Title: Dateline : UVI
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300565/00111
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Title: Dateline : UVI
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: University of the Virgin Islands.
Publisher: University of the Virgin Islands.
Publication Date: December 2010
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Bibliographic ID: CA01300565
Volume ID: VID00111
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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SPECIALIZING IN FUTURES


December 13, 2010 volxvi, number 12
Nursing Students to Benefit from Birthing Simulators


T hey have inflatable lungs, pulses,
veins, a uterus, a bladder and
they are pregnant. But these are not
your average women. Actually, they
are not women at all. They are ad-
vanced maternal birthing simulators.
The life-size mannequins belong
to the University of the Virgin Islands
School of Nursing and will be used
as teaching tools to simulate vari- -. -
ous birthing scenarios. The birthing "
simulators were unveiled and demon-
strated on the St. Thomas campus on
Dec. 6 and on the St. Croix campus --
on Dec. 10. The two Gaumard Sci- UVNursingProf
Ui/V Nursing Professo
entific NOELLE Advanced Maternal ers" a baby from the ,
and Neonatal Birthing Simulators, simulator as Tina and
one for each campus, were purchased
with a $28,574 grant from the Bennie and Martha Ben-
jamin Foundation. They will provide all UVI nursing
students instruction in normal, abnormal and multiple
deliveries.
These advanced birthing simulators are used world-
wide by healthcare educators. The equipment came with
monitors that can be programmed to show body temper-
ature, pulses and fetal heart rate, among other conditions.
It also came with a "code blue baby" on which CPR and
nasal gastric procedures, among other procedures, can be
performed.
"It rivals any university on the mainland and the
world," Dean of UVI's School of Nursing Dr. Cheryl
Franklin said. "It allows students to get the same experi-
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ence as any medical or nursing stu-
dent in the world."
Nursing Professor Meg Sheahan
explained that the Roy L. Schneider
Hospital on St. Thomas averages 60
to 90 deliveries per month, but be-
cause births are not usually sched-
"uled, it is hard to guarantee that stu-
dents will experience a live delivery
while enrolled in obstetrics courses.
"By putting this into their clini-
cal experience, we can prepare them
for what they'll experience at a hos-
pital, clinic or wherever they are,"
Prof. Sheahan said.
Meg Sheahan "deliv-
wly acquired birthing During the unveiling Nursing
David Beale look on. Professor Dr. Marion Howard and
Prof. Sheahan used the simulator to
demonstrate a normal delivery, a breach delivery and sev-
eral positioning of the placenta and umbilical cord. The
simulators also have several models of the vaginal open-
ing, showing various types of episiotomies, and a uterus
See Birthing Simulators on next page

UVI Gets a $1.5 M Grant.
$1 M to be Used for Scholarships
The University of the Virgin Islands has received a
$1.5 million grant to increase the number of students
in the Virgin Islands who enter colleges and universities.
A total of $1 million in scholarships will be available to
eligible students for the 2011-2012 academic year.
UVI, in collaboration with the Virgin Islands Board
of Education and the Office of the Governor, received the
grant from the U.S. Department of Education College
Access Challenge Grant (CACG) Program.
This grant allows UVI and its community partners to
provide information to students and families about post-
secondary education benefits, opportunities, planning and
career preparation, and to offer need-based scholarships
to students. Scholarships in the amount of $5,000 will be
available for students who demonstrate a need and meet
See Scholarships on next page


^'LIV'
st 1
Th motl nesete of Th Uiesit of th Vigi Island


HISTORICALLY AMERICAN.
UNIQUELY CARIBBEAN.
GLOBALLY INTERACTIVE.







Woodworkers Expo Offers Early Holiday Gifts


W wooden oil lamps, bowls, can-
dlesticks, mirrors, plaques,
pen cases even model sail boats
and intricate sculptures were on sale
at the fifth annual Virgin Islands'
Woodworkers' Expo. Spectators and
shoppers made their way from table
to table admiring and purchasing
items at the Expo held on St. Thom-
as Dec. 3-5 at the UVI Sports and
Fitness Center, before it moved to
St. John's Market Place Dec. 10-12.


i --- N,
Left: Candlesticks, mirrors and other items by Carol Spanner are on display and right, a
wooden dinnerware set by Bill Johnson is on display at the UVI Sports and Fitness Center


Birthing Simulators Continued
that can be hardened, softened and infused with fluid to
simulate blood loss.
"As nurses we have to anticipate everything," Dr.
Franklin said. The simulators allow students to work
through many possible childbirth scenarios and get them
to critically think through problems, she said. "It lends
itself to so much on-going teaching."
Students on both campuses will begin using the simu-
lators in the Spring 2011 obstetrics courses. But because
the simulators are so multifaceted, they will also be used
in the labs of other courses, Dr. Franklin said.

Scholarships Continued
the grant's criteria for application. Scholarships can be
used at any accredited college or university. Scholarship
applications and awards will be administered through the
V.I. Board of Education.
For more information contact Educational Outreach
Coordinator Denise Lake at 692-4101 or CACG Pro-


"The dream of Bennie Benjamin was to have the
healthcare in the Virgin Islands rival anywhere," David
Beale, executive director for the Bennie and Martha Ben-
jamin Foundation said at the event. Beale said he is happy
to see that dream being fulfilled. He was joined by Tina
Beale, the Foundation's administrator.
The Foundation is a long-time supporter of UVI's
School of Nursing. Bennie Benjamin, an acclaimed song-
writer and producer, was born on St. Croix.
The UVI School of Nursing offers two nursing pro-
grams. A Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree is offered
on the St. Thomas campus and the Associate of Science
degree is offered on St. Croix.

gram Project Investigator and Associate St. Croix Cam-
pus Administrator for Student Affairs Miriam Osborne
Elliott at 692-4188.

I4A;4e: UVI is a production of the UVI Public Rela-
tions Office. Contact us by telephone at 340-693-1056 or by
fax at 340-693-1055.


k.WL: UVI
2 John Brewer's Bay
St. Thomas, VI 00802


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