Group Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 7. No. 1.
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Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 7. No. 1.
Series Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of the Virgin Islands.
Affiliation: University of the Virgin Islands
Publisher: University of the Virgin Islands.
Publication Date: 12/26/2003
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Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean
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Volume ID: VID00005
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RESEARCH AND


PUBLIC SERVICE


NEWSLETTER


UNIVERSITY OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


Volume 7, No. 1 News from the UVI Research and Public Service Component


HANDS ACROSS THE WATER


LOCAL FARMERS AND UVI DONATE

SHEEP AND GOATS TO HAITI


A collaborative effort between Dr. Bob
Godfrey, UVI-AES Animal Science Program
Leader, Dr. Bethany Bradford, VI Department
of Agriculture veterinarian on St. Thomas,
and St. Thomas farmers Arthur Harthmann,
Buddy Henneman, Eugene Peters and
Sinclair Hamm resulted in local hair sheep
and goats being donated to the non-govern-
ment organization Heifer Project Interna-
tional (HPI) in Haiti on November 10-11,
2003. Dr. Paul Rudenberg, DVM, HPI-Haiti
Country Representative, coordinated the ac-
tivities in Haiti with the assistance of Dr. Kevin
Flannaghan, DVM, of the Christian Veteri-
nary Mission.
The sheep and goats will be given to
farmer associations that are part of two
projects in Haiti. The project participants will
receive training in animal husbandry, are
required to build adequate housing, plant im-
proved forages and keep records on the
animals. Technicians from HPI will visit the
associations monthlyto monitorthe progress
of the project. Two of the hair sheep will be given to
the University in Les Cayes for their breeding program
and one of the Boer goats will go to Christian Veteri-
nary Mission which distributes improved livestock
throughout Haiti. The farmer associations will be re-
quired to donate a high quality male offspring from the
animals they receive to another association. They will
also be rotating some of the males between the vari-
ous groups. The University in Les Cayes will be re-
quired to pass on four purebred offspring to be used in
other HPI projects.
The animals were flown from the USVI to Haiti by
Mike Foster, owner and pilot of Coastal Air on St. Croix.
Dr. Bradford, Dr. Godfrey and Sylvester Prentice, of
the VI Department of Agriculture, accompanied the


The plane is loaded with sheep and goats and ready to fly to Haiti.
Shown in the photo are Captain Mike Foster, Sinclair Hamm, Dr.
Bob Godfrey, Dr. Bethany Bradford, Sylvester Prentice and Patrick
Olive
animals on the trip. The animals were tested for a vari-
ety of diseases by the VI Department of Agriculture
veterinarians and the National Veterinary Diagnostic
Laboratory in Ames, Iowa and all received a clean bill
of health prior to being shipped to Haiti. Upon arrival in
Haiti, the animals were taken to a quarantine facility
where they will remain for a period of time before being
sent to the farmers.
In addition to the sheep from UVI, Dr. Godfrey pro-
vided copies of a hair sheep production booklet he wrote
Continued on p.2


JANUARY 2004


INSIDE

2 The Caribbean
Writer Announces
Vol. 17 Winners
3 Adult Learners
Complete Basic CES
Computer Training
Course
4 CMES Monitors
Coral Disease on
Fragile V.I. Reefs
5 St. Croix Schools
Join Fight to End
Hunger at World
Food Day
6 UVI-CES Promotes
Pollution Prevention
and Environmental
Restoration
7 AES Visited by
Director of Tropicall
Subtropical Aquac-
ulture
8 SBDC Briefs
9 ECC Conducts 2003
V.I. Community
Survey
12 AES and CES Offer
Ghana Training
Workshops

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d0MJJ










2 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
RESEARCH & PUBLIC
SERVICE (R&PS)
NEWSLETTER
IS AN INFORMATIONAL
NEWSLETTER ON THE UNITS
THAT MAKE UP THE
R&PS COMPONENT.
HTTP://RPS.UVI.EDU/
VICE PROVOST
HENRY H. SMITH, PH.D.
EDITORIAL BOARD
VELMA ABRAMSEN,
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO
THE PRESIDENT
LORNA CHESTERFIELD,
ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PROVOST
CLARICE C. CLARKE,
PUBLIC INFORMATION SPECIALIST
HELEN DOOKHAN,
ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST
MANUEL PALADA, PH.D.
AES RESEARCH ASSOCIATE
PROFESSOR
RAQUEL SANTIAGO SILVER,
ADMINISTRATOR
JACQUELINE SOMERSALL-
BERRY,
FORMER ASSISTANT TO THE
ECC DIRECTOR
PATRICE JOHNSON,
DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS
MARVIN WILLIAMS,
EDITOR, THE CARIBBEAN WRITER

LAYOUT & DESIGN
ROBIN STERNS, PH.D.

DISTRIBUTION
KIMA GATON
MAIL LETTERS OR COMMENTS TO:
LORNA CHESTERFIELD
UVI RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
#2 JOHN BREWERS BAY
ST. THOMAS, VI 00802
TELEPHONE: (340) 693-1061
FAX: (340) 693-1065
LCHESTE UVI.EDPU

THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VRGIN ISLANDS
15 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY,
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION,
TITLE IX, SECTION 504,
PL 101-542 EDUCATOR
AND EMPLOYER.


THE CARIBBEAN WRITER UPDATES

VOLUME 17 PUBLISHED/WINNERS ANNOUNCED
The Caribbean Writer, an international literary anthology published in the summer of
each year by the University of the Virgin Islands, recently released Volume 17 in its series.
The anthology retains a Caribbean focus, and like its predecessors, the latest volume fea-
tures the work of writers in the region and abroad (including writers and artists from the
Virgin Islands). In its continuing mission to encourage creative writing and criticism in the
region, The Caribbean Writer publishes book reviews, drama, personal essays, poetry,
short fiction, special sections that celebrate the work of acclaimed writers, and transla-
tions. Among the highlights in the current volume are a special section on the marvelous
writer Wilson Harris of Guyana, poetry and prose by Opal Palmer Adisa, book reviews by
an international gathering of critics and intellectuals, and imaginative work of such Virgin
Islanders as Brenda Y. Jackson, Winston Nugent, and Althea Romeo-Mark.
As is our custom, we recognized the prize winners of the previous volume, including
the Daily News Prize for poetry won by Loretta Collins, the Canute Brodhurst Prize for
short fiction awarded to Joanne Hyppolite, and the Marguerite Cobb McKay Prize for a
Virgin Islander earned by Deverita Carty Sturdivant. Volume 17 of The Caribbean Writer is
currently available at Education Central, Memories of St. Croix, Magazines and More, Un-
dercover Books and Whim Museum on St. Croix; Tropical Memories and Dockside Bookshop
on St. Thomas; Heritage Books and Arts on Tortola; as well as in both UVI bookstores.
Copies can also be ordered directly from The Caribbean Writer's office by calling (340)
692-4152, e-mailing qmars@uvi.edu or orders@thecaribbeanwriter.com, or from our se-
cure server website at www.TheCaribbeanWriter.com.

VOLUME 18 SUBMISSIONS/SPECIAL SECTION
The Caribbean Writer closes submissions December 30, 2003, for its next volume, #18.
Contributions towards a special section on Edwidge Danticat (who has authored books
such as The Farming of Bones, The Butterfly's Way and, her latest, Behind the Mountains)
and Lorna Goodison (whose books include Turn Thanks, Guinea Woman: New and Se-
lected Poems and Traveling Mercies) are being solicited for this particular volume.
Mail submissions to The Caribbean Writer, University of the Virgin Islands, RR 02, Box
10,000, Kingshill St. Croix, USVI 00850 or submit electronically to qmars@uvi.edu or
submit@thecaribbeanwriter.com. Submissions must be postmarked by December 30, 2003.
For more information, visit www.TheCaribbeanWriter.com or call Quilin Mars at (340)
692-4152.


HAITI
Continued from p. 1

and copies of research symposia on hair sheep and
Senepol cattle so that HPI can have more information
on raising sheep under tropical conditions. They will
also distribute this information to the farmers' associa-
tions in Haiti.
Dr. Rudenberg took the visitors from the USVI on
a tour of some of the mountainous areas of the coun-
try. There were a lot of farms on the hillsides using
terraced fields for crop production while the majority of
the livestock production occurred in the lowlands. The
climate was much cooler in the mountains compared
to the hot temperatures found in the lowlands.
Sheep from other locations could have been se-
lected by HPI, but the proximity of the USVI and the
fact that the sheep are already adapted to tropical con-
ditions and the high quality of animals were all decid-
ing factors in their decision to contact Dr. Bradford for
assistance. The animals selected from the USVI were
of very good quality and will have a positive impact on
sheep production in Haiti. There was discussion of
setting up another shipment of animals to Haiti again


to provide HPI with more animals to distribute to farm-
ers in the country. They were also interested in dairy
cattle and the use of the Senepol cattle from St. Croix
to provide tropical adaptation genetics to their animals.


Sheep and goats were transported in trucks by Heifer Project
International from the airport to the quarantine station in Haiti


T









JANUARY2004 3


ADULT LEARNERS COMPLETE BASIC


CES COMPUTER TRAINING COURSE


Six-year-old Wanda asked her grand-
mother, "Why are you going to school in
the evenings?" Her grandmother, Ms.
Brooks, answered, "Baby I am learning
how to use a computer."
Ms. Brooks attended a Basic Com-
puter Training Course designed especially
for mature members of the community
without prior computer experience. The
course was sponsored by the UVI-Coop-
erative Extension's Children, Youth and
Families-at-Risk (CYFAR) Program. In the
course, adults were encouraged to learn
everything they ever wanted to know
about the computer; and many partici-
pants in this initial training did not know
how to turn the computer on and off. (They
were encouraged to bring family members
who could assist or make them feel more
comfortable taking on the challenge for
the first time). All thirteen participants who
initially registered completed the six
weeks of instruction and were awarded
certificates of completion.
On December 2, 2003, a closing pro-
gram was held to celebrate the achieve-
ments of the participants. Marthious Cla-
vier, CES Extension Agent opened the
program. Greetings and remarks were
given by Kwame Garcia, CES State Di-
rector, Lois Sanders, Assistant Director,
4-H/Family & Consumer Sciences Pro-
gram and Jennifer Jackson, Chancellor.
From October to December, classes
were held two hours, twice a week for six
weeks, with tutorials available for persons
needing extra assistance. Topics included
exposure to: parts of the computer, using


CES computer training course participants being introduced to computers


a mouse, starting and closing a program,
the difference in software and hardware,
keyboard symbols and keys, the differ-
ence in folders and drives, motherboard,
modem, ram, cpu, saving documents,
printing, opening files, headers and
footers, error correction, i.e. cut, copy and
paste, spell and grammar check, undo/
redo, margins, insertion of page numbers,
e-mail and internet surfing.
It is the overall goal of the CYFAR Pro-
gram to bridge the digital divide in the ter-
ritory and encourage residents to learn


From front to back and left to right; Eloi Sylvester, Kimona Stanley, Margaret Clavier, Rachael Calixte, Donna
Samuel, Christian Merchant, Victoria Sylvester, Tim Nicholas, Marion Stanley, Adina Daisley, A velyn G. Moses,
Pamela Rogers and Esther Burroughs


more about the "global community"
through computers and related technol-
ogy. In recent years, the CYFAR Program
at CES has focused on providing com-
puter training to youth in local housing
communities. However, the St. Thomas
program has worked with senior residents
over the past year during the day. In St.
Croix, requests were made to provide this
course in the evenings which allows those
adults with full time employment, as well as
retirees, to take advantage of the course.
Victoria Sylvester, one of three local
teachers in attendance, stated, "The
school administration said they were go-
ing to put computers in the classroom and
I was completely computer illiterate. Now
I can use it."
Rachel Calixte exclaimed, I can now
order things for myself on the Internet
without having to call my children!"
This first class exemplified the say-
ing, "You are never too old to learn." Not
only did the participants complete the
course, they requested advanced informa-
tion and training to continue to reinforce
their newly acquired skills and to learn
new ones!
The popular Cooperative Extension
instructor was Marthious Clavier, a recent
UVI graduate in computer science. If you
would like to sign-up for a future class,
contact him at (340) 692-4090; or contact
Lois Sanders at (340) 692-4096 for other
information.









4 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


CMES MONITORS CORAL DISEASE ON


FRAGILE VIRGIN ISLANDS REEFS


Yellow Blotch Disease on mountainous star coral (Montastraea faveolata)

Coral reefs provide an essential habitat for a wide range of com-
mercially important fish and invertebrate species. They also provide
beauty that improves our quality of life and help to fuel the economy
of the Virgin Islands. Like other living creatures, corals can be vulner-
able to infection by diseases. Researchers worldwide have noted re-
cent increases of coral disease. Disease can lead to dramatic de-
creases in live coral cover and alter the function and productivity of
coral reef ecosystems. It has been suggested that recent increases
in coral disease may be associated with human-induced declines in
reef environmental quality, such as the contamination of coral reefs
from terrestrial pollution.
As part of a comprehensive coral reef monitoring program, re-
searchers from the Center for Marine and Environmental Studies
(CMES) are monitoring the levels of coral disease on reefs surround-
ing St. Croix, St. John, and St. Thomas. To date, CMES has studied
disease at 10 reefs in St. Croix, one reef in St. John, and 14 reefs in

ANIMAL SCIENCE PROGRAM RECEIVES
FUNDS FOR SHEEP NUTRITION RESEARCH
Dr. Bob Godfrey, Animal Science Program Leader, received
$5,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources
Conservation Service (NRCS) in Dallas, Texas, to support a
project to collect data on sheep nutrition. The project is in col-
laboration with the Grazing Land Animal Nutrition Lab at Texas
A&M University, College Station, Texas. Plant samples collected
from the pastures and feces from the sheep at the Sheep Re-
search Facility on St. Croix will be sent to the lab at Texas A&M
and analyzed using near infrared spectrophotometry (NIRS) to
determine the nutrient quality of the grass the sheep are con-
suming. In the past, NRCS has provided support to the animal
science program to collect samples to develop this information
for pregnant and lactating ewes. This new project will be con-
ducted using young, growing lambs. Results from both projects
will be used to establish baseline data for a software program
developed by the NRCS called NutBal. This program allows live-
stock producers to input information regarding the level of pro-
duction they want to achieve from their animals along with the
current nutritional inputs. The software calculates what changes
should be made to the nutritional level to support the desired
level of production.


Dark Spots Disease on massive starlet coral (Siderastrea siderea)
St. Thomas. So far, the data indicated that disease levels on the reefs
around St. Thomas and St. John vary seasonally and geographically,
and that levels of disease are lower at protected off-shore deep reefs
than reefs open to trap fishing.
The two most commonly observed diseases at the St. Thomas
and St. John sites were White Spots Disease and Yellow Blotch Dis-
ease. Another disease, Dark Spots Disease is characterized by dark
purple to gray or brown patches of discolored tissue on the coral colony
Sediment may collect in the center of the spots, sometimes causing
tissue mortality. Yellow Blotch Disease is characterized by irregularly
shaped blotches of yellow tissue. Tissue mortality may occur in the
center of the patch, resulting in a band of yellow tissue surrounding
algae or sediment. CMES found that, at shallow near-shore reefs,
there were significantly more coral colonies infected with Dark Spots
Disease in spring than winter, and that there tended to be more coral
colonies infected with Yellow Blotch Disease in the winter than spring
(2002-2003).
CMES also determined that the proximity of the reef to shore
may be a factor in the occurrence of coral disease. Deep reefs lo-
cated several kilometers off-shore had significantly lower levels of
Dark Spots Disease than the near-shore reefs of St. Thomas. This
may be due to higher levels of human-induced stresses, such as non-
point source pollution on the near-shore reefs, but further study is
needed to clarify if this is the case.
Finally, CMES found that levels of coral disease were lower at an
off-shore site that is part of the Red Hind Bank Marine Conservation
District (a marine protected area that is closed to fishing) and a deep
reef site that is open to fishing. At the non-protected site, fish traps
were observed to be resting directly on top of the coral. In addition to
directly damaging and breaking the coral through contact, physical
damage from fish traps (as well as boat anchors and SCUBA divers)
may stress the immune systems of corals, making them more sus-
ceptible to disease. Once again, further study is needed to clarify
exactly what role fish traps may play in the occurrence of coral dis-
ease.
Given the importance of coral reef ecosystems and the potential
impact of the spread of coral disease, CMES will continue to monitor
our coral reefs and explore new relationships and possibilities to help
ensure their health for years to come. For further information please
contact Dr. Richard Nemeth, CMES Director at (340) 693-1381 or
email rnemeth@uvi.edu.









JANUARY2004 5


ST. CROIX SCHOOLS )OIN FIGHT TO END


HUNGER AT WORLD FOOD DAY FETE


Four elementary schools and three youth
groups on St. Croix donated more than 2000
pounds of nonperishable food items to various
charitable organizations in the fight against hun-
ger. Youth from Ricardo Richards, Alfredo
Andrews, Juanita Gardine, Lew Muckle, 4-H
Leatherback Clover, St. Croix Christian Acad-
emy Starz 4-H Club, and the Boys and Girls Club
collected and delivered the food items to the
University of the Virgin Islands Cooperative Ex-
tension Service as their contribution to the World
Food Day celebration.
The Virgin Islands joined over 150 nations
in observing the 23rd celebration of World Food
Day The territory's observation on October 19th
included workshops on cucumber, avocado and
goat production. Afood court which housed 12
vendors, and a farmer's market provided attend-
ees with the opportunity to buy cooked food as
well as fresh fruits and vegetables.
Ataste of curried goat, goat water, cucum-
ber salad, and guacamole, a distribution of 5000
vegetable seedlings, field tours, and music by
Glamorous Sounds attracted over 1,500 people
of all ages to the St. Croix campus of the Univer-
sity of the Virgin Islands.
The official program began with opening
remarks from the master of ceremonies, Kofi
Boateng. The Keynote address was given by
Delegate to Congress Donna M. Christiansen.
During her presentation, she reminded attend-
ees that there is no better place to celebrate
World Food Day than at the university, in the
center of what used to be the bread basket of
the Virgin Islands.
"We are joining over 150 countries in all
parts of the world in all stages of development
to encourage the attention of people and their
governments to agricultural food production, to
increase awareness of hunger in the world and
to build a global alliance which will strengthen
political will in the fight against hunger and pov-
erty," she said.
She also said we cannot expect people to
listen to health messages when they are hun-
gry; however, by providing stable nutritious food
we can open the door to information sharing
which can lead to better health, which then sup-
ports increased productivity and thus increases
income for families and eventually for countries.
Finally, it will begin to reduce chronic malnutri-
tion and its adverse and far-reaching effects.
Remarks were also given by Dr. Lawrence
Lewis, Commissioner of the V.I. Department of
Agriculture, Dr. James Rakocy Research Direc-
tor of UVI Agricultural Experiment Station;
Kwame Garcia, State Director of UVI Coopera-
tive Extension Service, Jennifer Jackson, Chan-
cellor of UVI St. Croix campus and Dr. Henry
Smith, Vice Provost for UVI's Research and
Public Service.


I _7 r__u.


Top left: Delegate to Congress Donna
M. Christiansen giving the keynote
address at this year's World Food
Day activities
Top right: In the "House of Cans"
competition groups of 3-5 member
teams built aesthetically pleasing
structures using only the food items
collected
Bottom: Mr. Kwame Garcia, Sr., CES
State Director giving the welcome
remarks at World Food Day


For the first time a "Hunger Banquet," was
added to the list of activities for World Food Day.
Ten elementary schools and youth groups were
invited to send a six-member delegation, made
up of five students and one adult chaperone.
Each school or group represented a country and
prepared an interactive display on that country.
Meals were also served the delegations-some
were served full meals while others were given
nothing. This activity challenged the youth to think
critically about ourworld food situation and what
it feels like to go without.
Other youth activities included the "House
of Cans" competition where groups who partici-
pated in the food drive selected a coach and
formed 3-5 member teams and built aestheti-
cally pleasing structures using onlythe food items
collected. Also the "Plant A Seed For You and
Me," taught kids how to properly sow a variety of
seeds. In conjunction with the Department of
Human Services Bethlehem Shelter, students
from the Educational Complex agreed to estab-


lish a community garden at the shelter with veg-
etable slips from the World Food Day activity.
Although the day was filled with activities
for everyone, the purpose of World Food Day
was emphasized in all of the educational work-
shops-we must be advocates against pov-
erty and hunger and join with the United Na-
tions Food and Agriculture Organization in
their fight for international alliance against
hunger.


HTTP://RPPS. UVI. EP/









6 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


UVI-CES PROMOTES POLLUTION PREVENTION &

ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION


The UVI-CES and the NPS Committee held
the 8th V.I. Nonpoint Source Pollution Confer-
ence on "Strengthening CommunityAwareness
to Protect & Restore Our Environment," Decem-
ber 4-5, 2003, at the Westin St. John Resort &
Villas.
It featured oral and poster presentations as
well as exhibits relating to nonpoint source pol-
lution control in tropical climates. As a special
field trip this year, conference planners organized
a marine field trip along the spectacular south
shore of St. John. Throughout the trip, local sci-
entists and planners spoke to participants about
the various research projects and protection pro-
grams taking place in the area.
The conference also featured a youth par-
ticipation session on Day 2 that culminated with
a student logo contest. One Virgin Islands' middle
school student will be awarded $100 forthe best
Nonpoint Source Pollution logo. The Nonpoint
Source Committee will then use the winning logo
as the Committee's official logo in correspon-
dence and other documents.
The Nonpoint Source conference was de-
signed to facilitate communication ofthe impacts


of NPS pollution on the Virgin Island's environ-
ment and NPS pollution control practices that
can be implemented to protect and preserve our
ecosystems and water quality. The conference
audience consisted of representatives of the
construction and boating industries, as well as
government officials, non-governmental organi-
zations, and the general public. For information,
contact Kysha Wallace, DPNR-DEP, at (340)
774-3320 or kwallacedpnr@hotmail.com orJulie
Wright, UVI-CES, at (340) 693-1082 or
jwright@uvi.edu.
The conference is sponsored by the Virgin
Islands Department of Planning and Natural Re-
sources Coastal Zone Management Program,
Division of Environmental Protection & Division
of Fish & Wildlife; the University of the Virgin
Islands: Cooperative Extension Service, Con-
servation Data Center & Marine Advisory Ser-
vice; the Virgin Islands Resource Conservation
& Development Council, Inc.; the Virgin Islands
Nonpoint Source Pollution Control Committee;
the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and
the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Re-
sources Conservation Service.


Tons of sediment wash into Charlotte Amalie Harbor,
St. Thomas, after each heavy rain


SOLAR CROP DRYING TECHNOLOGY FOR THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


The Cooperative Extension Service, in
partnership with the V.I. Institute of Agricul-
ture Development, the V.I. Energy Office and
the V.I. Department of Agriculture, sponsored
two workshops on solar crop drying technol-
ogy during the month of October.
Workshops were offered on both the St.
Thomas and St. Croix campuses of the Uni-
versity by Dr. Clement Sankat, a member of
the Faculty of Engineering at the University
of the West Indies in Trinidad. Dr. Sankat
delivered a very informative presentation to
an enthusiastic audience of 37 on St. Tho-
mas and 17 on St. Croix. His lecture tar-
geted local farmers, herb growers, and in-
dividuals with an interest in agribusiness
(i.e. preserving or processing local agricul-
tural commodities).
Solar crop dryers are custom designed
dryer units that are practical and suitable for
farming operations with limited resources or
that lack access to commercial electric power.
On St. Thomas, the presentation con-
sisted of two parts a theoretical presenta-
tion at UVI which focused on the science
of crop drying technology, including the fac-
tors that influence the process of drying and
the quality of the final dried product. Also
discussed were designs for several types
of crop dryers which have potential for do-
mestic and commercial application in the
Virgin Islands. These various types have
been used throughout the Caribbean region
to dry a wide array of commodities, includ-


ing bananas, mangos, pineapples, papaya,
and fish.
The second day of training on St. Tho-
mas was conducted at the location of a solar
'community' dryer that was under construc-
tion. The participants benefitted from an on-
site explanation and discussion of the design,
construction, and operation of a walk-in, com-
mercial size drying unit.
Upon completion of this unit the dryerwill
be accessible, free of charge, to all workshop
participants for the purpose of processing
(drying) locally produced commodities. The
participants were encouraged to take advan-
tage of using the community dryer until they
construct their own, and to familiarize them-
selves with the drying process, and the use
of the dryer.
This workshop was organized in re-
sponse to requests from local crop produc-
ers and processors, especially those who
seek to add value to their harvests of me-
dicinal and culinary herbs. Some of these
crops include thyme, chives, parsley, basil,
mint, lemon grass, and a long list of plants
which we locally categorize as 'bush teas'.
As a result of this training the partici-
pants benefitted from increased knowledge
about solar drying technology. Participants
were issued certificates upon completion of
the workshop, and copies of schematic
drawings of several alternative crop dryer
designs. It is the hope of the workshop or-
ganizers that producers and processors will


incorporate the technology of drying as a
practice to enhance the sustainability oftheir
operations. The application of crop drying
technology extends the shelf life of commodi-
ties, creates alternative marketing opportu-
nities, and adds value to agricultural products.
Therefore, dried products may demand higher
prices on the market.
This initiative represented another suc-
cessful collaboration between the University
of the Virgin Islands, local government agen-
cies, and non-profit entities of our community.
The Cooperative Extension Service continues
to respond to the needs of our clientele to
improve the quality of life for the residents of
our community.


worKsnop participants win ur. SanKar at construction
site of a community solar crop dryer









JANLARY2004 7


AES RESEARCHER HONORED

BY INVITATIONS TO SPEAK
Dr. James Rakocy, AES Director and Research Professor of
Aquaculture, received invitations to speak at two conferences the
Ministerial Conference and Expo on Agriculture Science and Tech-
nology and the European Aquaculture Society Conference titled Be-
yond Monoculture.
The invitation to speak at the Ministerial Conference, which was held
in Sacramento, California on June 23-25, came directly from the U.S.
Secretary of Agriculture, Ann M. Veneman. She invited the Ministers of
Agriculture from 180 countries to provide "a forum for discussing the needs
of developing countries in adopting new food and agriculture technolo-
gies to help increase productivity, maintain food security, conserve re-
sources, protect the environment, and improve nutrition." Dr. Rakocy was
the only scientist invited who represented the U.S. aquaculture research
community. The title of his presentation was "Aquaponics: Integrated Tech-
nology for Fish and Vegetable Production in Recirculating Systems." The
U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Agency for International Develop-
ment, and U.S. Department of State sponsored the conference.
Dr. Rakocy was invited by the European Aquaculture Society to be a
keynote speaker and session co-chairman at Beyond Monoculture. The


Dr. Cheng-Sheng Lee delivers a seminar on aquaculture development in the Pacific
Islands

AES VISITED BY DIRECTOR OF

CENTER FOR TROPICAL AND

SUBTROPICAL AQUACULTURE
Dr. Cheng-Sheng Lee, Director of the Center for Tropical and
Subtropical Aquaculture (CTSA), visited the AES Aquaculture Pro-
gram on July 15-17. The purpose of his visit was to learn more about
the aquaculture technologies that have been developed at UVI and
to explore ways of incorporating UVI into the Center's programs.
In 1986 Congress established CTSAto support research, devel-
opment, demonstration, and extension to enhance viable and profit-
able U.S. aquaculture. The CTSA currently assists aquaculture de-
velopment in Hawaii and the U.S.-affiliated Pacific Islands, which in-
cludes American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana
Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Republic of Palau,
and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. In its 15 years of operation,
CTSA has distributed over $7 million to fund 161 projects addressing
a variety of national aquaculture priorities. CTSA is jointly adminis-
tered by The Oceanic Institute and the University of Hawaii and is
located at The Oceanic Institute's Makapuu Point site on the island of
Oahu in Hawaii.
Dr. Lee viewed UVI's aquaponic and greenwater tank culture
technology and thought that these systems would be ideal for the
production of tilapia and vegetables in tropical Pacific islands. He
indicated that he would search for ways of incorporating UVI into his
programs. UVI is a member of the Southern Regional Aquaculture
Center, administered by Mississippi State University, and is currently
unable to access CTSA funding.
Four aquaculturists from the Pacific Region [Guam, Saipan, and
Hawaii (2)] have received training in UVI's Aquaponics and Tilapia
Aquaculture Short Course, and the extension agent from Saipan built
a small aquaponic system based on the UVI design.
Dr. Lee presented a seminar entitled "Aquaculture Research in
Hawaii and the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands, The Oceanic Institute
and The Center forTropical and SubtropicalAquaculture." In his semi-
nar, he described projects on the culture of shrimp, marine finfish,
sponges, giant clams and black peals.
Dr. Lee's visit was an excellent cross-oceanic exchange of knowl-
edge and potential for future collaboration.


conference, which was held
in Trondheim, Norway, Au-
gust 8-12, examined the
emerging interest and need
for integrated systems that
utilize extractive aquaculture
(algae/aquatic plants and
shellfish) to remove inor-
ganic and organic wastes
generated from fed aquac-
ulture (fish and shrimp). Dr.
Rakocy was co-chairman of
the session on Economics
and Legislation of Integrated
Aquaculture and presented
a paper titled "Initial Eco-
nomic Analyses of
Aquaponic Systems." The
paper was published in the


Turbot cultured in recirculating saltwater
systems at a fish farm on the southern coast of
Holland


proceedings and was co-authored by Mr. Donald Bailey, AES Research
Specialist. Dr. Rakocy contributed a second paper (A Greenwater Tank
System withAeration, Mixing, Solids Removal, and Nitrification in the Water
Column) in the session on Integrated Freshwater Systems. This paper
was also published in the proceedings and was co-authored by Mr. Donald
Bailey; Mr. EricThoman,AES Research Specialist; and Mr. Charlie Shultz,
AES Research Analyst.
Before returning home, Dr. Rakocy stopped in Holland to visit
Wageningen University, the largest and most famous agricultural school
in Europe, at the invitation of Dr. Marc Verdegem, a faculty member. There
he presented a seminar on aquaponics to students and faculty, toured
Wageningen's world-class aquaculture and hydroponic research facili-
ties and visited a commercial turbot farm on the southern coast of Hol-
land. Turbot is a saltwater fish, which is similar to flounder. Using state-of-
the-art recirculating system technology, the farm produces 200,000 Ibs. of
turbot annually and distributes them to restaurants in Holland, Belgium
and Germany
These speaking invitations confirm UVI's reputation as the world's
leading institution in the development of aquaponic technology and dem-
onstrate that aquaponic food production is gaining international recogni-
tion. At each conference, several participants who were interested in ap-
plying aquaponic technology in their countries approached Dr. Rakocy for
additional information. These participants represented China, Sri Lanka,
Equatorial Guinea, Cayman Islands, Australia, Israel, Sweden, Wales and
Holland.









8 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


SBPC BRIEFS

WILLIAMS RECEIVES 2003
STATE STAR
Association of Small Business Develop-
ment Centers (ASBDC) President Donald
Wilson announced that Mary Joe Williams
has been selected as the 2003 State Star of
the University ofthe Virgin Islands Small Busi-
ness Development Center (SBDC) network.
The recognition ceremony occurred at the
ASBDC Fall Conference held at the Sheraton
Hotel in San Diego, California.
"I am pleased to make this announce-
ment, and to recognize Mary Joe Williams for
extraordinary contributions to the work of the
SBDC network and small business in the U.S.
Virgin Islands," said Wilson.
Ms. Williams is a Business Counselor I/
Training Coordinator at the UVI-SBDC. She
was chosen by the SBDC network for being
an exemplary performer, making a significant
contribution to the UVI-SBDC program, and
showing a strong commitment to small busi-
nesses in the V.I. State Director Warren T
Bush, and Lead Center Supervisor and 2002
recipient Linroy E. Freeman led the staff in
offering congratulations to Ms. Williams.
ASBDC is a partnership uniting private
enterprise, government, higher education and
local nonprofit economic development orga-
nizations. It is the Small Business
Administration's largest partnership program,
providing management and technical assis-
tance to help Americans start, run and grow
their own businesses. With more than 1,000
centers across the nation, the SBDC network
assists about 600,000 small businesses ev-
ery year in face-to-face counseling and train-
ing, in addition to assisting hundreds of thou-
sands more through fax and e-mail.

"FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING
SEPTEMBER 30, 2003, THE CENTER
CONDUCTED 63 TRAINING PROGRAMS
TERRITORY-WIDE, SERVING
APPROXIMATELY 1,400 RESIDENT
ATTENDEES. THE CENTER ALSO
RECEIVED A HIGHLY FAVORABLE
APPROVAL RATING ON THESE
PROGRAMS IN STAKEHOLDER
EVALUATIONS. APPROXIMATELY 800
CLIENT CASES WERE HANDLED
TERRITORY-WIDE VIA THE CENTER'S
FREE BUSINESS COUNSELING SERVICES,
AND MORE THAN 30 LOANS IN
EXCESS OF $1 MILLION IN SECURED
LOAN FUNDING WERE EXTENDED TO
SMALL BUSINESS PERSONS, WITH
ADDED TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
PROVIDED BY SBDC. "


WHEELER RECEIVES 2003 RPS
EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION
SBDC's Wendy Wheeler was one of
three recipients of the University's 2003 RPS
Employee Recognition Awards in a presen-
tation made at the RPS Annual Fall Retreat.
Ms. Wheeler serves as a Business Analyst/
Training Coordinator in the SBDC's St. Croix
office. Ms. Wheeler has made invaluable con-
tributions to the SBDC and is to be com-
mended for successfully taking the lead in the
various training initiatives that have originated
out of the St. Croix office. SBDC's State Di-
rector and Lead Center and Service Center
Supervisors joined SBDC staff in congratu-
lating Ms. Wheeler on her recognition. The
SBDC is particularly pleased to have had its
staffers recognized for a fourth consecutive
year as Ms. Wheelerjoins previous SBDC re-
cipients Karen Jones, Phyllis Bryan and Mary
Joe Williams.
UVI-SBDC HELPS U.S. SMALL
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
CELEBRATE NATIONAL
SMALL BUSINESS WEEK 2003
In recognition of the small business
community's contributions to the American
economy and society, the President of the
United States designates one week each
year as National Small Business Week. The
United States Small Business Administra-
tion (SBA) celebrated Small Business Week
2003, SBA: 50 Years Empowering
America's Entrepreneurs in July 2003. The
highlight was the presentation of awards for
outstanding contributions of small business
persons and advocates at the territorial and
national levels.
SBDC recognized the following honorees
at ceremonies on St. Thomas and St. Croix.
The ceremonies also included award distinc-
tions made by the SBAand the V.I. Economic
Development Authority (EDA).
The 2003 UVI-SBDC's Small Business
Person of the Year Award recipients were
Emric Leonard, TEPS Enterprises, Inc., St.
Thomas; Bill Murphy, Murphy's Automotive,
St. Thomas; Leayle Benjamin, Graphic Solu-
tions, St. Thomas; Allie and Beverly Petrus,
Subway Restaurant, St. Thomas; Lenny
Richardson, Luncheria, St. Croix; and Cedric
Armstrong, Armstrong's Homemade Ice
Cream, St. Croix.
The 2003 UVI-SBDC Financial Services
Advocates of the Year recipients were First
Bank U.S. Virgin Islands, award accepted by
Cassan Pancham, First Bank's First Vice
President, and Economic Development
Authority's Small Business Development
Agency, award accepted by Frank
Schulterbrandt, EDAs Chief Executive Officer.
The 2003 U.S. Small Business Adminis-
tration (SBA) Bank of the Year was First Bank
U.S. Virgin Islands, award accepted by


Cassan Pancham.
The 2003 U.S. Small Business Adminis-
tration (SBA) Small Business Persons of the
Year were Dynel Soto and Steve Wilson,
Quality Medical Equipment and Supply, Inc.,
St. Croix.
EDA's 2003 Entrepreneur of the Year
Award went to Alberta Benjamin, Chickie's
Shoe Store, St. Croix.
EDAs 2003 Fisherman of the YearAward
was awarded to Albert Joachim, St. Croix.
Several acknowledgements and certifi-
cates of appreciation were also given to the
numerous external stakeholders of the UVI-
SBDC for their invaluable contributions to the
Center's many recent successes.
The SBDC conducted a number of out-
reach seminars, open houses, workshops,
and media appearances to further augment
the festive activities in celebration of the SBA's
50th (Golden) Anniversary.

SBDC'S FY 2003 BUSINESS
COUNSELING & TRAINING
DIVISIONS EXPERIENCE
MA)OR SUCCESS
The SBDC continues to enjoy suc-
cesses with its counseling and training ini-
tiatives. In addition to the technical assis-
tance received by potential and existing
business owners primarily in the area of
identification and approval of loan fund-
ing, many of these individuals gained
broad-based training in a myriad of small
business areas.
The SBDC had major successes in its
STT- and STX-based counseling and pro-
gramming over the fourth quarter (Jul 1-
Sep. 30). Among the training topics covered
in both districts were: Introduction to
Microsoft Access, Individual Estate Plan-
ning, How Wills and Trusts Can Help Your
Business, EDC Benefits for Small Busi-
nesses, The ABCs of Small Business
Loans, Personnel Handbook for Small Busi-
nesses, World Class Customer Service, and
Getting the Leadership Edge.
For the fiscal year ending September
30, 2003, the Center conducted 63 training
programs territory-wide, serving approxi-
mately 1,400 resident attendees.
The Center also received a highly fa-
vorable approval rating on these programs
in stakeholder evaluations. Approximately
800 client cases were handled territory-wide
via the Center's free business counseling
services, and more than 30 loans in excess
of $1 million in secured loan funding were
extended to small business persons, with
added technical assistance provided by
SBDC.
Most of the Center's major fiscal year
milestones were exceeded, helping to make
a positive economic impact on the number
of jobs created and retained in the territory.









JANLARY2004 9


SBDC CONDUCTS FOUR-PART
SERIES WITH VIRGIN ISLANDS
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
In an effort to provide existing and pro-
spective entrepreneurs with a comprehensive
understanding of the various Virgin Islands
labor laws, regulations, and procedures,
SBDC conducted a four-part training series
on handling labor relations in collaboration
with the V.I. Department of Labor. The series,
held at the STX SBDC, covered the following
topics: Wage and Hourly Disputes and Dis-
crimination; Workers Compensation and
OSHA Requirements; Wrongful Discharge
Act; Due Process and A Fair Hearing. The
series was a tremendous success and the
SBDC will continue to launch such program-
ming to help better acquaint the VI small busi-
ness community with the key information
needed to effectively manage one's small
business and employees. SBDC thanks the
various external participants and presenters
who helped to successfully deliverthis series.
They include the V.I. Department of Labor's
Commissioner, Cecil Benjamin, Glen J. Smith,
Wanda Morris and June Austin. Thanks are
also extended to Angela Weber, Melvin
George, and Natalie Nelson Tang How, Esq.

SBDC MAKES FAST START TO
FY 2004 INITIATIVES
SBDC launched its FY 2004 training
schedule with several successful programs
in both districts. On St. Thomas, a Personal
Credit Seminar was held in collaboration with
First Bank Virgin Islands, a Professional De-
velopment seminar was held with added pre-
sentations from UVI's Verna Rivers and Karen
Blyden, and UVI alumna Lisa Wynne. Afour-
part series workshop on Checklist for Start-
ing a Business was also widely accepted and
supported by the residents of this community.
SBDC also gained a successful start in St.
Croix with its four-part labor series and with
internal collaborations from the University's
Student Activities Office (Clint Ferris). A pre-
sentation was made on the "Art of Leader-
ship" by St. Croix attorney and motivational
speaker, Angela Weber.
For more information on past programs
and upcoming events, please contact the
SBDC at (340) 776-3206 (STT) or (340) 692-
5270 (STX).


HTTP://RPS .UVI. EPU/


EASTERN CARIBBEAN CENTER CONDUCTS

2003 VIRGIN ISLANDS COMMUNITY SURVEY


Approximately 5 percent of V.I. house-
holds were randomly selected to be in-
cluded in the Virgin Islands Community
Survey (VICS) this year. Fieldwork, which
began at the end of June, was completed
on all three islands by August 31. More
than 40 interviewers were hired on a tem-
porary basis to collect housing and
population information. The housing-re-
lated questions covered items about the
housing unit in which respondents lived,
such as number of rooms, utilities, own-
ership, and mortgage. Population-related
questions covered items such as sex,
age, race, place of birth, education, mari-
tal status, migration, labor force status,
and income.
VICS 2003 is a follow-up to the sur-
veys conducted in 2001 and 2002. All 50
states in the U.S. conducted a similar
survey known as the American Commu-
nity Survey (ACS) that collects data on


an inter decennial annual basis. Unlike
the Census, which collects housing and
population data every 10 years, VICS al-
lows the annual collection of such data.
Updated information is a critical
component of organizing and planning
for social, economic, educational, health,
and other community needs. One vital
area of demand for such statistics is the
writing of grant proposals to secure fed-
eral funding. The funds awarded are fre-
quently linked to a fair share based on
population segment statistics. These
data also meet the needs of local gov-
ernment agencies that receive federal
grant funds and have programmatic re-
porting requirements.
The project was largely funded by the
Office of Management and Budget. The
Community Foundation of the Virgin Is-
lands provided an additional $15,000 for
the survey.


ECC COMPLETES LAW ENFORCEMENT PLANNING

COMMISSION JUVENILE OFFENDER STUDY


The continued involvement of Virgin
Islands youth in delinquent activity high-
lights the need for descriptive informa-
tion on juvenile offenders and a statisti-
cal examination of the factors that may
be associated with juvenile delinquent
activity. Researchers on the mainland
have conducted extensive studies that
point to causes and effects of stateside
juvenile delinquent behavior.
In the Virgin Islands, there has been
an absence of such research. A Study of
Juvenile Offenders in St Thomas and St
Croix was the first attempt to compile
data on juvenile offenders who have
passed through the correctional and
counseling system. It was also the first
research of its kind involving an in-depth
scientific approach to examining the fac-
tors that contribute to the Territory's
problem of juvenile delinquency.
The study examined several key fac-
tors that mainland studies identify as be-
ing associated with juvenile delinquency.
The data items included demographic at-
tributes of juveniles such as age, race,
gender, education, school enrollment,
place of birth, and employment. The psy-
chological assessment of the juvenile,
the number of children living in the
household, characteristics of the parents
of juveniles (age, place of birth, employ-
ment, and marital status) were also con-


sidered. Finally, the study explored sev-
eral characteristics of delinquent activi-
ties such as the number of offenses com-
mitted, type of offenses committed, out-
come or disposition of the offense, and,
when applicable, the type of weapon
used and duration between first and sec-
ond offense.
It is expected that the findings pro-
duced from this study will be used by leg-
islators to identify resources to fund nec-
essary preventive programs. Executive
officers may also use the data to estab-
lish policies geared to the reduction of
juvenile offenses.
The study was conducted by support
of a $120,000 grant from the Law En-
forcement Planning Commission (LEPC).
A Power Point presentation was made on
November 4, 2003, to the LEPC Board by
ECC team members Dr. Frank Mills, Dr.
Marcy Mason, Annette Gumbs, and
James Richardson. LEPC Board mem-
bers in attendance included Senator
Lorraine Berry, Commissioners of Edu-
cation and Human Services, the Drug
Policy Advisor to the Governor, and rep-
resentatives from the Department of Jus-
tice and LEPC.
For more information on the UVI
Eastern Caribbean Center and its
projects, contact Dr. Frank Mills, Direc-
tor, at (340) 693-1027 or fmills@uvi.edu.









10 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


r MANGO MELEE & FRUIT FESTIVAL

A HUGE HIT AGAIN


Residents evaluate several mango varieties at Mango
Melee


Three thousand people flocked to the St.
George Village Botanical Gardens to take
part in the annual Mango Melee and Tropi-
cal Fruit Festival. The festival is now part
of the fabric of St. Croix's community and
is an event that Crucians and visitors alike
look forward to.
As one entered the gardens, the sweet
smell of mangoes and other tropical fruits
filled the air. Now in its seventh year, the
festival has grown in the number of ven-
dors, both food and craft entrepreneurs,
fruit displays, workshops, and demonstra-
tions. Added interactive activities included
a mango-eating contest, mango evaluation,
mango and fruit identification contest, and
the "Nuttin' but Mango" food contest.
More than 85 varieties of mangoes
grown on St. Croix were displayed. Tropi-
cal fruits such as pineapples, carambolas,


figs, sour sops, breadfruits, breadnuts and
many more, also adorned the tables. At the
end of the festival, mango enthusiasts were
treated to a mango and tropical fruits auc-
tion.
More than 200 mango fans attended
hands-on demonstration workshops on the
propagation of tropical fruits and an ice
cream demonstration. Of course, the high-
light of the day was the mango eating con-
test. Fourteen young people competed for
the coveted first prize of $50. Other activi-
ties included garden games for children.
Mango Melee and Tropical Fruit Festi-
val is sponsored by the St. George Village
Botanical Garden, University of the Virgin
Islands Cooperative Extension Service,
Agricultural Experiment Station, and the
Virgin Islands Departments of Agriculture
and Tourism.


I we ry-ulep a nt0PiI lrbs IrerlrveCu eLC~r1111IIr I s i attrruI y uuiL1 bs ssurnI uI mlIc
Tree Care Workshop on UVI's St. Thomas campus

RESIDENTS GET HANDS-ON

TRAINING ON TREE CARE

Many trees in the Virgin Islands are not properly planted and
maintained. As a result, homeowners have problems with trees that
are planted too close to a structure, branches running through utility
lines, or trees that are dead or dying and are in need of care. The
Cooperative Extension Service' Urban Forestry Program assists
homeowners in the purchase and management of trees in the yard or
neighborhood.
Recently, CES partnered with We Grow Food, Inc., a nonprofit
farmer's group, to conduct a Tree Care Workshop for residents of the
western end of St. Thomas. This two-part workshop covered such
topics as tools of the trade, tree biology, tree shape and structure,
tool safety, fertilization, and reasons for pruning. The workshop
also included a practical pruning session where participants actu-
ally demonstrated some of the pruning principles they learned in
the classroom. For many of the participants, this was the first time
they actually used any tool to prune a tree or a shrub.
Participants who attended both sessions of the workshop received
a pruning saw and a certificate of completion.
To learn more on tree care and reasons for pruning, contact the
Cooperative Extension Service at (340) 693-1080 or 692-4080.


UVI-CES HELPS RESIDENTS

UNDERSTAND AND MAINTAIN

THEIR SEPTIC SYSTEMS
Many homes in the Virgin Islands use a standard septic system
to treat waste water from the bathroom, kitchen, and clothes washer.
However, public health officials and regulators report that more than
400 septic systems fail in the territory each year. Many septic sys-
tems fail in the Virgin Islands because of poor siting or upkeep. Waste
water from failing septic systems can pollute cisterns, wells, guts,
ponds, and beaches. Sewage can also overflow onto the soil surface
around a septic system, creating a public health risk. Waste water
also can cause algal blooms in ponds, lagoons, and coastal waters
that kill fish and shell fish.
To address these problems, the UVI Cooperative Extension Ser-
vice (CES) conducted Understanding Your Septic System workshops
in August on St. Thomas and St. Croix for residents interested in pre-
venting their septic systems from becoming a health hazard or pollu-
tion risk. Workshop attendees learned about how septic systems func-
tion, how to site and design a septic system, how to operate and
maintain septic systems to prevent failures, failure warning signs, and
methods for evaluating and ranking septic systems for pollution po-
tential.
Eighty-one percent of attendees said that they increased their
knowledge of septic system issues, and all participants said they would
implement at least one of the "good house-keeping" practices recom-
mended at the workshops. As a result of the workshops, CES staff
also visited a resident's home site to provide recommendations to
remedy the home-owner's failed system.
The Understanding Your Septic System workshop is part of UVI-
CES's VI*A*Syst (V.I. Home & Farm Water Quality Protection) Pro-
gram. VI*A*Syst is a voluntary program that offers Virgin Islanders a
simple and effective way to help protect water quality and improve
health and quality of life by reducing pollution risks in and around the
home. For more information on septic systems or the VI*A*Syst Pro-
gram, contact Julie Wright, (340) 693-1082 or jwright@uvi.edu, or
Dale Morton (340) 693-1086 or dmorton@uvi.edu.









JANUARY2004


ANIMAL SCIENCE PROGRAM HOLDS OPEN

HOUSE AT SHEEP RESEARCH FACILITY


The Animal Science Program of the Agri-
cultural Experiment Station opened the gates of
the farm to the community for an afternoon of
education and interaction. The open house was
held on September 25, 2003, at the Sheep Re-
search Facility on the St. Croix campus. Visitors
were given the opportunity to see the sheep,
learn about some of the student research
projects, and see some of the equipment used
in Animal Science research. The more than 30
people who attended the open house included
livestock farmers, UVI students, faculty and ad-
ministrators as well as other interested commu-
nity members. In addition to providing informa-
tion and exposure to the research equipment
visitors were treated to delicious samples of lo-
cal lamb cooked on the grill by Stuart Weiss,
Agronomy Research Specialist.
Dr. Bob Godfrey, Animal Science Program
Leader, demonstrated the use of an endoscope.
The endoscope is a device that allows research-
ers to look inside an animal using a small diam-
eterviewing scope and fiber optic light. The mini-
mally invasive procedure and equipment are
similar to that used in human medicine for an
increasing number of "out patient" procedures.
Dr. Godfrey and his staff use the endoscope,
connected to a video camera and a color moni-
tor, to evaluate the timing and number of ovula-
tions in the hair sheep as part of their research.
The demonstration included a pre-recorded
video of a procedure conducted to count the
number of ovulations on the ovaries of a sheep.
Raina Dodson, Research Specialist, dem-
onstrated the use of the linear array and Dop-
pler ultrasounds and a microscope. The linear
ultrasound is used to determine pregnancy in


livestock. This is similar to the procedure used
in human medicine to evaluate the health and
development of the fetus. Raina played a video-
tape of previously conducted examinations to
showwhat a 28 and 42 day old sheep fetus looks
like inside the ewe. Structures such as the beat-
ing heart, the head, the eyes, the skeleton and
the limbs were pointed out to the observers on
the screen. Another type of ultrasound demon-
strated was Doppler ultrasound. This is used to
monitor the heart beat of the fetus during devel-
opment. The linear and Doppler ultrasound
equipment will be used in a student research
project conducted during this fall (See related
article below). The microscope is used by the
researchers for semen evaluations and parasi-
tology research. Slides containing fixed speci-
mens of each type were available for visitors to
look at under the microscope. Adam "AJ" Weis,
Research Analyst, talked aboutthe animals used
in the research projects. Purebred St. Croix
White, Barbados Blackbelly, Dorper and Dor-
per X St. Croix White crossbred sheep were on
display. Adam provided information about the
management practices used on the farm, such
as rotational grazing, managed breeding and the
animal health program, as well as describing the
current research that is being done to evaluate
the productivity of the crossbred sheep in com-
parison to the purebreds.
Posters describing recent research projects
were on display as well. Several were the re-
sults of research projects conducted by UVI un-
dergraduate students in the Minority Biomedi-
cal Research Support-Research Initiative for Sci-
entific Enhancement (MBRS-RISE) program
supported by a grant from the National Institutes


JU


Top: ResearchAnalystsAdam "AJ" Weis tells a visitor
about the Dorper crossbred sheep that are being
studied by theAnimal Science Program
Bottom: Research Specialist Riana Dodson, center,
shows visitors how theAnimal Science Program uses
ultrasound to detect pregnancy in sheep. She is
pointing to the image of a sheep fetus on the monitor

of Health. The grant was awarded to the Sci-
ence and Math Division with AES as a collabo-
rator. TheAnimal Science program also conducts
research on cattle. Some ofthe posters displayed
results of research projects conducted on dairy
(Holstein) and beef (Senepol) cattle in the past
few years.


ANIMAL SCIENCE PROGRAM
HOSTS EXCHANGE STUDENTS


National Student Exchange students Lindsay Larsen
and Melinda Loewer conduct an ultrasound exam on a
St. Croix White ewe at theAES Sheep Research Facility
to determine the number of lambs she is carrying

Dr. Bob Godfrey is also mentoring two
undergraduate National Student Exchange


(NSE) students enrolled in directed indepen-
dent research. Lindsay Larsen and Melinda
Loewer are juniors from Oregon State Uni-
versity in Corvallis. Both students are Pre-Vet
majors and plan to apply to veterinary school
upon completion of their degrees. As part of
their directed independent research, they will
be conducting research projects in the Ani-
mal Science Program.
Ms. Larsen will be conducting a project
using linear array and Doppler ultrasound to
monitor fetal development in the Barbados
Blackbelly, St. Croix White and Dorper X St.
Croix White sheep. Upon completion of the
project, her data will be used to develop pre-
diction equations that would be used to pre-
dict fetal age based on size or heart rate. This
information currently exists for the temperate
breeds of wool sheep but not for the tropical
hair sheep breeds.
Ms. Loewer will be working on a project
that is being conducted in collaboration with
Dr. Scott Willard of Mississippi State University,
Starkville, MS, to evaluate non-ovarian sources


of progesterone in pregnant and non-pregnant
sheep. Progesterone is a steroid hormone se-
creted by the corpus luteum of the ovary after
ovulation and is partially responsible for main-
taining pregnancy. The adrenal glands also se-
crete the steroid hormone cortisol in response
to stress. These two hormones are linked be-
cause progesterone is a precursor in the syn-
thetic pathway of cortisol. Ms. Loewer's project
will involve treating pregnant or cycling ewes with
a hormone to stimulate adrenal production of
cortisol and progesterone in the presence of en-
dogenous, ovarian progesterone. Ewes that
have had their ovaries removed will be treated
with the same hormone to evaluate adrenal pro-
duction of cortisol and progesterone in the ab-
sence of endogenous, ovarian progesterone.
The results of her project will provide informa-
tion on the endocrinology of stress and preg-
nancy in sheep.
Both students will prepare research reports
on the results of their projects and assist in pre-
paring the data for presentation at a scientific
meeting.









12 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


AES RESEARCH FACULTY )OINED CES


STAFF IN GHANA TRAINING WORKSHOPS


The USDA Cooperative State Research,
Education and Extension Service, through its
International Program, invited the Cooperative
Extension Service (CES) to conduct a series of
training workshops forthe GhanaAgricultural
Extension Capacity Building Project. USDA
is collaborating with the Ghanaian Ministry of
Food and Agriculture (MOFA) to support
agribusiness, entrepreneurship and extension
development in Ghana.
The goal of this project is to build capacity
within the Ghanaian Extension System to en-
able agricultural agents to guide farmers in de-
veloping the ability to produce for the domestic
market and to participate in world trade. The
project will develop and implement a series of
train-the-trainer for agricultural extension per-
sonnel in Ghana in a variety of areas from
production through post-harvest handling,
value-added processing, export marketing,
agribusiness development, farm entrepre-
neurship and the development of off-and-on-
farm human institutional resources.
From February to September, three sepa-
rate workshops were conducted by CES and
Agricultural Experiment Station (AES) staff. The
first train-the-trainer workshop focused on mar-
keting and export business development of okra
and chili peppers presented by Mr. Kwame
Garcia, CES State Director, and Mr. Kofi
Boateng, CES Associate Director Several re-


source persons from Ghana also served as train-
ers. Its purpose was to establish a market-ori-
ented training for the extension agents and to
provide them with training strategies and skills
to better advise farmers on marketing, develop-
ment of business plans and accessing interna-
tional markets. The intensive 3-day seminarwas
held in Accra on February 19-21.
The 31 people in attendance included rep-
resentatives from the Ministry, MOFA extension
agents, farmers from several cooperatives, and
a few representatives from non-governmental
organizations. Specific topics presented during
the 3-day seminar included principles and prac-
tices of marketing of horticultural crops, stra-
tegic marketing of chilis and okra in Ghana,
developing a marketing plan for export and
developing a business plan. Evaluation feed-
back from participants at the end of the work-
shop were positive.
The second train-the-trainer workshop fo-
cused on production, post-harvest handling and
value addition of chili pepper and okra. Mr.
Stafford Crossman, Extension Program Super-
visor and Dr. Manuel Palada, AES Research
Faculty, along with Mr. MawuliAgboka, Horticul-
turist, DAES/MOFA, served as resource persons
and presented training lectures. Specific work-
shop goals were to: 1) present and discuss the
importance of appropriate management prac-
tices for growing and production of chili pepper


CES MINI-SOCIETY DEVELOPS 'BUSINESS TYCOONS'


The UVI-Coopera-
tive Extension Service
(CES) Mini-Society pro-
gram sponsored bythe
Ewing Kauffman Foun-
dation has as its mis-
sion the development
of entrepreneurial, eco-
nomic and citizenship -
skills in 8-12 year olds. ..
S"We are convinced Mini-Society particip
that the next Bill Gates business merchandise
can come from the Vir-
gin Islands," stated one ofthe trainers. Teach-
ers, counselors and youth workers have
been trained to facilitate youth as they move
through the Mini-Society experience over a
series of weeks. Through the curriculum,
young people are exposed to the idea of
owning their own business versus prepar-
ing to work for others. Independence and
self-sufficiency are stressed as young people
get the opportunity to experience and de-
veloptheirown business, which culminates
in a market day during which they might sell
merchandise and showcase service busi-
nesses.


an
e


Students initially learn
concepts through facili-
tated, structured activities,
i.e. scarcity and allocation
of resources. Their inter-
ests are peaked regarding
the number of consider-
0 nations in running a busi-
ness: Should you establish
yourself as a sole propri-
etor orworkwith business
partners? How do you set
goals and objectives?
What is involved in banking decisions? Why
is it important to work cooperatively with oth-
ers? What is involved in interviewing and hir-
ing staff? Although the emphasis is on en-
trepreneurship, economics and citizenship,
young people nationwide have demonstrated
an increased interest in school. Research
suggests the Mini-Society program en-
hances concepts and skills in other subject
areas, as well. For more information, con-
tact Kofi Boateng, Associate Director-CES,
at (340) 692-4066, or Lois V. Sanders, Asst.
Director-4-HIFamily & Consumer Sciences
Program, at (340) 692-4096.


(From left) Kofi Boateng, CES Associate Director,
and Kwame Garcia, CES State Director, with Patty
Fulton, National Program Leader for USDA's
International Programs, and MawuliAgboka of the
Ghanaian Ministry of Food and Agriculture at the
Ghana workshop

and okra to ensure quality of the product; 2) dis-
cuss the basic principles of post-harvest han-
dling and provide extension officers with a bet-
ter understanding of post-handling and process-
ing of chili pepper and okra for domestic and
export markets; and 3) present and provide
information and demonstrate and discuss vari-
ous methods and forms used in handling, stor-
ing, and value-adding processing for chili pep-
per and okra.
The intensive 3-day workshop was held in
Accra on June 4-6. The 30 people n attendance
included local farmers from various cooperatives,
food processors, representatives from the Min-
istry, and MOFA extension officers. The work-
shop consisted of training lectures, discussion,
demonstration, farm visit, tour of a post-harvest
handling facility, groupwork, group presentations
and evaluation. Some important topics covered
were climate requirements for okra and chili pep-
per, mulching, irrigation, plant nutrient, integrated
pest management, harvest and post harvest
handling. All of these lectures were presented
with colorful slides using the Power Point soft-
ware. The participants learned new develop-
ments and production methods, especially for
chili peppers, from research conducted at AES
for the past 10 years. At the end of the work-
shop, participants were highly satisfied with the
training materials presented by the trainers.
The third and final workshop focused on
pineapple production, harvest and post harvest
handling. Dr. Chris Ramcharan, retired AES
Research Faculty, conducted the workshop in
September The purpose and goals of the work-
shop were similar to those for chili and okra.
These workshops earned international rec-
ognition for RPS, in particular, and UVI, in gen-
eral. It is expected that requests for workshops
like this will continue in the future and CES and
AES will continue to provide the expertise. For
more information, please contact Mr. Kwame
Garcia at (340) 692-4091; e-mail:
kgarcia@uvi.edu.









JANLUARY2004 13


COMES EXPANDS GROUPER RESEARCH:

IDENTIFYING ESSENTIAL HABITAT


FORJUVENILE RED HIND


Red hind grouper have received con-
siderable attention from UVI researchers in
the last five years. These fish move long
distances to spawn at specific locations on
deep reefs during the full moon nights in
December, January and February. Such
spawning aggregations are especially vul-
nerable to over-exploitation. Thus, like many
other grouper species in the Caribbean,
management of red hind has focused on
protecting the sites where aggregations
occur though designation of marine re-
serves.
On St. Thomas, the Marine Conserva-
tion District contains the largest known red
hind spawning aggregation in the region.
Protection of this site has led to consider-
able population increases. However, there
is still a large 'black hole' in our knowledge
of the life cycle of these fish.
Larvae produced during the spawning
event typically spend around 30 days drift-
ing on ocean currents or actively dispers-
ing before settling into one or more nursery
habitats. But where the young fish choose
to settle and the habitats in which they
spend the first couple of years of their life
have, until now, remained a mystery.
Dr. Elizabeth Whiteman at the Center
for Marine and Environmental Studies has
spent the summer months investigating the
patterns of habitat use by juvenile red hind
around St. Thomas. She notes, "We can-
not ignore the juvenile life stages of these
fish. If they have very specific preferences
for a habitat that is either threatened or ex-
ists in only small patches, then only pro-
tecting the adults at spawning aggregations
(while clearly important) may do little to pro-
tect the population as a whole."
In fact, it does appear that young red
hind select specific habitat types. After con-
ducting searches for these fish at more than
20 different near-shore locations DrWhiteman
has demonstrated that these fish live in dis-
tinct habitats.
Small individuals, less than 15cm, have
been found in two habitat types: coral
mounds formed by finger corals and sand/
rock substrates covered with patches of
gorgonians, sponges or small coral heads.
Importantly, within these broad habitats the
fish are seen hiding amongst the fingers of
coral, the fronds of gorgonians, and sponge
tubes. These small fish seem to select habi-
tats which afford protection from potential
predators.
Furthermore, as juvenile red hind grow
they move between habitats, expanding into


Juvenile red hind hiding between coral fingers
reefs, patch reefs and bedrock habitats as
sub-adults.
Particularly striking is the finding that
more than 95% of the smallest size classes
seen were observed on the north coast of
St. Thomas. At the moment this raises far
more questions than answers. Is this a re-
flection of current patterns around St. Tho-
mas? Do suitable habitats now only exist
on the north side of St. Thomas? Do juve-
nile red hind found around St. Thomas origi-
nate from spawning aggregations further
east in the British Virgin Islands? There is
much potential for this research to continue
and expand. However, it's not always easy
to find these small individuals.
As adults, many groupers are shy and
cryptic, retreating into holes and cavities
when approached. Juvenile red hind show
the same characteristics. Finding and
censusing these fish can therefore be very
challenging. As part of this study, work has
focused on trials of new methods to
achieve accurate counts of individuals in
different habitats. Using bait to draw these
fish out of the complex reef structure ap-
pears very successful in detecting individu-
als of all sizes. Of course much remains to
be done.
During the spring when larvae disperse


from aggregation sites CMES staff hope to
deploy 'witham collectors'. These collectors
are typically used to census juvenile lob-
ster but may also be very effective at at-
tracting newly settled groupers.
Perhaps the most important conclusion
to draw from this research is that the es-
sential habitats identified so far, particularly
those dominated by sand/rock and gorgon-
ians, are rarely considered for inclusion in
near-shore marine protected areas. In the
last five years there have been dozens of
studies illustrating the importance of man-
groves and seagrasses as nursery areas for
many marine fish. The importance of coral
reefs for both coastal and biodiversity protec-
tion is also equally well demonstrated.
However, rarely are rock/sand domi-
nated habitats included as priorities for pro-
tection. Research on the juvenile groupers
is beginning to illustrate the importance of
networks of marine protected areas that
include examples of all habitat types.
In collaboration with the Ocean Con-
servancy this research will continue through
next spring and summer so that it will be
possible to determine whether the patterns
discovered so far can be applied to other
areas, e.g. St. John, and to other species
of grouper.









14 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


CES EMPLOYEE RECEIVES DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD


The Department of Planning and
Natural Resources, Coastal Zone Man-
agement Program named Olasee Davis
as the recipient of the U.S. Virgin Islands
Coastal Zone Management 25th Anniver-
sary Distinguished Service Award.
Davis received the award at a cock-
tail reception at Government House on St.
Thomas on October 12, 2003.
Davis was honored for his continued
commitment and diligent work in helping
to preserve the Virgin Islands' coastal and
marine resources for future generations
through environmental programs and
projects, and for promoting an attitude of
stewardship and responsibility to individu-
als in the U.S. Virgin Islands and the Car-
ibbean.
Davis, who is an extension specialist


with UVI's Cooperative Extension Service
in the Agriculture and Natural Resources
Program, has conducted numerous envi-
ronmental hikes and workshops on St.
Croix and St. Thomas for private and pub-
lic schools and youth groups.
According to Kwame Garcia, Sr., State
Director of UVI's Cooperative Extension
Service, Davis is an excellent UVI em-
ployee who has been recognized nation-
ally for his environmental commitment to
the territory and, through his work at the
Extension Service continues to provide
educational workshops that respond to the
needs of our community.
The staff of the Cooperative Extension
Service extended congratulations to Mr.
Olasee Davis on winning this distin-
guished award.


Olasee Davis poses with distinguished ServiceA ward


CES OBSERVES NATIONAL HOME INDOOR AIR QUALITY &

CHILDREN'S HEALTH MONTH I -M


The UVI Cooperative Extension Service
celebrated Home Indoor Air Quality (IAQ)
& Children's Health month by conducting
presentations for youth & community
groups, presenting information on local ra-
dio talk shows, and promoting awareness
of and actions to protect Children's Health
& Home Indoor Air Quality here in the Vir-
gin Islands.
National Home Indoor Air Quality Ac-
tion & Awareness Month was developed by
the Healthy IndoorAirforAmerica's Homes
Program and is supported by a Presiden-
tial Proclamation. Each week focused on a
different home indoor air topic (general IAQ
action & awareness, children & asthma,
secondhand smoke & children's health, and
lead & children).
During Children's Health Month, the En-
vironmental Protection Agency (EPA)joined
with other agencies of the President's Task
Force on Environmental Health Risks and
Safety Risks to Children to help Americans
take actions to protect our most precious
future resource our children. Families were
able to take advantage of a special Octo-
ber calendar that includes an action step
for each day of the month. Topics range from


. LiL4j 1


nutrition and school health, to environmen-
tal safety, to injury and disease prevention.
To promote Indoor Air Quality &
Children's Health months here in the Virgin
Islands, CES delivered a number of presen-
tations to teachers, health care workers and
students. CES discussed Indoor Air Qual-
ity in the Schools & A Less-Toxic Classroom
Environment with twenty (20) teachers and
paraprofessionals at the Annual 25th AFT
(American Federation of Teachers) Local
1825 Mini-Quest, held October 20th, 2003.
The room was overflowing with interested
participants, many of who promised to fol-
low up and invite CES staff to their schools
and try to have their administrators make
changes within the school (three additional
information packages were distributed to at-
tendees who were unable to join the ses-
sion).
CES delivered three indoor air quality
presentations to 28 adult education students
on the invitation of one of the Mini-Quest
participants. On November 4th, CES was
invited to deliver an indoor air quality & non-
toxic households presentation at the Mater-
nal Child Health & Children with Special
Health Care Needs Programs' (MCHC/
SHCN) "Asthma Awareness and Education
Program" at the St. Croix Curriculum Cen-
ter for 24 school nurses, Head Start per-
sonnel, and MCHC/SHCN program staff.
CES also delivered five indoor air quality
presentations to 148 sixth grade students,
9 teachers and 4 custodians at Lockhart
Elementary School. For all these presenta-
tions, participants were given a total of 125
information packets providing factsheets on


MCHC/SHCN "Asthma Awareness & Education"
program participants listen attentively to presenters

asthma, indoor air quality, the national Help
Yourself to a Healthy Home booklet, and
CES' Recipes for a Non-toxic Household
booklet.
CES also hit the airwaves with the mes-
sage. Staff appeared on WSTA's "Pulse of
the People" with Dr. Alex Randall and on
WVWI's "Afternoon Mix" with Raul Carrillo
(joined by local allergist Dr. Audria Thomas)
to discuss indoor air quality and children's
health issues. As a result of those radio
appearances, 2 clients called to request
further information about indoor air quality,
and a young lady even stopped a Healthy
Homes Coordinator (Dale Morton) in K-Mart
on a Sunday morning to request a copy of
CES' Recipes for a Non-Toxic Household
booklet. Ever on the job, Mr. Morton just
happened to have a copy of the booklet in
his car to give to her!
Even though October is gone, indoor
air quality and children's health continue to
remain important issues in the territory. For
more information on these topics, or to
schedule a presentation, please contact
Dale Morton at (340) 693-1080.









JAN UARY2004 15


NATURE TRAIL ON ST. CROIX


TO ENHANCE WILDLIFE HABITAT


Staff from CES, volunteers and members of the St. Croix Hiking
Association prepare the nature trail in EstateAdventure
A few years ago, a federal official of the USDA
Natural Resources Conservation Service visited the
Plant Material Center on St. Croix. While he was here,
he mentioned he mentioned to the members of the
RC&D Council that a hiking trail should be established
along the streambed of Estate Adventure. Thanks to
many volunteers, the Cooperative Extension Ser-
vice (CES) and members of the St. Croix Hiking
Association, the hiking trail has become a reality.
It would have happened without the collaboration
of the Virgin Islands Resource Conservation and De-
velopment Service and CES. Together, the agencies
wrote a grant that was funded through the Virgin Is-
lands Community Forestry Council. The goals and
objectives were:
1. To create educational opportunities and enhance
wildlife habitats in an island natural environment.
2. To create a nature center and botanical environ-
ment for students and adults in the Virgin Islands
affording them a hands-on opportunity to be involved
with planting and nurturing of plants on the nature
trail.
3. To involve students in the learning and application
of botany, geology, biology, wildlife, and environmen-
tal science.
4. Teachers of all disciplines (English, arts, science,
etc.) will be able to use this area to help enhance
and open the minds of students to the majesty of
nature. This area will be utilized by students to help
enforce observation skills that are unable to be
taught in a classroom environment.
5. To educate the public to the value of preserving the
natural resources of the Virgin Islands (soil, water,
air, plants, animal).
The cutting of the path to create the trail started in
the middle of 2002 by inmates from the Golden Grove
Correctional Facility. Students from Central High School
and the Educational Complex were also involved. Their
job was to computerize the species of plants and ani-
mals by scientific and common names, medicinal use of
plants, and historical and cultural use of the area.


A brief history of the area is also a part of the na-
ture trail. During the Danish colonial period of St. Croix,
the island was divided into nine quarters. These plan-
tation systems were named NorthsideA, Northside B,
Westend, Prince's, King's, Queen's, Company,
Eastend A, Eastend B proceeding from east to west.
Estate Adventure was designated as Prince Quarter.
The land was flat and was situated between two hills.
Before the estate was cleared for sugarcane cultiva-
tion, tall trees were found in the area.
When the Danish planter Reimert Haagensen
arrived on St. Croix in 1739, he stated, "The thick
forests had to be cleared, large trees felled and
hauled to the seashores for sale, roads had to be
cut and maintained, and the initial dwellings and
estate structures-the mills and factories had to be
constructed." The dry streambed today that divided
Estate Golden Grove and Estate Adventure was
once a small river that ran all year around to the
South Shore.
The three-quarter mile trail, located directly
south of the Department of Agriculture in Estate
Lower Love, is centrally located on the island. Sepa-
rating Estate Adventure from Estate Golden Grove
is the dry streambed. Water flows in this area from
the watershed of the north including Blue Mountain
and Big Fountain to the south sea of the island. From
the middle of the 1700's, cane grew in this area up
until 1966, when the fertile plains were then turned
to cattle grazing.
Today, the open field is used for hay. The Old
Danish Bridge built in 1910 is located at the top of
the trail. Along the trail are many native and intro-
duced species of trees. Also along the path is an
old sugar or water mill, as well as a small dam built
across the streambed. So far, we have constructed
four bridges, three sets of steps built from WAPA
telephones, and a boardwalk. Work is in progress
to build walkways in certain areas of the trail with
crushed stones.
Historical and species signs of plants and ani-
mals will be installed along the trail. These Signs
with information about a particular animal species
or historical site will be installed along the path.
Caution signs will also be installed, since it is feder-
ally funded project. At the head of the trail, there will
be a constructed shanty structure with information
about the trial including a map of the area, history,
distances, and other information for public use. The
trail has an appearance of a tropical rain forest with
savanna grassland on the west.
The benefits of this project are two-fold. Both stu-
dents and the general public who visit the site will gain an
increased knowledge in being able to identify native veg-
etation, historical sites, and wildlife common to these is-
lands. The trail also illustrates how all facets of nature
plays a major role in the island ecosystem.
This nature trail will promote the concept that the
environment can and should be able to coexist with
man. This is the only trial in the Virgin Islands of its
kind. The trail will officially be opened in early 2004.


"THE BENEFITS OF
THIS PROJECT ARE
TWO-FOLD. BOTH
STUDENTSANDTHE
GENERAL PUBLIC
WHO VISIT THE SITE
WILL GAIN AN
INCREASED
KNOWLEDGE IN BEING
ABLE TO IDENTIFY
NATIVE VEGETATION,
HISTORICAL SITES,
AND WILDLIFE
COMMON TO THESE
ISLANDS. THE TRAIL
ALSO ILLUSTRATES
HOWALL FACETS OF
NATURE PLAYS A
MAJOR ROLE IN THE
ISLAND ECOSYSTEM."


HTTP://RPS. UVI. EDU/










16 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE

UPCOMING EVENTS

FEBRUARY MAY 2004


F I
FEBRUARY
4 GUIDANCE TO FILING YOUR TAXES ON TIME/SBDC'
11 IDENTITY THEFT SEMINAR/SBDC
14-16 AGRICULTURE & FOOD FAIR/CES
18 NEW IMAGE POLICY BOARD SEMINAR/SBDC
18 PERSONNEL HANDBOOK FOR SMALL BUSINESSES/SBDC
20 YOUTH OUTREACH-JANE E. TUITT SCHOOL/SBDC
25 FILING YOUR BUSINESS TAXES/SBDC
26 NATIONAL CONSUMER MONTH WORKSHOP ON
SERVICES/CES


MARCH
3
4
8
17
17-18
23 & 26
24


CUSTOMER SERVICE/SBDC
FILING YOUR BUSINESS TAXES/SBDC
SMALL LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION SHORT COURSE/CES
TIME MANAGEMENT/SBDC
VEGETARIAN WORKSHOP/CES
WNET ROUNDTABLE/SBDC
DIABETIC WORKSHOP/CES


APRIL
7
7
8 & 14
13
14
26-MAY 1

MAY
5
12
13
13
13-14
19
25 & 28
27


MONEY MANAGEMENT/SBDC
COLOR LINES & DESIGN WORKSHOP/CES
GRANT WRITING BASICS/SKILLS/SBDC
COMPUTER TRAINING FOR FARMERS/CES
STRESS WORKSHOP/CES
NATIONAL SMALL BUSINESS WEEK/SBDC


COPING WITH UNEMPLOYMENT/SBDC
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT/SBDC
SELLING A BUSINESS/SBDC
BLOOD PRESSURE SCREENING & OSTEOPOROSIS/CES
HEALTH & BEAUTY WORKSHOP/CES
CHANGING CAREERS/SBDC
WNET ROUNDTABLE/SBDC
BUYING A BUSINESS/SBDCC


*for more information on these events, contact the sponsoring department.












UVI RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
S#2 )OHN BREWERS BAY
ST. THOMAS, VI 00802




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