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 AES scientists assist award-winning...
 2002 world food day
 In print: New handbook, book...
 ECC launches new technology
 VI-EPSCOR update
 AES aquaculture program constructs...
 SBDC briefs
 UVI sponsors senepol research...
 AES researcher conducts workshops...
 New hydroseeders trained
 Upcoming events






Group Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 6. No. 1.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300566/00002
 Material Information
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 6. No. 1.
Series Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of the Virgin Islands.
Affiliation: University of the Virgin Islands
Publisher: University of the Virgin Islands.
Publication Date: 12/26/2003
 Subjects
Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean
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Bibliographic ID: CA01300566
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    AES scientists assist award-winning UVI students with research projects
        Page 1
    2002 world food day
        Page 2
    In print: New handbook, book chapters
        Page 3
    ECC launches new technology
        Page 4
    VI-EPSCOR update
        Page 5
    AES aquaculture program constructs system in New Jersey
        Page 6
        Page 7
    SBDC briefs
        Page 8
    UVI sponsors senepol research conference
        Page 9
    AES researcher conducts workshops in Nigeria and Bangladesh
        Page 10
    New hydroseeders trained
        Page 11
    Upcoming events
        Page 12
Full Text






RESEARCH AND


PUBLIC SERVICE


NEWSLETTER


UNIVERSITY OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


Volume 6, No. 1


News from the UVI Research and Public Service Component


February 2003


AES SCIENTISTSASSISTAWARD-WI N NING


UVI STUDENTS WITH RESEARCH PROJECTS


Dr. Bob Godfrey, Animal Science Program
Leader at the Agricultural Experiment Station, served
as a mentor for an undergraduate student from the
Division of Science and Math. A Minority Biomedical
Research Support Research Initiative for Scientific
Enhancement (MBRS-RISE) grant from the National
Institutes of Health (NIH) that was coordinated by Dr.
Teresa Turner of Marine Sciences funded the
program. Dr. Godfrey is a collaborator on the four-
year grant and agreed to mentor students in his
laboratory.
The student, Okesiha Isles, had just completed
her freshman yearwhen she joined Dr. Godfrey's lab
in the summer of 2002. Ms. Isles' project involved
measuring physiological temperatures in hair sheep
rams and relating them to the environmental
temperatures. The project was conducted to develop
a procedure for use in cattle in the tropics as part of
a southern regional research project on heats stress
in dairy cattle.
A four-channel temperature data logger was
used to collect physiological temperatures (subcuta-
neous, rectal and scrotal) of the rams using
appropriately placed probes. The data logger was
held in pace by attaching it to a breeding harness


A St. Croix White and a Barbados Blackbellyram are shown in the
pasture with the physiological temperature data loggers used in the
study by Okesiha Isles, who worked with Dr. Bob Godfrey


Nina St Brice, who worked with Dr. Tom Zimmerman, is shown
in the Biotechnology and Agroforestry Program greenhouse
with papaya seedlings used in her project

with duct tape. A second data logger in the pasture
collected ambient temperature and relative humidity
throughout the 48-hour data collection period. Ms.
Isles was responsible for collecting and collating the
data on the days of the experiment. Dr. Godfrey
assisted her in conducting the statistical analyses and
then Ms. Isles created graphs and tables that were
used in poster and oral presentations.
Dr. Thomas Zimmerman in the Biotechnology 8
Agroforestry program mentored Latashia Joseph
and Nina St. Brice in his lab. Each of Dr. Zimmerman's
students also presented their research results at the
Emerging Caribbean Scientist Research Symposium
on St Thomas. The first price in the competition was
awarded to Nina St. Brice for her title "Selection of
transgenic papaya seedlings utilizing kanamycin
and DMSO." Latashia L. Joseph tied forthird place for
"Micropropagation of cassava plants."
Ms. Isles was also awarded third place for her
poster, "Evaluating relationship between environ-
mental temperature and physiological temperatures


Continued on p. 11


INSIDE
2002 World Food
Day


3 In Print: New
Handbook, Book
Chapters
4 ECC Launches New
Technology
5 VI-EPSCoR Update
6-7 AES Aquaculture
Program Constructs
System in New
Jersey
8 SBDC Briefs

9 UVI Sponsors
Senepol Research
Conference

10 AES Researcher
Conducts Workshops
in Nigeria and
Bangladesh
11 New Hydroseeders
Trained

12 Upcoming events









2 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
(R&PS) NEWSLETTER
IS AN INFORMATIONAL
NEWSLETTER ON THE UNITS
THAT MAKE UP THE
R&PS COMPONENT.
HTTP://RPS.UVI.EDU/
VICE PROVOST
HENRY H. SMITH, PH.D.

EDITORIAL BOARD
VELMA ABRAMSEN,
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO
THE PRESIDENT
LORNA CHESTERFIELD,
ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PROVOST
CLARICE C. CLARKE,
PUBLIC INFORMATION SPECIALIST
HELEN DOOKHAN,
ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST
RAQUEL SANTIAGO SILVER,
ADMINISTRATOR
JACQUELINE SOMERSALL-
BERRY,
FORMER ASSISTANT TO THE
ECC DIRECTOR
PATRICE JOHNSON,
DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS


LAYOUT& DESIGN
ROBIN STERNS

DISTRIBUTION
KIMA GATON

MAIL LETTERS OR COMMENTS TO:
LORNA CHESTERFIELD
L/VI RESEARCH & PBaC SERVICE
#2 JOHN BREWERS BAY
ST. THOMAS, VI 00802
TELEPHONE: (340) 693-1061
FAX: (340) 693-1065
LCHESTE&UVI.EDU

THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY,
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION,
TITLE IX, SECTION 504,
PL 101-542 EDUCATOR
AND EMPLOYER.


WORLD FOO
On October 16, 2002, residents of the United
States Virgin Islands joined people from all over the
world commemorating World Food Day. On St. Croix,
educational activities were held on October 20 on the
grounds of the University of the Virgin Islands.
Focusing on the theme "Water: Source of Food
Security," Dr. Henry Smith, UVI's Vice Provost for
Research and Public Service and director of the Water
Resources Research Institute, gave the keynote
address. Dr. Smith stated that the demand for fresh
and healthy drinking water will increase by 50
percent in 20 years. "Water directly affects food
production and is more precious than oil, for it has no
substitute," Smith said.
In her workshop presentation to World Food
Day attendees, Julie Wright, Extension Program
Supervisor, pointed out safe and healthy drinking
water practices. Information on how to maintain
cistern water quality, how to get water tested and
methods of water treatment were stressed. Other
workshops included the use of drip irrigation,
aquaculture options for the Virgin Islands, and hot
pepper, citrus and poultry production.
As usual, the food demonstration activities for














World Food Day participant accepting a tray of seedlingsfrom
Randy Macedon, Extension Agent


The Research Publications Unit recently
participated in the first Caribbean Book Fair and
Conference held in Port of Spain, Trinidad, from
November 2 to 5, 2002. The book fair was
sponsored by the Caribbean Publishers Network
(CAPNET), a non-profit network of pan-Caribbean
publishers which was created to support and build a
vigorous indigenous publishing industry in the
Caribbean.
The book fair and conference attracted
participants from 25 countries which included the
Caribbean islands, Belize, Cuba, Puerto Rico, the
Virgin Islands and mainland U.S.A.
Copies of both The Caribbean Writer (past and
current issues) and Contemporary Drama of the
Caribbean were displayed and completely sold out by
the end of the fair. However, the greater goal of


P DAY 2002


Non-T


Charles Smith, Extension Assistant, explaining the concept of
growing vegetable crops in small area using box gardens

adults and youth were a big hit. However, one of the
biggest events was the "plant-a-seed" activity by the
4-H Youth Club. This activity gave the youngsters an
opportunity to leam the recipe for a good soil mix
and proper seedling transplant techniques. Under
several red, white and blue tents were food vendors.
They sold food, drinks, tarts, jams, and many other
goodies. Farmers were also a part of this year's
activities and they had a variety of fresh produce for
sale.
The highlight of World Food Day, however, was
the vegetable seedling distribution. And, as usual, the
public was not disappointed. More than 8,000
tomatoes, cucumber and hot pepper seedlings were
distributed to attendees. The significance of World
Food Day was said best by attendee Sam Carr. He
said, This is wonderful, I look forward every year to
getting my seedlings from Extension Service. It
definitely helps when I can grow and eat fresh
vegetables."
World Food Day was sponsored by UVI's
Cooperative Extension Service in partnership with
the UVI Agricultural Experiment Station.


participating in the Book Fair and conference was to
publicize the publications and gain exposure within
the publishing industry in the Caribbean.
TheCaribbean Writeralso attained a distributor in
Trinidad and preliminary discussions were held with
a Canadian distributor for possible distribution in that
country. Meetings were also held with Caribbean
newspapers that were more than happy to provide
featured publicity for The Caribbean Writer and
Contemporary Drama of the Caribbean, since these
publications have a regional focus. Several
Caribbean printing companies also voiced their
interest in conducting business with future
publications of the Research Publication Unit.
For additional information on these publications
call (340) 692-4152 or visit our website at
www.TheCaribbeanWriter.com


THE CARIBBEAN WRITER EXPANDS

ITS REACH IN THE REGION









FEBRU ARY2003 3



IN PRINT...
RECIRGU3I


UVI-CES COMPLETES REVISED |__

ENVIRONMENTAL

PROTECTION HANDBOOK 0


Sediment eroded and trans-
ported from construction sites,
unpaved roads, driveways, parking
areas and other bare soils is the
primary nonpoint source pollutant
harming Virgin Islands' coastal
waters and degrading our coral
reefs. Most construction and earth
change projects in the VI do not use
effective erosion and sediment
control practices. In many cases,
those erosion and sediment control
practices that are used fail due to
improper design, installation and
lack of maintenance.
Recognizing that public education
and outreach are essential to reducing
nonpoint source pollution caused by
land-clearing activities, The Depart-
ment of Planning and Natural Re-
sources (DPNR) contracted the UVI
Cooperative Extension Service (CES) to
revise and reprint the Virgin Islands
Environmental Protection Handbook, a
manual describing proper practice
design, installation and maintenance.
The handbook presents up-
to-date information on design prac-
tices for low-impact developments,
specifications for erosion, sediment
and stormwater best management
practices (BMPs), and describes
predictive models that can be used
to estimate erosion and runoff.
The handbook is specifically
designed for the construction indus-
try (architects, contractors, drafts-
men, developers, and engineers),
but is also useful for individual
property owners. DPNR's goal is to
raise the standards of the Virgin
Islands' construction industry to
comply with national pollution
prevention standards.
The Virgin Islands Environmen-
tal Protection Handbook was un-
veiled at the 7th Annual V.I. NPS
Conference, where principal author
Julie Wright presented information
on a number of the practices
detailed in the handbook.
Members of the BVI nonprofit
group Island Erosion were so
impressed with the material pre-


sented that they requested an
encore presentation at their Island
Erosion workshop held June 21,
2002, at Lavitty Stout Community
College on Tortola.
To date, over 100 copies of the
handbook have been distributed to
NPS Committee members and other
handbook reviewers, DPNR 8 UVI staff,
local architects, engineers, surveyors,
contractors, real estate agents, and
NGO representatives, including clients
from the BVI and Dominica.
CES has been promoting the
handbook via local newspapers
and radio talk shows and through
announcements in NPS Update, the
newsletter of the V.I. Nonpoint
Source Committee and on the UVI
home page.
Hard copies of the Virgin
Islands Environmental Protection
Handbook are available for $15.00
per copy. To order a copy, contact
either Ms. Julie Wright, UVI-CES, at
(340) 693-1082, or Ms. Faye
Williams, V.I. RC&D, at (340)692-
9632 x. 101. The handbook is also
available in Adobe Acrobat format
through UVI's website at http://
rp s uv i e d u / C ES /
VIEnvironmental.Protection.Handbookpdf.


VIRGIN ISLANDS
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
HANDBOOK
2002
RBy-i


AES RESEARCHER

PUBLISHES BOOK
CHAPTERS
Dr. James Rakocy, AES Director and Research
Professor of Aquaculture, wrote chapters for two
new books, which were published in 2002. The
authors of these books wanted to include chapters
on the unique aquaculture systems that have
been developed at the University of the Virgin
Islands and invited Dr. Rakocy to contribute.
One book, titled Recirculating Aquaculture
Systems, 2nd Edition (769 pages and a CD), was
published by the Northeastern Regional Aquacul-
ture Center. The authors, all of whom are
aquacultural engineers, are Dr. Michael Timmons
from Comell University, Dr. Fred Wheaton from
University of Maryland, and Drs. James Ebeling,
Steve Summerfelt and Brian Vinci from the
Freshwater Institute in West Virginia. The book
provides a comprehensive description of the
principles involved in the construction and
operation of recirculating fish culture systems. Dr.
Rakocy contributed Chapter 18, "Aquaponics:
Vegetable Hydroponics in Recirculating Systems'
(pp. 631-672).
The other book, titled Ecological Aquaculture:
The Evolution of the Blue Revolution (394 pages),
was published by Blackwell Science, based in
London, and is distributed in the United States by
Iowa State Press. The editor is Dr. Barry Costa-
Pierce, Director of the Rhode Island Sea Grant
College Program and Professor of Fisheries and
Aquaculture at the University of Rhode Island. The
book provides information spanning a spectrum
of activities from artisanal to high technology
approaches to producing aquatic organisms in a
balanced and environmentally friendly way. Dr.
Rakocy contributed Chapter 9, "An Integrated Fish
and Field Crop System for Arid Areas' (pp. 263-
285).
These chapters provided an excellent
opportunity to summarize many years of research
on the aquaponic and greenwater tank culture
technology developed at the University of the
Virgin Islands. The information in these chapters
will form the basis for future research at UVI and at
other organizations conducting aquaculture
research. The chapters also signify that UVI's
Aquaculture Program has gained widespread
recognition for its valuable contributions to the
field of aquaculture.









4 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE NEWSLETTER


COASTAL WATER ECC LAUNCH ES \

QUALITYEW TECHL

STANDARDS NEW


REVISED


The Virgin Islands' Code requires
the Department of Planning and Natu-
ral Resources(DPNR) to review the
water quality standards once every
three years, and to amend, repeal, or
adopt new standards as appropriate.
DPNR's Division of Environmental
Protection (DPNR-DEP) has entered
into an agreement with the University
of the Virgin Islands (UVI) for the
purpose of reviewing and revising as
necessary the coastal water quality
standards.
The project commenced April 1,
2002. The general approach taken in
revising the water quality standards is
to analyze existing water quality data
collected and stored by DPNR. That
data was supplemented by research
conducted locally, as well as from
other U.S. states and territories.
UVI assembled a Technical Advi-
sory Group, consisting of professionals
from government agencies, private
sector firms, and non-governmental
organizations, which provided general
advice to UVI on the standards.
The proposed standards were sub-
mitted to DPNR for its review. Once the
proposed standards are accepted by
DPNR, they will be submitted to the
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
for review. Upon approval by the EPA,
the proposed standards will be submit-
ted to the VI Legislature for passage
into law.
Keep on the alert for announce-
ments from the DPNR regarding public
hearings on the proposed standards.
For more information on the
project, contact Mr. Hector Squiabro,
Division of Environmental Protection,
Department of Planning and Natural
Resources. Telephone: (340) 774-3320.


HTTP://ARPSAJVI. EP


Whenever the layman in the Virgin
Islands hears about a UVI survey, he
generally thinks of an interviewer going
from house to house with a question-
naire in hand. This is probably because
he associates a survey with the last three
decennial censuses that the Eastern
Caribbean Center (ECC) has conducted.
In addition to house-to-house sur-
veys, ECC also conducts telephone
surveys. These telephone surveys mostly
employ random digit dialing (RDD)
procedures. This method ensures that
each household in the survey is
randomly selected. A modern approach
to this method is CATI, or computer
assisted telephone interviewing.
In the CATI procedure, an inter-
viewer uses the telephone to contact a
household, and once a respondent
agrees to the interview, the CATI
software enables the interviewer to read
off the questions from a computer, often
a laptop, and enter the responses
directly into the computer.
Telephone interviewing is often a
preferred mode of data collection
because it is cheaper than the house-to-
house method, it is carried out faster,
and there is greater data quality control.
For these reasons, ECC has sought for
quite some time to maximize the
benefits from this survey sampling
procedure. That goal of establishing a
centralized telephone center was re-
cently realized when ECC initiated the
conduct of its first large-scale CATI
survey from its new location.
The telephone survey was made
possible by a grant to ECC from the
Office of the Governor that is managed
by the Bureau of Economic Research.
The sponsor of the grant is the US
Department of Health and Human
Services, the Health Resources and
Services Administration (HRSA). The
funds provided by HRSA to the VI
government are to identify the charac-
teristics of residents without health
insurance coverage, and to develop
approaches for providing access to
affordable coverage for VI citizens.
Prior to the receipt of this grant, ECC
set out to develop a telephone survey
facility that would house 12 carrels. Each
of these carrels is equipped with a laptop
computer with a mouse, a telephone
headset consisting of a mouth and ear
piece, a telephone keypad the size of a
hand, and a desk lamp. From these


Field supervisor Myrtle Peters monitors interviews
with digital telephone set
carrels, 12 interviewers can conduct 12
interviews simultaneously anywhere in
the Virgin Islands.
A new piece of equipment that
supports the calling center is a
supervisor's console. This consists of a
sophisticated digital telephone that
allows the supervisor to sit at her desk in
another room nearby and to monitor
any of the conversations taking place
between the interviewer and the
respondent. Neither the respondent nor
the interviewer knows when the conver-
sation is being monitored. The only
reason for this unobtrusive intervention
is to ensure quality control of the
process.
The survey is carried out in
collaboration with the State Health
Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC)
at the University of the Minnesota's
School of Public Health. SHADAC
produced the software used in the CATI
instrument.
The topics included in the survey
are health insurance status and type of
coverage, health status, access to care
and use of services. Those lacking in
insurance were asked about their access
to coverage through their employer or a
family member, knowledge of public
programs, and the main reason they do
not have coverage. Information on the
demographic characteristics of the
respondents is also collected.
The telephone interviewing was
conducted under the supervision of part-
time employee Myrtle Peters. Staff of
ECC's Research Institute, Annette Gumbs
and James Richardson, provided full
technical support in all aspects of this
project. Dr. Frank Mills was the Principal
Investigator of the survey.









FEBRUARY 2003 5



VI-EPSCOR UPDATE


The Virgin Islands is now recog-
nized as "an EPSCoR state or territory"
by the National Science Foundation
(NSF). EPSCoR (Experimental Program
for the Stimulation of Competitive
Research) was started by the NSF over
two decades ago to allow states to
upgrade their research infrastructure
as a means of improving their competi-
tiveness for research grants from the
NSF and other government agencies.
It seeks to nurture high-quality
research that serves the needs of each
EPSCoR community in building its
economy. The program is applicable to
university research but also to activi-
ties in the private and public sectors of
the community. States that attract
substantial portions of the NSF budget
are not eligible.
In the Virgin Islands, EPSCoR is
administered by the University with
the encouragement of the Virgin Is-
lands Government. With the approval
of the planning grant, NSF was, in
effect, welcomed into the national
EPSCoR family. Neighboring Puerto
Rico has been in EPSCoR since the
1980s. The National Science Founda-
tion requires broad community partici-
pation in the EPSCoR process. In some
states, the lead university works closely
with the state's office of science and
technology (or the equivalent). Some
state governments have an EPSCoR
liaison office.


" BY TH E END OF TH E SPRI NG 2003 SEMESTER, VI-EPSCOR MUST PREPARE A TEN-YEAR
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FORTHE PROMOTION OF RESEARCH IN THE VIRGIN ISLANDS.
SPECIFIC RESEARCH FOCUS AREAS WILL BE IDENTIFIED AND PROPOSALS WILL BE
GENERATED TO ACQUIRE THE NEEDED SUPPORTIVE INFRASTRUCTURE."


To help establish EPSCoR in the
Virgin Islands, the NSF awarded a
planning grant to the University. Dr.
Henry H. Smith, who is UVI Vice
Provost, is the VI-EPSCoR Program
Director and Professor Roy Watlington
is VI-EPSCoR coordinator. By the end of
the spring 2003 semester, VI-EPSCoR
must prepare a ten-year implementa-
tion plan for the promotion of research
in the Virgin Islands. Specific research
focus areas will be identified and
proposals will be generated to acquire
the needed supportive infrastructure.
As required by the NSF, cross-disciplin-
ary and inter-organizational collabora-
tion will be encouraged.
Consistent with both NSF guidelines
and the dictates of the University's
Strategic Plan, VI-EPSCoRis reaching out
to interested organizations and welcom-
ing all inquiries or expressions of inter-
est. VI-EPSCoR further wishes to identify
organizations and/or entrepreneurs that
may be able to define new research focus
areas for the Territory.
VI-EPSCoR will continue to wel-
come community guidance and assis-
tance in the identification of the


Territory's strengths, resources, weak-
nesses, interests and unmet research
needs. Towards this end, a group of
community advisors is being invited to
provide the counsel of their knowledge
and experience to the VI-EPSCoR Plan-
ning Committee.
These community advisors will
meet in the near future to advise about
a process for identifying the strengths,
interests and weaknesses of the Virgin
Islands with respect to fostering re-
search and technological and develop-
mental activities. They will also be
asked to give their perspectives on
opportunities for growth and on chal-
lenges to the success of the effort.
Interested parties should contact VI-
EPSCoR for more information.
The VI-EPSCoR office is in Room
226 of the UVI Sports and Fitness
Center. The telephone number is (340)
693-1478. Roy Watlington's e-mail
address is rwatlin@uvi.edu.
To learn more about EPSCoR, log
into the National Science Foundation's
EPSCoR web page at http://
www.ehr.nsf.gov/epscor/. UVI expects
to mount its own EPSCoR web page soon.


YOUTH GET POINTERS ON


CONFLICT RESOLUTION


Finding solutions to minimizing or
resolving conflicts among V.I. youth
was the focus of a two-day workshop
held at the University of the Virgin
Islands, St. Croix campus. The work-
shop on conflict resolution was
conducted by the Cooperative Exten-
sion Service's Children, Youth and
Family At-Risk Program (CYFAR) on
November 14 -15, 2002.
The objectives of the workshop
were: to develop an understanding
that because people are different we
will have conflicts; to show that
conflict is not always a bad thing but
can be turned into one if not handled
correctly; to develop problem-solving
skills that can aid in resolving
conflicts; and to teach how to adopt
behaviors that will minimize conflict.
The workshop included a


PowerPoint presentation, role playing,
and fun ice-breakers. The theme of the
workshop was "Suppressing the Hulk
in Me Will lead to a Better Commu-
nity!" Because of the recent rise in
crime, CES wanted to show the youth
that there is a better way to solve their
problems. SAY NO TO violence AND
YES TO peaceful resolution!
Topics included looking at what can
happen when conflict is handled
correctly; proper handling of conflict,
which can lead to unity of purpose and
collaboration and better decision mak-
ing and bring about positive changes;
and three steps to cooperative conflict
resolution: analyzing exactly what is the
conflict or misunderstanding, analyzing
your issues and interests and their issues
and interests, and finding solutions for
both parties.


HTTP://RPS.UVI.E[V/








6 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


UVI-AES AQUACULTURE


PROGRAM CONSTRUCTS


AQUAPONIC SYSTEM AT


NEW) JERSEY ECOCOMPLEX


/THETECHNOLOGIES
DEMONSTRATED ATTH E
NEWJERSEY
ECOCOMPLEX COULD
COME TO ST. CROIX ONE
DAY AS WELL. WITH THE
ANGUILLA LANDFILL
SOON TO CLOSE, IT TOO
COULD BE CAPPED AND
METHANE GAS BURNED
IN GENERATORS TO
PRODUCE ELECTRICITY
FORTHE ISLAND. TH E
WATER OF THE
CARIBBEAN COULD BE
DESALINATED WITH
POWER GENERATED BY
THEMICROTURBINES
AND DISTRIBUTEDTO
INDUSTRYAND
FARMERS. ,


The UVI Aquaculture Program designed and
built an aquaponic system in Columbus, New
Jersey over the past year and the system is now
operating at full capacity. The project was
funded by a contract with Rutgers University
through a grant from the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA). The "Waste to Food"
project is located at the New Jersey EcoComplex,
Burlington County Research and Development
Greenhouse.
Dr. James Rakocy and Mr. Donald Bailey
from UVI-AES constructed the aquaponic system
in the winter and spring of 2002 with the
assistance of employees from the greenhouse.
The system is similar to the aquaponic system on
the St. Croix campus. The only major
modification made for this system is 2 ft. wide
hydroponic tanks to facilitate the harvest of
tomatoes.
The system is installed inside a greenhouse
where temperatures can be controlled to that
which is suitable for year-round agriculture. The
system can produce over 10,000 Ibs. of tilapia
annually. Vegetable crop production is also
continuous through the year. The greenhouse
staff has planted half of the system with


tomatoes and the other half with other
vegetables including lettuce, basil, cucumbers,
eggplant and okra.
UVI continues its involvement with the
project. Every six weeks, 700 sex-reversed male
tilapia fry are shipped to the greenhouse. These
fry are grown in a separate recirculating system
to a size suitable for stocking before they are
stocked into the aquaponic system. The
greenhouse manager, Dr. Joseph Willis, came to
St. Croix in June to attend the Aquaculture
Program's 4th annual "Aquaponics and Tilapia
Aquaculture Short Course."
In addition, Mr. Bailey most recently traveled to
the greenhouse to participate in the grand opening
press event that introduced the project to the public.
The New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture, the EPA
Region 2 Administrator and a number of other local
dignitaries attended this event.
The UVI Aquaponic System installation and
operation is part of a larger resource
management project. The goal of the "Waste to
Food" project is to demonstrate technologies
that limit the consumption of new resources and
reuse waste generated by other activities. The
EcoComplex and Greenhouse are located at the


UVI aquaponic system at the EcoComplex in New Jersey









FEBRU ARY2003 7


UVI'S STATUS AS A
LEADER IN AQUAPONIC
SYSTEM DESIGN HAS
BEEN SPOTLIGHTED BY
INVOLVEMENT IN TH IS
PROJECT. BUILDING AND
OPERATING A VI
AQUAPONIC SYSTEM IN
A TEMPERATE ZONE
GREENHOUSE WILL
DEMONSTRATE THE
SUITABILITYOFTHE
TECHNOLOGY IN
REGIONS OTH ER THAN
THE TROPICS."


sZa ^r-. ."^:
|ifa.- J .


."I -- I


Hydroponicplantsbeingnourished byaquaculture effluent, showing (fromlefttoright) tomatoes, lettuce, ccuumbers, basilandlettuce


site of the Burlington County landfill and
recycling center. Some areas of the landfill have
been closed and capped with a geomembrane.
This membrane traps methane gas produced
from the decomposition of organic waste that is
buried in the landfill. Four microturbine
generators burn this gas producing 120 kw of
electricity that is used to run the aquaponic
system pump and air blowers and to light the
greenhouse. The aquaponic system water and
the greenhouse environment are heated by hot
water produced in heat exchangers on the
generators' exhaust manifolds. The aquaponic
system water is desalinated seawater and is
used to demonstrate that no freshwater
resources are required or diminished to operate
the system.
While the nearby landfill produces the
energy to operate the UVI Aquaponic System,
the system itself conserves water resources and
reduces waste discharge that would normally be
associated with separate aquaculture and
hydroponic production systems. Fish wastes
provide most of the nutrients required by plants
and the plants use the nutrients to produce a
valuable by-product.
Unlike separate fish culture units and
hydroponic systems which discharge wastes to the
environment, the aquaponic system recovers fish
culture waste into valuable plant production. The
discharge of nutrient solutions, common in
standalone hydroponic systems, is eliminated.


UVI's status as a leader in aquaponic system
design has been spotlighted by involvement in
this project. Building and operating a UVI
Aquaponic System in a temperate zone
greenhouse will demonstrate the suitability of
the technology in regions other than the tropics.
Access to production information and to the
system itself by U.S. farmers will increase
contacts by UVI with others interested in this
technology. EPA administrators are now better
aware of the research conducted on St. Croix.
One result of this is that the Program
recently received a $5,000 subcontract as part of
a planning grant "EcoComplex of Puerto Rico
and the Greater Caribbean Basin." This contract
is part of a $174,000 EPA grant that will study
the establishment of an environment-controlled
EcoComplex at the San Juan Landfill.
The technologies demonstrated at the
New Jersey EcoComplex could come to St.
Croix one day as well. With the Anguilla
landfill soon to close, it too could be capped
and methane gas burned in generators to
produce electricity for the island. The water of
the Caribbean could be desalinated with
power generated by the microturbines and
distributed to industry and farmers. Finally, an
aquaponic industry that produces fresh fish
and vegetables and reduces land and water
use, when developed, can enhance the local
agriculture industry and support the local HTTP://RPS.UVI.EDl/
economy.









s SBDC BRIEFS


RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE NEWSLETTER


UVI-SBDC AND VITEMA SPONSOR
NATURAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT
FORUM/TRADE FAIR
In August 2002, the Small Business Development Center
joined forces with the V.I. Territorial Emergency Management
Agency (VITEMA) in sponsoring a forum and trade fair on
natural hazards management. The free events were
coordinated to give the residents of this territory an
interactive means of acquiring pertinent information relating
to disaster preparedness planning, the insurance industry,
mitigation, earthquake and hurricane preparedness and
exemplary practices in emergency management.
The forum, moderated by attorney and former Lieutenant
Governor Derek M. Hodge, featured presentations by various
public and private sector entities including the Office of the Lt.
Governor (VI); DPNR; Tropical Shipping; FEMA; VI Insurance
Association; National Guard; the U.S. SBA; in addition to UVI's
Professor Roy Watlington; Dr. Gloria Callwood, RN; and
SBDC's State Director Warren Bush.
The Trade Fair held the following day at Tutu Park Mall
afforded residents an opportunity to see the latest products
and services available for the protection of life and property.
About two dozen agencies, including non-profit entities,
emergency service representatives, retail and other organiza-
tions provided instructional displays and giveaways to all
those who traversed the mall.
UVI-SBDC was pleased to provide its resources in support
of such a very vital community-based initiative and is eagerly
looking forward to assisting VITEMA in its efforts to help
better secure and empower all the residents of the Virgin
Islands.

ASBDC ANNOUNCES SELECTION OF
LINROY E. FREEMAN AS 2002 STATE
STAR AT FALL CONFERENCE
Donald Wilson, president of the Association of Small Business
Development Centers (ASBDC), announced that Linroy E.
Freeman was selected as the 2002 State Star of the University of
the Virgin Islands Small Business Development Center (SBDC)
network.
The recognition ceremony occurred at the recent ASBDC Fall
Conference held at the Opryland Hotel in Nashville, Tennessee.
"I am pleased to make this announcement, and to recognize
Linroy Freeman for extraordinary contributions to the work of
the SBDC network and small business in the U.S. Virgin Islands,"
said Wilson.
Mr. Freeman is Senior Business Counselor at the UVI-SBDC.
He was chosen by the SBDC network for being an exemplary
performer, making a significant contribution to the UVI-SBDC
program, and showing a strong commitment to small business in
the Virgin Islands.
America's Small Business Development Center Network is a
partnership uniting private enterprise, government, higher
education and local nonprofit economic development
organizations. It is the Small Business Administration's largest
partnership program, providing management and technical
assistance to help Americans start, run and grow their own
businesses. With more than 1,000 centers across the nation,
the SBDC network assists about 600,000 small businesses
every year in face-to-face counseling and training, in addition
to assisting hundreds of thousands more small businesses
through fax-on-demand and e-mail.


SBDC HELPS LAUNCH NEW ENTREPRE-
NEURIAL INITIATIVE IN ST. CROIX
The SBDC and collaborative partner New Image Foundation
held an opening ceremony in October 2002 commemorating
the initial St. Croix-based program of WNET (Women Network
for Entrepreneurial Training). WNET, a nationally recognized
federal program co-sponsored by the SBDC, provides
opportunities for professional women (men also invited) to
have monthly roundtable discussions on various small
business-related principles.
SBDC has always supported the initiatives of this program
and was delighted to celebrate the expansion to the island of
St. Croix. The first program concentrated on providing service
excellence and was held at the Small Business Development
Center's Training Facility in Sunshine Mall (Fredriksted).
The WNET program series promises to be another vital
link in the University's Small Business Development Center
strategic approach to improving economic conditions territory
wide, with special emphasis on St. Croix.

SBDC: VITAL ROLE IN NATIONAL DISABILITY
MENTORING DAY CELEBRATION
Warren Bush, State Director and active board member of
the Work-Able non-profit agency, was very instrumental in
assisting Work-Able's Director, Gwendolyn Powell, in
coordinating the successful events of October 16, 2002,
designated as National Disability Mentoring Day and for the
first time simultaneously celebrated in the US Virgin Islands.
In addition to several other participating public and
private sector organizations, SBDC played host to two high
school disabled students as part of the job shadowing activity
organized for the day. Those students spent hours at the SBDC
and were coached by all the members of the staff. They
received instruction on small business management principles
and the daily operations and functions of the center. The
students were also treated to a comprehensive tour of the St.
Thomas campus and thoroughly enjoyed their visit.
The SBDC has continued to ensure that youths are given a
fair and just opportunity to gain full exposure to small
business principles. If interested in participating in next year's
celebration, please contact the SBDC at (340) 776-3206 or
692-5270

YOUTH OUTREACH TRAINING UPDATE
Both offices of the SBDC have been extremely successful
in their attempts to take the entrepreneurial spirit into the
halls of the territory's elementary through senior high
schools. Most recently, the training coordinators and
business counselors at both offices offered a variety of
applicable training exercises to several schools including
Ricardo Richards Elementary School and Elena Christian Jr.
High School, both on St. Croix, and the Gomez and Jane E.
Tuitt Elementary Schools on St. Thomas.
As part of the growing initiative to help educate the
youth at an early age on the principles of entrepreneurship,
the exercises covered various topics. Included among those
are starting a business, banking products, the importance of
reading, writing, and arithmetic, and business planning.
The students demonstrated a sincere interest in the
information, and the SBDC will remain firm in its attempt to
help incorporate these principles into the schools' curricu-
lum on a regular basis.









FEBR UARY2003 9



UVI SPONSORS SENEPOL


RESEARCH CONFERENCE


A Senepol cattle research confer-
ence was held at UVI on November 8-
9, 2002. The title of the conference
was "Senepol Cattle for the New
Millenium." The conference was orga-
nized by Dr. Bob Godfrey of the
Agricultural Experiment Station, Mr.
Kofi Boateng and Ms. Sue Lakos of the
Cooperative Extension Service and Mr.
Hans Lawaetz of Annaly Farms, St
Croix. Support for the conference was
provided in part by the Senepol Cattle
Breeders Association and Mr. Art
Martinez, President, Dr. John Hough
through U.S. Livestock Genetics Ex-
port, Inc. and Mr. Paul Engler of Cactus
Feeders, Amarillo, Texas.
There has been a long-standing
partnership between UVI and Senepol
cattle producers on St. Croix. The
name "Senepol" is derived from
Senegal and Red Poll because the
breed was developed on St Croix by
crossing N'Dama cattle from Senegal
in West Africa with a Red Poll bull from
Trinidad. The resulting offspring were
evaluated and selected for desirable
traits such as lack of horns, heat
tolerance, the ability to survive under
tropical conditions, mild disposition,
good milk production and tender meat
production.
In the 1960's the work of UVI staff
and local cattle producers led to the
initiation of record keeping within the
breed which was followed by the
formation of the breed association in
1977. A Senepol conference was held
on St. Croix in 1987 in order to provide
a forum for researchers to present
their data that was specific to the
Senepol breed.
The more recent conference was
held in honor of the 25th anniversary
of the Senepol Cattle Breeders Asso-
ciation and provided researchers an
opportunity to update the scientific
information on Senepol cattle avail-
able to the producer and the research
community. There were 51 people in
attendance at the conference from
places such as Brazil, Colombia,
Panama, Paraguay, Puerto Rico, the
USA (Alabama, Mississippi, Nebraska,
Texas, Georgia, Florida and Tennes-
see), and Venezuela in addition to the
USVI. There were a total of 13
presentations of research or produc-
tion data from the USA mainland,


Top: The conference participantsposedfor this picture with the hills of Anally Farms in the background
Bottom: Conference participants are shown viewing cows and calves at the cattle pens of Anally Farms


Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Brazil,
Paraguay and Venezuela.
Topics included fertility evalua-
tions of bulls, evaluation of Senepol
cattle under a variety of environments
and management practices, an over-
view of the US feedlot industry and the
use of in vitro fertilization as a method
of propagating cattle. The proceedings
of the conference are being posted on
the Internet (http://rps.uvi.edu/AES/
Senepol/Main_Page.html) and will also
be distributed in electronic format on
CD in English and Spanish.


A tour of Senepol farms on St Croix
was also included as part of the
conference. After a seaside lunch on
the west end of the island, the
conference attendees traveled through
the scenic rain forest to Annaly Farms
to view Senepol cows and calves. From
there they traveled along the south
shore to Castle Nugent Farms to see
some young heifers and bulls as well
as cows in the breeding herd. The end
of the conference was highlighted by a
West Indian style dinner at the
Buccaneer Hotel.


"









10 RESEARCH &- PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER



ANIMAL SCIENTIST CONDUCTS


SHEEP WORKSHOPS IN NIGERIA


AND BANGLADESH


Dr. Bob Godfrey, Animal Science
Program Leader at the Agricultural Experi-
ment Station, conducted workshops on
sheep management in Nigeria during two
weeks in June 2002. This was Dr. Godfrey's
second trip to Nigeria as a volunteer for
Land O'Lakes International Development
Division's Farmer-to-Farmer program funded
by USAID. The main objective of the
assignment was to present workshops on
sheep management to the faculty and
students at the Federal College of Education
(Technical), Bichi in northern Nigeria near
the town of Kano.
Dr. Godfrey traveled to Abuja, the
capital of Nigeria, and met with Mr. Godfrey
Tafida, one of the Land O'Lakes staff
members. From Abuja he traveled to Kano
where he met with Mr. Ilyas Ahmed, a local
official from Kano State Agriculture and
Rural Development Authority (KNARDA),
who was coordinating the workshops with
the Federal College.
Dr. Godfrey spent six days at the
college conducting workshops that were
attended by students and faculty. The
course was based on information in a
booklet on hair sheep production written
by Dr. Godfrey, with modifications to suit
the local conditions and practices. There
was interest in topics such as selective
breeding, animal heath management and
marketing. Dr. Godfrey also provided
several books on livestock production for
use as reference material in the library of
the college.
Dr. Godfrey also traveled to
Bangladesh as a volunteer for Winrock
International's Farmer-to-Farmer program
that is also funded by USAID. He
conducted workshops on sheep manage-
ment in Bangladesh during two weeks in
July 2002. The objective of this assign-
ment was to present workshops on sheep
management to the members of the
Bangladesh Association of Rural and
Social Advancement (BARSA) cooperative
in the village of Satkhira and the
Intermediate Technology Development
Group (ITDG) in Faridpur.
Upon arriving in Dhaka, the capital of
Bangladesh, after three days of traveling,
Dr. Godfrey met with Dr. P.K Barua,
Program Country Advisor for Winrock
International, and planned his schedule.
Mr. A.KM. Anisur Rahman, of BARSA,
coordinated the workshops and visits to


ur (uujrey VISIuy wIuI vinii VUers ner IrIUHUrIur, brUIIylUUesfI. ur. IVIrurlU[rIriUU All oU I1U LU IIU fr.. aUrUU UJ
Winrock International are standing to the left of Dr. Godfrey.


local farms around Satkhira. One of the
main thrusts of BARSA is to encourage
women to participate in small ruminant
farming. In many villages there are women
who are divorced or widowed and due to
the culture and social structure they have
few opportunities for generating income. By
providing assistance to these women
BARSA is helping them to be able to provide
for themselves and their children.
After the workshops were completed
Dr Godfrey visited the Bangladesh Livestock
Research Institute (BLRI) at Savar near
Dhaka and met with Dr. Khan Shahidul
Huque, Principal Scientific Officer 8 Head
and other members of the animal
production staff.
Due to the interest of ITDG to visit
with Dr. Godfrey and obtain assistance
with goat production, some time was
allocated to spend with ITDG. Dr.
Muhammad Ali, Manager, Food Produc-
tion of ITDG took Dr. Godfrey for a visit to
Faridpur to see the goat production
program that ITDG is implementing in that
area. People in the nearby villages are
provided assistance in obtaining and
raising goats through ITDG. The majority
of the beneficiaries of the program are
divorced or widowed women and raising
goats is their main source of income. One
woman was able to buy a new metal roof
for her grass hut with the money she
made raising goats. This improvement


had a major, positive impact on her life
and she was hoping to raise more money
to further improve her home and help pay
for the education of her children. One
woman kept several male goats (bucks) at
her farm and she would lease them to
other farmers for use as breeding animals.
The bucks were obtained with the
assistance of ITDG and their extension
staff.
In Faridpur Dr. Godfrey also visited a
local livestock center that serves as a
training facility and resource for cattle
artificial insemination (Al) and met with
Kbd.lmdadul Haque Talukder, Assistant
Director, Animal Production, Department
of Livestock Services. The livestock center
staff members provide training in Al as
well as semen for breeding of cattle. After
spending several days in Faridpur and
visiting several farmers, Dr. Godfrey
returned to Dhaka to write his final report
for Winrock and then returned to St Croix.
These trips provided Dr. Godfrey with
another excellent opportunity to see how
livestock agriculture is done in other parts
of the world. It also allowed him to further
utilize the knowledge and experience he
has gained in tropical agriculture during
his tenure at UVI. By conducting these
workshops and training programs the
reputation of UVI is being enhanced and
spread throughout the worldwide agricul-
tural community.









FEB RU ARY2003 11


NEW HYDROSEEDERS TRAINED

ON ST. CROIX & ST. THOMAS


As part of its continuing effort to
promote effective erosion control in the
Virgin Islands to reduce nonpoint source
pollution, the UVI Cooperative Extension
Service (CES), in cooperation with the United
States DEpartment of Agriculture (USDA)
Natural Resources Conservation Service,
conducted Hydroseeding Certification Train-
ing Workshops October 22 and 24, 2002,
on St. Croix and St. Thomas, respectively.
UVI-CES and USDA, with funding from
DPNR, are cooperating on a joint project to
promote the use and effectiveness of
hydroseeding as an erosion control practice
in the Territory.
The 38 workshop attendees learned
about the innovative erosion control
practice of hydroseeding, used to rapidly
stabilize disturbed soils with grasses.
Hydroseeding equipment uniformly ap-
plies a combination of grass seed, water,
fertilizer, mulch and tackifier to a bare


area in need of seeding.
A primary advantage of hydroseeding
is lower labor costs one person can
operate a hydroseeder to apply seed, mulch
and fertilizer simultaneously. This method
also applies seed more evenly, results in
faster germination, and produces better
grass stands.
Workshop attendees also learned
about grasses appropriate for use in the
Virgin Islands and participated in a hands-
on demonstration during which bare soil
areas on both the St. Croix and St. Thomas
campuses of UVI were seeded.
The hydroseeders were originally
purchased as part of a joint project with the
Department of Planning and Natural
Resources-Coastal Zone Management
funded by the NOAA Coastal Services Center
to promote the practice in the Territory.
Upon completion of the project, DPNR
turned over the hydroseeders to UVI-CES to


St Croix workshop participants receiving hands-on
experience using the hydroseeder

further promote the practice and make the
equipment available to government agen-
cies as well as the general public upon
successful completion of a Hydroseeding
Training and Certification Workshop.
In 2002, hydroseeding certificates were
awarded to 33 attendees who successfully
passed the certification exam. For further
information on hydroseeding, please con-
tact Ms. Julie Wright, jwright@uvi.edu, or Mr.
Dale Morton, dmorton@uvi.edu, or call UVI-
CES at (340) 693-1080.


ANIMAL SCIENCE SHEEP FLOCK

INCREASES MULTIPLE BIRTHS


The hair sheep research flock at
the Sheep Research Facility of the
Agricultural Experiment Station on the
St. Croix campus has been experienc-
ing an increase in prolificacy (number
of lambs born) over the past several
lambings.
The sheep are managed on an
accelerated lambing system so that
each of the two flocks of breeding
ewes will lamb at 8-month intervals.
The flocks are staggered so that they
are not lambing at the same time.
In the spring of 2002 there were
1 5 sets of triplets born and in the most
recent lambing during November and
December of 2002 there were 10 sets
of triplets born.
In addition to these triplets there
was the first set of quadruplet lambs
born on the farm. A 6-year-old
Barbados Blackbelly ewe produced
the litter of three male lambs and one
female lamb. Unfortunately one of the
males died after only two days, but the
remaining three lambs are doing very
well.
The incidence of triplet births in
the sheep flock has been very low,
with only three to four ewes having
triplets in any given lambing.
The hair sheep in the university


flock are selected based on their being
born as twins and their ability to
produce twin lambs.
The average number of lambs
born per ewe over the past 16 years
has been 1.8. The recent increase in
the number of triplet births may be
due to selection pressure for the
genetic trait of multiple births.
Hair sheep ewes can raise twin or
single lambs with no difficulty. They
produce sufficient milk for the lambs
to receive adequate nutrition. In the
case of triplets the ewe cannot meet
the demand of the lambs for milk
without some assistance.
At the Sheep Research Facility all
ewes that are raising triplet lambs are
kept separate from the main flock so
that they can be supplemented with
some grain (2 Ibs per ewe per day) for
seven weeks after lambing to help
them produce more milk for the lambs.
The survival rate of the triplet lambs to
weaning has been 100% under these
conditions.
An economic analysis will be
conducted to determine if the supple-
mental feeding is cost effective. This
will be based on the pounds of lamb
that are weaned by the ewes raising
triplets and the costs of the feed.


l U-ycurI-vU lourt UUO BIUcutrclly cVVC VVIurI LtIcJIILtct
of quadruplet lambs born at the AES Sheep Research
Facility in 16years. There were three male lambs and
onefemale lamb in the litter


STUDENT PRO) ECTS
Continuedfromp. 1
in hair sheep rams in the tropics." Awards for
the students were presented to the students
during the NASA week that was held on St.
Thomas and St. Croix in November 2002.
The award consisted of a certificate and a
check from the United Negro College Fund.
Ms. Isles also attended the Annual
Biomedical Research Conference for Minor-
ity Students in New Orleans and made an
oral presentation of the data. She will be
attending the Southern Section Meeting of
the American Society of Animal Science in
Mobile, Ala., in February 2003 with Dr.
Godfrey to present the data there as well.
Ms. Isles is continuing to work in Dr.
Godfrey's lab and will prepare her data for
publication in a scientific journal, as well as
participate in other research projects.


T7'11 ^_---.

^*m"le L










12 RESEARCH & PUBLIC SER VICE NEWSLETTER


SBDC SPONSORS VARIETY OF
TRAINING SEMINARS
The SBDC met its mandate in exceeding
the required number of training programs over
the past fiscal period. The SBDC saw
tremendous support for its seminars held
throughout the territory, including the continu-
ation of the veterans' entrepreneurial series, a
two-part series on effective business planning,
customer service, landlord/tenant issues, and
budgeting/forecasting for a new business.
SBDC is looking forward to an active fiscal
year of new training activities in support of the
workforce development initiatives put forth by
the University.
To propose a topic for program consider-
ation, please contact the SBDC at (340) 776-
3206 or 692-5270.


RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
UPCOMING EVENTS
FEBRUARY MAY 2003


FEBRUA
20
25
26
MARCH
3
4
6
8
13&27
27
20
25
APRIL
4&11
2
9


RY
BEYOND BASIC ESTATE PLANNING/SBDC'
WOMEN'S NETWORK FOR ENTREPRENEURIALTRAINING(WNET) ROUNDTABLE/SBDC
SEMINAR BY DR. BETSYGLADFELTERON THE DECLINE OFACROPORA IN TH E VI/CMES

TRANSPLANTOF MANGROVE SEEDLINGS AT LAMESHUR
BUDGETING & MONEY MANAGEMENT/SBDC
TIME MANAGEMENT/SBDC
TEACH HER'S WORKSHOP ON ENVIRONMENTAL TOPICS/CMES
BUS INESS TAXES FOR 2002/SBDC
TERRESTRIAL RAPID ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT/ECC
QUICKBOOKS PRO/SBDC
WNETROUNDTABLE/SBDC


YOUTH OUTREACH/CMES
DEVELOPING A RESUME THAT WILL WORK FOR YOU
INTERVIEW TECH NIQUES
CUSTOMERSERVICE


5&12 WRITING A BUSINESS PLAN/SBDC
5&9 WNETROUNDTABLE/SBDC
LEADERS IP ESSENTIALS
8 BUSINESS AFTER HOURS & SBA/SBDC SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEARAWARDS/SBDC
*for more information on these events, contact the sponsoring department.








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