• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 UVI aquaponics featured in Japanese...
 The Caribbean Writer celebrate...
 WRRI: An alternative approach to...
 R & PS units help restore...
 USVI professionals trained in mini-society...
 SBDC briefs
 The future of trees in the...
 SBDC celebrates small business...
 7th annual nonpoint source pollution...
 Upcoming events






Group Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 5. No. 2.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300566/00001
 Material Information
Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter. Volume 5. No. 2.
Series Title: R&PS : Research and Public Service Newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: University of the Virgin Islands.
Affiliation: University of the Virgin Islands
Publisher: University of the Virgin Islands.
Publication Date: 12/26/2002
 Subjects
Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States Virgin Islands
Caribbean
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Volume ID: VID00001
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Table of Contents
    UVI aquaponics featured in Japanese documentary
        Page 1
    The Caribbean Writer celebrates
        Page 2
    WRRI: An alternative approach to treating wastewater
        Page 3
    R & PS units help restore mangroves
        Page 4
        Page 5
    USVI professionals trained in mini-society - Graduate student conducts thesis at UVI-AES
        Page 6
        Page 7
    SBDC briefs
        Page 8
    The future of trees in the Caribbean
        Page 9
    SBDC celebrates small business week
        Page 10
    7th annual nonpoint source pollution conference held
        Page 11
    Upcoming events
        Page 12
Full Text





RE


PU


N E


SEARCH AND

BLIC SERVICE


:WS LETTER


UNIVERSITY OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


Volume 5, No. 2 News from the UVI Research and Public Service Component

UVI AQUAPONICS FE/


N


JAPANESE


The AES Aquaculture Program was the center
of attention during March 17-20 as a film crew
from Japan spent four days making a video of the
aquaponic systems developed at UVI.
The filming company, Studio UMI, Inc.,
obtained a contract for the documentary from TV
ASAHI, a major Japanese network. The film crew
consisted of Mr. Osamu Monden, chief director,
Mr. Kiyoshi Namikawa, cameraman, and Mr.
Kazuhiko, video engineer. Ms. Junko Nishitani
Broom of the V.I. Tourism Bureau served as
interpreter.
Mr. Monden conceived the idea of a
documentary when he read about UVI's research
in the scientific literature. In addition to visiting
UVI, the film crew visited other aquaponic facilities
in the mainland: a commercial operation in
Massachusetts, a demonstration unit at a
foundation in New York, and an aquaponics
science project at a school in Pennsylvania.
During four days of intensive activity, the
crew filmed UVI's seven aquaponic systems from
every conceivable angle: aerial shots from a plane
with its door removed, underwater shots of fish
and plant roots, and close-up shots of the several
types of plants, as well as procedures dealing with
fish production such as egg collection and
incubation, feeding and harvesting.
The crew also filmed several locations on St.
Croix to give the Japanese audience some
knowledge of a tropical Caribbean island.
Members of the Aquaculture Program were

RESPONSE TO THE DOCUMENTARY IN )APAN
WAS VERY POSITIVE. ONE RESEARCH ENGINEER,
MR. NAOKI OGAWA, FROM MITSUBISHI HEAVY
INDUSTRIES, HAS ALREADY VISITED UVI TO SEE
THEAQUAPONIC SYSTEM. THE PRESIDENTOF
AN ENVIRONMENTAL COMPANY PLANS TO
VISIT UVI IN THE NEAR FUTURE.


October 2002

\TURED


DOCUMENTARY


Celebrity for St. Croix aquaculture
S


I 3 I
From the Virgin Islands Daily News article appearing on March
20, 2002: Film crew director Osamu Monden, left, cameraman
Kiyoshi Hamikawa, center, and UVI Research Specialist Eric
Thoman, right
shown in the video performing routine operations.
Dr. James Rakocy, Program Leader, was given
several speaking parts, but when the documentary
was aired, he was dubbed and it appeared that he
was speaking in Japanese.
The Asian community in St. Croix was excited
about this project and extended exceedingly
warm hospitality to the Japanese guests. Mrs.
Infee Coval and Mrs. Ritsu Slavski invited the film
crew to dinners at their homes, while Dr. and Mrs.
Continued on p. 7


IN SIDE

2 The Caribbean Writer
celebrates
3 WRRI: An Alterna-
tive Approach to
Treating Wastewater
4-5 R8PS Units Help
Restore Mangroves
6 USVI Professionals
Trained in Mini-
Society ,
6 Graduate Student
Conducts Thesis at
UVI-AES
8 SBDC Briefs
9 The Future of Trees
in the Caribbean
10 SBDC Celebrates
Small Business Week
11 7th Annual Nonpoint
Source Pollution
Conference Held
12 Upcoming events









2 RESEARCH & PUBLIC ER VICE NEWSLETTER


THE CARIBBEAN WRI


TER


CELEBRATES NEW EDITOR,


THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
(R&PS) NEWSLETTER
IS AN INFORMATIONAL
NEWSLETTER ON THE UNITS
THAT MAKE UP THE
R&PS COMPONENT.
HTTP://RPS.UVI.EDPU/
VICE PROVOST
HENRY H. SMITH, PH.D.

EDITORIAL BOARD
VELMA ABRAMSEN,
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENTANP
PROVOST
LORNA CHESTERFIELD,
ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PROVOST
CLARICE C. CLARKE,
PUL/IC INFORMATIONSPECIALIST
HELEN DOOKHAN,
ADMINITRA TIVE SPECIALIST
RAQUEL SANTIAGO SILVER,
APMINISTRA TOR
JACQUELINE SOMERSALL-
BERRY,
FORMER ASSISTANT TO THE
ECC DIRECTOR
PATRICE JOHNSON,
DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS


LAYOUT& DESIGN
ROBIN STERNS

DISTRIBUTION
DONNA ANDREWS
MAIL LETTERS OR COMMENTS TO:
LORNA CHESTERFIELD
UVI RES&ARCHt & PUBLIC SER VCE
#2 JOHN BREWERS BAY
ST THOMAS, VI 00802
TELEPHONE (340) 693-1061
FAX (340) 693-1065
LCHESTE0UVLI EUL
THE UNIVERSITY OF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
IS AN EOUAL OPPORTUNITY,
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION,
TITLE, SECTION 504,
PL 101-542 EDPUCTOR
ANI EMPLOYER.


NEW ISSUE
The University of the Virgin Islands has
announced the appointment of Mr. Marvin E.
Williams as the new editor of The Caribbean
Writer, an award-winning anthology published
under the Research and Public Service compo-
nent of the university.
Mr. Williams takes over from Dr. Erika J.
Waters, who has been the editor since its
inception, but who has now retired.
A professor at University of the Virgin
Islands, St. Croix campus for the past ten years,
Mr. Williams is also a writer and critic, and
served as the associate editor of the anthology
from 1996-2002.
Mr. Williams brings extensive editorial experi-
ence to the journal, having published a collection of
his poems, Dialogue at the Hearth (1993), and edited
Yellow Cedars Blooming (1998), a collection of Virgin
Islands literature. His work has also been published in
many national and international journals, including
The Caribbean Writer.
In commenting on Mr. William's appoint-
ment, Dr. Henry H. Smith, Vice Provost for
Research and Public Service at the University,
said that the University is very pleased to have
Mr. Williams serve in this position. His
qualifications and accomplishments attest to his
outstanding capabilities and we look forward to
him building even further on the great start that
Dr. Waters gave to this anthology.

Trinidadian writer V. S. Naipaul's Nobel
Prize is celebrated in a special section in the
newest volume of The Caribbean Writer. Cel-
ebrated critics, such as Homi K. Bhabha, Paula
Burnett, Selwyn Cudjoe and Bruce King, among
others, offer their responses to this award.
Never-before-published artwork by noted
Virgin Islander J. Antonio Jarvis, writer and
educator, is also featured, besides translations
from Cuban poet Nancy Morejon, poetry
selections included work by Opal Palmer Adisa,
Gabriel DiLorenzo, Howard A. Fergus, Deverita
Carty Sturdivant, lan McDonald, Cecil Gray,
Laurence Lieberman, Shaun A. Pennington,
Carrol B. Fleming, Marvin E. Williams, Thomas
Reiter and Virgil Suarez.
A play, the second by Cecil "A' Blazer
Williams, entitled, "I Don't Want to Bathe," is also
included. Short fiction selections include work by
Joanne Hyppolite, Authur Scott, Melissa Lugo
and Julie Babcock, while the personal essays
section features work by Katia Ulysse, Alexandra
Migoya and Derick O. Steinmann.
Book reviews are by noted critics Bruce
King, Geoffrey Philp, Elaine Savory, Robert D.


THE

CARIBBEAN

WRITER

.
,,.h ,.r..'=! -


Above: The cover of The Caribbean Writer, Volume 16,features
artby St. Thomas artist Eric Winter

Hamner, Roland B. Scott, H. Nigel Thomas, Maud
Pierre-Charles, June D. Bobb, and J. Michael
Dash, among others. The cover is by St. Thomas
artist Eric Winter and depicts two women
looking out to sea.
Volume 16 of The Caribbean Writer is currently
available at The Bookie, Memories of St. Croix,
Magazines and More, Undercover Books and
Whim Museum on St. Croix; Tropical Memories
and Dockside Bookshop on St. Thomas; and
Heritage Books and Arts on Tortola, as well as in
both UVI bookstores. Copies can also be ordered
directly from The Caribbean Writer's office by
calling (340) 692-4152, e-mailing qmars@uvi.edu
or orders@thecaribbeanwriter.com, or from our
website at www.TheCaribbeanWriter.com.

TRINIDADIAN WRITER V. S. NAIPAUL'S NOBEL
PRIZE IS CELEBRATED IN A SPECIAL SECTION IN
THE NEWEST VOLUME OFTHE CARIBBEAN
WRITER. CELEBRATED CRITICS, SUCH AS HOMI K.
BHABHA, PAULA BURNETT, SELWYN CUDJOE
AND BRUCE KING, OFFER THEIR RESPONSES TO
THIS AWARD.









OCTOBER 2002 3


AIR ARRIVALS PROJECT UNDERWAY


At a time when the airline industry is
still suffering from the impact of 9-11, it is
very important that the Virgin Islands
actively examine the implications for our
tourism-driven economy and devise a
strategy that will promote a high level of
passenger arrivals. Bill No. 24-0150, passed
by the 24th Legislature on September 20,
2001, provides the University of the Virgin
Islands with an appropriation to do just that.
The appropriation is being adminis-
tered by the Office of the Vice Provost for
Research and Public Service, headed by Dr.
Henry Smith. Team leader for implementa-
tion is Dr. Paul Leary, who has considerable
experience in the area of public policy issues
related to the Virgin Islands. Drs. Smith and
Leary are working in consultation with a
broad-based Community Advisory Group
composed of leading members of the
private and public sectors. Its executive
committee is comprised of Leary, Smith,
Pamela Richards (Commissioner of Tour-


ism), Sebastiano Paiewonsky (St. Thomas/St.
John Chamber of Commerce) and Davis
Mapp (V. 1. Port Authority). A Request for
Proposals has been published to attract an
experienced consultant who is knowledge-
able about both the national and Virgin
Islands dimensions of the air arrivals issue.
Special attention will be paid to the
challenges facing St. Croix.
The consultant will be charged with
developing a strategy and action plan that
will increase the flow of visitors. The results
will be presented at public forums on both
St. Thomas and St. Croix in January. The
plan will then be forwarded to the
appropriate parties for implementation.
UVI is committed to using its resources
to promote the general economic and social
well being of the community in close
consultation with all sectors and with the
public as a whole. This project is a good
example putting this commitment into
action.


WRRI: ALTERNATIVE APPROACH

,- .M TO TREATING


The alternative treatment system at Coral World
treats wastewater and nurtures flowering plants

Disposal of sewage in the Virgin Islands
without polluting our fragile ecosystems are
a major concern in the Virgin Islands. The
University of the Virgin Islands has worked
collaboratively with the Virgin Islands
Department of Planning and Natural
Resources to address this problem by
developing and testing systems for altera-
tive on-site treatment of sewage at several
places in the Virgin Islands.
These systems have been found to be
effective at preventing the discharge of
untreated sewage where it not only would
be aesthetically displeasing but also very
often poses a treat to health. One of these
systems has been installed at the Coral
World Marine Park on the east end of St.
Thomas. Coral World is an ideal site to
demonstrate the effectiveness of these
systems.


WASTEWATER

Coral World is located on a small
peninsula that is bordered on three sides by
pristine seas that are heavily used daily for
recreation. In this area, then, discharge of
inadequately treated wastewater would not
be tolerated. Additionally, the Coral World
facility is a major attraction on St. Thomas
and any unsightly areas, odors or other
unpleasantness would be soon apparent.
The wastewater treatment system at Coral
World then must always perform effectively.
The alternative treatment system
installed at Coral World treats wastewater at
the facility without a high energy input, with
low maintenance and nurtures a stand of
very attractive flowering tropical plants. It
blends in with the natural features at this
popular site. Any effluent that may remain
after the wastewater is treated is suitable for
irrigation use on the premises.
The system is being closely monitored
by the Water Resources Research Institute at
UVI for one year in order to determine ways
that the design of these systems may be
improved and their operation modified to
make them more efficient.
Additional information on the Coral
World alternative on-site wastewater treat-
ment system may be obtained by contacting
the WRRI at (340) 693-1067 or by mailing
hsmith@uvi.edu.


From left to right: Jane M. Kenny, U.S. EPA Regional
Director, Mayra Sudrez-Vdlez, UVI Marine Advisor
and William Muszynski, U.S. EPA Deputy Regional
Administrator. Picture courtesy of U.S. EPA

VIMAS EDUCATOR

RECEIVES EPA AWARD
Mayra Suarez-Velez, a marine advisor
at the University of the Virgin Islands,
received a 2002 Environmental Quality
Award from the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA).
Suarez-Velez recently returned from
the EPA's New York offices, where she
accepted the award for her outstanding
commitment to protecting and enhancing
environmental quality in the region.
Working from the belief that what we
learn to appreciate as children stays with
us for life, Suarez-Velez of the Virgin
Islands Marine Advisory Service has
focused on educating children in the V.I.
about caring for their local environment.
Under her leadership, VIMAS created
a comic book with the theme of
preventing water pollution, a coloring
book on marine conservation and an
interactive Caribbean Watershed Non
Point Source Pollution model.

SBDC DISSEMINATES ITS
FY 2001 ANNUAL REPORT
The Small Business Development
Center (SBDC) is proud to announce the
completion and dissemination of its FY
2001 Annual Report. This report docu-
ments the many successes of the UVI-
SBDC, which exceeded its fiscal year's
training and counseling milestones and
saw a significant increase in its overall
economic impact throughout the territory.
Copies of the report were distrib-
uted to all UVI Board of Trustees, RPS
Directors, Government's legislative/ ex-
ecutive authorities, stakeholders and
other local and federal entities.
The SBDC takes a high level of pride
in the work accomplished and the
dedicated services of its own personnel
and that of its collaborators. Many
thanks are extended to the University
for its continued support of the program
initiatives.









4 RESEARCH & PUBLIC ER VICE NEWSLETTER




l R&PS UNITS HELP


CMES RESTORES LAMESHUR BAY


DAIRY PRODUCERS

RECEIVE TRAINING
The University of the Virgin Islands
Cooperative Extension Service (CES) and
St. Croix Dairy Products, Inc. hosted a
training seminar on Quality Assurance for
Dairy Products. The seminar ran May 28-
June 5 at the University of the Virgin
Islands, Research and Extension Center,
St.Croix campus.
George Nelson, professor emeritus,
and Yvonne Nelson, senior lecturer, of the
University of Wisconsin-Stout, trained the
attendees in proper microbiological labora-
tory testing procedures and in good
manufacturing practices for dairy products.
Personnel from Island Dairies,
St.Thomas Dairies, the Dairy Herd Improve-
ment Association program of the Extension
Service and the laboratory staff from Roy
Lester Schneider Hospital participated in this
training.
This seminar is part of an ongoing effort
to keep dairy industry personnel in the V.I.
up to date on proper quality assurance
procedures. This helps guarantee that
locally produced dairy products are of the
highest quality.
Island Dairies has supplied Virgin
Islanders and the Caribbean with fresh dairy
products for 42 years. The milk is produced
by Holstein cows on four state-of-the-art
dairy farms on St. Croix. The milk is trucked
from the farms, processed at Island Dairies
plant in Sion Farm and delivered to the
grocery stores in a matter of hours.
UVI-CES tests all St. Croix dairy herds
every month and assists producers with
making sound management decisions. For
more information on the Dairy Herd
Improvement Program, contact Kofi Boateng
or Sue Lakos at (340) 692-4066 or (340)
692-4179, or e-mail slakos@uvi.edu.

"THIS SEMINAR IS PARTOFAN
ONGOING EFFORTTO KEEP DAIRY
INDUSTRY PERSONNEL IN THE V.I. UP
TO DATE ON PROPER QUALITY
ASSURANCE PROCEDURES.


I,
. '. "


81;'t /-.~r-JA ^


Hurricane-damaged mangroves at Lameshur Bay, St John


The Center for Marine and Environ-
mental Studies (CMES) has embarked on a
project to restore the mangrove forest at
Great Lameshur Bay, St. John. This two-
year project is funded by a grant from the
Virgin Islands National Park Service and
will be based out of the Virgin Islands
Environmental Resource Station (VIERS),
CMES' marine facility on St. John.
The mangrove area in Great Lameshur
Bay was severely damaged by a series of
hurricanes from 1989 to 1995. Each
successive hurricane further damaged the
mangrove system and closed off the tidal
channel that provided flushing of the
lagoon. In 1999, however, Hurricane
Lenny reopened the natural tidal channel
and positive changes in the mangrove
system have already begun to occur.
This project is intended to restore the
wetland community in the bay to its
original form. Mangroves are important
for adjacent coral reefs since they function
in retaining sediment eroded from the
land and they provide an important
nursery habitat for commercially and
ecologically important marine fishes and
invertebrates.
During the project 500 seedlings of
each of three mangrove species will be
planted: red mangrove (Rhizophora
mangle), black mangrove (Avicennia
germinans), and white mangrove


(Laguncularia racemosa). Although the red
mangrove seedlings will be planted
directly in the sediment, the black and
white mangroves will be grown for several
months in tree cones before planting.
During this time, a CMES intern, who
will be stationed at VIERS for 12 months,
will maintain the seedlings and monitor
the growth and survival of the newly
planted trees. The intern will also be
involved in helping VIMAS education and
outreach efforts by developing educa-
tional materials and delivering presenta-
tions to local and visiting school groups.
The Virgin Islands Marine Advisory
Service (VIMAS), one of CMES' programs,
will play a major part in this project.
VIMAS' agents Marcia Taylor and Mayra
Suarez-Velez will coordinate the planting
and monitoring activities for the project.
On St. Croix, VIMAS agents are active
in doing other mangrove restoration
projects such as the Salt River mangrove
restoration where 13,500 red and 3000
black mangroves were planted.
Like the Salt River restoration, VIMAS
will be seeking volunteers from the
community to assist with the mangrove
planting. If you would like information on
this project or to volunteer, please contact
Mayra Suarez-Velez at (340) 693-1392 or
Marcia Taylor at (340) 692-4046. E-mail
msuarez@uvi.edu or mtaylor@uvi.edu.


I ,
t








OCTOBER 2002 5



RESTORE MANGROVES


VIMAS WORKS ON THE UVI WETLANDS

RESERVE AND PROVIDES HANDS-ON


TRAINING


FOR YOUTH ON ST. CROIX


Left: Amaris Chew, 70th grade student at the St. Croix Educational Complex, holds red mangrove seedlings which she has collected
Right: Lamin Jackson, Amaris Chew and Candace Cornwall plant black mangrove seeds into tree cones


The Center for Marine and Environ-
mental Studies (CMES) has embarked on
a project to both provide environmental
education and hands-on training to high
school students to restore the man-
groves at UVI Wetlands Reserve.
The project is funded by USGS
through UVI's WRRI and headed by
Marcia Taylor of the St. Croix V.I. Marine
Advisory Service (VIMAS).
Mangrove areas are important to
wildlife and help maintain the quality of
our marine waters. However as much as
50% of the mangrove areas in the V.I.
have been destroyed in the last 50
years.
The project seeks to assist in
restoring a mangrove area as well as
provide hands-on training to St. Croix
youth.
This one-year project has three
main parts. One, it will provide hands-on
training to ten St. Croix high school
students on mangrove restoration tech-
niques. Students will collect red and
black mangrove seeds and plant the red
mangroves directly at the reserve. The
black mangrove seeds are germinated


and grown for several months before
planting.
The Agricultural Experiment Station
(AES) is assisting with the project by
providing space in their greenhouses for
the seedlings. The new trees will be
monitored and replaced as needed.
Two, the project will provide
training to students on how to lead
educational tours at the reserve and an
opportunity to provide tours for other St.
Croix youth.
The students will learn about
mangroves and teach other youth about
the plants and animals at the site and
the importance of the major ecosystems
found there.
Three, 200 black and 50 red
mangroves will be planted at the site
which well help to restore the man-
groves that were damaged by recent
hurricanes.
"Working with the interns has really
been delightful" remarked Marcia Tay-
lor, marine advisor for the project.
"They are all enthusiastic and are
able to effectively convey information
they have learned to other students.


Most of the interns want to major in
science when they attend college and
some want to pursue degrees in marine
biology. This project is providing a great
way for them to gain experience in the
field," she said.
If you would like to get more
information on this project or VIMAS,
you can call VIMAS at (340) 692-4046 or
e-mail mtaylor@uvi.edu.


HTTP://RPS.VVI. EPV/









6 RESEARCH & PUBLIC ER VICE NEWSLETTER


M


Neldra Fint trained elementary school teachers
how to implement the mini-society program in
the territory
USVI PROFESSIONALS
TRAINED IN MINI-SOCIETY
Representatives from the Boys' and
Girls' Club, elementary schools, commu-
nity programs, churches, the housing
community, and the local government
converged on UVI recently to learn
about the Mini-Society, an experience-
based instructional system that teaches
8-12-year-old students entrepreneur-
ship, economics, and citizenship.
Neldra Flint of the Kauffman Center
for Entrepreneurial Leadership trained
29 St. Croix and 20 St. Thomas/St. John
individuals to implement the program.
The Mini-Society was made possible
through a grant of $50,000 obtained by
Kofi Boateng of UVI-CES.
The USVI was the first U.S. territory
to incorporate the Mini-Society, which
already exists in 43 states. The program
was introduced in the 2001 UVI-CES
summer camps. Through the training,
this program information will be
included in local schools' curricula and
may be used by other agencies, as well.
The highly motivating, creative and self-
directed program makes academic
classes more meaningful and empha-
sizes skills. Children learn the value of
working cooperatively, practicing set-
ting and achieving goals, using organi-
zational skills, practicing good time
management, understanding how natu-
ral/logical consequences work, and
learning responsibility/accountability.
They will also be exposed to possible
careers for the future and have fun.
The Mini-Society is a ten-week
program, but it will generate "teachable
moments' that will help teachers and
students move naturally through the
curriculum. Instead of learning in a
vacuum, students will be able to relate
their education to practical, real-life
experiences. From other established
programs, we have learned that the
Mini-Society is a win-win situation for
both teachers and students, but in the
final analysis, the community will be the
biggest winner. For more information,
call Kofi Boateng at (340) 692-4066, or
e-mail kboaten@uvi.edu.


UF GRADUATE STUDENT


CONDUCTS


HIS


THESIS


RESEARCH AT UVI-AES


Brian Becker, a University of Florida
graduate student in the School of Forest
Resources and Conservation, is currently
conducting a thesis research on medici-
nal plants as part of the requirements for
a Master's degree in Agroforestry.
Brian first came to UVI in March
2002 for a brief visit and orientation on
the activities of the Agricultural Experi-
ment Station. He returned this summer
to conduct his field research under the
supervision of Dr. Manuel Palada,
Research Associate Professor of Horti-
culture.
The thesis research is supported by a
grant from the Center for Subtropical
Agroforestry, University of Florida. The
research is also a part of UVI subcontract
with University of Florida under the USDA
Initiative for Future Agriculture and
Farming Systems (IFAFS).
Brian's thesis focuses on the integra-
tion of high value horticultural crops such
as culinary herbs, medicinal plants, hot
peppers, and papaya into an agroforestry
system consisting of medicinal trees.
He is studying the establishment and
productivity of these crops when grown in
association with medicinal trees in the
Virgin Islands.
On-farm trials are established to
evaluate agronomic and economic perfor-
mance of local medicinal plants and
culinary herbs intercropped with Morinda
(Noni) and Moringa (drumstick tree).
Medicinal plants and culinary herbs are
grown by farmers in their home gardens
in a mixed cropping system.
These plants are considered non-
timber forest products (NTFP), and their
economic significance is not well docu-
mented in the Virgin Islands. Brian will be
the first one to conduct this study and
collect agro-economic data to evaluate
the potential role of these plants in the
Virgin Islands' economy.


"BRIAN'S THESIS FOCUSES ON THE
INTEGRATION OF HIGH VALUE
HORTICULTURAL CROPS SUCH AS
CULINARY HERBS, MEDICINAL
PLANTS, HOT PEPPERS, AND PAPAYA
INTO AN AGROFORESTRY SYSTEM
CONSISTING OF MEDICINAL TREES.


mnan becKer, graduate student, university oj Honaa,
gives instructions on field layout and planting of
medicinalplants at Estate Rattan, St Croix
At Estate Rattan, plots have been
established to cultivate local herbs such as
"Japana," Inflamation Bush," Worrywine"
or Blue Verbena, Lemongrass, and
Wormgrass in between hedgerows of
Moringa (Moringa oleifera). Brian will
collect plant growth data, including
establishment, height, leaf area and fresh
weight of marketable parts. After assem-
bling the agronomic data he will conduct
economic analyses to determine produc-
tivity and profitability of this unique
agroforestry system.
Brian is expected to complete his
study by the end of the fall semester and
will present the results in a seminar. Brian
was a former Peace Corps Volunteer in
Nepal, and he shared his experiences in
Nepal when he gave a seminar last March
at UVI-AES, St. Croix campus.
Brian is the second graduate
student conducting a thesis research in
the Vegetable Crops Program. Dr. Palada
also supervised the dissertation re-
search of Maurice Yabba, who con-
ducted his field research at UVI and
completed his Ph.D. degree last summer
at Michigan State University.
Dr. Palada has been granted a
Courtesy Associate Professor position in
the School of Forest Resources and
Conservation at the University of
Florida, Gainesville.









OCTOBER 2002


VI-EPSCoR PLANNING UNDERWAY


UVI is pursuing an opportunity to improve
Virgin Islands society and quality of life through
the Experimental Program for the Stimulation
of Competitive Research (EPSCoR). EPSCoR,
made available through the National Science
Foundation (NSF), fosters research at the
university level and in the private and public
sectors. VI-EPSCoR is administered by the
University of the Virgin Islands with the
encouragement of the Virgin Islands Govern-
ment.
The NSF started EPSCoRovertwo decades
ago to allow states and territories to upgrade
their research infrastructure and improve their
competitiveness for research grants from the
NSF and othergovemment agencies. It seeks to
support high-quality research that serves the
needs of the community by building its
economy.
A planning grant recruited from the NSF
by VI-EPSCoR Program Director Dr. Henry H.
Smith will support work over the next nine


months. Former St. Thomas campus chancel-
lor Roy A Watlington is VI-EPSCoRcoordinator.
On August 29, the VI-EPSCoR Planning
Committee met to begin preparing for a multi-
year implementation of the grant. Several task
forces will begin the process: The Interests and
Strengths Task Force will canvas the university
community to identify the interests of UVI
researchers and the University's developable
research strengths. The Community Linkage
Task Force will engage interested members of
the Virgin Islands community in research
activities that can benefit Virgin Islands society
and economy. The Research Focus Selection
Task Force will establish processes and criteria
for selecting research areas to be pursued.
To prepare, Smith and Watlington
participated in a national EPSCoR forum in
Anchorage, Alaska. To learn more about
EPSCoR, visit the NSFs EPSCoR web page at
www.ehr.nsf.gov/epscor/. UVI expects to
mount its own EPSCoR web page soon.


WRRI PROFILES CISTERN WATER QUALITY
Cisterns are required by law in the and other animals to the catchment areas
Virgin Islands and are the preferred source serving the cisterns and proximity to
of water for many persons here. roads, shorelines and other potential
However, treatment of cistern water is sources of airborne pollutants.
not required by law and varies from The data collected over time will also
household to household. Cistern water reflect changes in water quality due to
quality may then be a significant threat to variations of rainfall input because of
the health of users. The the Virgin Islands seasonal fluctuations.
Water Resources Research Institute The data gathered in this study will
(WRRI) is currently monitoring the quality assist in refining water quality manage-
of cistern water at several sites in the ment practices for cistern systems.
Virgin Islands to determine how this Combined with data obtained in other
quality changes with varying environmen- WRRI studies, the findings of this
tal factors affecting cistern systems. investigation will aid in developing an
In this U. S. Geological Survey-funded understanding of the quality dynamics in
study, the WRRI is developing profiles of these systems.
water quality in cisterns influenced by Contact the WRRI at (340) 693-1062
diverse factors, including access by birds or hsmith@uvi.edu for more information.

WRRI OFFERS WATER TOPICS SEMINARS


Disseminating information on water
resources issues relevant to the Virgin
Islands is an integral part of the mission
of the Virgin Islands Water Resources
Research Institute (WRRI). Two such
seminars were recently held.
On June 4, 2002, Dr. Amos Winter of
the University of Puerto Rico presented
"Precipitation Patterns in the Caribbean
and Climate Change," a seminar based
partly on his analysis of century-long
patterns of Caribbean rainfall data.
Dr. Winter spoke about reasons for
the annual bimodality in our precipita-
tion data and pointed out that while one
of the peaks may have a relationship to
El Nino, the second is more related to sea
surface temperatures in the north tropical
Atlantic.


Ms. Marcella Jennings discussed
"Maintaining Water Quality in Cisterns,"
on July 16. Cisterns are a principal water
source in the USVI and are required by
law.
Ms. Jennings has operated a water-
testing laboratory in St. Thomas for over
15 years. Participants included repre-
sentatives from government agencies,
water professionals and cistern users
concerned about the quality of the water
they use on a daily basis.
All water seminars are conducted
simultaneously on the UVI St. Croix and
St. Thomas campuses using the Univer-
sity videoconferencing facilities. Persons
with suggested topics for future semi-
nars should contact the WRRI at (340)
693-1062 or hmith@uvi.edu.


7

SBDC PARTAKES IN WORLD
MUSEUM CONFERENCE
AND EXPO
The Small Business Development
Center (SBDC) was pleased to be invited to
participate in the 1st Annual World Museum
Conference at the Wyndham Sugar Bay
Resort, St. Thomas. Seventy-five percent of
all museums are technically small busi-
nesses and many of them are museums/
businesses for profit.
As one of the featured panelists, SBDC
spoke on the ways a small business/
museum could obtain funding, correct cash
flow problems and improve its operations.
SBDC also discussed recommended
management and training techniques that a
museum (small business) can adopt to help
make the business work more efficiently.
This was a great opportunity for the
University to have initial participation with
such global influences.

AQUAPONICS
Continuedfromp. 1.
Yum San Chiu provided lunch one day.
The documentary aired May 14 in
Japan on Channel 10 in a 30-minute
program called "Spaceship Earth." Mr.
Monden estimated that the audience
was approximately 5 million people. The
Aquaculture Program received a copy of
the video, which will be shown in the
next aquaculture seminar.
Response to the documentary in Japan
was very positive. One research engineer,
Mr. Naoki Ogawa, from Mitsubishi Heavy
Industries, has already visited UVI to see the
aquaponic system. The president of an
environmental company plans to visit UVI in
the near future.
And another individual, Matsua Takuya,
was so inspired by the documentary that he
already built a prototype aquaponic system
in Tokyo, in which he is raising koi carp,
broccoli, jute and okra. In a recent
communication to an aquaponics Intemet
news group, he wrote, "We have a dream of
operating the first commercial aquaponics
farm in Japan and hope to spread the
technology all over Japan and other Asian
countries." This is a stunning example of the
influence UVI has on the global community.


HTTP://RPS.UVI. EDU/









8 SBDC BRIEFS


RESEARCH & PLBLICSER VICE NEWSLETTER


SBDC LOOKS TO THE FUTURE THROUGH
YOUTH OUTREACH PROGRAMS


SBDCstaff made presentations to a variety of youth programs


Knowing that the USVI's future economy is directly tied to
today's youth, the SBDC is committed to its Youth Outreach
Program. Its objectives are to start exposing young adults in the
schools and other organizations, to future business and
entrepreneurial opportunities while emphasizing the absolute need
of success in academic performance.
During National Small Business Week, the SBDC worked with
many of the territory's schools including the Ricardo Richards
Elementary School, where a presentation was made stressing The
Three R's Reading, wRiting and aRithmetic." Over the course of a
day, SBDC spoke to 5th and 6th graders and their teachers,
numbering about 200. The SBDC stressed the need to understand
that knowledge today is the key to tomorrow's success.
In addition, the SBDC has developed and enhanced the
educational presentation for the Youth Outreach Program, through
other block segments that include junior high and high school
levels. In July over 50 students between the ages of 12-16 (in
several St. Croix School-To-Work and Career Development Summer
Programs) received training by the SBDC. The staff also made
presentations to the Arthur A. Richards Junior High School "School-
To-Work Summer Academy" and the Career Directions, Inc. "Career
Awareness Summer Program" on "What is An Entrepreneur and
Entrepreneurship?"
This is all part of our incentives designed to train tomorrow's
small businesspersons in their entrepreneurial growth and
economic development. The SBDC intends to continue reaching out
to all educational levels at the various schools throughout fiscal
year 2002-2003.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR
Nadine Marchena, Assistant Chief Executive Officer of the
Economic Development Authority (EDA), led a very informative
discussion to a capacity crowd at the SBDC's Training Facility in
June 2002.
Approximately 60 individuals attended this seminar which
concentrated on providing insight on the various economic
benefits and privileges available to small businesses, including
its eligible Virgin Islands supplier program, IDC and trade
benefits, etc. Ms. Marchena, a proven and very experienced
economic development officer, provided many helpful hints.
The overall program was a tremendous success. The SBDC
coordinated this program as part of its continued collaborative
initiatives with partnering government agencies that are
committed to the improvement of the small business sector of
the community.


SBDC )OINS UVI BUSINESS STUDENTS
AT LAS VEGAS TRADE SHOWS
After learning of the invaluable annual Associated Surplus/
Associated Merchandise (AMD/ASD) Jewelry/Gift Trade Shows
in Las Vegas via former UVI professor Dr. Patricia Cummins,
SBDC sent a representative to attend. In so doing, SBDC gained
tremendous insight into wholesale buying, found new and
interesting products to extend or compliment various product
lines, met hundreds if not thousands of manufacturers,
distributors, suppliers from all over the world including the
U.S., Taiwan and Korea, Hong Kong, and China.
Additionally, the SBDC counselor witnessed the creation
of international partnerships for a global economy and better
identified with how the supply chain works. Also seen at the
trade show was the latest technology for marketing/
promoting products.
Several hundred brochures/business cards from the
various manufacturers and distributors were obtained. Being
so directly linked to the small business sector of the V.I.
community, this trip afforded the SBDC the opportunity to gain
first-hand exposure to the mainstream distributors, suppliers,
wholesalers, and manufacturers in the U.S. and international
markets.
By meeting these industry leaders/participants, the SBDC
obtained a significant level of insight and pertinent
information which we will continue to use at regular client
counseling sessions.

SBDC PARTICIPATES AT VI FBLA STATE
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE
Virgin Islands Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA)
conducted its 2002 State Leadership Conference earlier this
year in April at Marriott's Frenchman's Reef Beach Resort.
SBDC conducted an all day seminar called "How to Write a
Business Plan," This seminar gave the student delegates an
opportunity to engage in brainstorming a business idea in
addition to writing and presenting a mini-business plan.
State Chair Cecilia M. Walters-Smith and State Adviser
Maria Thomas-Lewis, were very pleased with our high energy
participation, and together we are both looking forward to a
continued cooperative relationship.

SBDC OFFERS PRESENTATION ON START-
ING A BUSIN ESS IN THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
The Global Life Church, located at 5-2 Estate Raphune in
St. Thomas, USVI, held its first annual Financial Conference
earlier this year.The church's pastor and founder, Oral F.
Hazel, invited the UVI-SBDC to participate by conducting a
presentation on the basic principles and procedures of starting
a business in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
SBDC served as the key lead presenter for that evening and led
discussions on the basic steps toward successfully starting a
business in the Virgin Islands. Topics included different forms of
ownership, licensing requirements, how to prepare a winning
business plan, the significance of one's personal credit history, and
common myths about the overall process.
Pastor Hazel has committed to empowering his
congregation with entrepreneurial insight and the SBDC was
delighted to participate in this inaugural event. The interactive
session was conducted for approximately two hours and was
recorded as part of the SBDC's outreach counseling initiatives.
The workshop was very well received and requests have
already been made for similar programs in the future.









OCTOBER 2002 9


TRAINING ON TAX
RECORD KEEPING


Alonzo Brady talks taxes before the capacity crowd
The SBDC scheduled a series of workshops focusing on
empowering existing and potential entrepreneurs with the
skills and information needed to ensure effective record-
keeping practices and compliance with the tax laws.
On July 18, 2002, the first program in this three-part series
was held at the SBDC Training Facility in St. Thomas.
Mr. Alonzo Brady, Revenue Agent III and 19-year veteran
at the V.I. Internal Revenue Bureau, served once more as the
lead presenter and provided information on applicable tax
laws, discussions on gross receipts and excise taxes, etc.
Mr. Brady has been an invaluable asset to the SBDC and
this community as evidenced by his many in-kind
presentations delivered at SBDC's training programs.
The series continued with a seminar featuring the V.I.
Department of Labor, followed by a workshop which focused
on the Lieutenant Governor's Office with special emphasis on
the Corporations and Trademarks division.
SBDC CONTINUES OUTREACH TRAINING
TO ST. )OHN RESIDENTS
As part of the ongoing fiscal training initiatives of the
Small Business Development Center (SBDC), a SBA ProNet/
Procurement 8 Purchasing seminar was presented in
collaboration with the U.S. Small Business Administration
(SBA) in June 2002 for the St. John community.
Carl Christensen, SBA Project Officer of the USVI, joined
SBDC in leading the discussion on the various components/
benefits of the SBA's ProNet resourceat the V.I. Legisature's
Conference Room in Cruz Bay, St. John.
Many of the SBA's current programs and services were
highlighted and reinforced. Mr. Christiansen encouraged all
business owners to visit the SBA's website at www.sba.gov to
register their businesses) under the SBS ProNet program. This
will afford many businesses the opportunity to be aligned with
various applicable federal projects that may be in need of
contracted vendors.
Mr. Christensen also highlighted the various guaranty lending
programs available for loan consideration via the conven-
tional local lending institutions.


Some 760foresters participated in joint meetings held on St. Thomas in June

FORESTERS: FUTURE OF

TREES IN THE CARIBBEAN
Some 160 foresters, scientists and environmentalists from the
Caribbean and the U.S. mainland met on St. Thomas to discuss the
future of trees in the Caribbean. The gathering, held at the Marriott
Frenchman's Reef Resort June 9 -14, was the first joint meeting of the
Caribbean Urban Foresters and the Caribbean Foresters.
According to Dr. Louis "Akil" Petersen, conference co-chair,
the primary benefit was networking. He said it brought the region
closer together to exchange information on all fronts. "This was
an historic occasion. Both groups of foresters were meeting for
the first time for the 7th Annual Caribbean Urban Forestry
Conference and the 11th Caribbean Foresters Meeting. Foresters
are concerned with the need to strike a balance between the
productive use of the forest for human purposes and the
sustainable existence of the forest. Urban foresters are concerned
with the use and maintenance of trees in the urban setting. It is
my hope that this joint meeting will bridge the divide between
urban and natural forest areas, because the divide is a human
delineation, not a natural one."
Petersen said that the conference was primarily for foresters
and forestry personnel. However, one of the conference's objectives
was to help educate and inform the public about the importance of
trees to the environment.
Presentations during the week included sessions on the use of
native plants on restoration projects, native urban forests of the
Virgin Islands, remarkable big trees of cultural interest in the U.S.
Virgin Islands, and native trees and their growth and development.
At an awards luncheon on Tuesday, June 11th, three groups
were recognized for their contribution toward the promotion of
urban forestry in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Awards were given to the
UVI Physical Plant, St. Thomas-St. John Anti-Litter and Beautification
and the Levitt Homes Corporation in Puerto Rico.
Foresters and local residents enjoyed the field trip to St. John.
The field trip included a self-guided trail to the Virgin Islands'
National Park at Cinnamon Bay, which featured an old sugar mill site
and native tropical forest. Presentations were made by the National
Park Rangers and local artisans.
Conference participants also toured an exhibit of locally made
products. Artisans such as Avelino Samuel from St. John, Bien
Brignoni, Stephen Walsh, Carol Spanner, Al Henry, Albion George
and Justin Todman displayed a variety of wood products made from
the local forests.
The conference was sponsored by the UVI Cooperative
Extension Service, USDA Forest Service-IITF, Puerto Rico
Conservation Foundation and the V.I. Department of Agriculture.


SBDC OFFERS
COMPLIANCE &









10 RESEARCH & PUBLIC ER VICE NEWSLETTER


SBDC CELEBRATES NATIONAL


SMALL BUSINESS WEEK


Annually, the President of the United States
declares National Small Business Week to
recognize the distinguished contributions of
small businesses throughout the U.S. and its
territories.
This year, National Small Business
Week 2002: Small Business Where America
Works was acknowledged by the UVI-SBDC
and its cooperative partner, the U.S. Small
Business Administration, by a series of
events and programs May 5-11.
The SBDC and the SBA were featured
on various television and radio programs
highlighting the services and resources
available to small businesses in the Virgin
Islands.
The week included seminars on
business planning territory-wide. An open
house with collaborative partner JPMorgan
Chase was held in St. Thomas and St. Croix.
Additionally, the SBDC engaged in providing
youth outreach through presentations to
many of the territory's schools.
The highlight of National Small
Business Week is the traditional awards
ceremony that honors entrepreneurs and
institutions. This year the SBDC collaborated
with the St. Thomas and St. Croix chapters of
the Chamber of Commerce and coordinated
business casual environments (mixers) in
conjunction with their Business After Hours
social events. Over 300 persons witnessed
the recognition of the award recipients, who
were recognized for their individual and
corporate successes and contributions to the
small business community.
In order to set the atmosphere for the


AWARD RECIPIENTS
SBDC Small Business Person(s) of the Year
OJohn Demo & Donald Siener, Caribbean
Bracelet Company (STX)
OPamela Jurgen-Abdillahi, Hi-Tek Beauty
in Nail City (STT)
ORosemary Sauter, Century 21/Sauter a
Associates (STT)
SBDC Financial Services Advocate of the
Year
OJPMorgan Chase Bank (STT)
OSmall Business Development Agency
(SBDA)/Government Development Bank
(STX)
SBA Small Business Person of the Year
OAlphonso Boyce, Gonzi's Limo and
Dignitary Service (STT)
SBA Small Business Advocate of the Year
OCynthia Jerry, New Image Foundation
Corporation
SBA Bank of the Year
OJPMorgan Chase Bank


2002


SBA Small Business Person of the Year Alphonso
Boyce, Gonzi's Limo and Dignitary Service, pictured
with wife and co-operator, Mrs. Carla Frett Boyce
Business After Hours event, the lights twinkled
softly over the Pentheny Building Courtyard in
Christiansted, St. Croix, where beautiful jazz
tunes echoed from the Central High School
Jazz Combo while culinary students from the
St. Croix Educational Complex served a feast to
please attendees' palates.
Over 125 persons turned out to discuss
the present economic issues affecting St.
Croix and join together with the SBDC to
honor some important people and organi-
zations in the community.
The SBDC awarded honors and
congratulations to John Demo and Don
Siener as "SBDC Small Business Persons of
the Year" for the economic stimulus and
contributions they have provided to the
islands. Not only have they expanded their
jewelry stores Larimar on the Waterfront
and The Caribbean Bracelet Company
throughout the islands, but they were very
instrumental in bringing a radio promo-
tional person/program, "Rock and Roll Re-
Wind," to St. Croix as its home base.This
program reaches out to the entire
continental USA as well as 18 countries
worldwide. During three hours of weekly
programming, it constantly promotes the
USVI, especially St. Croix.
Important recognition were also
awarded to JP Morgan Chase Bank for "SBA
Bank of the Year" and the V.I. Small Business
Development Agency as "SBDC Financial
Services Advocate of the Year" on St. Croix.
Their respective support in local invest-
ments to small and new businesses has a
great impact in growth for those who might
not otherwise have taken the "entrepre-
neurial leap" in today's economy.
With the blend of successful busi-
nesses, the excitement of the youths in
attendance, great food and music, this was
truly a night to remember.


DELEGATES


ATTEND


NATIONAL 4-H EVENT
continuedfrom page 72
delegates from all over the world were
represented, including individuals from
as far apart as Japan, Tobago and
Russia. These delegates represented the
6.8 million members worldwide and
more than 600,000 adult leaders.
As part of the observance, 100
individuals who made significant contri-
butions to 4-H were honored by
induction into the 4-H Hall of Fame,
accessible exclusively through
cyberspace on the national 4-H website.
The UVI delegation included Lois
Sanders, assistant director of the 4-H/
Family 8 Consumer Sciences Program;
Donna Athill, adult volunteer; and three
youth, two from St. Croix, O'Neal
Doward and Kendall Richmond; and
Audrey Malone of St. Thomas. The
Virgin Islands was one of two Caribbean
nations represented. Tobago attended
for the first time.
All of the workshops, consulting
groups and assemblies were designed
with youth in mind, from the planning to
implementation of the entire confer-
ence. It was a wonderful opportunity to
see youth encouraged to work to their
fullest potential and take leadership
roles in making sure conference goals at
every level were met.
The adults assisted in working with
the youth, but all activities were youth-
driven. Some of the most exciting
activities included the Share Fair where
representatives set up booths and
displayed success stories in their locale.
A very popular event was the pin swap
where participants exchanged pins
indicative of their country, territory or
county.
One emphasis of the content areas
was on the changing perception of 4-H,
which has historically been seen as an
organization for rural youth to learn
about "cows, cooking and sewing."
There are clubs that have these areas as
prominent activities for teens; however,
science and technology, personal devel-
opment and leadership, communication
and expressive arts are highly valued by
today's youth, as well.
Only 11 percent of 4-Hers in the U.S.
live on a farm, and 23% live in central
cities, according to the U.S. Department
of Agriculture, 2001.
This was probably one of the most
memorable and meaningful confer-
ences in the history of 4-H. For further
information, contact Ms. Lois Sanders at
(340) 692-4096, or e-mail Isander@uvi.edu.








OCTOBER 2002 11


AQUACULTURE SHORT


COURSE

LARGEST


ATTRACTS


CLASS


EVER


The 7th annual V.I. Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference was well-attended

NONPOINT SO URCE

CONFERENCE HELD
"Protecting land, sand and sea for a healthy environment
and economy" was the theme for the 7th Annual V.I. Nonpoint
Source Pollution Conference, May 16-17. More than 150 people
from the U.S. and British Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S.,
including many government agency representatives attended
the conference at the Westin Resort on St. John.
Charles James Gibson, a professional land-use planner from
the University of Connecticut's Cooperative Extension Service
and a featured speaker at the conference, discussed the need for
comprehensive planning, conservation and development as it
relates to nonpoint source pollution.
Gibson has put together a program called Nonpoint
Education for Municipal Officials. The program helps scientists
and regulators to find ways to help government officials and
people who serve on boards and commissions understand the
issues of nonpoint pollution.
Also attending the conference were Senators Adlah
Donastorg and Donald Cole. Cole, who chairs the Senate
Planning and Environmental Protection Committee, said in his
welcome remarks that he recognizes the challenges of balancing
development with conservation.
The conference also focused pollution prevention on
construction sites, marine water quality monitoring, land-use
effects on coastal waters and infrastructure in Puerto Rico and
providing alternative solutions to wastewater disposal problems.
The conference was sponsored by V.I. Department of Planning
and Natural Resources, UVI Cooperative Extension Service,
Conservation Data Center and the V.I. Marine Advisory Service.

CES CLOTHING CONSTRUCTION WORKSHOP

A seven-week program on clothing construction
sponsored by the Cooperative Extension Service culminated
on June 20, 2002. The 18 participants included a cross-
section of the St. Croix community.
Ms. Rosalind Browne, Extension Assistant spearheaded
this workshop, designed to acquaint participants with
information on the parts and functions of a sewing machine
and how to operate it. Participants quickly learned about
zippers, pockets, appliques, fabric texture, collars, buttons,
hems and other aspects of clothing construction.
Their efforts resulted in several garments ranging from
casual T-shirt fabric to two-piece skirt and top sets to
evening attire.
For more information, contact Ms. Browne at (340) 692-
4098 or e-mail rbrown@uvi.edu.


The AES Aquaculture Program held its 4th Annual
Aquaponics and Tilapia Aquaculture Short Course in June.
Twenty-four students from the Virgin Islands and around the
world participated in the seven-day course.
The course provided intensive study of the aquaculture
technology that has been developed at UVI, namely aquaponics
and greenwater tank culture. Aquaponics is the combined culture
of fish and hydroponic plants in recirculating systems while
greenwater tank culture is a bacterial-based system that
intensifies fish production greatly and produces a nutrient rich
slurry that can be used to irrigate and fertilize field crops.
Instructional staff consisted of Dr. James Rakocy, Mr. Donald
Bailey, Mr. Eric Thoman and Mr. Charlie Shultz. Each instructor
lectured daily in his area of expertise.
Students came from six countries and the U.S.A., including
such distant locations as South Africa, Lebanon and Hungary.
Other countries represented were Mexico, Canada, and Antigua.
U.S. students came from eight states (California, Washington,
Utah, Colorado, Alabama, Georgia, New Jersey, and Massachu-
setts) and two territories (U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico). This
group represented a great diversity of experience and training,
ranging from beginners to seven people with Ph.D.s.
This year's class included four students from the Virgin
Islands, three from St. Croix and one from St. Thomas. The St.
Croix students are already involved in agriculture and are
looking for ways to incorporate aquaculture into their
operations.
The Aquaculture Program has outstanding facilities for
conducting this course, including seven aquaponic systems and
ten greenwater tank systems. Among these systems is one
commercial-scale aquaponic system and one commercial-scale
greenwater tank system capable of annually producing 11,000
and 15,000 Ibs of tilapia, respectively.
Each day of instruction included a half-day of lecture and a
half-day of fieldwork. The fieldwork included all of the activities
the students needed to design, construct and operate their own
systems. The students were assigned tasks that included egg and
fry collection, fingerling sorting and stocking and marketable fish
harvesting.
They also worked with all aspects of vegetable crop
production such as mixing planting media, seeding, transplant-
ing and harvesting. This hands-on experience allowed the
students to apply the concepts taught in the morning lecture to
the reality of farm production.
Through classroom lecture and field experience the students
received a well-rounded education on UVI's aquaculture
systems. They left St. Croix with the ability to either practice
aquaculture as a hobby or on a commercial scale. They can also
serve as extension educators or initiate research programs in
aquaponics and greenwater tank culture at their home
institutions.

/STUDENTS CAME FROM SIX COUNTRIES AND THE U.S.A.,
INCLUDING SUCH DISTANT LOCATIONS AS SOUTH AFRICA,
LEBANON AND HUNGRY. OTHER COUNTRIES
REPRESENTED WERE MEXICO, CANADA, AND ANTIGUA.









12 RESEARCH & PUBLIC ER VICE NEWSLETTER


RESEARCH & PUBLIC SERVICE
" COMING EVENTS
OCTOBER NOVEMBER 2002


A delegation of UVI-CES personnel, a volunteer leader and
three territory youth attended the centennial celebration

4-HERS ATTEND NATIONAL
CONFERENCE & CENTENNIAL
CELEBRATION
The National 4-H Conference and 100th
year observance was held in Washington,
D.C., April 7-13, 2002, at the National 4-H
Center. This centennial commemoration
was entitled, "Building A Global Community:
The Power of Youth." More than 350


OCTOBER
1-12
10
24
29
NOVEMBER
5-7
7
13
14
19-21


COAST WEEK CLEAN UP STX/CMES
CUSTOMER SERVICE EXCELLENCE/STT/SBDC'
SELECTING A LEGAL STRUCTURE FOR YOUR BUSINESS STX/SBDC
LANDLORD OR TENANT: WHO'S IN CHARGE /SBDC

WRITING A WINNING BUSINESS PLAN STX/SBDC
CHECKLIST FOR GOING INTO BUSINESS/SBDC
IT'S ALL ABOUT YOUR ATTITUDE, NOT YOUR ALTITUDE STX/SBDC
SELECTING A LEGAL STRUCTURE FOR YOUR BUSINESS/SBDC
WRITING A BUSINESS PLAN/SBDC


Continued on page 70












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