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 CMES conducts red hind study at...
 The Caribbean Writer announces...
 Senator speaks at UVI Ag forum
 WRRI summer water education sessions...
 UVI presents V.I. senate results...
 AES aquaculture program achieves...
 CES farmer computer short course...
 SBDC briefs
 CMES evaluating sedimentation on...
 UVI-AES offers four new fact...






Group Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 6. No. 3.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300566/00004
 Material Information
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 6. No. 3.
Series Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of the Virgin Islands.
Affiliation: University of the Virgin Islands
Publisher: University of the Virgin Islands.
Publication Date: 12/26/2003
 Subjects
Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean
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Bibliographic ID: CA01300566
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    CMES conducts red hind study at coral world
        Page 1
    The Caribbean Writer announces its vol. 16 winners
        Page 2
    Senator speaks at UVI Ag forum
        Page 3
    WRRI summer water education sessions offered to campers
        Page 4
    UVI presents V.I. senate results of air services study
        Page 5
    AES aquaculture program achieves record enrollment in aquaponics short course
        Page 6
        Page 7
    CES farmer computer short course a success
        Page 8
    SBDC briefs
        Page 9
    CMES evaluating sedimentation on St. Croix reefs
        Page 10
    UVI-AES offers four new fact sheets
        Page 11
        Page 12
Full Text






RESEARCH AND


PUBLIC SERVICE


NEWSLETTER


UNIVERSITY OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


Volume 6, No. 3 News from the UVI Research and Public Service Component


COMES CONDUCTS RED HIND


STUDY AT CORAL WORLD


coral vvorci aquanstassists uiviLs in proving a natural setting in tne coral reerexnioitat coral vvonci to stimulate tne naitat grouper
normally lives in


Researchers at UVI's Center for Marine and
Environmental Studies (CMES) are working with
Coral World Marine Park on a study to
determine the effectiveness and longevity of
scientific tags being used on red hind grouper.
This is part of an ongoing tagging program
being conducted by CMES to determine the
population size and movement patterns of the
red hind grouper on reefs around the USVI.
The red hind grouper is a very important
fish in the USVI for economic, cultural and
environmental reasons. The grouper has been
overfished in much of the Caribbean, and is,
therefore, of special interest to fisheries


managers. Red hind grouper reproduce or
spawn during three months in the winter each
year, generally gathering from miles around to
form huge spawning aggregations on one
particular reef. This makes them extremely
vulnerable to overfishing at that time. The
Caribbean Management Council created a
marine reserve in 1999, closing all fishing, to
protect the groupers in the area they are known
to aggregate. This reserve, the Marine Conserva-
tion District (MCD), is located south of St.
Thomas on the deep shelf drop-off, and has


Continued on p. 2


SEPTEMBER 2003


INSIDE
2 The Caribbean
Writer Announces
Vol. 16 Winners
2 UVI Receives S1.1
million SCORE Grant
3 Senator Speaks at
UVI Ag Forum
4 WRRI Summer
Water Education
Sessions Offered to
Campers
5 UVI Presents V.I.
Senate Results of Air
Services Study
6 AES Aquaculture
Program Achieves
Record Enrollment
In Aquaponics Short
Course
8 CES Farmer Com-
puter Short Course
a Success
9 SBDC Briefs
10 CMES Evaluating
Sedimentation on St.
Croix Reefs
11 UVI-AES Offers Four
New Fact Sheets


(HJ










2 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


THE CARIBBEAN WRITER ANNOUNCES


ITS VOLUME 16 PRIZE WINNERS


THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
RESEARCH & PUBLIC
SERVICE (R&PS)
NEWSLETTER
IS AN INFORMATIONAL
NEWSLETTER ON THE UNITS
THAT MAKE UP THE
R&PS COMPONENT.
HTTP://RPS.UVI.EDU/
VICE PROVOST
HENRY H. SMITH, PH.D.
EDITORIAL BOARD
VELMA ABRAMSEN,
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO
THE PRESIDENT
LORNA CHESTERFIELD,
ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PROVOST
CLARICE C. CLARKE,
PUBLIC INFORMATION SPECIALIST
HELEN DOOKHAN,
ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST
MANUEL PALADA, PH.D.
AES RESEARCH ASSOCIATE
PROFESSOR
RAQUEL SANTIAGO SILVER,
ADMINISTRATOR
JACQUELINE SOMERSALL-
BERRY,
FORMER ASSISTANTTO THE
ECC DIRECTOR
PATRICE JOHNSON,
DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS
MARVIN WILLIAMS,
EDITOR, THE CARIBBEAN WRITER

LAYOUT & DESIGN
ROBIN STERNS, PH.D.

DISTRIBUTION
KIMA GATON
MAIL LETTERS OR COMMENTS TO:
LORNA CHESTERFIELD
UVI RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
#2 JOHN BREWERS BAY
ST. THOMAS, VI 00802
TELEPHONE: (340) 693-1061
FAx: (340) 693-1065
LCHESTE UVI.EPU

THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VRGIN ISLANDS
15 AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY,
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION,
TITLE IX, SECTION 504,
PL 101-542 EDUCATOR
AND EMPLOYER.


The Caribbean Writer, the international
literary anthology published by University of the
Virgin Islands, announces its annual prizes from
its Volume 16 issue.
The David Hough Literary Award, a $500
prize given to a Caribbean author, goes to lan
McDonald, a Trinidadian who has lived in
Guyana since 1955. Mr. McDonald, currently the
editor of Kyk-Over-AI, has had his work
published by The Caribbean Writer as early as its
Volume 2 issue. This award is donated by Sonja
Hough, owner of Sonja's Jewelry in Christiansted,
St. Croix.
The Marguerite-Cobb McKay Prize, a $200
prize to a Virgin Islands author, goes to Deverita
Carty Sturdivant, a St. Thomas attorney currently
serving as the Director for the division of


RED HIND
Continued from p. 1
been monitored over the last three
years by Dr. Richard Nemeth of CMES
and his research staff.
Nemeth is also interested in
discovering where the fish go when
they are not in the reproductive
season. With funding assistance from
the National Marine Fisheries Service
MARFIN program, several thousand
fish have been caught on the
aggregation site and tagged with small
plastic external tags over the past three
years. They are then released back into
the MCD.
Each tag is inscribed with the CMES
telephone number and a unique serial
number. Many of the tagged fish have Taggedr
been recaptured by fishermen, some in
areas up to 25 kilometers from the reef on which
they were released. Understanding how well the
tags are retained by the fish and whether they
influence mortality is extremely important.
To test the effectiveness and longevity of
the tags, Nemeth is keeping a watch on a group
of tagged red hind groupers in captivity. This
part of the study will be used to estimate the
percentage of tags that remain on grouper in the
wild. Kenny Turbe, a local fisherman, was
contracted to catch red hind grouper around St.
Thomas to be used in the study.
Sixty fish were collected and released into
the coral reef exhibit and stingray pool at Coral
World, after being measured and tagged.
Crystal Buckley, a student intern at CMES
and recent graduate of Antilles High School,
works with Coral World staff to feed and monitor
the fish daily. Grouper are notoriously gregari-
ous and, once they are accustomed to feeding
schedules, will come out into the open to feed,


Banking and Insurance in the Virgin Islands.
The other prize winners are Joanne
Hyppolite (a Haitian writer and children's book
author currently living in Florida), who won the
Canute A. Brodhurst Prize ($400) for fiction while
Loretta Collins (a professor at University of
Puerto Rico) received the Daily News Prize ($300)
for poetry.
The Charlotte and Isidor Paiewonsky Prize
for first-time publication in The Caribbean Writer
went to Nicolette Bethel, a Bahamian writer and
anthropologist presently teaching at the College
of the Bahamas.
For more information on The Caribberan
Writer, contact Professor Marvin E. Williams,
Editor. Telephone (340) 692-4152, fax
(340) 692-4026 or e-mail mwillia2@uvi.edu.


edhind


where they are easily seen. Buckley records the
number of tagged fish she sees each day, and
with the help of Coral World aquarists, searches
the exhibits for tags that may have fallen off the
fish.
The natural settings in the coral reef and
stingray exhibits at Coral World simulate the
habitat the grouper normally lives in, and
presents hazards to the tags that would also be
present in the wild. Examples are rocks that the
grouper could use to rub the tags off, and algae-
eating fish that might chew up an algae-
encrusted tag.
"We're lucky to have the Coral World facility
available to us," says Nemeth. "It's great to have
the collaborative support of Coral World's
administration and staff on this project." Nemeth
plans to keep the fish for one year before they
are released back into the wild.
For more information, contact Dr. Nemeth at
(340) 693-1381 or at rnemeth@uvi.edu.









SEPTEMBER 2003 3


UVI RECEIVES $1.1 MILLION SCORE


GRANT TO INCREASE RESEARCH


The University of the Virgin Islands has
been awarded $1.1 million to increase faculty
biomedical research. The Support of Continu-
ous Research Excellence (SCORE) grant will
support two research projects at UVI during
the next four years.
"The SCORE grant is one of several
activities at the University designed to provide
research opportunities for faculty, stimulate
interest in science-oriented careers for stu-
dents and provide practical benefits for the
community," said SCORE Program Director Dr.
Henry Smith.
The research projects will focus on marine
biomedical research. One project, a study of
the effects of temperature on a neural circuit
in spiny lobsters, will be led by Dr. Richard Hall.


SENATOR SPEAKS AT UVI
Focusing on the
theme of the April
22-23, 2003, Agri-
culture Forum,
"Prospects for Sus-
tainable Agriculture
,Q.; in the Virgin Is-
a. lands," Senator
.ao I Luther Renee de-
scribed agriculture
as the "sector to
provide the most
links to the other
Senator Luther Reneee spoke to sectors and thereby
Virgin Islands farmers in April enhance economic
growth and devel-
opment." Thus, the
agricultural sector plays a "pivotal" role, as it fulfils its
potential for "sustainable economic development."
Renee acknowledged the role agriculture could
play in establishing a link between "tourism and the
manufacturing industry"; however, the relationship
has not been forged, to the detriment of the farmers
and the Virgin Islands.
He did suggest, however, that "we should aim at
creating a sector that is competitive, sustainable, and
efficient." Renee emphasized that "The farmer is the
industry," and every effort should be made to
support the farmer.
"Farmers must be provided with the needed
equipment, know-how and training" through
improved "production technology to reduce labor
cost and improve efficiency in farm operations."
Because the agricultural sector is demand
driven, the Department of Agriculture and the
University of the Virgin Islands, its main supporter,
needs to engage in vigorous training, especially for
fishermen who need assistance in safety practices
and proper fish handling techniques if they are to
conserve "the marine resources" and regard fishing
as a "business venture," he said.


Dr. Richard Nemeth will lead the other project,
a study to assess grouper breeding population
structure and reproductive potential.
The SCORE program aims to increase the
number of biomedical researchers at UVI and
foster productivity, resulting in increased
presentations of original research, along with
submissions and publications of research
articles.
SCORE is part of the National Institutes of
Health (NIH) Minority Biomedical Research
Support (MBRS). It was created to assist
biomedical research at minority serving insti-
tutions to develop competitive research pro-
grams and to increase the number of under-
represented minorities professionally engaged
in biomedical research.


ur. Alex Kanaanl spoKe to I starr In June

IMPROVING OUR PITCH!

Dr. Alex Randall, the "Good News Guy" from
WSTA radio, and a member of the Research and
Public Service Advisory Council, made a
presentation to RPS on June 18, 2003, entitled
"How to Get the Message Out."
Dr. Randall's presentation was intended to
help staff in making the public more aware of
activities of RPS and in turn make RPS services
more responsive to community needs.
Topics covered in the presentation included
recognizing what is news, getting the news
media's attention, determining what should be
included in press releases and also how to target
presentations for various audiences.
Dr. Randall's presentation was timely,
informative and well-received. Already tips
offered by Dr. Randall have are being used by
RPS staff.


"THE SCORE GRANT IS
ONE OF SEVERAL
ACTIVITIES AT THE
UNIVERSITY DESIGNED
TO PROVIDE
RESEARCH
OPPORTUNITIES FOR
FACULTY, STIMULATE
INTEREST IN SCIENCE-
ORIENTED CAREERS
FOR STUDENTS AND
PROVIDE PRACTICAL
BENEFITS FOR THE
COMMUNITY," SAID
SCORE PROGRAM
DIRECTOR DR. HENRY
SMITH."


HTTP://RPS.VVI. ED/









4 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


WRRI SUMMER WATER EDUCATION


SESSIONS OFFERED TO CAMPERS


UVI student Althea Adolphin teaches water education to Wesleyan summer campers


Althea Adolphin, a student who is
pursuing a Bachelor of Arts Degree in
Mathematics and Secondary Education
from the Division of Science and
Mathematics was given the opportunity
to work with Water Resources this
summer, June 16 to July 18, 2003. This
student assisted in information dissemi-
nation and outreach efforts by providing
sessions on water education to the
Wesleyan Summer Camp.
The 20 campers instructed were
from grades levels four to seven. The
Water Resource Research Institute's very
own Water Education Module for Virgin
Islands Schools was used as the source
of information for the lessons. This
water module was developed to provide
students with an opportunity to gain an
awareness of and respect for water
resources in the Virgin Islands. As noted
in the introduction of the Water Module,
the information used to compile it was
taken from research of over ten years
done by Water Resources Research
Institute on cistern water systems with
concentration on water quality manage-
ment, water conservation, and weather
phenomena in the Virgin Islands.
The aspects of water education


taught to the campers focused on the
water module's three units on Water
Conservation, Water Quality and
Weather. These three units were
summarized and adapted into three
thirty-minute lessons. Each lesson was
enhanced by a field trip to relevant
places to the topic covered. The lesson
on Water Conservation was made more
meaningful by a visit to the E. D.
Plumbing Supply House where a display
and explanation of various water saving
devices was made available to the
students.
The second lesson on weather was
complimented by a trip toWRRI's
Meteorological Observatory where the
campers were able to see the instru-
ments used to measure weather phe-
nomena. The third lesson focused on
water quality and was covered by a visit
to the Caribbean Safe Water Lab where
the students were enlightened on
various techniques of water analysis
such as membrane filtration. The group
was also taken to the water plant of the
Virgin Islands Water and Power Author-
ity where they were given a tour of this
facility that produces fresh drinking
water from sea water through a process


called desalination, and supplies it as
potable water to V. I. the community.
The students were very receptive and
found the field trips interesting, informa-
tive and meaningful. The following
observations were made:
-When asked about the source of
their water supply in their homes, their
responses were grocery stores and
cisterns. No one mentioned potable water.
It was further discovered that they did not
know if their homes had potable water
connections.
-They admitted that they never gave
thought to water conservation but were
now willing to become more responsible
and take part in conserving water.
-Students had a hard time accepting
the desalination process.
The campers were encouraged to
take what they learned and share it with
others. In conclusion, they were given a
pledge sheet to complete entitled "My
Water Pledge" from the Texas National
Association of Conservation Districts'
booklet.
For more information, contact Henry
H. Smith, Ph.D., Director, (340)693-1062
tel, (340) 693-1065 fax, email:
hsmith@uvi.edu.








SEPTEMBER 2003 5


UVI PRESENTS


V.


SENATE


RESULTS OF AIR

SERVICES STUDY


University of the Virgin Islands President Dr. La Verne Ragster presents the
final report of a study of the territory's air services to V.. Senate President
David Jones
University of the Virgin Islands President Dr. LaVerne
Ragster presented the final report of a study of the territory's
air services the USVI Air Services Marketing and
Development Report to V.I. Senate President David Jones on
July 8, 2003.
The study, commissioned by the Virgin Islands 24th
Legislature, was produced by UVI in conjunction with the
internationally known consulting firm of Edwards and Kelcey
Inc., from Washington, D.C.
In her presentation, Dr. Ragster pointed out that the final
report stressed the need for more aggressive marketing of the
territory as a tourist destination.
She also noted that, in order to be successful, such an
effort would require a high degree of collaboration among
various departments of government and the private sector.
Sen. Jones said the report would provide important
guidance and empirical data for V.I. policy makers.
Extensive public presentations of the air services study's
draft report were conducted by UVI and the Edwards and
Kelcey team in late May on St. Thomas and St. Croix.


CES CONDUCTS

CLOTHING

CONSTRUCTION

AND FOOD AND

NUTRITION CLASSES
The University of the Virgin Islands' Cooperative
Extension Service's CES Family and Consumer Sciences
Program-Foods and Nutrition and Clothing Construction
classes presented certificates to 59 participants at the closing
ceremonies on Wednesday, June 11, 2003, and on Thursday,
June 12,2003.
Ms. Miriam Greene and Ms. Rosalind Browne, Extension
Assistants, organized and delivered the two popular classes.
Ms. Lois Sanders, Assistant Director of the 4-H/Family and
Consumer Sciences Program gave the welcome, while Mr.
Kwame Garcia, CES' State Director, and Mr. Kofi Boateng,
Associate Director, made closing remarks.
Twenty-one participants in the Clothing Construction
classes enrolled as beginners, intermediates, and advanced.
Many were continuing students who had begun at the first
stage earlier in the year. The participants modeled their
completed tailor-finished outfits to the applause of their
relatives and friends.
The 18 Foods and Nutrition participants of the morning
program, and the 20 of the evening program, learned the
importance of nutrition to healthy living. Using the food
pyramid as their guide, they baked desserts, created
vegetarian dishes, and learned to use healthy substitutes for
traditional and new recipes.
In light of the national concern placed on eating habits and
their relationship to obesity and other health problems,
emphasis was placed on healthy eating habits. Samples of
nutritious dishes were served to the delight of the relatives and
friends.
To sign up for a class, or to get more information, please
contact Ms. Greene at (340) 692-4083 or e-mail
mgreene@uvi.edu; or Ms. Sanders at (340) 692-4096 or e-mail
Isander@uvi.edu.


HTTP://RPS. VI. EU/









6 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


AES AQUACULTURE PROGRAM


ACHIEVES RECORD ENROLLMENT IN


AQUAPONICS SHORT COURSE


The 5th AnnualAquaponics and Tilapia Aquaculture Short Course was held on St. Croix in late June 2003. Thirty-three students attended from foreign countries around
the world, the U.S.A., the Caribbean Region and three from St. Croix


The AES Aquaculture Program recently completed its Fifth
Annual Aquaponics and Tilapia Aquaculture Short Course,
which was held June 22-28 on the St. Croix Campus. Course
attendance reached a record of 33 students, an increase of
nine students over the previous year's high of 24. Several late
applicants had to be turned away because enrollment capacity
was exceeded.
The 7-day course addressed the principles and practice of
tilapia culture in aquaponic systems and greenwater tanks.
Although these unique production systems have been
developed for conditions in the Virgin Islands, they can be
applied in many areas of the world, including cold climates
where the UVI aquaponic system has been used to grow
tilapia and crops in environmental-controlled greenhouses.
The course consisted of the normal mix of classroom
instruction and hands-on fieldwork. The students were given
an overview of tilapia production around the world and a
history of the development of the UVI aquaponic system.
Course topics included: greenwater and aquaponic system
design, construction methods, fish biology, production
management, water quality control and monitoring, business
plan preparation and marketing. In the field, students were
exposed to all the tasks involved in operating a tilapia farm
such as fish breeding, stocking, feeding, sampling, harvesting
and processing. UVI's fully operational aquaponic systems
gave students exposure to all aspects of plant production. The
course culminated with a fish fry luncheon at the research
facility, a banquet at Sunterra Carambola Beach Resort and a


full day sailing trip to Buck Island. The students received a
certificate of completion, a class picture and a t-shirt with an
original design featuring the concept of fish and plants grown
together in a recirculating system.
Students generally learn about the short course through
the Aquaculture Program's web page (http://rps.uvi.edu/AES/
Aquaculture/UVIShortCourse.html). This year's course at-
tracted a fish farmer from Australian, a student from Japan, an
entrepreneur from Hong Kong and a researcher from Guam.
Other foreign participants came from Mexico, Jamaica, St.
Lucia and the British Virgin Islands. U.S. mainland participants
came from 11 states: Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Florida,
Hawaii, Idaho, Minnesota, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas and
Virginia. Closer to home were two participants from Puerto
Rico and three from St. Croix.
The Aquaculture Program has trained 108 students from
22 countries, 24 states and three territories for the past five
years. Several of these students are applying the knowledge
obtained at UVI to develop educational systems, which serve
as the basis of high school science curricula. Other short
course graduates are building commercial operations or
assisting farmers to adopt this new technology in their role as
extension agents. Through these endeavors, the impact of UVI
on the future of food production is greatly magnified and will
continue to expand.
For more information, contact James Rakocy, Ph.D.,
Director/Professor of Aquaculture, (340) 692-4020 tel, (340)
692-4035 fax, e-mail jrakocy@uvi.edu.









SEPTEMBER 2003 7


"THE INTERNSHIP
PROGRAM AT UVI/AES
PROVIDED THE
FRENCH STUDENTS
WITH AN
OPPORTUNITY TO
LEARN THE VARIOUS
ASPECTS OF TROPICAL
AGRICULTURE IN THE
SMALL ISLAND
ENVIRONMENT OF
THE CARIBBEAN."


From left: French students Emilie Cramet, Sebastian Perry and Lucie Dromer

UVI-AES HOSTS INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS


This summer AES served as host to three students
from France. Emilie Cramet and Lucie Dromer are
sophomores majoring in food processing innovation at
Quimper's Institut Universitaire Professionannalise
(IUP), Universite de Bretane Occidentale.
As part of their degree in food processing, the
university requires students to obtain work experience
abroad for a minimum of four weeks at any company,
research center or university worldwide to, among
other things, improve their English. The students are
responsible for all expenses related to the internship
program including travel, room and board expenses
and insurance. There is no cost to UVI.
The third intern is Sebastien Perry from the Institut
Superieur d'Agriculture de Beauvais, France. He is in his
second year of a five-year program that will end with a
Master of Agriculture diploma. He is currently studying
biochemistry (animal and human metabolism),
physiology, genetics, statistics, accounting and
economics.


Emilie and Lucie mainly worked in the AES
Vegetable Crops Program. Sebastien concentrated in
Aquaculture.
The internship program at UVI/AES provided the
students with an opportunity to learn the various
aspects of tropical agriculture in the small island
environment of the Caribbean.
Particular topics included growing vegetables,
herbs and medicinal plants in agroforestry systems;
aquaponics-integrating vegetable production with
aquaculture system; forage production and pasture
management; hair sheep production and manage-
ment; papaya and plantain production; and growing
ornamental plants flowers and shrubs. They also had
the opportunity to visit local farms where AES is
conducting on-farm research projects.
The fact that AES was able to attract three interns
from foreign countries emphasizes the international
reputation of UVI-AES in agricultural sciences research
and training.


SBDC PASSES U.S. SBA'S FINANCIAL EXAMINATION

The SBDC is pleased to announce that it successfully passed its recent biannual
financial examination by its partner and main sponsor, the U.S. Small Business
Administration (SBA).
As part of the national standards and criterion set forth by the SBA, all SBDCs within the
national network are examined every two years to ensure financial compliance with the
mandates set forth under the SBA's program guidelines.
SBDC received praises from SBA Examiner Mr. Reginald Teamer, who commended the
organization for its very strong and effective management and financial controls.
Mr. Teamer met with UVI President LaVerne E. Ragster; Provost, Dr. Gwen Marie-
Moolenaar; Vice Provost, Dr. Henry H. Smith; Mrs. Peggy Smith, Assistant Controller, and
Mr. Carl Christiansen, SBA's Project Officer (VI) during his on-site examination.


HTTP://RPS. UVI. EDU/









8 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


Participants received certificates at the closing ceremony of the IUVI-CES Farmer
Computer Training and Record-Keeping short course

CES FARMER COMPUTER

SHORT COURSE A SUCCESS


On June 18, 2003, ten
farmers and two supporting
children received certificates
at the closing ceremony of
the University of the Virgin
Islands' Cooperative Exten-
sion Service's Farmer Com-
puter Training and Record-
Keeping short course. That


was the first of three such
courses which are planned
for the year. The presenters,
Mr. Randall Macedon and Mr.
Marthious Clavier, conducted
the Short Course from Febru-
ary 24 to June 16, 2003. The
course was designed to in-
crease participants' knowl-


edge and usage of computers
to enhance their work.
The farmers first learned
how to use Microsoft Window
2000's functions such as drag
and drop, right click, left click,
boot up and shut down. They
then progressed to word
processing, using Microsoft
Word 2002. They were intro-
duced to the world wide web
where they conducted on-line
searches and set up e-mail
accounts. Finally, they learned
record keeping, using the Farm
Files software.
Pre-evaluative and post-
evaluative questionnaires
showed that there was over-
whelming improvement in the
farmers' reported use of the
computer after the short course.
The farmers commended the
"very knowledgeable" present-
ers in their positive comments
where they said they have
progressed from "illiteracy to
literacy."
Now that they have been
exposed to the wonders of the
technology, the farmers would
like CES to conduct other short
courses on the following


topics: crop production, green
house management, grafting
and irrigation; animated farm-
ing systems; research websites
on crop, insect and livestock
data; and accounting and
using the computer.
To get further informa-
tion, please contact Mr. Clavier
at (340) 692-4090 or e-mail
mclavie@uvi.edu or Mr. Clinton
George, Assistant Director of
Agriculture and Natural Re-
sources at (340) 692-4071 or
e-mail cgeorge@uvi.edu.


H1TP://RPS. UVI. ED[)/


AES SCIENTIST PUBLISHES SIX INTERNATIONAL PRODUCTION

GUIDES FOR ASIAN INDIGENOUS VEGETABLES


Earlier this year, Dr.
Manuel Palada, Research
Professor and Vegetable Spe-
cialist at the Agricultural
Experiment Station, spent
one month as visiting scien-
tist at the Asian Vegetable
Research and Development
Center (AVRDC) in southern
Taiwan where he completed
writing a series of production


guides for selected veg-
etables indigenous to Asia.
These guides are being used
as references by interna-
tional cooperators and farm-
ers in South and Southeast
Asia in growing these spe-
cialty vegetables.
These production
guides, as pictured, are for
amaranth, Amaranthus sp.
(AVRDC Pub# 03-552);
basella, Basella alba (AVRDC
Pub# 03-553); bitter gourd,
Momordica charantia
(AVRDC Pub# 03-547); jute
mallow or bush okra,
Corchorus olitorius (AVRDC
Pub# 03-546); kangkong,
Ipomoea aquatica (AVRDC
Pub# 03-554); and moringa,
Moringa oleifera (AVRDC
Pub#03-545).
Dr. Palada started work-
ing on this project when he
was on sabbatical at AVRDC
in 2000-2001. He conducted
field experiments evaluating
and studying the growth


performance of these veg-
etables in the humid tropics.
He returned to AVRDC last
February to complete the
publication of these produc-
tion guides. During his brief
stay, he revisited some of the
projects he established on
indigenous vegetables.
One of these, is the
moringa tree (see photo). This
tree is very popular in Asia
where people use the leaves
and green pods as vegetables
rich in vitamins and minerals.
It has also some medicinal
value and is being used in
alley cropping agroforestry
project at AES.
The production guides
can be accessed and down-
loaded on a pdf file from the
AVRDC website at
www.avrdc.org. Go to publi-
cations and click indigenous
vegetables. For more infor-
mation please contact Dr. M.
C. Palada at (340) 692-4086
or e:mail: mpalada@uvi.edu.


~I
i-
L









SEPTEMBER 2003 9


SBDC BRIEFS


SBDC AND VI DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
SPONSOR YOUTH CAREER TRAINING
In June 2003, the University of the Virgin Islands' Small
Business Development Center (SBDC) participated in an
Entrepreneurial Enrichment Program sponsored by the VI
Department of Labor/Division of Training. The initiative, entitled
Partial Employment Technique (PET), is part of a major effort to train
eligible Virgin Islanders between the ages of 15-18 for careers and
jobs within our labor market that provide life and vocational skills
that will ensure a successful future.
Through SBDC's Youth Outreach Program, the Center was able
to assist the VI Department of Labor by making a presentation on
"Entrepreneurship" that incorporated real life aspects on operating a
small business. This St. Croix-based initiative bodes well for the
University's strategic efforts to educate the youth on the principles of
entrepreneurship and build stronger relationships with the
Department of Labor and many other community-based partners.

SBDC COLLABORATES ON FINANCIAL
TRAINING WORKSHOP
During last quarter, the SBDC and the U.S. Small Business
Administration (SBA), along with the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation (FDIC) held a Train-the-Trainer workshop on FDIC's "Money
Smart" The "Money Smart" curriculum was designed to help break the
cycle of poverty by providing individuals (particularly those of low and
moderate income) with the basic tools to make informed choices
concerning personal financial matters. The participants were given the
tools necessary to train individuals in the community using 10
instructional financial training modules, covering the basics of banking,
the concept of credit, checking accounts, personal budgets, the
importance of saving money, banking consumer rights, credit reports,
credit cards, consumer loans and the process of getting home-
ownership financing.
The 30 participants represented all aspects of the community,
including federal and local government agencies, church organizations
and other community groups. This successful program was led primarily
by Ms. Valerie Williams and Mr. Robert Francis, FDIC Community Affairs
Officers, and Ms. Sachie Tanaka, Community Affairs Specialist

SBDC PARTNERS TO FOSTER ENTRE-
PRENEURIAL SPIRIT IN YOUTHS
The SBDC has been asked to partner with the Virgin Islands
Resource Conservation & Development Council, a non-profit group
made up of volunteer members of the Fire Department, the
Department of Planning and Natural Resources (DPNR), The Water
and Power Authority (WAPA), and other agencies. The Council's
goals and objectives are to enhance community leadership and
encourage diverse economic development through teaching
decision-making skills to youth and the establishment of businesses
that market local products. The program is working with the
Woodson Junior High School woodworking students and the St.
Croix Central High School Chapter of the Future Business Leaders of
America, to produce and sell property plot signs to community
residents. The signs are required under law, but, more importantly,
they can help save time and lives, by assisting the police and
firemen trying to locate homes during emergencies.


The SBDC has been asked to become a part of the team in
helping the students set up the "business" including the business
plan, budgeting, marketing, and operations. The goal of this
program is to become an ongoing youth business enterprise that
will become sustainable by itself through revenue generation while
watching the youth grow to new parts of the business and gain
insight into their own future abilities of entrepreneurship.

SBDC, INTEGRAL TO VI DEPARTMENT OF
LABOR'S RAPID RESPONSE PROGRAM
Recently, the UVI-SBDC was invited to be a member of the VI
Department of Labor's Workforce Investment System, "Rapid
Response Team." The "Rapid Response Team" was established in
accordance with the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, consisting
of mandated partners from various government departments and
agencies, to assist employees who become unemployed due to
recession in work, mass lay-off, plant closure or natural disaster.
Members of the team include: Department of Labor's Job
Service Division; Unemployment Insurance; Department of Human
Services, Department of Health, Department of Housing Parks &
Recreation; Veteran Affairs; VI Housing Finance Authority; and the
UVI-Small Business Development Center. Each department and
agency was asked to meet with businesses facing lay-offs and
closures and educate their employees/workers about vital services
available to dislocated workers (i.e. emergency housing,
unemployment insurance, welfare and entrepreneurial assistance).
SBDC is integral in helping those persons with options for starting
their own businesses. This initiative addresses such needs across the
territory and SBDC welcomes the ongoing opportunity to assist any
and all affected persons in all districts.

SBDC AND INTERNATIONAL NET-
WORKING ORGANIZATION PLAN FOR
AN AFFILIATE IN THE TERRITORY
The SBDC recently took major steps toward linking the
territory's business community to an organization with a world-wide
network, the International Council for Small Businesses (ICSB), a
nonprofit group that deals with small businesses and entrepreneurs.
Through the efforts of Provost, Dr. Gwen Marie-Moolenaar, and
SBDC State Director, Warren T. Bush, SBDC invited Dr. Jaime Luis
Santiago Canet, President of the Puerto Rico and Caribbean Affiliate
of the ICSB, to St. Thomas.
Dr. Santiago explained the inner workings of the ICSB at an
SBDC-sponsored gathering from its Nisky Center offices to about a
dozen leaders representing the University, public and private
sectors alike. ICSB seeks to advance entrepreneurship and small
business internationally by sharing knowledge, technology and
experience. The organization specifically seeks members from the
three sectors that are key to economic development: business,
government and academia.
The University's SBDC most likely would be the sponsoring
organization for a local chapter of the ICSB. Members will have
access to world conferences, affiliate conferences, journals,
bulletins, global networking opportunities, an international
exchange service and other resources.
For more information on ICSB, please call the Center at 776-
3206 or 692-5270 or e-mail wbush@uvi.edu.








10 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


COMES:

EVALUATING SEDIMENTATION

ON ST. CROIX REEFS


Sera Harold, Research Analyst
for the St. Croix VIMAS office,
collecting sediment trap on
Long Reef St. Croix


Human activities, such as fishing, anchoring,
and upland development, could negatively
impact our coral reefs. However, many feel that
the single most destructive influence is the
excessive influx of sediment from upland
development. During construction, vegetation is
removed and soil is exposed. Rain picks up and
carries the soil into the marine environment,
decreasing the amount of light available to
corals, thereby slowing photosynthesis. Sedi-
ment falling on coral can smother corals and
reduce larval settlement. When sediment is
deposited on a coral, a considerable amount of
energy is used to remove it, energy that the coral
could have used for growth and reproduction.
This stresses the coral, making it more
susceptible to diseases and bleaching, and
decreases its ability to recover after natural
disturbances.
Although sediment deposition rates are an
important parameter for coastal managers, little


data exists on sedimentation rates in VI waters,
especially around St. Croix. This year, the Center
for Marine and Environmental Studies (CMES) is
working to fill this gap by collecting sedimenta-
tion data at several St. Croix coral monitoring
sites. Through a grant from DPNR, Division of
Environmental Protection, CMES has recently
reported the first set of sedimentation data.
Preliminary results show that sedimentation
rates at the five St. Croix coral sites are lower
than those found at the St. Thomas sites as
presented by Dr. Richard Nemeth at the 2000
Non Point Source Conference. Data also suggest
that the winter months have higher sedimenta-
tion rates than spring and summer.
Data generated in this study could help
establish baseline data for a crucial water
quality parameter, leading to new standards to
protect our marine water quality. If you have
any questions on this project, contact Marcia
Taylor at (340) 692-4046 or mtaylor@uvi.edu.


HTTP://RPS. UVI. EDU/









SEPTEMBER 2003 11


UVI AGRICULTURAL


EXPERIMENT STATION


GENERATES NEW FACT SHEETS


The Agricultural Experiment Station
recently published four fact sheets with
the following titles: 1) Characteristics of
U.S. Virgin Islands Agriculture in the
1990s; 2) Production Versus Consump-
tion of Selected Agricultural Commodi-
ties, U.S. Virgin Islands, 1997; 3)
Farming for Profit: An Overview of the
Basic Tools; and 4) Determining the
Sex of Papaya Plants for Successful
Management of Backyard and Com-
mercial Production.
The first three fact sheets
were written by Dr. Gerard
D'Souza, Professor of Agricultural
and Resource Economics, West -.
Virginia University. Dr. D'Souza .
was a Visiting Professor and
Agricultural Economist who spent
his sabbatical at UVI/AES during
the fall semester of 2000.
During his stay, he worked with
AES scientists and professional staff
in conducting economic analysis for
all the data that AES accumulated over
the years in agronomy, animal science,
aquaculture, fruit and ornamental crops
and vegetable crops. He developed
budgets and prepared cost/benefits
analysis for selected enterprises using
AES data.
The first two fact sheets describe
the recent status of agriculture in the
Virgin Islands. Most of the information
is based on the recent agriculture
census for Virgin Islands and in the fact
sheet, Dr. D'Souza discusses the
implications of this census to VI
agriculture.
The third fact sheet, Farming for
Profit, covers topics on enterprise budgets,
partial budgeting, financial statements,
feasibility analysis and business plan. The
fact sheet is designed to guide and help
farmers improve their farm management


skills. It is a basic tool for successful and
profitable farming operation. The
fact sheet provides a simple
format for preparing an establish-
ment and maintenance budget
using hair sheep production as an
example. These fact sheets were
distributed to farmers during the
~77 Agriculture Forum held at UVI, St.
Croix on April 22 and 23, 2003.
The fourth fact sheet was
prepared and authored by Dr.
Thomas Zimmerman, Research Assis-
tant Professor and Program Leader,
Biotechnology and Agroforestry Unit. The
fact sheet is the result of several years of
experiments with papaya at AES. Dr.
Zimmerman conducted several studies
where he examined and investigated
plant growth characteristics as well as
reproduction of papaya plants. He
developed a method of determin-
*. ^:.' ing the sex of papaya plants
'.. based on flower characters and
'growth habit.
The fact sheet is a valuable tool
for backyard home gardeners as
Well as farmers. Knowing the sex of
papaya plants early during the
initial growing stage will help
farmers remove male plants that are
unproductive. Fruit-bearing papaya
plants are either female or bisexual
(hermaphrodite).
Production and publication of
these fact sheets were made
possible through the efforts and
services of Dr. Manuel Palada, AES
Publications Coordinator and
Technical Editor; and Dr. Robin
Sterns, Editor.
For more information and
copies of fact sheets please
contact Dr. Manuel C. Palada, (340) 692-
4086 or e-mail: mpalada@uvi.edu.


DURING HIS STAY, DR.
D'SOUZA WORKED
WITH AES SCIENTISTS
AND PROFESSIONAL
STAFF IN
CONDUCTING
ECONOMIC ANALYSIS
FOR ALL THE DATA
THAT AES
ACCUMULATED OVER
THE YEARS IN
AGRONOMY, ANIMAL
SCIENCE,
AQUACULTURE, FRUIT
AND ORNAMENTAL
CROPS AND
VEGETABLE CROPS. HE
DEVELOPED BUDGETS
AND PREPARED COST/
BENEFITS ANALYSIS
FOR SELECTED
ENTERPRISES USING
AES DATA.I


SBDC'S TRAINING CONTINUES TO THRIVE
The UVI Small Business Development Center (SBDC) had major successes in its STT- and STX-based
programming over the third quarter. Among the seminar topics covered in both districts included:
Grant Writing, Time Management, Writing an Effective Business Plan, Quick Books, Estate Planning
(Wills, Deeds, Trusts), Developing an Effective Resume, Security for Your Small Business (Fraud
Prevention), Microsoft Powerpoint, and Human Resource Management
SBDC will continueto sponsor training to addressthe entrepreneurial and economic development
potential of aspiring and existing business owners and their employees. For more information on these
programs and upcoming events, please contact SBDC at 776-3206 (STT) or 692-5270 (STX).










12 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER




2 0 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
UPCOMING EVENTS
OCTOBER DECEMBER 2003



OCTOBER
1-12 COASTWEEKS CELEBRATION/CMES'
5 HANDLING LABOR RELATIONS/SBDC
10 PERSONNEL LAW FOR MANAGERS & SUPERVISORS/SBDC
24 HOW TO HIRE & FIRE EMPLOYEES/SBDC
24 YOUTH OUTREACH/SBDC
31 SEXUAL HARASSMENT: SERIOUS BUSINESS & ZERO TOLERANCE/SBDC

NOVEMBER
10-14 GULF & CARIBBEAN FISHERIES INSTITUTE 56TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE/CMES
14 OVERCOMING STRESS AT WORK/SBDC
14 YOUTH OUTREACH/SBDC
17 CHECKLIST FOR STARTING A BUSINESS: LICENSING/ZONING/SBDC
18 WNET ROUNDTABLE/SBDC
24 MOTIVATING EMPLOYEES: MAXIMIZING PRODUCTIVITY IN THE WORKPLACE/SBDC

DECEMBER
4 CHECKLIST FOR STARTING A BUSINESS: BUREAU OF INTERNAL REVENUE/SBDC
5 THE ABC'S OF ACCOUNTING/SBDC
12 CASH FLOW MANAGEMENT: QUICKBOOKS PRO/SBDC
10 CHECKLIST FOR STARTING A BUSINESS/SBDC
12 YOUTH OUTREACH/SBDC
15 INTRODUCTION TO QUICKBOOKS/SBDC
17 INTERMEDIATE QUICKBOOKS/SBDC

"for more information on these events, contact the sponsoring department.






SUVI RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
#2 )OHN BREWERS BAY
ST. THOMAS, VI 00802




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