• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Reaching out to the Hispanic...
 RPS staff Yvonne Horton named UVI...
 CMES brings noted coral researcher...
 AES conducts field day/workshop...
 AES participates in multi-state...
 CES offers computer training to...
 SBDC briefs - CDC, CES plan new...
 Fisheries conservation workshop...
 AES successfully harvests first...
 Rescuing a rare orchid
 Upcoming events






Group Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 6. No. 2.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300566/00003
 Material Information
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 6. No. 2.
Series Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of the Virgin Islands.
Affiliation: University of the Virgin Islands
Publisher: University of the Virgin Islands.
Publication Date: 12/26/2003
 Subjects
Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA01300566
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

6-2003newsletter1 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Reaching out to the Hispanic community
        Page 1
        Page 2
    RPS staff Yvonne Horton named UVI employee of the year
        Page 3
    CMES brings noted coral researcher to UVI campuses
        Page 4
    AES conducts field day/workshop on medicinal plants
        Page 5
    AES participates in multi-state research project on dairy cattle heat stress
        Page 6
    CES offers computer training to farmers
        Page 7
    SBDC briefs - CDC, CES plan new field guide
        Page 8
    Fisheries conservation workshop held at VIERS
        Page 9
    AES successfully harvests first crop from commercial-scale tank
        Page 10
    Rescuing a rare orchid
        Page 11
    Upcoming events
        Page 12
Full Text





RE


PU


N E


SEARCH AND


BLIC SERVICE


:WS LETTER


UNIVERSITY OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


Volume 6, No. 2


News from the UVI Research and Public Service Component


REACHING


HISPANIC

FUNDAMENTALS DE PEQUENAS
EMPRESAS, DESARROLLANDO UN
PLAN DE NEGOCIO*
'SMALL BUSINESS FUNDAMENTALS, DEVEL-
OPINGA BUSINESSPLAN
In March, 2003, the Small Business Develop-
ment Center presented a series of training topics that
targeted the Hispanic-speaking population, particu-
larly on St. Croix. This program is being implemented
to reach a community sector that has previously
been untapped and yet makes up approximately
40% of the small business owners on the island.
Presented by Ms. Carmen Acevedo Adams, the
interactive audience concentrated on a "hands-on"
discussion (fully in Spanish) regarding the reasons
one might want to be an entrepreneur, stressing the
creation of ideas and need for constant up-front
research to make those ideas feasible. Specifically,
the session stressed the basic steps required to
develop a business plan as a guideline to be assured
of success.
Future topics for this training series will include
hands-on budgeting and financial analysis, and
record keeping through Quickbooks.


More than 130 local farmers packed into the
University of the Virgin Islands' Melvin Evans'
Theater on St. Croix, to attend a two-day
agricultural forum, April 22-23,2003, to discuss the
future of agriculture in the territory.
With the theme, "Prospects for Sustainable
Agriculture in the V.I," the forum addressed several
important issues for a sustainable agriculture
industry: (1) production, marketing and agri-
markets; (2) education outreach and research; (3)
funding; (4) water for agriculture, and farmers'
perspectives; and (5) assessment of the territorial


OUT TO


THE


COMMUNITY

RADIO NEWS ON INTEGRATED
MODEL FARM DIRECTEDATSPAN-
ISH AUDIENCE
Victor Almodovar, an agricultural aide at the
Agricultural Experiment Station's (AES) Integrated
Model Farm (IMF) project, recently arranged an
interview between UVI Integrated Model Farm
personnel and Radio Latino 98, Castle Coakley,
Christiansted, whose broadcasts reach all of the U.S.
Virgin Islands as well as Vieques and eastern Puerto
Rico.
Yvonne Daly Canos-Cruz, a colorful local radio
personality, invited Victor and Michael McGuire, the
Farm Manager, to the station for the interview. Over
the course of the hour-long interview, the two UVI
employees spoke about the University's history of
agricultural research and the IMF project. The project
is being developed by AES with support from a grant
from the USDA Initiative for Future Agriculture and
Food Systems (IFAFS) Program. The project is a
cooperative effort between AES, Cooperative
Extension Service, Water Resources Research
Institute, V.I. Department of Agriculture, University of
Continued on p. 3


agricultural policy.
According to Kwame Garcia Sr., Director of
UVrs Cooperative Extension Service, "the agricul-
tural forum represents an effort by local farmers
and agricultural experts to address issues that will
revitalize the agricultural industry." The forum, he
said, also presented an opportunity for both
farmers and agricultural experts to develop
initiatives for securing the future of agriculture in
the territory and to look at the current agricultural
policy and add revisions where needed.
Continued on p. 2


IN SIDE
3 RPS Staff Yvonle
Horton Named UVI
Employee of the
Year
4 CMES Brings Noted
Coral Researcher to
UVI Campuses
5 AES Conducts Field
Day./Workshop on
Medicinal plants
6 AES Participates in
Multi-State Researxh
Project on Dairy
Cattle Heat Stress
7 C ES Offers Computer
Training to Farmers
8 SBDC Briefs
8 CDC, CESPlan New
Field Guide
9 Fisheries Conserva-
tion Workshop Held
atVIERS
10 AES Successfully
Harvests First Crop
from Commercial-
Scale Tank
11 Rescuing a Rare
Orchid
12 Upcoming events


JUNE 2003


UVI AGRICULTURAL FORUM LEAVES

FARMERS 'EXCITED AND HOPEFUL'










2 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


FORUM FOCUSED ON DEVELOPING

INITIATIVES TO REVIVE THE V.I.

AGRICULTURE INDUSTRY
Continued from P. 1


THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
(R&PS) NEWSLETTER
IS AN INFORMATIONAL
NEWSLETTER ON THE UNITS
THAT MAKE UP THE
R&PS COMPONENT.
HTTP://RPS.UVI.EDU/
VICE PROVOST
HENRY H. SMITH, PH.D.

EDITORIAL BOARD
VELMA ABRAMSEN,
EXECUTIVEASSISTANT TO
THE PRESIDENT
LORNA CHESTERFIELD,
ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PROVOST
CLARICE C. CLARKE,
PUBLIC INFORM TION SPECIALIST
HELEN DOOKHAN,
ADMINISTRATVE SPECIALIST
MANUEL PALADA, PH.D.
AES RESEARCH ASSOCA TE
PROFESSOR
RAQUEL SANTIAGO SILVER,
ADMINISTRATOR
JACQUELINE SOMERSALL-
BERRY,
FORMER ASSISTANT TO THE
ECC DIRECTOR
PATRICE JOHNSON,
DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS
MARVIN WILLIAMS,
EDITOR, THE CARIBBEAN WRITER

LAYOUT & DESIGN
ROBIN STERNS, PH.D.

DISTRIBUTION
KIMA GATON
MAIL LETTERS OR COMMENTS TO:
LORNA CHESTERFELp
UVI RESEARCH &P PUBLIC SERVICE
#2 OHN BREWERS BAY
ST. THOMAS, VI 00802
TELEPHONE: (340) 693-061
FAX (340) 693-1065
LCHESTE-UVI, EDPU

THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VIRGIN I/SANDS
ISAN EOUAL OPPORTUNITY,
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION,
TI7E IX, SECTION 504,
PL 101-542 EDUCATOR
ANP EMPLOYER,


The keynote speaker, Lawrence Lucas, Presi-
dent of USDA Coalition for Minority Employees,
excited the group with his presentation. He said that
helping small and disadvantaged farmers to
continue working the land is an important struggle
that involves preserving culture and preserving the
farming way of life.
"If we can sustain the rebuilding of other
countries, we must demand that our country do the
same for us," he said. Lucas also urged farmers to
form cooperatives by sharing equipment, and
marketing techniques, and by engaging in bulk
purchasing. He added that product processing and
packaging can help farmers sustain their livelihood.
"We can ill afford to leave blackfarmers behind,"
Lucas said. The destiny of black farmers is in our
hands."
A special presentation entitled an "Overview of
Marketing and Production: The St. Kitts Model" was
given by Cedric Liburd, Minister of Agriculture,
Fisheries, Cooperatives, Lands and Housing in St.
Kitts. In his presentation, Mr. Liburd said that St. Kitts'
Department of Agriculture has instituted a training
program for farmers. Additionally, the Department
has instituted a marketing program and has
arranged for the island's local hotels to purchase all


Dr. Thomas Zimmerman, UVI Research Assistant Professor,
explaining his papaya research project toforum participants


of their produce from the local farmers.
Dr. Terry Nipp, President of AESOP Enterprises,
Ltd., discussed access to federal funding for
agricultural development, and Dr. John Mayne,
Assistant Director, Southern Region SARE, provided
information on the sustainable agriculture research
and education program and grants for farmers.
Other sessions included presentations by Dr.
Richard Moore on the need for reliable agriculture
statistics and Commissioner of Tourism Pamela
Richards on agri-tourism. Rev. Eddie Williams
discussed the Role of FFA in agricultural develop-
ment, Dr. James Rakocy on agricultural research, and
Mr. Kwame Garcia, Sr. on agricultural extension and
outreach.
On Wednesday, April 23, the session began with
the potential sources of water for agriculture. Alex A.
Moorhead, HOVENSA's Vice President of govern-
ment affairs and human resources, stated that the
refinery is prepared to supply water if available to the
Department of Agriculture for distribution to farmers
during periods of drought. Representatives from V.I.
Water and Power and St. Croix Renaissance Group
also spoke to farmers on the potential sources of
water for agriculture.
Farmers such as Kendal Petersen from St.
Croix Farmers in Action; Eridge Thomas from We
Grow Food, Inc.; Kiko Gasperi from the St. Croix
Senepol Association; Sheila Shulterbrandt, St.
Thomas Livestock Association and Mrs. Rosalia Drew
gave their perspectives and recommendations on
the need to for a sustainable agricultural industry in
the Virgin Islands.
Dr. Henry Smith, UVI's Vice Provost for Research
and Public Service, moderated the session to assess
the Virgin Islands' agricultural policy. Four separate
groups discussed legislative policies, infrastructure
development, production and marketing and
education and research. Group reports and
recommendations will be complied and be available
for shaping future agricultural policy and other uses.
According to organizers, the agricultural forum
was a tremendous success. Kendall Petersen of St.
Croix Farmers in Action and a forum committee
member, said it best: "There will be more forums in
the future and this forum has only scratched the
surface of the issues that farmers and fishermen are
facing." He said that those who took part were
excited and hopeful for the future of agriculture.
The agricultural forum was sponsored by UVI's
Cooperative Extension Service in partnership with
UVI's Agricultural Experiment Station, V.I. Depart-
ment of Agriculture, St. Croix Farmers in Action,
Southern Rural Development Center and USDA
Natural Resources Conservation Service.
For additional information on the forum, contact
Mr. Kwame Garcia, State Director of the Cooperative
Extension Service at (340) 692-4091 or
kgarcia@uvi.edu.









A/NE2005 3


Ms. Yvonne Horton, UVI Employee of the Year

RPS STAFF RECEIVES

UVI EMPLOYEE OF

THE YEAR AWA RD
Research 8 Public Service (RPS) is proud
to have one of its employees honored as
recipient of the UVI Employee of the Year
Award. Ms. Yvonne Horton, Administrative
Specialist I at the Agricultural Experiment
Station (AES), St. Croix campus, received the
Employee of the Year Award on April 10,
2003 during the UVI Service Award
Ceremony.
Horton has been employed at AES for
22 years, starting as Secretary I in 1981, and
worked her way up to Administrative
Specialist in 1998. Every year she has
received excellent performance evaluations.
With the increased activity and
expanded projects on special grants at AES,
Horton has steadily assumed greater
responsibility to meet the ever increasing
challenges of her position. She provides
administrative assistance in all areas of AES,
for example, assisting in the organization of
meetings and conferences sponsored by
AES, including collecting registration fees,
sending out announcements and coordinat-
ing all personnel actions for AES-a unit with
39 employees.
According to Horton, she insures that all
reports are submitted electronically to the
appropriate federal agencies, and has sole
responsibility for tracking all AES research
projects during their 3- to 5-year life.
Additionally, she also communicates with
funding agencies in Washington, D.C., and
attends USDA administrative meetings.
During her 22 years of service to AES,
Horton has witnessed a period of sustained
expansion in programs, facilities, personnel,
funding and output. As the complexity of
administering AES increased, she rose to the
challenge and developed professional skills
to maintain an efficient and effective
administrative unit.
"I am very honored and appreciative in
getting this award," Horton said. "My years of
service at UVI have been highly rewarding."


Vegi Burger
1 pound black eyed peas or lentil
1/4 cup onion, finely chopped
2 sprigs thyme, finely chopped
3 carrots, grated
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 cup parsley, finely chopped


'MIRIAM'S KITCHEN'
As one steps inside the Research and
Extension Center it does not take too long to
notice that something good is cooking. The
aroma leads everyone into "Miriam's
Kitchen." This kitchen is a special place not
only for those of us who can always get
something to eat, but for persons of different
background who want to eat and live a
healthier lifestyle.
In "Miriam's Kitchen," the food pyramid
is the centerpiece of the table. Miriam uses
this as the cornerstone for her health and
nutrition classes. Each week, classes and
hands-on demonstrations focus on one
food group-from baking whole wheat
bread to making healthy snacks.
March was a particularly exciting
month, as the Expanded Food and Nutrition
Program (EFNEP) joined other health
agencies in observing National Nutrition
Month. This year, the focus was on
preparing vegetarian meals. EFNEP nutrition
workshops emphasized healthy food substi-
tutes and taught participants to make such
vegetarian dishes as tofu lasagna, soy milk
drink and veggie burgers.
The Expanded Food and Nutrition
Program (EFNEP) is designed to assist
individuals in acquiring the knowledge,
skills, attitudes, and changed behavior
necessary for nutritionally sound diets, and


2 teaspoons soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon ground sage
oil for frying
Avocados, mashed
Alfalfa sprouts
Tomatoes, chopped


1. Soak black eyed peas or lentils ovemight in 1 quart water. Drain water and blend peas in food
processor or blender. Do not cook.
2. Chop vegetables and seasonings; add to black eyed or lentil peas.
3. Spoon batter on lightly greased grill or frying pan to make 6 five inch circles. Fry on both sides until
brown. (To bake: flour patties and place on greased baking pan and bake at 350 F.)
To serve: Cut circles in half Use the burger as bread to hold filling of your choice. To do this, spread
one side of one half vegi burger with mashed avocado. Top with alfalfa sprouts, chopped tomatoes, or
fresh vegetables of your choice. Place other half of vegi burger on top of vegetables and serve.
Each burger (without vegetables) provides:
Calories 136, Fat 3g, Protein 7g, Carbohydrates 22g, Sodium 125mg, Cholesterol Omg


SHOW HIGHLIGHTS IMF
Continuedfromp. 1
Guam, University of Puerto Rico and the
USDA Agricultural Research Service Tropical
Agriculture Research Station in Mayaguez,
PR.
McGuire discussed the objectives for
the farm, which are to integrate aquaculture,
fruits, vegetables, and livestock production
on 5 acres of land and to develop systems
that will have gross annual revenues of over
$100,000. A rainwater catchment will
capture rainfall that will be used for the fish
tanks and crop irrigation. Waste from the


fish production will be used to fertilize
plants, and small livestock (sheep or goats)
will graze the fallow plots between crop
plantings.
Currently the farm is in the building
stage, but when it is completed later this
year tours will be given so that farmers can
see the integrated system in operation and
learn about the potential for it's application
in the Virgin Islands. By demonstrating the
integration of these crops and practices it is
hoped that local farmers will adopt the
concept and use it to enhance their
efficiency and improve their financial
outlook.


(


lulah Lynch of Specialist Health Store and Deli
demonstrating how to prepare stewed tofu
to contribute to their personal development
and improvement of the total family diet
and nutritional well-being.
Eating right can be something done
without much fanfare, and only needs
careful planning. To leam more about the
EFNEP call (340) 692-4094. Enjoy the
vegetarian recipe listed below.









4 RESEARCH & PUBLIC S5ER VICE NEWSLETTER



CMES BRINGS NOTED CORAL


RESEARCHER TO UVI CAMPUSES


' i i| it-- l[ U I, l w it on ,i n t d"." i w,,^,(
t;",.' ( (it iit :i'.". i( ..- ,t. 1 it ..i ,:,i."n o i ( it L11 I
A o.-ik n A lor n (\'nt 'i in t i.i, kio


Dr. Betsy Gladfelter presented
"Acropora palmata (elkhorn coral): the
catastrophic decline of the giant of the
Caribbean" to standing-room only crowds
at UVI campuses in both St. Croix and St.
Thomas. The presentations, which took
place on February 11 in St. Croix and
February 26 in St. Thomas, were
organized by the Virgin Islands Marine
Advisory Service (VIMAS) of the Center for
Marine and Environmental Studies (CMES).
Thanks to VIMAS, the lectures were
well publicized with flyers and through
local newspaper and radio. Attendance
exceeded expectations, but UVI staff
quickly provided extra seating. Students,
government employees, members of the
media, a member of the VI Legislature, UVI
staff, and other community members
attended to leam about the importance of
elkhom coral in reef construction and
ecology, as well as the decline of elkhorn
coral in the past and the threats this coral


HTTP://RPSJJV[. EPU/


may face in the present and future.
Acropora palmata, the elkhom coral,
has a massive form whose outspread
branches can exceed 7 meters. It is the
dominant shallow water reef-building
species in the Caribbean. It plays a major
role in reef construction and evolution,
protection of shorelines, and its branches
create a complex habitat harboring many
important reef organisms including fishes.
Because of its decline in the past 30
years, the NOAA Office of Protected
Resources is considering placing it on the
endangered species list. When studies of
various aspects of the biology, ecology
and geology of this coral began in the
1970s, ten square km of shallow
windward reefs on the eastern portion of
St. Croix were "Acropora-dominated reefs."
No reefs in the area can be considered
that way today.
In the late 1970s, on portions of Buck
Island Reef, this coral had a live coverage
exceeding 60%; Teague Bay Reef had
about 50% live cover, while the south
shore reefs had live coverage of up to
35%. Re-surveyed in 2002, these regions
had about 1% live coverage, with isolated
patches having up to 3.6% cover.
White-band disease, described and
its effects hypothesized in the late 1970s,
was the primary cause of the mortality of
this important coral species, although
repeated hurricanes, predators and other
factors have contributed to maintaining


the low live coverage presently seen on
Virgin Island reefs.
However, researchers in St. Croix as
well as elsewhere in the V.I. are
encouraged by their recent observations
that show a number of new, healthy
young elkhorn coral colonies in many
areas. It is suggested that this species
might possibly recover to its former
dominance, if these populations continue
to grow over the next several decades in
the absence of repeated stressors such as
hurricanes, increased water temperature
or land-based threats such as sediment
run-off.
Dr. Gladfelter is a long-time St. Croix
resident and was a scientist at the West
Indies Lab in St. Croix from 1974 to 1990,
becoming director in 1988. She was
instrumental in documenting the decline
of elkhorn coral in the Virgin Islands
through the late 1970s and early 1980s.
Enthusiastic and athletic, she inspires
others to explore the natural world.
Dr. Gladfelter is currently a Guest
Investigator at the Marine Policy Center of
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in
Massachusetts and has recently published
a book entitled Agassiz's Legacy: Scientists'
Reflections on the Value of Field Experience
(Oxford University Press, Oct. 2002).
Thanks to Marcia Taylor and Sera
Harold at VIMAS in St. Croix and Mayra
Suarez-V61ez at VIMAS in St. Thomas for
making these events possible.









AINE2003 5


TAKE THIS AND CALL ME IN THE MORNING:


AES CONDO UCTS
FIELD DAY/

WORKSHOP ON

MEDICINAL PLANTS
Last December, Rattan Herb Tea
Garden, Estate Rattan, St. Croix, was the
venue for conducting a field-day and
workshop on medicinal plants and culinary
herbs organized by the AES Vegetable Crops
Program. There were more than 30
attendees; and the purpose of this activity
was to educate participants on the potential
uses of local and indigenous medicinal
plants; their cultivation and growth charac-
teristics. Some of the participants are
already involved in small-scale herb
businesses and were interested in expand-
ing their enterprises.
The field-day segment exposed partici-
pants to the research plot where medicinal
plants are grown in an alley cropping/
agroforestry system with Moringa a
popular medicinal tree with multiple uses in
the tropics. Other medicinal plants on site
included Japana, Worrywine, and Inflam-
mation Bush. The attendees also viewed
some of the culinary and aromatic herbs
intercropped with Moringa. Common herbs
included Lemongrass, Sweet Marjoram,
Thyme, Sage, Basil, Chamomile and
Rosemary. Brian Becker, a graduate student
from the University of Horida, explained the
objectives of the agroforestry research with
medicinal plants. Becker was able to
elaborate on this issue as it forms part of his
master's thesis.
The workshop was hosted by Infee
Coville a project coordinator involved in
small-scale processing of medicinal herbs.
Dr. Manuel Palada, Research Associate
Professor and Project Leader, described the
growth; medicinal uses; cultivation; harvest-
ing and processing of various medicinal
plants in the Virgin Islands. Jeanmarie
Mitchell, Research Analyst, demonstrated
methods of growing; caring for; and
managing transplants. Jacquel Dawson,
director of Project Bush Tea, an invited
speaker from St. Thomas, presented
information on the preparation of herb and
bush tea. The workshop culminated with
actual demonstrations of how to prepare
Noni juice, Noni oil and tea by Infee Coville.
The participants did not only leave
these sessions with additional knowledge of
the medicinal plants and culinary herbs, but
also samples thereof. Each participant
received Noni juice, Noni oil and transplants
of various culinary herbs.
There was positive feedback in the


Top: Infee Coville isshown pouring some Noni oil into a bottlefor workshop participants to take home for their
personal use
Bottom: Jacquel Dawson talks to the workshop attendees about the preparation of herb and bush teas


workshop evaluation. The participants
indicated that they would like to have more
activities similar to this activity. There was
also the expressed desire to encourage the
formation of a St. Croix Herb Society where
members can share and exchange informa-
tion about medicinal herbs.


The field-day and workshop were co-
sponsored by the UVI Cooperative Exten-
sion Service and the V.I. Department of
Agriculture.
For more information contact Dr.
Manuel C. Palada, (340) 692-4086 or
mpalada@uvi.edu.








6 RESEARCH & PUBLIC ER VICE NEWSLETTER



DAI RY COWS HAVE


"HOT


"THE CARIBBEAN
REGION IS KNOWN FOR
ITS HIGH TEMPERATURE
AND HUMIDITYAND
THE U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS
IS NO EXCEPTION TO
THESE FEATURES. THUS,
THE HOLSTEIN CATTLE
ARE SUSCEPTIBLE TO
HEATSTRESS, WHICH
CAN NEGATIVELY
IMPACTTHEIR
REPRODUCTION AND
MILK PRODUCTION.


HAlR


These two Holstein heifers have different percentages of black hair coat The heifer on the left has 24.2% black hair and the heifer on
the righthas 90.9% blackhair


Dr. Bob Godfrey, Animal Science Program
Leader, is participating in a multi-state research
project to evaluate the effects of heat stress on dairy
cattle (S-299 Enhancing Production and Reproduc-
tive Performance of Heat-Stressed Dairy Cattle). One
aspect of the research being conducted by Dr.
Godfrey and his staff is evaluating the effect of hair
coat color on the level of heat stress experienced by
Holstein dairy cattle on St. Croix.
The contrasting coat pattern of the black and
white Holstein cows are a common site on the dairy
farms of St. Croix. Unlike the red Senepol beef cattle,
which are a tropical breed, Holstein is a breed that
was developed in more temperate regions of the
world. The Caribbean Region is known for its high
temperature and humidity and the U.S. Virgin Islands
is no exception. Thus, the Holstein cattle are
susceptible to heat stress, which can negatively
impact their reproduction and milk production.
Holstein heifers at Mt. Mint Dairy farm on St.
Croix that were bred by artificial insemination were
used for this project. The percentage of black hair
coat for each heifer was determined using digital
photos of the right and left sides of the heifers and
image analysis software. In addition to coat color, the
surface temperature of the black and white hair coat
on each heifer was measured using a hand held
infrared thermometer. Rectal temperatures of the
heifers were measured using a digital veterinary
thermometer every other day for a 30-day period
after Al during the spring (April-May) and fall
(September-October). Environmental conditions (tem-
perature and relative humidity) were monitored daily
during the periods of data collection using data
loggers. Ms. Okesiha Isles, a UVI Research Initiative
for Scientific Enhancement (RISE) student working in
Dr. Godfrey's lab, assisted with the data collection and
presented the data as a poster at the First Annual
Spring Symposium of the Emerging Caribbean
Scientists held on the St. Croix campus in March 2003.


The darkheifers (more than 50% blackhair) had
higher rectal temperatures and lower pregnancy
rates than the light colored heifers (less than 50%
black hair). The surface temperature of black hair on
the heifers was 70 F higher than the surface
temperature of the white hair. Based on
environmental data collected for this project the
temperature-humidity index (THI) was 77 in the
spring and 80 in the fall. Since heat stress in livestock
is defined as any time the THI exceeds 72, the heifers
were under conditions of heat stress during both
times of the year. The elevated THI in conjunction
with the higher rectal temperatures of the darker-
colored heifers would place them under a higher
level of heat stress their the lighter-colored
counterparts.
Analysis of historical data from a dairy farm on
St. Croix did not detect a strong relationship between
coat color and milk production in Holstein cows.
After analyzing the environmental data from the
recent project it appears that dairy cattle on St. Croix
are under some level of heat stress throughout the
year. Therefore, any variations in coat color may not
be able to totally overcome the negative effects of
high environmental temperatures on milk produc-
tion or reproduction. However, the careful selection
of dairy cattle with less black hair could decrease the
magnitude of heat stress experienced by these
animals, and thereby enhance their reproduction or
milk production.
As part of a multi-state research project, data is
being collected at several states in the southeast US
to supplement the data being collected in the USVI.
The relationship between coat color and reproduc-
tion or milk production will be evaluated under a
variety of environmental conditions.
More information about the project and the
cooperators from other states can be found at http:/
/rps.uvi.edu/AES/S299/S299_home_page.html.


HTTP://RPS.UVI. EDU/


PAYS"








/JNE2003 7


FARMERS


LEARN


NEW TECHNOLOGIES


Mathious Clavier, Extension Agent (standing), assisting Reynardo Vasquez during a computer training course


Reynardo Vasquez said he did not
mind a picture of him being taken at the
computer to publicize an upcoming
computer training course for Virgin Islands'
farmers. In fact, excitedly he said "Yes!" Ray,
as he is affectionately called, is one of 10
farmers who signed up for the introductory
course.
When asked him how the computer
class was going, enthusiastically, he said,
"Excellent! I am learning a lot."
Each year, from June through
October, the U.S. Virgin Islands goes
through its hurricane season. For many
Virgin Islanders, 1989 was a memorable
time; many lost their homes, important
documents and records. For Virgin
Islands' farmers, however, it was particu-
larly hard especially for small farmers
who never kept farm financial records.
Therefore, getting agricultural disaster
assistance was extremely difficult.
For many small farmers in the Virgin
Islands, the lack of proper farm financial
records has prevented them from
qualifying for farm loans or agricultural
grant assistance programs. To help
strengthen the farm financial manage-
ment of farmers, the Cooperative Exten-
sion Service has initiated a computer
training program that will teach small
farmers in the Territory how to keep good
financial records.
Farmers attend evening classes twice


per week for two hours. They leam the parts
of the computer, keyboarding using
Microsoft Word, they are introduced to e-
mail and the Intemet, they leam programs
such as Excel, and finally, they leam how to
enter financial data.
The training is divided into three
sessions. The first session ran February 24
through May 22, 2003. Session two runs
from June 3 through September 4 and
session three from September 16 through
December 16, 2003.
According to Clinton George, CES
Assistant Director for Agriculture 8 Natural
Resources, over the past 20 years, 90% or
more of approximately 270 small crop
farmers in the U.S. Virgin Islands have not
been consistently engaged in the practice
of maintaining farm operational and
financial records. This makes it difficult for
them to participate in agricultural disaster
assistance programs, alternative energy
assistance programs, and natural re-
sources programs that are customarily
offered by local and federal agencies.
Kwame N. Garcia, CES State Director,
recently said, This computertraining course
not only teach farmers how to use computer
software, but also to search the World Wide
Web in accessing other agricultural pro-
grams that are available nationally."
For more information on the computer
training, call (340) 692-4071.


RPS ADVISORY


GROUP


MEETS


The Advisory Council of Research and
Public Service met on Monday, April 14,
2003, to review present RPS program
offerings, leam of future plans and provide
input for guidance in RPS. The meeting was
conducted by video conference between the
University's two campuses. Members of the
Council in attendance were Mr. Roger
Dewey, Ms. Janice Hodge, Mr. William
Murchison, Dr. Alex Randall and Mr. Frank
Schulterbrandt.
Presentations were made by RPS
Directors highlighting major ongoing activi-
ties in their units and directions that their
units will be taking in the future. A special
presentation was made to the group by
Professor Roy Watlington, Project Director
for VI-EPSCoR, the Virgin Islands Experimen-
tal Program to Stimulate Competitive
Research. This program is sponsored by the
National Science Foundation and is cur-
rently a priority initiative of the University.
Advisory Council members
complimented RPS staff on their programs
and made several suggestions for inclusion
in future RPS offerings. The Advisory Council
meets formally on an annual basis but
remains constantly involved with RPS
programs through direct contact with RPS
Directors and the Vice Provost. They are
kept notified of activities in RPS and are
encouraged to participate in all seminars,
workshops, courses and similar events.
Persons interested in assisting RPS to
more effectively implement its mission by
serving on the Advisory Council should
contact the Vice Provost for Research and
Public Service, Dr. Henry H. Smith by phone
at (340) 693-1062 or by email at
hsmith@uvi.edu.


HTTP://RPS.U VI.EEDV/


STX








8 SBDC BRIEFS


UVI-SBDC GAINS POSITIVE RATING IN
RECENT ACCREDITATION REVIEW
The UVI Small Business Development Center (UVI-SBDC) is
pleased to announce that it successfully gained accreditation from
the America's Small Business Development Centers (ASBDC)
Network following a recent review. As part of the national standards
and criterion set forth by ASBDC and main sponsor, U.S. Small
Business Administration, SBDCs are evaluated every four years for
accreditation recertification. The UVI-SBDC received high marks for
having successfully created an environment in which the program
leaders address organizational values and performance expecta-
tions in conjunction with UVI and SBA strategic objectives.
Specifically, the SBDC was evaluated on a number of significant
areas that embraced operational/structural components including,
but not limited to, the following: Leadership and Organizational
Issues; Strategic Planning; Client and Stakeholder Focus; Program
Performance Standards; Staff Qualification and Resource Utilization;
Process Management.
The ASBDC accreditation review team was led by Mr. Dennis
Gruell, State Directorof the Connecticut SBDC and Mr. Jim King, State
Director of the New York Small Business Development Center. The
team was privileged to meet with UVI's President LaVeme E. Ragster,
Provost Gwen-Marie Moolenaar and and Dr. Henry H. Smith, Vice
Provost.
The management and staff are very proud of this accreditation
certification and wish to thank the University community for its
continuous support. The SBDC is expected to undergo a similar
financial examination review by its lead sponsor, the SBA, in the not
too distant future.
SBDC AND 32ND ANNUAL AGRICUL-
TURE AND FOOD FAIR
The SBDC continues to participate in the Ag Fair while stressing
that agriculture is a business that can be very lucrative, including
stressing Community Supported Agriculture as a win-win situation.
Although not a new concept, it is an innovative way to connect
consumers and farmers in a mutually beneficial relationship of
supply and demand.
Agri-tourism is another method by which farmers can generate
additional revenue by simply sharing their knowledge of their farms
with people for education or entertainment. This could be done
through simply sampling fruits and vegetables, meandering
through the fields, seeing historical buildings and perhaps even
creating a petting farm. Over the past, more than 1 million people
have visited the Virgin Islands each year many would be excited to
see how bananas and papayas are grown. School tours are
excellent educational opportunities to provide a positive effect for
children to leam about farming. All this can be beneficial and
"entrepreneurial" for our Territory's farmers.


YOUTH OUTREACH PROGRAM
FUTURE BUSINESS LEADERS WEEK


FOR


As part of the on-going need to work with future entrepreneurs of
the islands, the SBDC training staff was an integral participant in the
"Youth Outreach Program for Future Business Leaders of America
Week"
Working with the schools, seminars were presented to the St.
Croix Educational Complex, as well as the Elena Christian Junior
High School. Starting with the basic three "R(s)" of "Reading, wRiting
and aRithmatic," the program stresses the importance of education
from the beginning elementary grades through high school.
It is the intent to instill that youth can gain the opportunities to
success in whatever business field they may elect. Similar outreach
initiatives have been targeted for the FBLA's schedule of activities
based on St. Thomas.


RESEARCH & PLBLICSER VICE NEWSLETTER


CDC,


CES


PLAN


NEW FIELD GUIDE
The Eastern Caribbean Center, Conservation Data Center has
received a $20,000 grant from the V.I. Department of Agriculture to
produce a Field Guide under the Urban and Community Forestry
Assistance Program. A cooperative agreement between Coopera-
tive Extension Service and ECC will provide an additional $8,000 for
publication costs.
Recently, with the help of UVI Cooperative Extension Service
and many other partner agencies, the CDC prepared the first
detailed and accurate maps of the marine and terrestrial resources
of the Territory through a Rapid Ecological Assessment (REA). The
V.I. Data Atlas Series, a comprehensive GIS mapping of physical and
biological data about the Territory, spotlights the distribution of
these marine and terrestrial habitat types.
Ridge to Reef: A Field Guide to the Plant and Marine Communities of
the Virgin Islands is based on the REA maps and classification systems
developed in the Territory. The guide links both marine and
terrestrial systems, and encourages the understanding that for
small, mountainous, tropical islands, natural resource protection
must consider land use and marine impacts together.
The book is scheduled for completion and publication by the
end of 2003. Ms. Toni Thomas of UVI-CES and Dr. Barry Devine of
CDC are co-authoring the publication. For further information
contact Ms. Thomas at (340) 693-1084 and Dr. Devine at (340) 693-
1038.


AES FISH SYSTEMS

SEMINAR HELD
In the U.S. Virgin Islands farming of fruits and vegetables is
widely practiced. However, fruits and vegetables are not the only
goods that these islands may produce. The cultivation of Tilapia fish
is a continuing area of research that the University of the Virgin
Islands has been recognized for internationally. Keeping in line with
the mission of the University, to provide community service, the
Water Resources Research Institute and the Agricultural Experiment
Station presented a seminar summarizing developments made at
UVI in this area of fish farming.
The seminar which was entitled "Commercial Fish Farming
Systems: Recent Research Development at UVI," was presented by
Dr. James Rakocy. Dr. Rakocy is the Director of the Agricultural
Experiment Station and Research Professor of Aquaculture. The
seminar was held in St. Croix on Tuesday, April 15. from 10:30 a.m.
to 12:00 p.m. with a tur-out of about 20 persons and again in St.
Thomas on Wednesday, April 16, from 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. with
a count of 23 persons.
Dr. Rakocy's presentation described three types of production
systems that were developed at the University of the Virgin Islands.
These systems include cage culture, greenwater tank culture and
aquaponics, which all conserve and reuse water. The seminar
included topics such as construction materials and techniques,
production management and marketing and economics. Dr.
Rakocy and his staff are available to make similar presentations to
organized groups and may be contacted at (340) 692-4020 or by
email at jrakocy@uvi.edu.
More information on the UVI aquaculture program may also be
obtained by visiting their website at http://rps.edu/AES/Aquacultue/
aqua.html.









JUNE2003 9



FISHERIES CONSERVATION



WORKSHOP H ELDATVI ERS


i,. "~ yawbr~
Ir


Participants in thefirstfisheries conservation workshopfor the eastern Caribbean share information


During December 9-13, 2002, The
Nature Conservancy, The Ocean Conser-
vancy and UVI's Center for Marine and
Environmental Studies collaborated in
an effort to conserve and protect the
Caribbean marine environment and its
species by hosting the first fisheries
conservation workshop for the Eastern
Caribbean.
The workshop was held at UVI's
Virgin Islands Environmental Resource
Station (VIERS) in St. John, USVI, which
provided an ideal setting to focus the
participants' attention on discussions
related to sustainable marine resource
management. The objective of the
workshop was to bring together scien-
tists, conservationists, government agen-
cies and fishermen to share expertise,
concerns and possible solutions to
protect and conserve Caribbean marine
life.
The idea originated from a similar
workshop held in Belize where The
Nature Conservancy partnered with
local fishermen and divers to identify,
monitor and protect several fish spawn-
ing areas off the coast of Belize. The
workshop at VIERS was focused on two


areas of research: the identification and
conservation of fish spawning aggrega-
tion sites and the use of marine
protected areas.
During the 5-day workshop over 50
participants from Belize, Grenada, St.
Lucia, Virgin Gorda, St. John, St. Croix
and St. Thomas discussed their con-
cerns, exchanged ideas and participated
in training sessions to help collect data
for scientific studies on fish spawning
aggregations. Participants learned how
to identify commercially important
species using scientific names, use GPS
and nautical charts to locate and map
spawning aggregations sites and use
fish tagging techniques. These topics
were of great interest to all participants
as the rapid decline of fish population
and the increased loss of coral reef have
sparked concern in fishermen, scientists
and conservationists alike.
Throughout the Caribbean, includ-
ing the Virgin Islands, many spawning
aggregations have been eliminated by
over-fishing. This not only causes a
decline in reef fish populations through-
out the region but also impacts local
fishermen on an economical level.


Fishermen at the workshop were very
concerned about protecting the present
fish population as well as the longevity
of the species, especially groupers and
snappers.
"I never looked at fishing from a
conservation standpoint before but after
seeing these patterns it really concerns
me. I think policies need to be made,
implemented and enforced so that these
species can survive to feed our
children's children," stated Esau Ross of
Virgin Gorda. Having the same concern,
many fishermen in Central and South
America are now working in the
conservation industry, doing research
instead of fishing commercially.
After establishing the need for
protected areas, towards the end of the
workshop, participants were asked to
develop a hypothetical zoning plan for
the island of St. Croix as well as fishing
regulations. This activity brought to-
gether fishermen and managers in small
groups from around the Caribbean to
solve current problems and anticipate
future issues. The groups presented their
work to other participants, showcasing
what they had learned from each other
during the week. The enthusiasm and
creativity demonstrated by participants
will carry these efforts into the next
stage, which includes spawning aggre-
gation research and the development of
appropriate marine protected areas.
For more information on this or
future workshops please contact The
Nature Conservancy (340-773-5575),
The Ocean Conservancy (340-776-
4701), or UVI's Center for Marine and
Environmental Studies (340-693-1380).


HTTP://RPS. VI. EPV/








10 RESEARCH & PL/BLIC S5ER VICE NEWSLETTER



A BOUNTIFUL HARVEST:


UVI-AES SUCCESSFULLY HARVESTS F RST


CROP OF TILAPIA FROM COMMERCIAL-


Commercial greenwater aquaculture tank Agricultural Experiment Station
The Aquaculture Program at the Agricultural Experiment
Station successfully harvested its first crop of tilapia from a
newly constructed commercial-scale greenwater tank. A total
of 6334 lbs. of Nile tilapia, averaging 2 lbs. per fish, was
produced.
Greenwater aquaculture refers to the rich, green color of
the water, which is characteristic of some intensive systems
for raising tilapia and other fish throughout the world.
Significant advances have been discovered at UVI over the
years regarding the roles of algae, bacteria, and suspended
organic matter in terms of water quality and supplemental
feed for the fish.

"WATER QUALITY IN THE COMMERCIAL SYSTEM WAS VERY
GOOD THROUGHOUTTHE GROWTH TRIAL, AND FISH
GROWTH WAS EXCELLENT. THE YIELD FROM THE FIRST
HARVEST REPRESENTS A 29-FOLD INCREASE OVER STANDARD
POND PRODUCTION CAPABILITIES.


The tank's design is the culmination of research in greenwater
aquaculture conducted at UVI over the last 12 years. The
plastic lined, concrete and cinderblock tank measures 52-feet
in diameter and holds over 50,000 gallons of water. The
commercial-scale tank has shown to be very efficient at
removing settlable solids because of a 3% sloped bottom and
central drainage cone. Solids are removed daily from the tank
and this effluent is utilized for irrigating and fertilizing
terrestrial crops.
A major break-through in the operation of the new, large
tank was realized upon the installation of an aerator tilted
horizontally, as opposed to its standard vertical position.
Intense vertical mixing combined with horizontal flow keeps a
portion of organic matter suspended in the water column
thereby enhancing a natural filtration process. Additionally,
the bacteria-rich organic matter is grazed upon by the fish,
which improves feed conversion ratio and reduces feed costs.
Water quality in the commercial system was very good
throughout the growth trial, and fish growth was excellent.
The yield from the first harvest represents a 29-fold increase


SCALE


GREENWATER TANK












RESCUING A

'NATIVE VIRGIN

ISLANDER'


More than 3,000 fish weighing 2 lbs each were harvested from the commercial
greenwater tank

over standard pond production capabilities.
The development of recirculating aquaculture systems
capable of sustaining high fish densities is a technology
ideally suited to the Virgin Islands where flat land and fresh
water are limited. Advances in greenwater system design are
important for the Virgin Islands because this technology
provides an alternative to the importation of seafood to the
Territory. Greenwater aquaculture involves a design that is
simple and very efficient regarding space, cost, water use, feed
input, and waste generated. The overall goal is the
development of a system for use by everyday farmers which,
when effectively integrated with field crop production as a
source for irrigating and fertilizing plants, is environmentally
sustainable and economically profitable.
Tilapia are harvested weekly and marketed on-site at the
AES Field Station and to local restaurants. The Aquaculture
Program offers an intensive, annual short course, Tilapia
Aquaculture and Aquaponics, which will be conducted June
22-28, 2003. More information about the short course by
visiting the web site at: http://rps.uvi.edu/AES/Aquaculture/
UVIShortCourse.html.
This research was supported by a grant from the USDA
Southern Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and
Education fund.


The Sandy Point Orchid (Psychilis macconnelliae) is one of three
rare native Virgin Island orchids that can still be found on St.
Croix. However, the population has seriously declined due to
land development private collectors and natural disasters such
as hurricanes and brush fires. The orchid is listed as an
endangered plant on the VI-DPNRlist for the U.S. Virgin Islands.
Jacqueline Kowalski, research analyst, Biotechnology a
Agroforestry Program, has been working on developing tissue
culture techniques to save this plant. Her work involves
growing the dust-sized, less than 1/32 inch, seeds in tissue
culture. Because the seed is so small mature seed capsules are
used before it opens to disperse the tiny seeds. The seeds in the
capsule are clean and opening the seed pod in tissue culture
allows for easy handling and spreading of these minute seeds
on the media.
Kowalski recently attended a session on "Plant Biotechnol-
ogy 2002 and Beyond" held under the auspicies of the
International Association for Plant Tissue Culture a Biotechnol-
ogy that was hosted by the 10th Congress. Her participation
was made possible through a fellowship that she sought At this
event Kowalski presented her results for successfully
germinating the seeds on a tissue medium containing mineral
nutrients (fertilizer), vitamins, soy protein and charcoal.
Kowalski's system has potential to be used by local
nurseries and orchid enthusiasts with hopes of increasing the
population of this beautiful native plant.


AINE2005 11










12 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
UPCOMING EVENTS
)UNE SEPTEMBER 2003


JUNE
4 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT/SBDC'
5 SECURITY FOR SMALL BUSINESS IS MORE THAN A LOCK AND KEY/SBDC
22-28 AQUAPONICS AND TILAPIA AQUACULTURE SHORTCOURSE/AES
JULY
9 MICROSOFTACCESS/SBDC
17 PERSONNEL HANDBOOK FOR SMALL BUSINESSES/SBDC
22 -24 EDC BENEFITS FOR SMALL BUSINESSES/SBDC
AUGUST
5 MATRKETINGSTRATEGIES/SBDC
6 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT/SBDC
7 USING MICROSOFT PUBLISHER TO MARKET YOUR BUSINESS/SBDC
20 PERSONAL CREDIT/SBDC
TBA LANDLORDS AND TENANTS/SBDC
SEPTEMBER
11 LIFE AND HEALTH INSURANCE: THE BENEFITS OF HAVING INSURANCE/SBDC
13 CUSTOMERSERVICE EXCELLENCE/SBDC
18 GRANTWRITING/SBDC
25 HOW WILLS AND TRUST CAN HELP YOUR BUSINESS AND OTHER LEGAL HINTS/SBDC


for more information on these events, contact the sponsoring department.










UVI RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
#2 )OHN BREWERS BAY
ST. THOMAS, VI 00802




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs