moon in
early January, Albion Llewellyn of the BVI
Conservation and Fisheries Department
(CFD) and Orville Phillips of H. Lavity Stoutt
Community College (HLSCC) joined CMES
in St. Croix to observe specific techniques
used to assess red hind spawning aggrega-
tions. Work off St. Croix focused on locating
and studying red hind grouper aggregation


"RESEARCHERS AND MANAGERS FROM
BOTH TERRITORIES ARE INTERESTED IN
LEARNING WHICH MANAGEMENT
TECH NIQUES ARE MOST EFFECTIVE FOR
THESUSTAINABILITY OF RED HINDAND
POSSIBLY OTHER GROUPER SPECIES.I

areas on Lang Bank. On Lang Bank red hind
have been closed to commercial fishing sea-
sonally since 1990, but the actual aggrega-
tion sites on the bank have never been sci-
entifically investigated. This was an opportu-
nity for researchers from both territories to
work together in an area that was new for
everyone. Staff from The Nature Conservancy
and the VI Division of Fish and Wildlife also
participated in this research.
In a second study CMES scientists
worked with researchers from CFD and
HLSCC for several days during the full moons
of December, January and February, on as-
sessing historic red hind spawning aggrega-
tion sites south of Ginger and Norman islands,
BVI. The objective was to compare red hind
spawning populations in the BVI with those in
the MCD south of St. Thomas. In the BVI, a
seasonal closure for red hind grouper is en-
forced during the spawning season (Decem-
ber through February). During that time pos-
session of the fish is illegal. In the USVI, red
hind grouper possession is legal during the
spawning season, but fishing is prohibited in
the MCD year-round. Researchers and man-
agers from both territories are interested in
learning which management techniques are
most effective forthe sustainability of red hind
and possibly other grouper species.
Both projects and attendance at the GCFI
conference promoted international and local
marine research and the exchange of man-
agement philosophies and ideas. CMES also
partnered with commercial fishermen in an
effort to integrate local fishery knowledge and
scientific technology and information for a
greater understanding of the status of fishery
resources in the USVI and BVI. Funding for
the St. Croix project was provided by a re-
search grant from the National Institute of
Health to Dr. Nemeth, research conducted in
the BIV was funded by an international fish-
eries program within NOAA, and travel forthe
BV Islanders was funded by The Nature Con-
servancy, which promotes and supports inter-
national education and collaboration in the Car-
ibbean. For more information, contact Dr. Rick
Nemeth, (340) 693-1381 or rnemeth@uvi.edu.










4 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


LEPC STUDY
Continued from p. 1
drugs or alcohol and 67 percent reported being suspended from school.
The majority of juvenile offenders also reported that they were frequently
involved in arguments and that they had anger control problems.
The examination of St. Thomas youthful offenders revealed results
similar to those found in St. Croix. For instance, 71 percent of the St.
Thomas Juvenile Investigation Bureau cases thatwere examined involved
males and 73 percent of the youth were born in the Virgin Islands. The
majority of the St. Thomas youthful offenders (88 percent) were enrolled
in school at the time of their first offense. Just over half (55 percent) of the
juveniles lived with their mother only. An examination of the St. Thomas
Department of Human Services data revealed that 13 percent ofthe youth-
ful offenders reported being physically abused and just over a quarter (26
percent) indicated that they had used drugs or alcohol (Table 2). Nearly
60 percent of the juveniles reported that they had been suspended from
school. Just over 40 percent of the youth indicated that they were fre-
quently involved in arguments and 43 percent of the juveniles suggested
that they had anger control problems.
The study also found that 61 percent of St. Croix juveniles and
55 percent of St. Thomas juveniles committed their first offense be-
tween the ages of 14 and 16 (Figure 1). Further, 85 percent of the St.
Croix youthful offenders and 63.7 percent of the St. Thomas juve-
niles had committed only one offense, rather than being repeat of-
fenders (Figure 2).
There were several other notable findings from the study For in-
stance, in both St. Croix and St. Thomas, males were nearly twice as
likely as females to be repeat offenders. Additionally, a first-time offender
who admitted feelings of failure or worthlessness had twice the risk of
being a repeat offender compared to those who did not admit such feel-
ings. This was the case for both St. Croix and St. Thomas youthful offend-
ers. The analysis of St. Croix juvenile offenders also indicated that juve-
niles who used drugs or alcohol had odds of recidivism that were nearly
three times higher than those youth who did not use those substances.
The findings from the St. Croix data also suggested that a juvenile of-
fender who had a relative that had been previously charged with a crimi-
nal offense was almost seven times more likely to be a repeat offender
than those juveniles who did not have such relatives.
It is expected that the findings produced from this study will be used


Table 2 Presence of Risk Indicators St Thomas
Yes No
Total NumberI Percent NumberI Percent
Felt like a failure or worthless 171 44 25.7 127 74.3
Had trouble controlling anger 196 84 42.9 112 57.1
Had frequent arguments & fights 186 76 40.9 110 59.1
Ever been suspended from school 213 123 57.7 90 42.3
Ever been expelled from school 174 40 23.0 134 77.0
Used drugs or alcohol 167 43 25.7 124 74.3
Getting hurt (physically abused) 124 16 12.9 108 87.1

Figure 1 Age at First Offense





S1a31 StCroix



7 9B rl Ir]1. I9 3 L 4 1' 16 I
Age

Figure 2 Total Number of Offenses Committed




E I St Croix
~ ~ L- St Thomas




by legislators to identify resources to fund necessary preventive programs.
Executive officers may also use the data to establish policies geared to
the reduction of juvenile offenses. For additional information on the study,
contact the Eastern Caribbean Center at (340) 693-1020.


CDC CELEBRATES 'GIS DAY'


The Conserva-
tion Data Center
(CDC), a unit of the
Eastern Caribbean
Center at UVI, cel-
ebrated GIS Day
2003 with the stu-
dents and staff of the
University of the Vir-
gin Islands, Family
Life Center (UVI-
FLC) program.
Stevie Henry,
CDC's Data Manager, UVI-FLC participants
introduced the at- aGPS
tendees to Geographic Information
System (GIS) and Global Positioning
System (GPS) technology. The presen-
tation demonstrated how geography
relates to our daily lives. Participants
colored maps to show how the popu-
lation on St. Thomas is distributed by
Census subdistricts. Marine and veg-
etation community maps for the U.S.


Virgin Islands pro-
duced by CDC were
exhibited at the pre-
sentation.
The students
were most excited
about using the GPS
equipment to cap-
ture information
about places of inter-
est in the Michael J.
Kirwan housing de-
velopment. After col-
:ollecting data using electing the field data,
the students wit-
nessed the processing of their GPS
data and saw how their data displayed
in a GIS.
As a result of the participants' en-
thusiasm about their experience, staff
from the UVI-FLC are attempting to col-
laborate with the CDC on a more sig-
nificant GIS project that would benefit
the Michael J. Kirwan community.


CASSAVA
Continued from p. 1
This research and field trial of genetically
enhanced cassava is significant to the Carib-
bean because cassava has been part of the is-
land culture from the time of the native Carib
and Tiano Indians. They cultivated the bitter cas-
sava and used it as a source of starch in their
diet. Throughoutthe tropical regions it ranks third,
after rice and corn, as a food source for people.
The cassava being grown at UVI was ge-
netically engineered to produce a uniform starch.
Starch, processed from cassava, is commercially
used in pastries and bread, snack foods, the pa-
per industry and as a thickening agent in soups
and sauces. Evaluation of the genetically en-
hanced cassava under tropical field conditions
is the first step in selecting superior cassava
plants for commercial use.
The Biotechnology &Agroforestry Program
has been micropropagating the genetically en-
hanced cassava through tissue culture to pro-
duce 1,000 plants for the field trial.Latashia Jo-
seph, Jay Wiltshire and Kevin Dupigney, UVI
MBRS-RISE students, have been involved in tis-
sue culture projects with the cassava under the
guidance of Dr. Zimmerman.


m









JUNE 2004 5


SBDC INTRODUCES NEW CUSTOMIZED


BUSINESS COUNSELING SERIES


The University of the Virgin Islands Small
Business Development Center (UVI-SBDC),
in its mission to provide free business coun-
seling assistance to the USVI residents, re-
cently introduced its FY2004 Business Coun-
seling Series to the community. More specifi-
cally, to assist the community's residents, pro-
spective and existing business owners with
effective planning, management tools, best
practices, preventive measures, and helpful
hints for various business subjects, free busi-
ness counseling has been routinely coordi-
nated and provided in very small interactive
group sessions.
The SBDC gathers at most five individu-
als/module to meet within its private confer-
ence room for a roundtable discussion and
presentation led by an SBDC Business Coun-
selor. These sessions provide for great net-
working opportunities, business exchanges,
information sharing, and, most notably, op-
portunities to gain generalized assistance/in-
sight from the Business Counselor on the
subject matter as needed.
These hugely successful series are usu-
ally presented in morning and afternoon ses-
sions over a five day work week on various
business applications, subjects, and prin-
ciples. Helpful hints/tips were provided on the
following subjects at earlier roundtable busi-
ness counseling sessions:


S"Personal Credit/Effective Money Man-
agement": ways to better manage your bud-
geting, spending, repayment habits re: over-
all personal and business finances.

M "Effective Product Selection, Pricing, and
Placement": best practices to gain maximum
exposure on product investments.

S"Effectively Interviewing, Selecting, and
Managing Your Employees: keys behind suc-
cessfully conducting interviews, selecting the
right candidate, and managing your employ-
ees.

S"Innovative Advertising/Marketing Tech-
niques": conventional and unconventional
mediums available to help certify ultimate
market exposure.

S"Writing and Implementing an Effective
Business Plan": preparing a winning business
plan, road map, sense of direction for your
business.

M "Effective Cash Flow Management for
Emerging and Existing Business Owners":
ways to best identify the cycle of inflows and
outflows of cash on your business.


More topics will be presented on the ba-
sis of client survey needs assessments. At-
tendees have responded in an overwhelm-
ingly positive manner to this small group of-
fering and insist that we continue to offerthese
sessions on an ongoing basis. These ses-
sions are not to be confused or mistaken for
the SBDC's regulartraining programs or semi-
nars. The SBDC training seminars are all open
to as many attendees as can be accommo-
dated and are held under different circum-
stances and locations. These business coun-
seling series provide for more personalized
hands-on, interactive instruction to group
sizes of no more than five persons per ses-
sion.
Please stay tuned for future announce-
ments of the free business counseling series
offerings. If you are ever interested in attend-
ing, please call immediately because the ses-
sions fill up quickly. The SBDC in its custom-
ary service offerings conduct one-on-one con-
fidential business counseling sessions with
clients daily and any of the aforementioned
subject areas (and more) can be presented
on an individual basis as needed. However,
an appointment needs to be confirmed for
such private counseling meetings.
For more information on these sessions,
please call the SBDC at (340) 776-3206.


CYFAR AWARDS COMPUTER CERTIFICATES


What do you get when 12 commit-
ted adults face their computers, and
one dedicated instructor takes them
from fear to expertise? In only six
weeks, twice weekly, these 11 ladies
and one gentleman converged on the
CYFAR Computer Lab on the West
Campus at the University of the Virgin
Islands to engage in Basic Training.
An April 5th program marked the
culmination of the training, with open-
ing remarks by Ms. Lois Sanders, As-
sistant Director of the 4-HIFamily &
Consumer Sciences Program. Mr.
Kwame Garcia Sr., State Director-CES


Sr\ atheA rtral vv avvapril 5h
the April 5th program


remarked on the program, and the importance of being com-
puter literate.
Before they received their well-deserved certificates, the
participants shared their experiences. Most of them said they
had seen the advertisement in the newspapers, but by the
time they called, the program was closed; therefore, they
were put on a waiting list.
Ms. Linda Mclntosh, who uses the computer on her job,
was thrilled when Mr. Marthious Clavier, the Extension Agent
1/CYFAR Program, called her when the new class was about
to begin. Mclntosh said that the class "reinforced" her skills,


and has proved to be very beneficial.
She had high praise for Mr. Clavierwho,
she said, is "perfect for the class, has
vast knowledge, and is always willing
to share." She thinks Clavier has "a gift"
to relate to others.
Mr. Collins, the sole male in the
group, admitted that he "always
wanted to learn to use the computer."
As a salesman, he thinks his newly ac-
quired knowledge will enhance his
performance on the job. Having
learned how to surf the internet, and
how to send e-mails, he has ordered
a computer so that he will be able to


expand his knowledge.
All participants concurred with Jayne Santa, an em-
ployee of Olympic Car Agency, who said: "I definitely want
more."
This program was one in CES' Community Outreach
series. The next two programs will be geared toward farm-
ers, then the Basic Computer Training Program will be re-
peated. The 12 certificate recipients know that they are not
on their own, because they "have Mr. Clavier's number."
Clavier clarified, smilingly, that "that's a part of the course-
lifetime tech. support."


I=









6 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


MODEL FARM HAS OPENING CEREMONY


The Opening Ceremony for the Integrated
Model Farm (IMF) atAES was held in Decem-
ber 2003 and was attended by 25 people from
the community. Senator Luther Renee, Chair of
the Committee on Agricultural and Economic
Development, attended the ceremony Senator
Renee gave a presentation in which he acknowl-
edged the excellent work done by AES and the
potential benefits of the Integrated Model Farm
project for the agriculture industry in the USVI.
Other people who gave presentations were Dr.
Jim Rakocy DirectorAES; Mr. Kwame Garcia,
Director CES; Mr. Stafford Crossman, Deputy
Commissioner of Agriculture; and Mr. Mike
McGuire, Research Specialist and project leader.
The Agricultural Experiment Station at UVI
has developed the 5-acre IMF that collects rain-
water to grow tilapia in tanks and uses the water
from the fish to irrigate vegetables and fruittrees.
The farm is being studied to determine how in-
tegrated production practices can be adapted
for use in the Virgin Islands. The project is funded
by a grant from USDA- Initiative for FutureAgri-
culture and Food Systems awarded to Univer-
sity of the Virgin Islands Agricultural Experiment
Station. The project has both internal and exter-
nal cooperators. Within UVI the cooperators are
AES, the Cooperative Extension Service and
Water Resources Research Institute. External
cooperators are University of Guam College of
Agriculture and Life Sciences, USDA Agricul-
tural Research Service- TropicalAgriculture Re-
search Station and the VI Department of Agri-
culture.


Senator Luther Renee is shown speaking to the attendees at the Opening Ceremony of the Integrated Model
Farm hosted byAES


The objectives of the project are to demon-
strate a 5-acre whole farm system that integrates
fish, fruit and vegetable production. Most of the
water for the farm will be obtained through rain-
water harvesting. The farm will operate with four
people and it is hoped that it will generate more
than $150,000 in gross income.
The farm is now in full production. The fish


tanks are stocked and the vegetable and fruit
crops are being harvested. Some of the veg-
etables that have been produced and marketed
include tomatoes, cucumbers, hot peppers, plan-
tains and papayas. Financial and water budgets
will be developed for the IMF and this informa-
tion will be published so that VI farmers can use
it to develop integrated farms of their own.


CES PREPARES STUDENTS FOR AGRICULTURE CAREERS


The UVI Cooperative Extension Service
(UVI-CES) in partnership with the V.I. Re-
source Conservation & Development Coun-
cil (VIRC & D), the USDA Forest Service/
International Institute of Tropical Forestry,
and Alcorn State University developed an
opportunity for eight students to participate
in an eight-week training institute in Sus-
tainable Agriculture during the Summer of
2004. The objective of this initiative is two-
fold. First, as the territory prepares to di-
versify the local economy by developing the
agricultural sector, there is a need to en-
courage young adults to pursue careers
in agricultural science. Second, accord-
ing to the latest census data on the US
Virgin Islands, the average age of farm-
ers is approximately 55 years. This initia-
tive, therefore, seeks to address the need
to prepare and train young farmers in the
latest scientific techniques in crop and
livestock production.
The training will be free of charge to
participants, and conducted from June 7
through July 30, 2004, at Alcorn State Uni-


versity in Lorman, Mississippi. Alcorn State
University will provide classroom lectures,
hands-on field and laboratory exercises,
and technical tours of University facilities
and farms. Thanks to a $50,000.00 grant
received by the VIRC & D from the USDA
Forest Service, eight successful applicants
will receive scholarships that will cover ex-
penses associated with airfare and ground
transportation, meals, dormitory accommo-
dations, and a weekly stipend.
As a result of this training and exposure,
the participants will develop a comprehensive
overview of the science of agriculture and re-
lated career opportunities. The technical
knowledge acquired may also be used to im-
prove farm management skills. Furthermore,
this training will hopefully serve as an incen-
tive to encourage further studies in agricul-
ture at the post secondary level.
In addition to publicizing and promot-
ing the Summer Institute initiative, the UVI-
CES will assist with the screening and se-
lection of applicants, and conduct an orien-
tation session to prepare the participants for


university (campus) life. The orientation
session will include a general overview of
SustainableAgriculture and the courses to be
taught during the eightweeks of training. Upon
completion of the Summer Institute, CES will
also provide counseling and advisory support
for participants who desire to do post second-
ary studies in agricultural science.
This initiative represents another effort
on the part of the University of the Virgin
Islands to become involved and engaged
in the VI community to address local needs
and improve the quality of life for the resi-
dents of the territory. The future of agricul-
ture in the Virgin Islands depends upon the
preparation of another generation of farm-
ers and scientists. The UVI-CES is proud
to contribute toward the growth and devel-
opment of young adults who will, in turn,
contribute to the growth and development
of the Virgin Islands' community.
For additional information regarding the
Summer 2004 Sustainable Agriculture
Training Institute, please call CES at 693-
1071 (STT) or 692-4071 (STX).









JUNE 2004 7


SBDC AND PARTNER GAIN FAST 2004 START

TO WNET ROUNDTABLE PROGRAM


For approximately five years, the UVI-
Small Business Development Center
(SBDC) and the New Image Foundation
Corporation (NIFC) have collaborated in
sponsoring the annual Women's Network
for Entrepreneurial Training (WNET)
Roundtable Program Series. NIFC is the
U.S. Small Business Administration's (SBA)
U.S. Virgin Islands representative respon-
sible for administering this program.
Through collaboration with the SBDC,
monthly roundtable discussions, training
programs, workshops, and seminars have
been presented in the St. Thomas-St. John
and St. Croix districts. These programs aim
at orienting and nurturing the Virgin Islands
business women, through practical appli-
cation, to the concept of business owner-
ship and small business management.
During this current fiscal period, the NIFC
and SBDC have co-sponsored several suc-
cessful monthly WNET meetings. One of the


highlights in these gatherings is the recogni-
tion ofthe Entrepreneur of the Month, whereby
an official award is presented to the honoree
in acknowledgement of her dedication, com-
mitment, and small business successes in the
Virgin Islands community. The SBDC and
NIFC are pleased to announce the names of
the two most recent honorees who received
this distinction: January 2004, Ms. Beverly
Clarke (Owner) and daughter, Ms. Karen
Clarke of Discount Travel; March 2004, Ms.
Bonnie Erb (Owner), Bonnie's By The Sea
Restaurant.
The Policy Board ofthe New Image Foun-
dation, in collaboration with the UVI-SBDC
and FirstBank Virgin Islands, recently
launched its annual "Dollars and Sense" pro-
gramming series. This series has been imple-
mented to cover a series of quarterly personal
financial seminars on various related subjects
to assist individuals seeking more financial
empowerment. These low cost (fees) train-


ing sessions are very comprehensive and in-
corporate the varied expertise of the SBDC,
New Image Foundation, FirstBank, and invited
Keynote Speakers, accordingly. Recently, a
program was held in St. Thomas on "The Road
to Home Ownership." This module was very
well attended and featured Ms. Audrey Morton
of the VI Housing Finance Authority and Ms.
Karen Sprauve of FirstBank.
The NIFC Policy Board Leadership,
FirstBank and the Management and Staff of
the SBDC extend many thanks to the present-
ers and the attendees alike. It is the collec-
tive wish that everyone will continue to sup-
port these programs and gain as much infor-
mation as they can as it relates to home own-
ership, money management, investing, etc.
Future programs in this series are ex-
pected to cover such areas and more. For
more information, please call the New Image
Foundation Policy Board at (340) 777-8883
and/or the SBDC at (340) 776-3206.


SBDC BRIEFS


SBDC SEMINAR ON IDENTITY
THEFT AND FRAUD
PREVENTION
In February, the SBDC presented an
Identity Theft Seminar in St. Thomas. This
seminar, which featured Mr. Ronald Roberts,
former Bank Compliance Officer and Owner
of Roberts Resources, focused on the risks
associated with identity theft, customer/con-
sumer privacy, credit card fraud, and other
related security issues to over 40 individu-
als. The SBDC firmly believes that the com-
munity at large needs to become more cog-
nizant of threats linked to identity theft in
order to better implement preventive mea-
sures and minimize the probability of being
victimized. The issues that surround this dy-
namic have many adverse consequences
for individuals and businesses alike.
Mr. Roberts put it this way: "What is
identity theft? It's when someone steals your
personal information, such as your name,
address, bank/credit account numberss,
social security number, or EIN number, and
then poses as you. Using your personal
identifiers, identity thieves can obtain credit,
employment, health care services, rentals,
phone bills, file bankruptcy, or if arrested,
use your name as a result. Other results of
identity theft include bank fraud, credit card
fraud, tax refund fraud, mail fraud, wire
fraud, passport fraud, check fraud, terrorist
activities, etc."


Mr. Roberts and the SBDC caution ev-
eryone to please take proactive steps to se-
cure and protect privacy and personal iden-
tifiers. Mr. Roberts correlated these prac-
tices to local USVI news headlines of re-
cent years so as to not have anyone take
these issues for granted. Among the help-
ful hints offered were the following: check
your credit report at least once per year;
review new checks, to ensure none were
stolen in transit; safeguard all PIN numbers;
if your bills or bank statements are late,
contact the company; check verifiable sig-
natures and matching ID when processing
credit card swiping transactions, etc. The
SBDC and Mr. Roberts, an SBDC partner,
are available to provide consulting refer-
ences and more details as needed. Please
contact Mr. Roberts (Roberts Resources) in
St. Thomas at (340) 776-1687 or the SBDC
at (340) 776-3206.

ANNUAL ST. CROIX AGRI-
CULTURAL AND FOOD FAIR
The SBDC had another successful
showing as part of the University's commit-
ted RPS involvement and presence in St.
Croix's 33rd Agricultural and Food Fair,
"Agriculture, an Open Door in 2004," held
in February. SBDC's primary focus was to
present literature on "How to Start a Busi-
ness," "How to Write an Effective Business
Plan,"as well as "How To Actively Pursue
Agri-Tourism." These brochures, among
others, helped to provide a wealth of infor-
mation to existing and prospective entre-
preneurs seeking greater formal organiza-


tion and or results. The SBDC was particu-
larly pleased to have experienced a con-
stant buzz at its display booth over the
three-day event. The SBDC offers its con-
gratulations to all of the Ag Fair Coordina-
tors and Organizers and looks forward to
being present once again in 2005!

SBDC'S YOUTH 2004
OUTREACH PROGRAM
INITIATIVES
The SBDC Youth Outreach program
has become an inspirational presentation
in collaboration with the Future Business
Leaders of America (FBLA). On St. Croix,
the SBDC was an integral part of design-
ing and assisting in the indoctrination pro-
gram for over 20 new candidates to the
FBLA. SBDC assisted in providing speak-
ers and overall encouragement for these
future entrepreneurs. To culminate that par-
ticular indoctrination, an SBDC employee
was even awarded an honorary member-
ship to FBLA. Since then the SBDC has
worked with FBLA, especially during the
National FBLA Week, in helping design ef-
fective workshops for this set of local
youths, including "What it Means to be an
Entrepreneur" and "Dressing for Success."
Additional youth programs were held
at St. Thomas' Jane E. Tuitt, Sts. Peter and
Paul, and Seventh Day Adventist Schools
to provide hands-on information on the prin-
ciples of business management. SBDC
personnel met with dozens of students who
were each provided packets of information
Continued on p. 11









8 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


CMES RECEIVES NSF FUNDING

TO RENOVATE THE VIERS

LABORATORY ON ST. )OHN


The Center for Marine and Environmental Studies received
a grant for $185,000 from the National Science Foundation to
renovate the Virgin Islands Environmental Resource Station
(VIERS).
The primary goals of the NSF funding are to: 1) renovate
and transform the VIERS research laboratory from a facility with
uncomfortable and difficult general use areas to a facility with
functional and complementary workspaces, 2) purchase major
research equipment to expand research capabilities from very
basic ecological observations to more sophisticated experimen-
tation and measurements and increase research capabilities at
both spatial and temporal scales within the biosphere, and 3)
modernize the information technology, communications and data
management systems which will foster greater collaboration
among researchers and strengthen the linkages between re-
search and education.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF VIERS
VIERS has provided nearly 40 years of continuous service as a
learning center for environmental education and research. For-
merly known as the Virgin Islands Ecological Research Station,
VIERS was established by the College of the Virgin Islands in
November 1966 under the authority of a Memorandum of Un-
derstanding with the Virgin Islands National Park.
The first laboratory at Little Lameshur Bay was originally
designed to be a low-cost scientific base camp for professional
ecologists seeking to undertake laboratory and field research
on both marine and terrestrial biodiversity. Shortly after its es-
tablishment, VIERS was selected as the site of the US Depart-
ment of Interior ocean-floor human habitat experiment, Project
Tektite I and II, and was moved to its present location at Great
Lameshur Bay.
The current facility was built in 1968 by the U.S. Navy Sea
Bees to house scientists and support staff for Project Tektite. In


Figure 1. Schematic image of the Tektite II underwater habitat in Great Lameshur
Bay


"BECAUSE OF THE CLOSE PROXIMITY OFALL REPRESENTATIVE
TERRESTRIAL AND COASTAL MARI N E ENVIRONMENTS, VI ERS
PROVIDES SIGNIFICANT OPPORTUNITIES TO MAKE
SUBSTANTIVE COMPARISONS AMONG THESE DIFFERENT
TROPICAL BIOMES. VIERS IS ALSO UNIQUE IN THAT IT IS
IDEALLY SITUATED FOR INTEGRATING RESEARCH AND
EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES BY PROVI DI NG A VENUE WH ERE
THE CULTURALLY DIVERSE POPULATION OF THE VI RGIN
ISLANDS AND EASTERN CARIBBEAN CAN INTERACT WITH
SCIENTISTS FROM LOCAL, REGIONAL, AND NATIONAL
INSTITUTIONS. "


i-igure 2. Map snowmg VI:tR campstre ana laboratory nestlea wiinm me pristme
environments of the Virgin Islands National Park
1969 and 1970 Projects Tektite I and II were the first of their
kind to utilize underwater habitat technology that allowed sci-
entists to live underwater for several weeks at a time while per-
forming a variety of biological experiments on coral reef organ-
isms and biomedical and engineering studies (Figure 1).
At the end of the Tektite projects in 1970, the camp was
turned over to the University of the Virgin Islands. During this
research intensive time period world-renowned scientists used
the VIERS facility including Dr. Sylvia Earle and Dr. Jack Randall.
In 1992, the camp's name was changed to Virgin Islands Envi-
ronmental Resource Station to reflect UVI's commitment to pro-
viding unique research and learning experiences for students
and scientists interested in environmental education, training
and research of terrestrial, coastal and marine communities of
small tropical islands.
Since 1997 VIERS has been managed and operated for UVI
by Clean Islands International, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit environ-
mental educational organization. In 1999 oversight of VIERS
activities and operations was taken over by the Director of UVI's
Center for Marine and Environmental Studies.









JUNE 2004 9


Figure 3. Te VIERS lab as it exists today on tne snore of Great Lamesnur Bay


THE IMPORTANCE OF RENOVATING VIERS
VIERS is located on Great Lameshur Bay, St. John within the
boundaries of the Virgin Islands National Park and United Na-
tions (UNESCO) Biosphere Reserve, which offer protection to
the surrounding pristine coastal scrub, dry forest and moist for-
est habitats (Figure 2).
VIERS is also directly adjacent to the 12,708 marine acres
of the Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument established
in 2001. The high biological diversity represented within these
ecosystems is within walking or swimming distance of the VI-
ERS facility.
Because of the close proximity of all representative terres-
trial and coastal marine environments, VIERS provides signifi-
cant opportunities to make substantive comparisons among
these different tropical biomes. VIERS is also unique in that it is
ideally situated for integrating research and educational activi-
ties by providing a venue where the culturally diverse popula-
tion of the Virgin Islands and Eastern Caribbean can interact
with scientists from local, regional, and national institutions. The
rustic nature of VIERS, its remoteness and the outdated labo-
ratory facilities has maintained usage of the facility for research
at a very low level.
The $185,000 received from NSF, however, will allow UVI
to modernize and improve VIERS' research and technology in-
frastructure to increase the quantity, quality and dissemination
of research results by UVI faculty and visiting scientists.
More specifically the VIERS laboratory (Figure 3) will be
completely renovated to provide an analytical lab, a semi-wet
lab, a wet lab, running sea water system with sea tables and
aquaria, a computer lab with high-speed internet access, major
research instrumentation like microscopes, balances, image
analysis system and environmental data loggers, dive compres-
sor, scuba equipment and a boat.
For more information on this project please contact Dr. Rick
Nemeth at 340-693-1381 or rnemeth@uvi.edu. You can also
visit the VIERS website from: http://marsci.uvi.edu/.


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HTTP://RPS. UVI. EDIJ/


UVI TRANSFERS AQUACULTURE

TECHNOLOGY TO AMERICAN

SAMOA
Dr. James Rakocy, Aquaculture Program Leader,
was invited to provide aquaculture technical assis-
tance to a group of about 20 tilapia farmers in Ameri-
can Samoa. The invitation came from Mr. Alosina
To'omalatai, President of the Samoan Family Sunfish
Cooperative. Dr. Darren Okimoto, the American Sa-
moa Sea Grant Extension Agent, organized the visit
and obtained funding for the trip from the Tropical
and Subtropical Aquaculture Center in Hawaii. The
4-day visit took place during March 8-12.
Dr. Rakocy presented two early evening work-
shops on the tilapia production systems that have
been developed at the UVI. The workshops covered
greenwater tank culture and aquaponics, the com-
bined culture of fish and plants in recirculating sys-
tems. The workshops addressed the development of
these technologies, construction techniques and pro-
duction management. About 28 people attended each
workshop and expressed a high level of enthusiasm
for applying these systems in American Samoa.
A challenge that American Samoa faces is its iso-
lation. Supplies reach the island by an ocean freighter
from Los Angeles once every two weeks. There are
for four jet flights a week from Hawaii with a flying
time of 5 hours, but there are no direct flights to the
U.S. mainland. The importation of high quality fish
feed from the U.S. is needed to increase tilapia pro-
duction and efficiently utilize UVI's culture systems.
After the workshops, Dr. Rakocy had the oppor-
tunity to visit five fish farms and a hydroponic veg-
etable operation. In addition to raising tilapia, one
farm grows freshwater prawns, and another farm is
in the process of building a facility to grow giant salt-
water clams and marine finfish. One luxury that
American Samoa has is abundant supplies of fresh-
water resulting from annual rainfall of more than 200
inches. American Samoa is located in the South Pa-
cific at 14 degrees latitude south and is the home of
StarKist Samoa, a tuna cannery, which employs nearly
3,000 people and processes approximately 350 mil-
lion pounds of tuna annually.
The workshops were held at the American Samoa
Community College, which is a Land Grant institu-
tion. Dr. Rakocy gave a guest lecture on aquaculture
to Dr. Okimoto's Natural Marine Resources Course
and had the opportunity to meet Dr. Adele Satele-
Galea'i, President of American Samoa Community
College; Ms. Laura Laumatia, Agriculture Extension
Program Manager; and Dr. Don Vargo, Research Co-
ordinator of the Land Grant Program.









10 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


CDC SCIENCE BRIEFS


CORAL BAY SEDIMENT
DEPOSITION AND REEF
ASSESSMENT PROJECT
The Coral Bay Sediment Deposition and
Reef Assessment Project, funded with
$22,000 provided by the VI Department of
Environmental Protection, has been com-
pleted. Final results indicate an alarming in-
crease in the sedimentation rate in the har-
bor and bay as a result of unprecedented
development in one of the largest and fastest
growing watersheds in the Virgin Islands. An
increase of 10-20 times the natural rate was
detected as having begun less than 15 years
ago, at the same time that residential and road
development increased dramatically. Coral
reef assessment shows only 10-15% live coral
and deteriorating water quality Several pre-
sentations of the results were made at the
NPS conference, the Coral Bay Community
and the St. John Rotary. Residents are con-
cerned and have organized a Community
Council and Watershed Committee to ad-
dress concerns.

RECOVERY AND LOSS OF REEF
BUILDING CORALS
The Conservation Data Center (CDC),
partnering with USGS Marine Biologist Dr.
Caroline Rogers, has developed a surface
water GPS/GIS mapping technique to assess
Elkhorn Coral colonies, the primary near-
shore reef builder. USGS has contracted
$10,000 for CDC to develop an Access data-
base tied to GIS spatial mapping of colony
size, disease, predation, and live cover. The
database and GPS technique developed will
be used at the V.I. National Park, Buck Island
and Florida National Marine Sanctuaryto track
coral recovery. The project is ongoing but the
database and colony maps are completed,
and the USGS staff has been trained in their


use. Results indicate that coral disease oc-
curs and sometimes lesions heal much more
quickly than previously thought.

"A FIELD GUIDE TO THE PLANT
AND MARINE COMMUNITIES
OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS"
Partnering with Cooperative Extension
Service (CES) staff member Ms. Toni Tho-
mas, the CDC and CES are getting close to
completing this new publication that highlights
the Rapid Ecological Assessment maps pro-
duced by CDC in 2000. This field guide, paid
forwith $20,000 provided by a VI Department
of Agriculture Urban Forestry Grant and
$8,000 from CES, is in the final stages of lay-
out and peer review. For the first time, resi-
dents and visitors will have a map and guide
to the diverse natural communities that make
the Virgin Islands such a rich and remark-
able place. Publication is planned forthe sum-
mer of 2004.

THE WETLANDS AND
RIPARIAN AREAS INVENTORY
Partnering with Island Resources Foun-
dation, CDC is leading a $120,000 Phase I
pilot study to characterize the watersheds and
wetlands ofthe Virgin Islands. Inventory maps
of wetland types and locations, along with field
sampling within 18 priority watersheds for
sediment deposition rates, water quality and
plant communities, have been completed.
The CDC and IRF are analyzing results and
preparing final map products for DPNR. A
subsequent $100,000 Phase II study will ex-
pand on the work and sample the additional
32 VI watersheds to establish a wetland in-
ventory based on ecological value, potential
land use threats and preservation priority.
As a continuation of the first project, the
UVI Water Resources Research Institute is


providing $38,000 to continuethe work of cre-
ating a model for watershed management in
Coral Bay. These funds will assist with devel-
opment of a Watershed Association to ad-
dress sediment and non-point source pollu-
tion issues. In addition, a Watershed Brochure
and Watershed Atlas will be developed to
assist with future planning. Reef assessment
and water quality sampling will expand, and
an engineering firm will be hired to provide
an innovative conceptual design for a
stormwater management and catchment sys-
tem for the Carolina Valley.
The Center for Marine and Environmen-
tal Studies at UVI has contracted with CDC to
provide $16,000 for services to complete
mangrove restoration at Lameshur Bay, St.
John, by providing GIS maps of existing and
planted mangrove communities. In addition,
CDC will conduct some field sampling to char-
acterize the plant and animal communities to
develop a baseline for comparison of recov-
ering populations in the future as a result of
the mangrove planting.

NEW GRANT APPLICATIONS
AND PROJECTS
Non-Point Source Grant "Sediment
Deposition and Coast Watershed ImpactArea
Mapping for Priority Bays and Watersheds in
the Virgin Islands." $24,500.
NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Grant-"
Mapping and Assessing Changes in Marine
Populations within the East End Marine Park."
$42,500.
EPA Wetlands Program Development
Grant -" Developing a Comprehensive Wet-
land Monitoring and Assessment Program for
the Virgin Islands." $460,000.
The Ocean Conservancy "Mapping
Grouper and Snapper SpawningAggregations
in the Virgin Islands." Contract for services:
$16,000.


CES RECEIVES GRANT TO TRAIN AGRICULTURAL PROVIDERS


The University of the Virgin Islands Cooperative Exten-
sion Service (CES) received a grant of $20,965 for two years
to train agriculture service providers. The training will in-
clude a collaborative team of agricultural trainers and pro-
fessionals who will develop a two-day training workshop
about organic production, certification, and regulation. This
will be a comprehensive "train the trainer" program.
In 2003, the University of Florida received a Sustainable
Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) grant to execute
a training program to help agriculture service providers in
understanding and communicating to agricultural produc-
ers the provision contained in the Organic Food Production
Act. Included as collaborators in the two-year project are
the University of Kentucky and other national, public and
private organizations.


The short-term goal is that these agriculture service pro-
viders will understand and be able to communicate the regu-
lations regarding organic production in the U.S. to agricul-
tural producers in the territory. The long-term goal of the
project is to increase the amount of acreage and number of
certified organic producers in Florida, Kentucky, and the
U.S. Virgin Islands.
Extension Specialist Carlos Robles is the team leader
for the Virgin Islands. On the local team are representatives
from CES, Department of Agriculture, USDA Farm Service
Agency and Natural Resources Conservation Service, and
Local Farmer's organizations. To learn more about the SARE
grant, contact Carlos Robles at (340) 693-1083 or Clinton
George at (340) 692-4070.









AJNE 2004 11


AES PROGRAM MENTORS EXCHANGE STUDENT


Ms. Elizabeth Chamberlain is an under-
graduate Animal Science major at Louisi-
ana State University who is conducting re-
search in the lab of Dr. Bob Godfrey, Ani-
mal Science Program Leader at the Agri-
cultural Experiment Station. Ms. Chamber-
lain sought out Dr. Godfrey a year ago when
she was first exploring the opportunities in
the National Student Exchange program at
LSU. She found that the directors of the pro-
gram at LSU were more supportive of her
application because she had contacted Dr.
Godfrey and made arrangements to work
in his lab while she was attending UVI.
In addition to other classes at UVI, Ms.
Chamberlain signed up for several credits
of BIO 495-Directed Independent Research
in Biology. Her project is to develop a new
method for counting sperm cells in the lab.
The Animal Science Program conducts re-
search to evaluate fertility of livestock, and
one method of evaluating the fertility of bulls
and rams is to evaluate their semen. Part
of the semen evaluation consists of deter-
mining the concentration of sperm. The cur-
rent method of using a microscope and a
hemacytometer to count sperm and deter-
mine concentration is slow and costly in
terms of human labor and time.
Ms. Chamberlain's project was de-
signed to calibrate and validate the spec-
trophotometer and plate reader for use in
counting sperm cells of bulls and rams.
Both of these pieces of lab equipment use


the percentage of light absorbed by a so-
lution to measure intensity of color or
opacity of the solution. A benefit of the
plate reader is that it can analyze up to
96 samples in a matter of seconds and
download the results to a computer,
whereas the spectrophotometer in the lab
can only read one sample at a time and
is not integrated with a computer.
By comparing the absorbance values
of the unknown samples to those of a set
of standards, the concentration of sperm
in the samples can be determined. The
results of Ms. Chamberlain's work so far
have shown that the concentration of bull
and ram sperm can be determined using
either the spectrophotometer or the plate
reader. The difference between the highly
accurate hemacytometer counts and the
results of the two new techniques is less
than 8% and is within acceptable limits.
Ms. Chamberlain presented the results of
her project at the Spring Research Sym-
posium held on the St. Croix campus.
The procedures developed by Ms.
Chamberlain will assist the Animal Sci-
ence Program by making the lab more
efficient when evaluating semen samples
of bulls and rams as part of research
projects or as an extension function for
local livestock producers. It is also a good
example of the fact that UVI and AES have
much to offer students in the way of re-
search opportunities.


Liz Chamberlain counts sperm cells under the
microscope to determine concentration prior to
analyzing the sample using the spectrophotometer


SBDC
continued from page 7


covering Banking and Saving, How to
Start a Business, Effective Money Man-
agement, and How to Run a Successful
Student-run Concession Business. For
more information on the SBDC's Youth
Outreach program, please call the STT/
STX offices at (340) 776-3206 and (340)
692-5270, respectively.

SBDC COLLABORATES WITH
VETERANS
Over the past recent months, the
SBDC actively participated in the annual
Veteran's Expo in St. Croix and St. Tho-
mas presented by the USVI Veteran's lo-
cal chapter, as part of the celebration of
Veterans' Month. The SBDC was available
to help attendees make informed deci-
sions about starting one's own business
with business counseling and training
assistance. Additionally, the SBDC pro-
vided information on potential SBA loan
guaranty and other programs geared for
veterans.


SBDC AND THE WOMEN'S
BUSINESS CENTER E-
COMMERCE SUMMIT
The SBDC was an attendee at the an-
nual WBC E-Commerce Summit entitled
"Bridging the Gap" held at Divi Carina Bay
Resort. The SBDC also participated as an
exhibitor at the WBC E-Commerce Expo
event held in the Sunshine Mall with ap-
proximately 50 other vendors. The SBDC
provided information to the public regard-
ing the counseling and training aspects of
SBDC available to aspiring entrepreneurs
and small business owners.

SBDC AND HUMAN SERVICES
PROGRAM INVOLVEMENT
The STX/SBDC has been an active par-
ticipant in Helping Children Work (HCW)
multi-series programs, initiated by the De-
partment of Human Services for individu-
als who have been displaced from jobs or
need additional training in order to seek/


secure employment. As part of the first
three-week session, HCW requested the
assistance of SBDC to present the module
Money Management for Personal Success.
The success story surrounding that session
is that all attendees are now gainfully em-
ployed. This program will continue through-
out the fiscal year and SBDC continues to
support this initiative.

SBDC AND IRB DISCUSS 2003
BUSINESS TAXES
The SBDC and the VI Internal Revenue
Bureau held two seminars in February on
Filing your 2003 Business Taxes. The first
session, held at the Legislature's Confer-
ence Room in St. John, was attended by
over 20 individuals. The keynote present-
ers, Mr. Clifford Charleswell and Mr. Alonzo
Brady, helped simplify the tax process. The
second session, held at the SBDC's Nisky
Center Training Facility, saw an equal
amount of attendees who also benefited
from the expertise of these IRB Agents.


HTTP ://PP5. UVI. E P&










12 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE

UPCOMING EVENTS

)UNE SEPTEMBER 2004


r -
JUNE
14-18 CARIBBEAN URBAN FORESTRY CONFERENCE/CES'
15 NEW IMAGE POLICY BOARD SEMINAR/SBDC
16 THE BEST OF THE SBA PRODUCTS AND SERVICES- STT/SBDC
17 THE BEST OF THE SBA PRODUCTS AND SERVICES-STJ/SBDC
20-26 AQUAPONIC & TILAPIA AQUACULTURE SHORT COURSE/AES
21-JULY 30 4H SUMMER ACADEMY/CES
29 DESIGNING A WEBPAGE DAY I (INTERMEDIATE)/SBDC


JULY
1
6
8
9
15
19-23
21

28
23 & 26
24


DESIGNING A WEBPAGE DAY II/SBDC
DESIGNING A WEBPAGE DAY III/SBDC
DESIGNING A WEBPAGE DAY IV/SBDC
BASIC BUSINESS EXPOSURE/SBDC
BASIC BUSINESS EXPOSURE/SBDC
CARIBBEAN FOOD CROPS SOCIETY/CES
DETAILS OF BUSINESS OWNERSHIP: INSURANCE PLANNING/
SBDC
DETAILS OF BUSINESS OWNERSHIP: INVENTORY CONTROL/SBDC
WNET ROUNDTABLE/SBDC
DIABETIC WORKSHOP/CES


AUGUST
3 HOW TO BUY AND SELL A HOUSE/SBDC
5 HOW TO BE A GOOD LANDLORD/SBDC
5 DETAILS OF BUSINESS OWNERSHIP: MARKETING
STRATEGY/PRICING PRODUCTS & SERVICES/SBDC
12 DETAILS OF BUSINESS OWNERSHIP: MARKETING
STRATEGY/ADVERTISING YOUR BUSINESS/SBDC
18 MARKETING STRATEGIES/SBDC
19 DETAILS OF BUSINESS OWNERSHIP: INTERVIEWING &
HIRING THE RIGHT PEOPLE/SBDC
31 INTRODUCTION TO MICROSOFT PUBLISHER/SBDC

SEPTEMBER
11 MINI CONFERENCE/SBDC
13-18 COASTWEEK/CMES
16 DETAILS OF BUSINESS OWNERSHIP: BASIC
ACCOUNTING/BOOKKEEPING/SBDC
21 WNET ROUNDTABLE/SBDC


*for more information on these events, contact the sponsoring department.










UVI RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE

o #2 )OHN BREWERS BAY
ST. THOMAS, VI 00802




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