Annual report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands

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Material Information

Title:
Annual report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands
Alternate Title:
Annual report - the Governor of the Virgin Islands
Portion of title:
Annual report of the Governor of the Virgin Islands to the Secretary of the Interior
Annual report, Virgin Islands
Physical Description:
v. : tab. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Virgin Islands of the United States -- Governor
Publisher:
for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Creation Date:
1962
Frequency:
annual
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Virgin Islands of the United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States Virgin Islands

Notes

Numbering Peculiarities:
Report covers fiscal year.
General Note:
Title varies slightly.
General Note:
Vols. for 1925/26 issued as Senate document 170, U.S. 69th Congress, 2d session.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Virgin Islands
Holding Location:
University of Virgin Islands
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 01235215
lccn - 26027791
issn - 0363-3438
Classification:
System ID:
CA01300023:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
    Front Matter
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Legislation
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Important Legislation
            Page 9
    Office of the Government Secretary
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Division of Personnel
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Virgin Islands Planning Board
        Page 15
    Office of the Probation Officer
        Page 16
    Department of Agriculture and Labor
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Department of Commerce
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Department of Education
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Department of Finance
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Department of Health
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Department of Housing and Community Renewal
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Department of Property and Procurement
        Page 76
    Department of Public Safety
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Department of Public Works
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Department of Social Welfare
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Human Relatons
        Page 94
    Public Utilities Commission
        Page 95
    Selective service operations
        Page 95
    Virgin Islands Employment Service
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Municipal Courts
        Page 99
        Page 100
    Conclusion
        Page 101
Full Text





THE GOVERNOR OF THE

VIRGIN
ISLANDS
TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30


AnulRpr










THE GOVERNOR OF THE

Virgin Islands
TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30


Annual Report
1962



















UNITED STATES
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

STEWART L. UDALL, Secretary

TERRITORY OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
RALPH M. PAIEWONSKY, Governor





























UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, WASHINGTON, D.C.

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D.C. Price 35 cents





















Contents


INTRODUCTION AND HIGHLIGHTS OF THE YEAR . .
LEGISLATION . . . . .
OFFICE OF THE GOVERNMENT SECRETARY .. ...
DIVISION OF PERSONNEL .. . .......
VIRGIN ISLANDS PLANNING BOARD .. .....
OFFICE OF THE PROBATION OFFICER .. ....
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND LABOR . .
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE .....
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION .. . ......
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE .. . ......
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH .. . .......
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND COMMUNITY RENEWAL
DEPARTMENT OF LAW .. . .......
DEPARTMENT OF PROPERTY AND PROCUREMENT .
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY ....
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS .. . .....
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE .. .....
HUMAN RELATIONS .. . ........
PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION .....
SELECTIVE SERVICE OPERATIONS ....
VIRGIN ISLANDS EMPLOYMENT SERVICE .. ....
MUNICIPAL COURTS . . .. .. .
CONCLUSION . . . . .


Page
. 1













1962 Annual Report of the

Governor of the Virgin Islands

Ralph M. Paiewonsky, Governor



FISCAL year July 1, 1961 to June 30, 1962 was a year in which
tremendous progress was made in the Virgin Islands on all
fronts-political, social, economic-as this Annual Report will show.
This progress took work-plain, hard work on the part of the execu-
tive branch of the government, the legislative branch of the govern-
ment, and on the part of the people. It also required and received
the cooperation and understanding of local problems by the officials
of the Department of the Interior.
During the year the Governor appointed an Economic Development
Board consisting of Government officials and private business and
Government representatives to prepare an Overall Economic Develop-
ment program to make the Virgin Islands eligible for financial assist-
ance under the U.S. Area Redevelopment Act. By the end of the
fiscal year a comprehensive report was submitted to the Governor and
forwarded to the U.S. Area Redevelopment Administrator. This
report details the economy of the islands, bases for economic growth,
and sets forth the major problems of housing, public works, tourism,
education, industry, trade, transportation, agriculture, hospitals and
public health. It spells out the three major problems of housing, water
and electricity which are typified in all aspects and phases of living
and working in the islands.
In the field of Housing, the number one problem of the islands,
advances include the appointment of a Housing ,Coordinator; estab-
lishment of a local office of the Federal Housing and Home Finance
Agency; renovation of public villages in St. Croix; commencement of
a resettlement project in one of the worst slum areas; and, at year's
end, the creation of a new Department of Housing and Community
Renewal.
A concerted effort was made to stimulate a program of land and
home development. In emergency housing considerable progress was
made in St. Thors, and in St. Croix over 80 families evicted from pri-
vate estates were relocated on government-owned land. Applications
were filed with the Housing and Home Finance Agency for Federal







2 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

funds for urban planning assistance and for a community renewal
program. The enactment of a zoning and subdivision law-for the
first time in these islands-made the islands eligible for such Federal
aid. As a result of representations made by the Governor, a U.S.
Housing and Home Finance Agency Office was established in the
islands with an Assistant Regional Administrator for Virgin Islands
Operations. There has been an encouraging response from the bank-
ing institutions of the islands to appeals to make more credit facilities
available for housing programs.
The shortage of fresh water has always been a serious problem and
a handicap to the development of industry and tourism. Water is also
a vital need for the health, comfort, and well-being of the people who
live and work in the islands.
A new salt water distillation plant, built by the Virgin Islands Cor-
poration on the island of St. Thomas, was completed and provides
over 275,000 gallons of fresh water a day. The use of fresh water in
St. Thomas increased substantially, about double the capacity of the
distillation plant, making it necessary to continue the round-the-clock
haul from Puerto Rico. Plans for a larger distillation plant are under
active consideration.
In St. Croix the exploration for underground water met with suc-
cess. Thirty-nine wells were drilled, of which 30 were successful. Six
of these wells will provide 300,000 gallons per day of additional water
supply for the residents of Christiansted, while other wells in the
western end of the island will provide the additional water require-
ments for the people in the Frederiksted area. Under an arrange-
ment with the United States Geological Survey Division of the De-
partment of the Interior a further program for continued exploration
and evaluation of the underground water potential is being pursued
in all three islands. A geologist has now been stationed in the islands
on a permanent basis to supervise and carry out this program.
During the fiscal year the problem of the supply of electrical power,
which is generated and distributed by the Virgin Islands Corpora-
tion, continued to be urgent and critical in the Virgin Islands as a
whole, but particularly on the island of St. Thomas. The major
problem faced by the corporation's power division is its difficulty
in obtaining sufficient financing of a capital nature to keep pace with
the extremely rapid growth of the islands and with the concomitant
high rate of increase in power consumption.
The breakdown during the year of the then largest piece of generat-
ing equipment in the St. Thomas power station (a 2,500 kilowatt diesel
engine) caused serious outages throughout the island of St. Thomas.
The situation was fortunately relieved by the installation during
the year of a 3,000 kilowatt steam generating plant which did much







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 3

to correct the situation and which, as described above in this report,
also provides the basic power for the production of 275,000 gallons
of fresh water per day as a dual product. A 3,000 kilowatt diesel
unit was also installed in St. Croix during the year, greatly -ameliorat-
ing the situation in that island.
It is planned that an additional 3,000 kilowatt diesel engine will be
installed in St. Thomas later in calendar 1962 or early in 1963.
Longer range plans also call for the installation in St. Thomas of an
additional 5,000 kilowatt steam engine and a 3,000 kilowatt diesel
engine in St. Croix at a later date. Funds will have to be requested
from the United States Congress by the corporation for the latter two
units mentioned. The corporation has been assured by its power con-
sultant that the acquisition and installation of these additional units
will assure the Virgin Islands of firm power for the foreseeable future.
During the year the number of tourist visitors increased greatly.
This growth has been phenomenal, whether measured by number of
visitors or by estimated expenditures. An effective advertising and
promotional program was inaugurated and carried out, highlighting
the islands as a year round resort with wonderful climate, scenic
beauty, Old World charm and atmosphere, excellent swimming and
snorkeling, a free port with many well stocked gift shops, bargain
prices, and a convenient place to come to where English is the official
language. Hotels and guest houses were full during the winter sea-
son and continued with good business during the rest of the year.
Shops and stores also experienced increased sales in spite of the many
new ones that opened for business during the year. This increased
business was shared by everyone. As a direct result, Customs dues
increased from $502,000 in the fiscal year 1961 to $890,000 in fiscal
year 1962. Expenditures by tourists leaped to approximately
$35,000,000, an increase of $10,000,000 over the preceding year.
The National Park Service expanded and improved its facilities
on the island of St. John and established the Buck Island Underseas
Park, expected to become a prime visitor attraction on St. Croix.
These programs, together with the special $200 Customs allowance
for tourists generated unprecedented prosperity. Total revenues of
the islands jumped to $11,000,000-an increase of 251/2 percent-the
highest on record in the history of the territory, thereby permitting
record operating and capital improvements budgets.
At present, tourism is the principal industry and of primary im-
portance to the overall economy of the islands. While this is true,
and while tourism will continue to be exploited to its fullest potential,
it cannot, and should not be the islands' only industry. Prudence
and wisdom dictate diversification. Small industries are being en-
couraged to establish, creating new job opportunities at higher wages.







4 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


Secretary Udall; Governor Paiewonsky and Mrs. Paiewonsky cutting ribbon dedi-
cating the Buck Island Underseas Park on March 18, 1962.

The Industrial Incentive Act was revised in November 1961 for the
purpose of attracting and encouraging private investment from the
outside. In addition to this program, the big inducement to manu-
facturing firms is the provision contained in section 301 of the U.S.
Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, which permits duty free entry into
the United States of items of Virgin Islands manufacture containing
foreign materials of not more than 50 percent of its total value.
Practically all manufacturing firms make use of this provision
and ship the bulk of their goods to the United States. These small
industries are engaged in manufacturing, processing, or assembling
such diverse products as clothing, costume jewelry, watches, watch
bands, thermometers, chemicals, aluminum jalousies, wool yarn and
shower proofing of textiles. These concerns now employ about 864
persons with annual payrolls averaging $2,100,000, and add strength
and stability to the economy.
A major achievement was accomplished in attracting new industries
to the islands when, with legislative concurrence, a contract was signed
with the Harvey Aluminum Co., to build a $25,000,000 plant
in St. Croix to process bauxite into alumina. Besides the capital


^







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 5

investment in plant equipment and machinery, the company will em-
ploy 1,200 to 1,500 persons in various categories of employment dur-
ing the construction period, which will take about 18 months. About
400 employees will be employed on a permanent year round basis to
run the plant, with job opportunities for professional, executive,
skilled and semiskilled workers, which will contribute substantially
to a higher standard of living for the people of the Virgin Islands.
A major problem for consideration is the question of what to do
about the Virgin Islands Corporation (a wholly owned Federal
corporation) and its sugar operation, which seems to be plagued with
increasing deficits year after year. A brief look into the history of
this corporation reveals that in 1957 the Public Works Subcommittee
of the Committee on Government Operations of the United States
House of Representatives recommended that the next 3 to 5 years
should be regarded as a period for testing the economic soundness
of Vicorp's sugar operations and that the corporation should be
continued in Government ownership during that time.
The Committee further recommended that Congress should study
the results with the view of disposing of the sugar industry to private
industry or to the territorial government, if it showed a profit and if
reasonable safeguards could be agreed upon to protect the islands'
economy, or with a view to setting up a program for the discontinu-
ance of the operation and disposing of its assets if it continued to be
unprofitable.
The 5-year testing period shows that the corporation sustained an
average annual loss of some $378,000. Also, the figures on employ-
ment show that the corporation is in the odd position of importing
practically all of its labor force to harvest a crop which is being
processed and marketed at a loss.
The Federal Government undertook the sugar operations on St.
Croix in 1934 as a relief project to rescue a population economically
stranded by bankruptcy of the major sugar factory. The sugar op-
eration in St. Croix cannot justify itself financially on its past per-
formance, which shows an average loss of $378,000 over the last 5
years. Neither can it justify itself on the other premise for which it
was created: that is, to provide employment for the natives of St.
Croix.
Another important consideration is the fact that labor costs are
constantly increasing and the need for higher wages and other in-
creased costs of operation will tend to make the losses greater and
greater each year. Since the sugar industry generally depends on
cheap labor it will become extremely difficult to keep such an industry
going without a very substantial subsidy, which must now come out
of local government matching funds, which ordinarily would be







6 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

available for the building of additional schools, hospitals, and other
public projects.
After careful study and proper consideration and evaluation of the
facts and discussions with Congressional committees, and with the
Legislature of the Virgin Islands, the Board of Directors of Vicorp
will make a final determination based upon what will ultimately be
best for the people of the Virgin Islands.
During this fiscal year steps were taken to upgrade educational
standards at all levels. The professional staff in both elementary and
secondary education has been strengthened and the necessary task of
improving existing school plants and construction of new ones was
commenced. Accreditation of the high schools of the islands has been
fixed as a goal for the year 1964. After a year of study and intensive
efforts, the College of the Virgin Islands became an accomplished fact.
It will open on July 1, 1963 as a Junior College offering 2-year courses
in liberal arts, and such other subjects as may be prescribed by the
Board of Trustees, to about 100 students.
Medical services were strengthened by the addition of a modern
annex to the hospital at St. Croix to meet the need of the out-patient
clinics and the addition of an up-to-date formula room in the hospital
in St. Thomas.
An apprenticeship and training program was started. The Home
for the Aged in St. Croix was renovated and, with improved staff,
is resulting in 100 percent improved care. An inspection of prisons
was made by the Director of the U.S. Bureau of Prisons who
recommended that a new and modem prison be built.
In public works, a contract was awarded for hauling garbage to the
sea in St. Thomas. The money value of construction completed and
initiated was $6,945,000 on 40 projects, principal of which were six
schools, airport extension on St. Thomas to handle turbo-prop planes,
construction of a deep water pier at Frederiksted, and construction of
a jet airstrip on St. Croix. Jet planes service from the mainland to
the Virgin Islands commenced in June 1962.
A management survey and design for a new centralized accounting
system were prepared to commence operation in July 1962. The in-
come tax administration program was surveyed by the U.S. Internal
Revenue Service and reorganization to improve tax collection serv-
ices is in process.
A professionally directed real property reassessment program re-
sulted in an increase of 44 percent in real property tax collections
from $348,000 in 1961 to $503,000 in 1962. These taxes should increase
well over 100 percent within 4 years.







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 7

President Kennedy and Secretary of the Interior Udall have stated
publicly they are in favor of an elected governor for the islands, and
legislation was recommended to the Congress to permit the people of
the islands to elect their own governor. In sending a message to the
Congress on this subject, the President noted that the Virgin Islands
have demonstrated a maturity and a capacity for stable and
responsible government.


Legislation

Cooperation and understanding between the Executive and Legis-
lative Branches of the Government of the Virgin Islands were at an
all-time high during the fiscal year. The following record of legisla-
tion is an indication of the responsible cooperation achieved between
the two branches:
Six sessions of the legislature were held-three special sessions of
the Fourth Legislature, July 14, 1961, October 23-30, 1961, December
4-5, 1961; the regular session of the Fourth Legislature, January 8-
March 8, 1962, followed by special sessions on April 11, 1962 and June
6-13, 1962.
At the July 14, 1961 special session, three bills were proposed,
adopted and approved. At the October 23-30, 1961, special session 24
bills were proposed, in addition to 3 resolutions. Adopted were 22
bills, of which 22 were approved and 2 bills referred to committee for
further study. At the December 4-5 special session 4 bills and 1 reso-
lution were proposed. All were adopted and the 4 bills approved.
At the regular session, January 8-March 8, 1962, there were 111
bills proposed, including 8 resolutions. Ninety bills were adopted,
including 8 resolutions, 1 was withdrawn, 6 incorporated in other bills
and 14 were referred to committee for further study. Seventy-seven
were approved, 8 required no executive action, 5 were pocket vetoed
and 1 was recalled. -''
There were three bills proposed, and one resolution at the April 11,
1962 special session. F6ur bills were adopted, of which three were ap-
proved and one required no executive action.
Thirty-six bills were proposed at the June 6-June 13, 1962 special
session. Thirty-three were adopted, of which one required no execu-
tive action; three were referred to committee for further study; thirty-
two were approved.







8 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS





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Under Secretary of the Interior James K. Carr; Congressman Wayne N. Aspinall,
Chairman, House Interior and Insular Afairs Committee; Congressman Leo
O'Brien, House Interior and Insular Affairs Committee; and Governor Ralph M.
Paiewonsky, at the dedication of the new Salt Water Distillation Plant in St.
Thomas, which produces 275,000 gallons of fresh water per day and furnishes
3,000 KW of electric power from a steam generating plant.


34







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 9

Important Legislation
Several important and significant pieces of legislation were passed,
including the following:
1. Act No. 778, to create the Apprenticeship and Training
Council.
2. Act No. 798, Relating to the Industrial Incentive program
to plug loopholes in earlier programs, and to provide for further
stimulation of the economy of the islands.
3. Act No. 800, to establish the Buck Island National Monu-
ment in St. Croix.
4. Act No. 801, to provide for zoning and subdivisions.
5. Act No. 814, to ratify and adopt an agreement relating to
an Alumina Plant Development on the Island of St. Croix, for the
purpose of encouraging and promoting the investment of at least
$25,000,000 of private capital in an alumina processing plant.
6. Act No. 816, to regulate the issuance of injunctions in labor
disputes.
7. Act No. 819 relating to the Personnel Division, for the pur-
pose of strengthening the Merit System for career government em-
ployees by providing for fair hearings before the Government
Employees Service Commission in dismissal cases.
8. Act No. 834, the Joseph A. Gomez Homestead Exemption
Act for the purpose of encouraging home ownership through a
partial exemption from the payment of real property taxes.
9. Act No. 845, to raise the legal rate of interest on first priority
mortgages on real estate from 6 to 7 per centum for the purpose
of stimulating new mortgage money for housing construction.
10. Act No. 852, to establish the College of the Virgin Islands,
the cardinal objectives of which shall be the stimulation and utili-
zation of the intellectual resources of the people of the Virgin
Islands and the development of a center of higher learning where-
by and wherefrom the benefits of culture and education may be
extended throughout the Virgin Islands, the Caribbean and other
areas.
11. Act No. 855, to reorganize and establish the Department of
Law.
12. Act No. 871, for the acquisition of land in several areas of
Charlotte Amalie for resettlement of superficiary house occu-
pants in owner-occupied dwellings.
13. Act No. 873, for the acquisition of land in St. Croix for
the purpose of community development.
14. Act No. 903, to establish the Department of Housing and
Community Renewal. This Act also provides for the Virgin







10 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Islands Housing Authority and the Virgin Islands Urban Re-
newal Board with the head of the Department as chairman of
both agencies for better coordination.
15. Act No. 902, to promote and regulate safety in the use and
operation of motor boats.


Office of the Government Secretary

Act No. 819, Fourth Legislature, regular session 1962, provided for
the transfer of the Division of Personnel to the Office of the Governor
effective March 1, 1962. Except for this change, the duties and re-
sponsibilities of the Office of the Government Secretary remained the
same as established by the Revised Organic Act of 1954 and the Virgin
Islands Code of Laws.
The activities for the year included continuation of the important
function of compiling and publishing the laws and regulations of the
Government of the Virgin Islands such as the annual supplements
to the code, rules and regulations, register, session laws, reports, and
the enactments of the legislature in slip-law form. During the year,
140 acts and 14 resolutions of the legislature were filed with the Gov-
ernment Secretary's Office pursuant to law and were ordered printed
in slip-law form.
The office conducted surveys and on-the-spot inspections to ensure
coverage of all businesses by the appropriate license, and to determine
to some degree the growth of the community as manifested by the in-
creasing number of businesses and occupations. The following chart
shows a comparison of licenses issued, and fees collected over the past
four fiscal years:

Licenses issued and fees collected

1959 1960 1961 1962
District _
Licenses Fees Licenses Fees Licenses Fees Licenses Fees
St. Thomas
and St. John 1165 $43,918.80 1227 $46,238.501 1393 $51,689.00 1514 $117,839.98
St. Croix _-- -- 630 21,224.20 886 30,549.00 974 34,659.00 922 38, 474.00
Total _-- 1795 $65,143.00 2113 $76,787.50 2367 $86,348.00 2436 $156,313.98

Corporate activity also showed a steady increase in the number of
new corporations registered, despite the fact that there has been an
increase in the number of corporations dissolved or withdrawn. Dur-
ing the year total corporate franchise taxes collected amounted to
$20,128.00 as compared with $16,464.00 in 1961. Other corporation








REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 11

fees collected during the fiscal year totaled $12,458 as compared with
$11,874 in the preceding year.

1959 1960 1961 1962

Foreign Domestic Foreign Domesti c Foreign Domestic Foreign Domestic

Certificates of incorporation
issued ..---- ..--------- 5 82 8 111 14 115 17 166
Certificates of amendments
issued -.----......------------ 8 1 30 1 24 2 30
Dissolutions _--------- --------_____ 2 4 3 12
Withdrawals-----...-- 2 -----_- -- ------ ----- 2 ..... ___ 2 ..----- -
Mergers --------- ----.- --- .... ........ 2 3
Surrender ofcorporate rights --.... ...... ....... .I ... .......---------- -------- 3


Trademark and patent activity in 1962 increased to 24 registrations
and $1,305 in collected fees as against 12 registrations and $810 in fees
during 1961.
The Office of the Government Secretary continued the preparation
and issuance of all passports in accordance with the rules and regula-
tions prescribed by the U.S. Department of State. During the fiscal
year, 199 passports were issued, 28 were renewed, 9 were amended,
and 1 was extended, a total of 237 passport actions to compare with
252 for last year.
There were 68 insurance agent's licenses issued during the year
as compared with 47 in the preceding year. The following is a com-
parative table of taxes and fees collected for the past four fiscal years.

1959 1960 1961 1962

Renewal of certificates of authority and original regis-
trations-.---...--------------------------. $1,538.50 $1,651.00 $1,951.00 $3,076.00
Agent's licenses...------------------------------1,831.00 1,521.00 2,111.00 2,821.86
Broker's licenses ------ ---------------------- ----- 100.00......
Gross premium taxes ------- ........-------------- 5,079.08 6,002.95 12,316.87 12,784.86
Filing annual statements-.-----.-------------------- 101.00 98.50 126.00 151.00
Filing power of attorney---. -----__......__.___ __.. 15.00 15.00 45.00 145.00
Booklet of insurance laws..... ----------------------. ___ -- -_ 51.00 61.00
Solicitor's licenses..........._ __.._._....._..__.... _-----------_ ._ __------------_ 200. 00
Total ...---......--. ---____ .......__ ....._ 8,564.58 9,888.45 16,700.87 19.239.72


The Board of Control of Alcoholic Beverages prescribed and en-
forced the regulations pertaining to distilled spirits. The high stand-
ard of rums produced in the Islands must be maintained because of
the importance of the rum industry to the local economy. United
States excise taxes on rum and other products contributed $7,761,935
in revenues to the Virgin Islands Government in 1962 on the 741,260
proof gallons shipped.
The Sanitary Facilities Committee continued efforts to eliminate
the antiquated and objectionable nightsoil removal service and replace
it by connections to the modern sewer and sanitary disposal system.







12 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

While the housing shortage made it virtually impossible to relocate
tenants occupying undesirable areas, nevertheless 55 applications were
processed, 40 of which received loans totalling $48,516 for the con-
struction of proper sanitary facilities.
During the year the Government Secretary's Office was relieved of
the program for construction of urgently needed emergency housing
as this responsibility was coordinated with the office of special assist-
ant to the Governor in charge of housing.


Office of the Tax Assessor

The real estate property tax reassessment project conducted by a
private management consultant firm established an up-to-date system
of real property evaluation and taxation. Act No. 834 approved
March 15, 1962, provided homestead exemptions and Act No. 909, ap-
proved June 18, 1962, arranged to spread increases over a period of
four years. While it is estimated that these laws will reduce real
property tax collections by some $160,000, it is expected that this pro-
gram will bring an estimated $629,854 in revenues from 1962 assess-
ments, an increase of $87,605 over taxes computed in 1961 assessments.
The following is a detailed table of assessments and taxes by islands:

Real property assessments

1957 1958 1959 1960 1961

St. Thomas--._ _. ... ------ $13,170,900 $15,053,900 $16,846,500 $28,939,384 $28, 432, 438
St. Croix---....------------- 11,179,102 12, 329, 066 13, 020, 298 27, 391,290 29,135,558
St. John-.-----.. --....---------- 598, 400 662, 700 642,956 1,890,266 2,016,358
Total ------------- 24,948,402 28,045,666 30,509, 754 58,220,940 59,584,354

Real property taxes

1957 1958 1959 1960 1961

St. Thomas .------------..-- $164, 637 $188,175 $210, 581 $296,228 $305, 456
St. Croix ----- -------_ --- 139, 739 154, 113 162, 856 231,908 304,194
St. John -------------- -- 7,480 8,285 8,037 14,113 20,204
Total. --------- ---- 311,856 350, 573 381,474 542,249 629, 854







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 13

Offices of the Recorder of Deeds-St. Thomas and St. Croix

The following is a comparative table of documents recorded during
the last four fiscal years:

1960 1961 1962
Document
St. Thomas St. Croix St. Thomas St. Croix St. Thomas St. Croix

Deeds ....____----.--___ 448 480 426 441 583 676
Mortgages--..---.--... 327 325 360 383 349 403
Chattle mortgages ..-- 70 113 116 144 236 166
Conditional sales con-
tracts.......___ 863 59 886 106 1,040 161
Cancellations and re-
leases ----------- 220 240 216 401 235 352
Bills of sale----- ---------- ---- ------- 11 ------
Adjudications ....--- 18 8 24 15 21 30
Certificates of death---- __- 16 5 8 2 10
Assignments-..- ---._-- -___-_-_ _----- --- 35 ------
Leases-- __--- 18 -- _------ 43 -
Easements --------- --------- ----15 --.--------- -------------- ------- -
Liens...----.....------------- 34 _- 91 -----.
Miscellaneous -..... 116 119 86 132 119 297
Certificates of attach-
ment------------_ ----_----- 107 ------------ 113
Total.------- --- 2,062 1,360 2,221 1,737 2,730 2,208


Industrial Incentive Program

The Industrial Incentive program, geared over the past five years
toward attracting industries to the Virgin Islands with the objective
of providing large scale employment locally, was moderately effective
and was scheduled to expire on December 31, 1961. However, the
administration mindful of the problems and anxious to improve the
economic opportunities for the people of the Virgin Islands conducted
a study of the laws and policies governing the incentive program.
Based on the findings, Act 798 was passed to extend the program,
enlarge the number of eligible enterprises and remove the conflicts
and ambiguities of the old law. It was hoped that these improve-
ments would induce new industries to establish in the Virgin Islands.
This may well have been the case, as in 1962 there were 76 tax exempt
businesses as compared with 55 in the preceding year, and it attracted
Harvey Alumina, a corporation with a demonstrable capital invest-
ment of $1,000,000 and annual employment potential of 500 persons.


Division of Personnel

The Division of Personnel completed its fifteenth year of opera-
tion, having been created in 1947. Its work is concerned with
performing centralized staff functions for the Government of the
677738-63--- 2







14 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Virgin Islands, in addition to providing departmental personnel
services for the operating agencies of the executive branch. It also
administers the local Retirement Law, and acts as liaison agency
between the Territorial Government and the Federal Social Secur-
ity Administration in matters relating to coverage of government
employees.
During the past year the Division of Personnel was transferred
by legislative action from the Office of the Government Secretary
to the Office of the Governor, a change which had been contem-
plated by several past administrations.
Several significant pieces of legislation affecting personnel ad-
ministration were enacted during the past year. A local unem-
ployment insurance system was created, although employee benefit
payments will not begin until 2 years hence. The powers of the
five-member Government Employees Service Commission were ex-
panded considerably so that the Commission now has final author-
ity in deciding on employee appeals from dismissal, demotion, or
suspension for more than 30 days. Veterans' preference in com-
petitive examinations for employment was liberalized to permit
claiming the 5 percent perference without first having to pass the
particular examination. Another important piece of legislation
permits any department head to recommend and the Governor to
approve, the issuance of a noncompetitive classified service appoint-
ment to anyone who has served satisfactorily for a minimum of
60 days in an emergency or provisional capacity.
The Retirement Law was amended to provide a form of life
insurance benefit whereby the surviving beneficiary who is not en-
titled to other benefits under the law is granted a cash payment,
the amount of which is related to length of service and last salary
of the deceased employee. The maximum payment is one full
year's salary up to a maximum of $7,500, where the employee had
served for 10 years or more. Due to financial restrictions, no action
has as yet been taken to relieve underfinancing of the retirement
system by raising from 4 percent to 7.63 percent the Government's
contribution as has been recommended by the consulting actuary.
The results of a pay plan study for which the Government con-
tracted with a consulting firm are now available, and legislation is
being prepared. The study, based upon community wage data, is
the first of its kind in almost 10 years, and only the second such
study since creation of the Personnel Division. Also included in
the contract was a study for up-dating the personnel rules and
regulations.







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 15

In another attempt to meet difficult recruitment, the government
embarked on its first large-scale effort to provide housing for em-
ployees recruited outside of the Virgin Islands, thereby making
quarters available in St. Thomas at reduced rentals to about 50
teachers. Along similar lines, legislative authority is being used
to allow reimbursement of most normal expenses incurred by em-
ployees and their families traveling to the Virgin Islands to accept
employment.
A depleted labor market made short by our rapid economic
growth, our high cost of living which decreases attractiveness of
our salaries, and our acute shortage of middle-income housing are
still the major factors in making recruitment difficult, particularly
for those professions and skills which must be recruited from out-
side. While the salary factor is important, especially to resident
personnel, the housing and cost of living factors are the most
serious in terms of attracting the skills and professions which are
not produced by local educational and training facilities; and un-
til these problems are rectified we will not be in a favorable com-
petitive position to attract such employees to our Islands.
The following is a distribution of positions as to major occupa-
tional groups and also showing the total number of permanent
employees of the Government of the Virgin Islands.

St. Thomas St. Croix Total
and St. John

Clerical ......-------- -------------- ---------------- 219 87 306
Administrative -. ... .......- ------------------- 92 37 129
Supervisory --------------------------------------- 5 5 10
Professional -_------------ 290 200 490
Subprofessional ---.... ---- ---------------- 94 87 181
Public Safety -__ _--------- ----------------------- 71 84 155
Inspectional -....- -- ----- -------------- -- 11 6 17
Equipment operators --------------------------------- 38 34 72
Trades and labor ------------------------------------- 220 169 389
Housekeeping -...........----------------------- 84 81 165
Food service ____ ...... -----------.----- -------- 69 53 122
Farming and gardening .--- --------------------- 3 0 3
Total Classified Service------------------ 1,196 843 2,039
Unclassified Service---------------- --------. --. ..222
Total Virgin Islands- -- 2, 261



Virgin Islands Planning Board

During the year the Planning Board prepared the zoning regula-
tions which were enacted as subchapters III and IV of chapter 3, title
29 of the Virgin Islands Code. As provided therein, the Board also
prepared zoning maps and subdivision regulations and held public







16 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

hearings thereon in Charlotte Amalie, Christiansted, Frederiksted,
Cruz Bay, and Coral Bay.
The Board also prepared plans for waterfront improvement in
Christiansted, and a marina at Enighed Lagoon in St. John.
In February a new Board was appointed in accordance with legis-
lative changes in its organization, requiring legislative approval of
members and making the Commissioner of Public Works ex-officio
Secretary of the Board.
A contract was signed with the Housing and Home Finance Agency
for an urban planning assistance grant of $113,875, the first such
grant in the Virgin Islands.
A contract was negotiated with Aero Service Corporation to pro-
duce maps of approximately one-half of the Virgin Islands for
$86,400.
By the end of the year all subdivision applications were being
submitted to the Board.
The Board studied and approved the three Urban Renewal Plans
for the Barracks Yard area in Charlotte Amalie, Water Gut area in
Christiansted, and the Lagoon Street area in Frederiksted.


Office of the Probation Officer

During the year 130 defendants were investigated, representing an
increase of 73 cases over the number of cases received in 1960-61.
At the beginning of the fiscal year the case load was 46. From July 1,
1961 to June 30, 1962, 102 cases were received, making a total case
load of 148 cases handled during the year. This office averaged about
65 cases under supervision monthly.
Twenty-six preparole reports were submitted to the Parole Board.
The Probation Office also made 27 reports in connection with the In-
terstate Compact Administration on persons who had previously
lived here, or were desirous of taking up residence here.
This office also supervised the activities of a total of 20 juveniles
for a 6 months' period each by order of the Judge of the Municipal
Court in St. Thomas. Although they were not formally placed on
probation, nevertheless, they increased the work volume.
With the growing awareness of the role probation plays in the com-
munity, this office has been called upon to render additional services.
Several reports were made in contempt cases for nonsupport
payments.







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 17

Department of Agriculture and Labor

St. Croix Agricultural Program

The activities of this Division are organized to serve the increasing
needs of the farmers engaged in this highly competitive industry.
In response to requests and complaints from farmers and citizenry,
regarding the difficulties experienced in obtaining certain supplies and
services necessary for successful farming, this division is a source of
seeds and seedlings, fruit trees, fertilizer, insecticides, land preparation
and technical advice.
These supplies and services are available to the public at cost.
Duplication or competition with private business engaged in these
services is avoided.
Through this service, many citizens have been able to establish small
orchards of grafted mangoes, bananas, avocadoes, and many varieties
of citrus fruits. Some farmers obtain their entire supply of seeds or
seedlings from this agency.
During this year 63,149 pounds of vegetables were harvested from
the crop trial at the station at Anna's Hope, St. Croix. Of the total
amount harvested, 58,546 pounds were distributed to the government
institutions. The remaining 4,603 pounds were used to supplement
the swine feeding program.
The Swine Improvement and Production program got its start early
in this year. Already, this program is meeting some of its short-run
goals. Many citizens have secured baby pigs from our stock. Boars
have given service to the sows of many farmers.
Most of the sows have given birth to at least one litter of pigs within
their first year of life and some of the older sows have already weaned
their second litter.

Loans to Farmers and Fishermen

This medium of credit became active at the close of this fiscal year.
Over 20 farmers and fishermen, representing all three islands, received
loans up to $500 from funds appropriated for this purpose by the
legislature.
Many of the recipients have purchased outboard motors and fish-
ing traps to enable them to increase their fishing range. The farming
applicants are purchasing irrigation pumps, and equipment for hog
and poultry raising.







18 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Soil Conservation Service

With the transfer of the Soil Conservation Service to this depart-
ment from the Virgin Islands Corporation, a significant increase in
water conservation and supply is anticipated. Pond construction to
supplement the deficient water supply on the island of St. Thomas is
being planned. It is also planned that the construction of additional
ponds on the island of St. Croix will make an active contribution in
the off-season production of vegetable crops.
In St. Thomas a survey will be made to determine two possible
sites for the construction of ponds with a capacity of some 40,000,000
gallons each. It is projected that this amount of fresh water will
serve a great need in the acute water shortage in St. Thomas and, at
the same time, reduce the high cost of purchasing water elsewhere.
It is anticipated that this program will be also extended to the island
of St. John.

Wild Life

During the year 110 bird licenses and 53 deer licenses were processed.

St. Thomas Agricultural Program

The Dorothea Station in St. Thomas served the community through
the sales of plants, insecticides, fertilizers, chemicals and technical
advice. The maintenance and further beautification of the parks on
this island were provided by this station.
Members of the staff worked closely with the Soil Conservation
Board in several field extension projects such as land utilization,
terracing, irrigation, and developing methods which would reduce
the cost of production.

Parks and Beaches

Li'mpricht Park.-After many decades of depreciation and in-
activity, and upon the request of the Land Marks League, this de-
partment undertook the rejuvenation of Limpricht Park in
Christiansted.
This park was completely cleaned and redecorated with several
hundred ornamental plants of many different varieties. Included
among the new installations and decorations are lights, fountain,
benches, concrete walks, painting of walls, fences and statue.
Cramer Park.-After an extensive improvement program by this
department, the gate of Cramer Park was officially opened on June







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 19

7, 1961. Since opening day, 28,497 recreational seekers have passed
through this gate. Since less than 1,000 persons attended Cramer
Park prior to the park's administration under this department, this
figure represents an increase 30 times greater than the past attendance.
The Frederiksted Waterfront.-The newly developed waterfront
parkway in Frederiksted extends approximately 1,500 feet in length
or 31/2 city blocks. The beautification of this area was accomplished
by this department.
Other Parks.-Regular maintenance duties in the parks of St.
Thomas, Christiansted, and Frederiksted were carried out. These
duties include replacement planting, pruning, fertilizing, mowing of
lawns, and painting when necessary.

Sugarcane Subsidy in St. Croix

This program functions in two forms of assistance to sugarcane
producers:
1. A producer receives $1 for each ton of sugarcane delivered to
the factory. This form is limited to 2,000 tons per farmer.
2. A producer is eligible to receive $50 for each new acre of sugar-
cane planted during a year. This form is limited to a maximum of
30 acres.
During this period 235 claims were processed.

Workmen's Compensation

During the year the Division of Labor received a total of 1,003
injury reports. There were 1,135 awards made representing com-
pensation for disability, death, medical attendance, funeral expenses,
and cost of publications with respect to death cases. The total figure,
amounting to $132,347.60, is broken down as follows:
Temporary total disability ___________________________ ---$52, 997. 03
Permanent partial disability_---___________________________ 26, 140. 81
Permanent total disability -----------_ ___-- 2, 565. 16
Medical costs, including travel- -------_-------- _----- __ 45,116.33
Death compensation ------- ------------------- 5, 000. 00
Funeral expenses ------------------ _----- ------ 206. 77
Newspaper publications ------ ----------- -------- 321. 50

Industrial Safety
This phase of the Division's activities is supervised by two Safety
Inspectors. They enforce special safety regulations in regard to
safety in industry. During this fiscal year, compliance with such
regulations has been generally good.







20 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Wage and Hour Administration

During the period 70 complaints were filed with the Division with
regard to wages, and a total of $4,616.07 was recovered on behalf of
the employees. An unrecorded number of minor complaints and
inquiries were settled by on-the-job contacts and examination of
payrolls.
The Insular Wage Board completed its study of the industries in
the Virgin Islands during the year. As of June 30, four wage orders
were in effect and Wage Order No. 5 had been forwarded to the
Governor for approval.

Legislation

During the fiscal year under review, Act No. 791 was passed by the
legislature and approved by the Governor providing, among other
things, that the Insular Wage Board follow certain procedures in
establishing minimum wages, such as fixing at least three categories
in each industry. This Act also provided for a 5-day work week
beyond which an employer must pay overtime rates, and for the de-
termination of prevailing wage rates to be used by the Virgin Islands
Employment Service in clearances for nonresident workers.

Labor Relations

Under the provisions of the Labor Relations Chapter of the Virgin
Islands Code, the number of petitions filed by the labor organizations
for certification was 14. In some instances, certification was made
without an election where the union proved that more than 50 percent
of any group wanted the union. Otherwise, elections were held by
the secret ballot to determine the representative.

Office of Veterans Affairs
The Office of Veterans Affairs carried out its functions in the usual
manner, educating veterans and their dependents with regard to their
rights and privileges and filing of necessary claims for benefits.
There were 2,189 contacts made with the Director in and out of
the office.
Services to enlisted personnel and their dependents have greatly
increased, especially in St. Croix, due to the lack of Red Cross
personnel.






REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 21

Division of Apprenticeship and Training

Since the creation of this Division, the Director has started a survey
of trades and industries to establish a priority status according to
demands and the immediate interests in our communities.
Several conferences were held with representatives of the hotel in-
dustry, the construction industry, religious and civic groups, the
Vocational Coordinator, Department of Education, and students of
the high school.
The Apprenticeship and Training Council has approved a set of
standards, and preparations are underway for placements in different
trades.

Finance

Financial support of the varied activities of the Department of
Agriculture and Labor amounted to $256,691.76.


Department of Commerce

The Department of Commerce has expanded both in scope and
activity since its inception May 1, 1961. Its aims have been to imple-
ment and support the ambitious and effective program of economic
development undertaken by the administration.
The principal divisions of the Department are the Visitor's Bureau
(renamed from the Division of Tourism), Division of Trade and
Industry, and the Marine and Aviation Division.
The Department also operates the News Bureau, assists the Virgin
Islands Rum Council, maintains Virgin Islands Government Infor-
mation offices in New York City and San Juan, Puerto Rico, and
cooperates closely with the Tourist Advisory and Trade Advisory
Boards.
This stimulated and expanded program is now achieving results
and has made the current fiscal year the most successful in Virgin
Islands history from the standpoint of tourism.

Literature

Literature this year featured a new look, emphasizing the slogan,
"1-2-3-Go to the Virgin Islands." This, with the "V I" image which
has been devised as the symbol for the Virgin Islands, affords an
effective set of selling material.







22 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

The Department had printed and distributed the new Vacation
Adventure brochure, a shopping brochure in both English and Span-
ish, rate sheets for both summer and winter, the Three Island bro-
chure, Pertinent Facts booklets, weather insurance policies, luggage
stickers, postcards and posters. In addition, the Department prepares
and prints a cruise ship list and issues a monthly News Bulletin to
tourist interests, travel agents and transportation officials. Whenever
necessary, this material is updated at each reprinting to keep it in line
with changes in the Islands' tourist economy.

Publicity

Favorable and widespread publicity in all media has been a strong
support for the Department's advertising and promotional efforts.
The varied vacation appeals of the Islands stressed in newspapers,
magazines, and on radio and television would have cost, if paid for at
prevailing rates, more than $5,000,000 during the fiscal year. The
dedication of the new underwater National Park at Buck Island, St.
Croix, earned favorable Virgin Islands mention and picture place-
ments in newspapers around the world, two full color pages in Life
Magazine and other feature articles in addition to radio and television
coverage.
Visiting writers and photographers are helped on their visits and
the News Bureau provides travel and other features for newspapers
and magazines as well as hometown pictures of visitors. It also covers
Department activities and works closely with other Government
departments in assisting on publicity coverage.

Weather Insurance

A new promotion emphasizes the Virgin Islands' ideal year round
weather. This was accomplished by interesting many of the hotels
and guest houses to cooperate by guaranteeing free rooms for guests
any day the mean temperature fell below 700. Special "weather in-
surance policies" were printed and distributed. This unique "weather
insured, pleasure insured" policy was stressed in a strong advertising
program in newspapers, national magazines and travel trade
publications.

Information Offices

For the convenience of prospective travellers and business interests,
Virgin Islands Government Information Offices are maintained in
New York City and San Juan, P.R.







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 23

The New York Office is at 16 West 49th Street in an attractive
ground floor location in the heavily travelled Rockefeller Center com-
plex. During the year this office handled 32,361 inquiries and dis-
tributed 75,742 units of literature. The staff maintains close personal
contacts with travel executives and supplies information and coordi-
nates promotional efforts. Similar service is provided by the Infor-
mation Center in San Juan in recognition of the growing importance
of the Puerto Rican market among residents of that Island as well as
visitors and transient 'businessmen.


Cruise Ships

St. Thomas continued to hold its position as the most popular port
of call for Caribbean cruise ships during the fiscal year. A total of
131 cruise vessels visited Charlotte Amalie, bringing 57,639 vacation-
ers. Progress in this field is reflected in the fact that in 1951-52 only
12 ships, carrying 5,293 passengers, visited St. Thomas.
While the total number of ships decreased from 157 for fiscal year
1961 to 131 for fiscal year 1962, the number of passengers increased
slightly from 57,470 in fiscal year 1961 to 57,639 in 1962. Due to per-
mission granted American flag vessels to deviate from their normal
runs without sacrificing regular subsidy payments, St. Thomas was
favored with visits of such ships as the United States, America,
Independence, Brazil, Argentina, and the Santa ships of the Grace
Line.

Month Cruise ships Passengers

July 1961 -- --------------------------------------------- 6 2,221
August -...-- 8 3, 037
September--------- 1 417
October .- .- ---------------------------------------------------- 5 2,087
November .. --------- --.----------------------- 8 3,119
December ... .... ......------------------------------------------- 14 5,976
January 1962 -.----------------------------- 23 9, 670
February -..........-------------------------- 21 9, 918
March ..--------------------------------- 26 13,358
April. --- ------------------------ 11 5,499
May -. __ ------------- -------------- 4 1,060
June ----------------------- 4 1,277
Totals-- ---------------- 131 57,639


Tourist Visitors

A total of 291,100 visitors came to the Virgin Islands during the
year, as compared with 254,700 for fiscal year 1961 and 203,400 for
fiscal year 1960.
Air Traffic Cruise Ships
1959-60 ------------------ 124, 400 1959-60 --------- ----- 49, 700
1960-61 --- -----------146,100 1960-61 -------------- 57,470
1961-62 ---------------- 176,750 1961-62 ------------- 57, 638







24 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Tourist Expenditures
Again utilizing 1951-52 as a base year, tourist expenditures in the
Virgin Islands have increased more than sevenfold since that time.
The 1951-52 figure was $4,100,000. This fiscal year saw tourist ex-
penditures totalling $35,100,000, up from $25,817,000 for fiscal year
1960-61.

Visitor's Bureau
The Visitor's Bureau, previously known as the Division of Tourism,
was renamed during the present fiscal year. It is responsible for the
development of tourist traffic to the Virgin Islands and for the overall
supervision of vacationers and proper operation of resort facilities.
There is an office in St. Thomas and one in St. Croix to accomplish
these objectives.

Promotional Program
The Department's advertising campaign in all media was stepped up
with effective results. Tourists interests and both air and sea carriers
to the Islands cooperated to give this campaign more scope and im-
pact. Supplemental tie-in campaigns with department stores and
resort wear manufacturers were undertaken successfully. Newspaper
advertising insertions were increased in proven markets and new areas
opened with advertising campaigns in several new cities. Spot com-
mercials were utilized on radio in New York City. Of particular note
was the completion of a new promotional motion picture, in color and
black and white, for showing on television and to serve as a tool in
selling group promotion. Advertising in travel trade media also was
accelerated with good results.

Virgin Islands Rum Council
The past fiscal year saw the first major effort by the Virgin Islands
Government, through the Virgin Islands Rum Council, to promote its
rums on a national scale. This has succeeded, as revealed in U.S.
Treasury figures on excise taxes collected and returned to the Virgin
Islands from rums shipped to the mainland during the last fiscal
year. A record $7,761,935 was returned to the Virgin Islands Treas-
ury, an increase of $841,493 over the previous year. Stepped up ad-
vertising had a beneficial impact on the liquor industry-the first
insert was selected by the trade as "the best liquor advertisement of the
year." In addition, promotional material has been eminently suc-
cessful and wide distribution is in progress.







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 25

Marine and Aviation Division

The Marine and Aviation Division functions to supervise and oper-
ate the Government-owned docks, wharves and airports, and has
charge of registering and licensing small boats, both private and those
for public hire. Completion of runway improvements at Alexander
Hamilton Airport in St. Croix enabled that island to join the jet age
on Saturday, June 9, 1962 when appropriate ceremonies welcomed
the first scheduled jet airliner which is a forerunner to faster, more
frequent and more convenient air transportation. New fueling
facilities are now under construction and runways and taxiways are
being improved.
Another important gateway to St. Croix was opened the following
day, June 10, 1962, when the new 1,200-ft. deep-water pier at Frederik-
sted was officially dedicated. Enabling deep-draught vessels to tie
alongside, the pier is convenient to the business district and enables
commercial vessels to load and discharge cargoes directly without
delays and demurrage of lightering.

Port of Charlotte Amalie

576 ships paid $42,316 pilotage.
566 merchant ships totalled 2,576,724 gross tons.
148 Government ships totalled 1,102,020 gross tons.

Port of Christiansted

953 arrivals.
949 departures.

Port of Frederiksted

159 arrivals.
159 departures.
The following tables show traffic at the two airports:

Harry S. Truman Airport, St. Thomas

Passengers
Landings
In Out
Caribbean Atlantic Airlines ...------------... ------------- 9,102 176, 802 176, 997
B.W.I.A. and Leeward Islands Air Transport ...- -----------. 1,015 4,764 4,654
Nonscheduled and private aircrafts... ---- .. 3,204 4,404 (1)
Military aircraft .----.-.-------------.---------- 1,082 2,689
Air taxi. ----------..--------------------------------642 837
Total ---- ....------- --- ---------..- 15,045 189,496 181,651

1 Not Available.







26 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Alexander Hamilton Airport, St. Groia
Passengers
Landings
In Out

Pan American World Airways. ---- ------. ------ 291 8,038 8,034
Caribbean Atlantic Airlines ....... ------- ........----- 3,264 52, 224 55,488
Nonscheduled and private aircraft .............------------- 2, 892 ---
Military aircrafts_-- ------ ---------- 2,000 ---- ----
Passengers, nonscheduled and private planes-- --------- ---- 15,000 15,000
Passengers, Military and Government planes .----. -------- ------------. 10,103 10,102
Total .----. ------------------ ----- 8,447 85,365 88,624

Division of Trade

The Virgin Islands economy progressed during the year at a record
pace. Economic indicators were a substantial increase of $2.3 million
in Government revenues; a healthy increase in employment and per
capital income; a 25 percent rise in small manufacturing industries
and payrolls; a substantial increase in imports; completion of a deep-
water pier at Frederiksted, St. Croix, calculated to at least double
shipping in the near future; opening of the jet airport at the Alexan-
der Hamilton airport in St. Croix; lengthening of the Harry S.
Truman Airport in St. Thomas to accommodate turbo-prop jets;
operation of the first salt water distillation plant on St. Thomas
which produces 275,000 gallons of fresh water daily, and the establish-
ment in St. Croix of Harvey Aluminum Virgin Islands, Inc., a $25
million industry which will employ some 1,500 workers during the
construction period and 400 on a permanent basis upon completion
of plant facilities.
Real estate sales throughout the Virgin Islands averaged one mil-
lion dollars per month. Sectors of the economy, including trade,
public services, transportation, finance and other services followed
the general pattern of the increase.
Imports rose to $50 million, an increase of 18.5 percent over the
previous year. Exports on the contrary increased by only 10 percent
for a total of $9.1 million. Imports of raw materials and semifabri-
cated products used in production accounted for the largest increase
in imports, followed by motor vehicles, construction material, food
and machinery, equipment and other capital goods which contribute
to the productive capacity of the Virgin Islands economy. Ship-
ments of raw sugar to the United States accounted for the highest in-
crease in exports.
Personal income reflected an appreciable increase and the average
income per family rose to approximately $3,865 and income per
capital to $953. The apparent high family income is accounted for by
the fact that in most instances both husband and wife work.







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 27

Accurate figures on the level of migration are not available. How-
ever, it is believed to be much lower than the average during the past
5 years. The estimated population increased by 1.5 percent during
the year.
The Virgin Islands Employment Service disclosed that employment
reached its highest level at the end of fiscal year 1962. There was
also a remarkable increase in the number of employees receiving
higher wages. Opportunities for employment at higher remuneration
occurred in sectors of construction, trade and Government
employment.
An appreciable portion of the rapid increase in economic activity
during the year was attributed to the development of human and
physical resources during the past 15 years. Virgin Islands workers,
especially those employed in factories with incentive programs, dem-
onstrated increased productivity. There was also a high rate of capi-
tal investment during the year.

Comparison of Imports and Exports
Total Trade 1955-61

Year Imports Exports Total trade
1955--------------------- ....-------.. $16, 255, 575 $4,116,053 $20, 371, 628
1956 --. ----- -------- ---.. .--_... --- 18,947,426 5,597,161 24,544,587
1957 -.... --..------..-.---------.--.. 21,239,242 5,006,873 26,246,115
1958......----_---.... ----- ...--. -.. .. 23,622,093 3,534,805 27,156,898
19.59-....----._... --. --- ..--------- ---- 33, 642,297 6,273,623 39,915,920
1960.---------------..-- ---------.....-- 42,282,052 8, 255,017 50,637,069
1961-------....-_-_- -...- ....-- .-.- .... .. 50,208,444 9,133,124 59,329,046

Total imports from United States ------- --------- $38, 725, 786
Total imports from foreign .--------_------------_____________ 11, 482, 658
Net total ----._---------------- _---------------_--_ 50, 208, 444
Total exports to United States ------------..----------------- 8, 317, 418
Total exports to foreign.-------------------..------------- 815, 706
Net total------------------------------------- _-___ 9, 133, 124


Department of Education

The school year 1961-62 was a significant year for education in
these islands. In many respects, it marked a turning point in the
long history of education which dated back to 1841 when compulsory
education first became law. The Department recognized the require-
ments for change brought about by the great social and economic
developments which characterize this period in the Virgin Islands.
It accepted and answered with positive action the tremendous chal-
lenge to educational leadership which the times presented. The year
dramatized the unlimited opportunities for further educational growth








28 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

and service and showed that with proper support and active profes-
sional leadership, stimulation and encouragement, the rank and file
of the teaching profession could and did live up to the challenge of
the times.
As this report will show, the Department of Education made definite
progress in solving the manifold problems which have plagued edu-
cation over the years. It took giant steps in providing quality educa-
tion for the people of the Virgin Islands.
The total appropriation for the operations of the Department of
Education for the fiscal year 1962 amounted to $2,649,743. This repre-
sented an increase of 21.98 percent over the previous year's operating
budget.
The breakdown of local appropriations follows:

Division Appropriation Percent of
appropriation

Administration... -_ _----- -- .---- ------------- $173, 750.00 6.6
Educational programs --------. --- ------------ -------- -- 1,965,425.00 74. 2
Community programs ----------------- 241,300.00 9.2
Public recreation ---------- (139, 900.00) (5. 5)
Public libraries and museums --------- (87, 200. 00) (3. 2)
Vocational rehabilitation... ---. -------- (14,200.00) (0.5)
Grant-in-Aid program ---- ---------- ----- -- 140, 200.00 5.2
Special projects ..- ------------------------------------- 129, 068. 21 4.8
Total ------------------------ ... -.... 2,649,743.21 100.0

The Federal Government contributed on a matching basis $49,029.30
under National Defense Education Act, $62,340.09 for Vocational
Education, $11,382 for Rural Libraries, $37,717 for School Lunch and
$27,497.81 for Vocational Rehabilitation. In addition, $81,518 was
received under Public Law 874 for federally affected areas.
In addition to the operating budget, funds for school improvement
and additional classroom facilities were appropriated by the Virgin
Islands Legislature. The total amount for fiscal year 1962 was
$420,000, details of which are included in another part of this report.
To equip two new elementary schools in St. Thomas, $105,000 was
appropriated in 1962.

Personnel

The Department had a total of 555 positions authorized. The break-
down, as of January 15,1962, follows:
Administration-all positions_ --_------_-___----- 84
Educational program-Professional ______----------- 289
Educational program-Nonprofessional _----------- 123
Bureau of Recreation__-------------------------- 33
Bureau of Public Libraries and Museums__- -__----------- -- 20
Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation ------------ 6

Total ------------- ----------------------- 555







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 29


Frederiksted Pier, St. Croix. Built of concrete and steel under the Matching
Funds Program and completed in June, 1962, at a cost of $1,020,000 The pier
extends 1,656 feet from the shoreline. The pierhead is 240 feet long and can ac-
commodate vessels up to 33 feet draft.

The key to the success of any operation depends on the quality of
its personnel as well as the adequacy of the number committed to
it. A great deal of time was spent analyzing the strengths and weak-
nesses of the Department's professional and nonprofessional staff to
determine whether the Department had the number and the kind of
personnel necessary to perform its great tasks. The analysis revealed
two major things: (1) the number of personnel was totally inadequate
to do an effective job; and (2) a great deal of talent was not being
used properly and effectively. The analysis found that there existed
an unusually large pool of well trained and highly competent person-
nel whose latent talents remained untapped.
A number of key positions were established and competent per-
sonnel were hired to give the Department the necessary leadership.
Four off-island educators were brought in to assist the Commissioner
in revamping the school system and qualified Virgin Islanders were
appointed to other key posts, wherever possible. A native of St. Croix
was made Deputy Commissioner of Education. The Deputy served
677738--3- 3







30 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

as the Commissioner's chief representative in St. Croix, charged with
the tasks of administering the educational program in the island.
The Department put considerable emphasis on in-service training
programs. For the first time in many years, one-day teacher insti-
tutes were held in St. Thomas and St. Croix. Several workshops
were also held for both professional employees and nonprofessional
employees. The first workshops for custodial staff were conducted
during the year in St. Thomas and St. Croix. In addition to the work-
shops and institutes, in-service training through an expanded program
of supervision and conferences did much to improve the efficiency and
effectiveness of personal services in every area of activity and every
level of operation.
A major improvement worthy of note was the lifting of the general
morale of the employees of the Department of Education. Several
factors were responsible for the improvement of morale. The genuine
interest, the moral and financial support given by the administration
as a whole and by the Virgin Islands Legislature; the leadership ren-
dered by the administrative and supervisory staff of the Department
of Education; the interest exhibited by the Board of Education; and
the general feeling that education, at last, was on the forward move,
all contributed to the fine morale of the employees.
The Department devoted considerable time to the recruitment of
teachers for the 1962-63 school year. There were over 100 positions
to fill, 70 of which were new positions authorized in an effort to reduce
pupil-teacher ratio to approximately one teacher for every 30 students.
Over 1,000 inquiries from prospective teachers were answered.

Out-of-School Professional Activities
The Virgin Islands was honored to have one of its educators selected
by the United States Department of State as one of twenty American
educators to participate in an international seminar in Europe under
the Fulbright program.
For the first time, educators from the Virgin Islands participated
in the evaluation of mainland high schools for accreditation by the
Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. This
was part of the program designed to familiarize the staff members with
the accreditation process of the Middle States Association.
Several staff members participated in mainland professional con-
ferences, including the 17th Annual Convention of the Association
for Supervision and Curriculum Development in Las Vegas, Nev.;
a conference on the school lunch program in Washington, D.C.; con-
ferences on the manpower training program, called by the United







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 31

States Office of Education; and conferences on youth fitness, one held
in Washington, D.C., the other in Michigan.
The Commissioner of Education took part in three mainland con-
ferences. He was a member of the program committee of the Chief
State School Officers Council for 1961-62 and took part in the Youth
Fitness Conference held in Washington, D.C. The Commissioner
spoke on the "Role of Education in a Free Society" as a seminar
leader in a multi-nation conference held in St. Thomas, under the
sponsorship of the Junior Chamber International. The Commis-
sioner also served as a member of the Executive Committee of the
College of the Virgin Islands. The Executive Committee was re-
sponsible for laying the groundwork for the College of the Virgin
Islands, which was scheduled to open for instruction in July 1963.

Virgin Islands History Project
With the approval of the Governor, the Department of Education
began on a project to prepare a "History of the Virgin Islands" for
use in the public schools. A committee consisting of three laymen
and seven educators was appointed by the Governor to assist the Pro-
ject Director in the writing of a high school text. In addition to the
high school history text, the Equity Publishing Co. of New Hamp-
shire, in cooperation with the Project Director and the Governor's
Committee, is also preparing a history text for use in the intermedi-
ate grades. Both texts were scheduled for use by the school year
1963-64.

Cultural Activities
The cultural activities of the Virgin Islands were enhanced by the
visit of two off-island musical groups. The schools of the islands spon-
sored a variety of musical shows and plays. The high school bands
from Charlotte Amalie High School and Christiansted High School
were especially active during the year in many community programs.
The exhibit of children's art work in both St. Thomas and St. Croix
was highly successful. Some 20 pieces of art work were sent to New
York for exhibition at the Dorothy Yepez Galleries, Saranac Lake,
N.Y. Four won honors.

New Regulations
One of the major problems in the Department was the lack of basic
policies, regulations and procedures governing many of its operations.
The first revision and perhaps the most important in the long run, of
these regulations during the year, therefore, was teacher certification.







32 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

A second regulation governing the use of school facilities and equip-
ment by the public for other than school use was prepared and sent
to the Board of Education for its review and action. A third one on
personnel policies, regulations, and procedures was completed at the
close of the year and was being forwarded to the Board of Education
for its action. A set of administrative rules and procedures for pur-
chasing was worked out in cooperation with the Department of Prop-
erty and Procurement and put into effect early in the school year.
The federally aided programs also needed revisions to bring them
up-to-date. After careful study and review, amendments to the State
Plan on Title V, National Defense Education Act, having to do with
guidance and testing, were approved by the Board of Education.

Financial Assistance to Students
The Department processed 135 applications for loans and financial
assistance from students entering or enrolled in colleges and uni-
versities throughout the country and Puerto Rico. The sum of $54,-
830 was loaned to 100 students. Eleven students received grants
totalling $5,275.
In addition to grants and loans to students, the Department sub-
sidized two higher education programs in the Virgin Islands. The
sum of $30,000 was granted to Hampton Institute, Hampton, Va., to
continue its on-island program of higher education which started in
1953. The sum of $6,728 was awarded to students enrolled in the
extension program of Catholic University of Ponce, P.R.

Building Programs
The school year 1961-62 saw the opening of 42 new elementary
classrooms in St. Thomas-the first ones since the middle fifties. A
two-classroom kindergarten school opened at Frenchtown, an eight
classroom elementary unit opened in March 1962 at Nisky, and a 32-
classroom elementary school was completed during the summer of
1962 and was scheduled to open in September.
During 1962 over $1,500,000 for new classrooms and other school
facilities was appropriated by the Legislature at the request of the
Governor. While there is still a long way to go to solve the problem
of classroom shortage, the year 1962 brought the first major effort
in this direction.

Reorganization of the Department
One of the major problems of the Department of Education in
recent years was the inadequacy of its organization. A major project







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 33

of the year, therefore, concerned the reorganization of the entire
Department of Education. The Division of Curriculum and Instruc-
tion (formerly called the Division of Educational Programs), was
expanded and strengthened and an educator who specialized in cur-
riculum and instruction was recruited as Deputy Commissioner to
head up the division. Secondly, all business and nonprofessional
auxiliary services in the Department were consolidated into a new
Division of Business and Auxiliary Services. A Virgin Islander was
appointed Deputy Commissioner to head the division.
The reorganization resulted in classification of duties and responsi-
bilities, consolidation and coordination of related activities, hence
strengthening departmental operations.

Divisional Report of Activities

A. Division of Curriculum and Instruction
The Division of Curriculum and Instruction is concerned primarily
with planning curriculum and administering the educational program
in all schools in the Virgin Islands. As an auxiliary function, the
division is also responsible for research and experiments in education,
for pupil personnel services, for school library services, and for all
other activities having to do with or related to the instructional
program.
The division was completely reorganized and strengthened during
the year by the addition of five new key subdivisions and especially
by the establishment of five key professional administrative positions.
At the beginning of the year, the division was staffed at the head-
quarters level by only two elementary supervisors, one kindergarten
supervisor, two art supervisors and one music supervisor. By the end
of the year, the division consisted of a Deputy Commissioner for Cur-
riculum and Instruction, who headed the division, and five program
directors as follows: one Director of Elementary Education; one Di-
rector of Secondary, Vocational and Adult Education; one Director
of Pupil Personnel Services; one Director of School Library Services
and Instructional Materials; and one Director of Educational
Research and Statistics.
The supervisory staff was strengthened by the addition of a super-
visor of science for the system, a primary school supervisor for St.
Croix, and an education officer for St. John. These additions raised
the supervisory staff to nine.
The educational program had for the first time a strong head-
quarters staff working exclusively on matters of education-planning,







34 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

evaluating, conducting and ever improving the important business of
educating the children and youth of the Virgin Islands.
Schools and Enrollment.-There were 28 school units in the islands,
three of which were junior-senior high schools. St. Thomas had one
junior-senior high and ten elementary units. St. Croix had two junior-
senior high schools and six elementary units. In St. John there were
three elementary units. There were also four public kindergartens
on St. Thomas which functioned as individual units, and two on St.
Croix.
The total school enrollment, kindergarten through 12, in the public
schools of the Virgin Islands at the close of the school year 1961-62
was 7,624. This represented an increase of 492, or 6.9 percent over
the previous year and 214 over the enrollment figure at the beginning
of the year, September 30,1961.
June enrollment-1958 to 1962

1957-58 1958-59 1959-60 1960-61 1961-62
Kindergartens.---------------------------- 312 420 422 426 495
Grades 1 through 6 -- 4, 122 4,098 4,229 4,507 4, 740
Grades 7 through 12 ....... ..-- -..... -- ------.. 1, 957 1,976 2,198 2,199 2,389
Total .......----------..------- 6,391 6,494 6,849 7,132 7,624

Estimate for 1962-63 is 7,900; for 1967-68, 10,000-a 35 percent
increase over 1962 enrollment.
Record Graduating Class.-The three public high schools grad-
uated a record number of students in 1962: 158 from Charlotte
Amalie High School, St. Thomas; 48 from Christiansted High School
and 13 from Claude 0. Markoe School, both in St. Croix. At the close
of fiscal 1962, 41 graduates were reported to be headed for colleges
in Puerto Rico and the United States mainland.
Budget for Curriculum and Instruction.-Since this is the primary
division of the Department, 74.2 percent of the operating budget for
1962 was allocated to it. The appropriation for the year showed a
21.98 percent increase over the previous year.
General Improvement in Educational Programs.-Education at all
levels of the school system showed marked improvement during the
year as a result of a vigorous campaign to up-grade the quality of
instruction throughout the Islands. A Deputy Commissioner for
Curriculum and Instruction, a Director of Elementary Education, a
Director of Secondary Education, and a Director of School Libraries
and Instructional Materials were appointed to assist the Commissioner
of Education and other department officials in directing and guiding
the improvement programs. The activities by grade levels and pro-
grams follow:







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 35

(1) At the kindergarten level, a series of workshops, conducted by
the Kindergarten Supervisor, enabled the teachers to share valuable
experiences and to assist one another in evaluating and planning the
entire program. New furniture, equipment, and materials heretofore
unavailable were received during the year, contributing to the all-
around improvement of the kindergarten program.
In St. Croix the Director of Elementary Education inaugurated a
special 8-week summer program for preschool, non-English speaking
Puerto Ricans. This was the first special effort taken to assist Puerto
Rican students with the language problem. As expected the program
proved to be quite successful, and plans were made to continue it as a
permanent feature of the kindergarten program, especially in St.
Croix where the problem of non-English speaking students is quite
acute.
The public schools enrolled 495 kindergarten students under 15 full-
time teachers. Parent-Teacher Associations were particularly active
and showed considerable interest in school matters.
(2) At the elementary level the campaign to raise the level of in-
struction and improve the overall program took many forms. First
of all, a series of meetings with all principals and administrative per-
sonnel were held to acquaint them with the improvement program. At
these meetings emphasis was placed on the important role of the
principal in the educational enterprise and the need for each of them
to provide the leadership within the schools.
Early in the year a complete tour of all elementary schools was
made by the elementary supervisors for the purpose of assisting prin-
cipals and teachers in conducting orientation on the improvement
program and in evaluating the schools to determine immediate needs.
Upon completion of this initial phase, the need was obvious for guide-
lines for teachers. With the help of supervisors and teachers, bulletins
were prepared stressing pertinent suggestions for the improvement of
instruction. Following a second brief period of evaluation, every
teacher agreed that the Language Arts needed major attention. With
this basic understanding, teachers willingly assisted in developing
teaching aids, in attending conferences, and in participating in study
groups aimed toward the improvement on instruction in this area.
In addition to the stepped-up program of classroom supervision,
teacher conferences and demonstrations, several workshops were held
throughout the Islands. Among them was a 2-week health workshop
conducted jointly by the Department of Health and the Department
of Education. A one-day teachers' institute was held in St. Thomas
and St. Croix on the teaching of Language Arts. Two science and
Mathematics Workshops were conducted under the sponsorship of the
National Science Foundation. The professional growth of the teach-







36 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

ers as a result of these workshops was reflected in the quality of
performance in the classroom.
In an attempt to broaden the experience of students and to bring
the benefits of mass media, the department increased its program of
obtaining and using audio-visual aids. In a series of meetings the
use of film strips, especially, was stressed during the years. The
establishment of a Curriculum Materials Center will strengthen the
program even more.
The Department inaugurated a long-range program of develop-
ing school libraries for every school. The elementary schools received
by the end of the school year some $16,000 worth of science and mathe-
matics books and $10,000 worth of other books. The appointment of
a Director of School Libraries will enable the development of school
libraries to proceed without a letup.
The work of the 'art supervisor of St. Thomas, especially in plan-
ning instruction in art and in integrating art with other subjects and
learning experiences, was worthy of special note. The supervisor was
most helpful in assisting teachers in the use of art as one means of
creative experience for students. In addition to her work with teach-
ers and students, two art exhibits were held in St. Thomas under her
direction and supervision.
(3) Secondary Education.-The Department embarked on a vigor-
ous program of improvement in the secondary schools designed to
achieve accreditation for all three public high schools in the islands.
Under the leadership of an educator who was contracted to guide the
accreditation project, the schools began working on such important
tasks as defining philosophies of education, establishing goals and pur-
poses, revamping curriculum and improving quality of instruction,
strengthening pupil personnel services and bringing physical facilities
up to standard. At the invitation of the Commissioner, the Executive
Secretary of the Secondary Commission of the Middle States Associa-
tion of Secondary Schools and Colleges, and an official of the Second-
ary Commission of the Association visited the three schools to
ascertain whether the schools were ready for regular evaluation. The
joint report following the visit advised that the schools were ready for
regular evaluation by a committee from the Middle States Association,
and March 1963 as the time for the visit. By the end of the past
school year most of the recommendations of the two-man team were
carried to completion or near completion and others were being given
top priority for action during the school year 1963. Accreditation by
1963-64 is a distinct possibility.
Specifically, the major improvements in the three high schools
included the following:







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 37

(a) Drafting Philosophy of Education.-For the first time, the
staff of the high schools worked together on determining a philosophy
of secondary education.
(b) Curriculum Study.-Several faculty committees were formed
and every phase of the curriculum was seriously examined. The re-
sult of the study was a comprehensive curriculum which allows for a
great many more choices among elective courses than were possible
under the old pattern. Music, art and physical education were ex-
panded and Conversational Spanish was made available to all seventh
graders for the first time. A training program for students interested
in hotel and restaurant service occupations would be available by
September 1963. The two larger high schools, Charlotte Amalie High
School in St. Thomas, and Christiansted High School in St. Croix,
were greatly improved as comprehensive high schools. Because of
small enrollment, Claude O. Markoe High School was restricted to
the academic program and prevocational education courses.
An important result of the revamping of the curriculum was the
adoption of uniform requirements for graduation and the standard-
ization of textbooks. This would enable'students from one high school
to transfer to another without undue hardship.
(c) Improvement in Instruction.-As part of the program to im-
prove instruction, the procurement and distribution of instructional
supplies, materials and equipment were greatly improved during the
year. Acquisition of new modern equipment were in evidence every-
where, such as science equipment, electric typewriters, band instru-
ments, library books, and art supplies. The in-service training of
teachers also was increasingly activated through conferences, insti-
tutes, workshops, committees and the like. The high school teachers
participated in a one-day workshop on the teaching of language arts.
Science lectures and workshops under National Defense Education
Act financing were of great value to science and mathematics teachers.
A Foreign Language Consultant from the University of Miami was
brought to the islands to evaluate the foreign language program
(Spanish) and to assist teachers in improving their work. Three
Spanish teachers were sent at government expense to summer insti-
tutes at .colleges in Puerto Rico and the mainland. To render greater
assistance to teachers in the classrooms on a regular basis, department
heads in the larger high schools, especially, were given time off from
teaching to devote some time to planning with teachers and super-
vising their work in the classrooms.
(d) Guidance.-The guidance program at the high school was
strengthened by the addition of one guidance counselor at Claude O.
Markoe High and a second one at Christiansted High. By the end of
the period of this report, the Charlotte Amalie High School guidance







38 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

staff was increased from two to four, with a fifth one assigned exclu-
sively to the seventh graders. Supervision of guidance counselors by
the Coordinator of Guidance did much to improve the guidance serv-
ice at the high school. In addition to the Coordinator, a consultant
from the mainland conducted a series of in-service training sessions
over a 4 months period.
(e) Administrative Staff.-The Director of Secondary Education
devoted considerable time to assisting principals and assistant princi-
pals in doing a more effective job. For the first time, the adminis-
trative staff from all of the high schools met as a group several times
during the year to study common problems, share experiences, and
plan future activities. To get all administrative personnel familiar
with the accreditation processes, all principals were sent to the main-
land to participate in the evaluation of high schools for accreditation
under the Middle States Association jurisdiction. In addition to par-
ticipation in the evaluative process, the principals also observed ad-
ministrative practices in mainland high schools under Middle States
Association Secondary Schools and Colleges jurisdiction.
(f) Physical Facilities.-Some progress was made towards bring-
ing the physical facilities of all three high schools to meet minimum
accreditation requirements. The high schools in St. Croix were
painted during the year and general repairs were begun in all three
high schools. Funds to add special facilities such as gymnasium,
music suite, art -and vocational education, as well as additional
classrooms for general use, were appropriated during the year.
(4) Vocational Education.--Except for a course or two in the adult
program and the practical nursing program, vocational education is
primarily -a secondary school function. The school year 1962 showed
definite improvement in the area. To expand the program to include
out of school training activities, the Vocational Education Division
was given a separate divisional status in the department with a Dep-
uty Commissioner as its head. Plans were underway to participate
in the manpower training and retraining program under the Federal
Manpower Training Act.
Vocational education has been generally recognized as an impor-
tant area of activity in the schools. For the most part, graduates
of the program were integrated into community work force without
any difficulty. A newly organized on-the-job training program for
students in the third year of vocational training would improve the
record even more. Twenty-one students were given on-the-job train-
ing experience in various industries and governmental activities.
The Practical Nursing program for adults graduated its second
class in St. Thomas with 6 students and the first class in St. Croix with
10 graduates. The first in-school class of practical nurses started at






REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 39

the Charlotte Amalie High School in St. Thomas. In addition to the
work at the school, the practical nurses instructor conducted an in-
service training course for nurse aids and practical nurses at the
Charles Harwood Memorial Hospital at St. Croix.
Enrollment in vocational classes was 872 for 1962 as compared with
989 for 1961.
(5) Adult Education.-The adult education program offered a
limited number of courses in the evening. The budget was doubled
for the year 1962 from what it was the previous year. Seventeen
courses were offered in St. Thomas for a combined enrollment of 271
and four courses in St. Croix with an enrollment of 77 students. The
program included several classes in English, including a class in Eng-
lish for non-English speaking people, science, mathematics, bookkeep-
ing, typing and shorthand.
B. Division of Business and Auxiliary Services
The Division of Business and Auxiliary Services provides the logis-
tic support for the educational programs. It has four major areas of
activities: (1) Business and Accounting Section; (2) Property and
Procurement Section; (3) School Lunch program; (4) Auxiliary
Services, such as maintenance and transportation.
The division was reorganized during the year to facilitate the work
of its various sections. Business operations were streamlined and the
entire business operations of the Department were strengthened.
Maintenance and Repair of Schools.-For the first time in many
years the Department began a program of regular maintenance, repair
and improvement of its buildings. The maintenance staff was aug-
mented. Substantial progress was made in the painting of school
buildings during the year. A number of major repairs and improve-
ments were accomplished during the year. In St. Croix a new head-
quarters office building at Christiansted was completed and occupied.
The School Lunch program was given a thorough review during the
year. A major improvement in the program was the placement of
school lunch activities in the schools under the general supervision and
direction of the school principal. This will tie in the school lunch
with the educational program.
The records show that during the school year of 1962 more children
participated in the school lunch program than in previous years. The
average daily participation was 6,329, an increase of 425 over the
previous year. 1,079,112 type "A" lunches were served.
C. Division of Community Programs
The Department of Education operates four programs which are
related to but not directly connected with the educational programs.







40 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

These activities are administered by three bureaus: (1) Bureau of
Public Recreation; (2) Bureau of Public Libraries and Museums;
(3) Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation; and (4) Grants-in-Aid
programs. There were significant activities in all of these areas dur-
ing the past year.
(1) Bureau of Public Recreation.-The Bureau is set up to plan
and promote community recreation and sports activities for adults
in the community.
One of the most significant developments in the area of sports and
recreation was the tremendous increase in the participation of the
community. The St. Thomas Rotary Club raised money for the
development of a children's playground at Griffith Park which was
being equipped by the close of the year. The St. Thomas Tennis
Association conducted Tennis Clinics on a weekly basis for 8-year-olds
and over. The association also conducted in St. Thomas a tennis
tournament with the Rio Piedras Club of Puerto Rico. The Emile
Griffith Committee sponsored the first "Fight Card" in the Lionel
Roberts Park, featuring the World's Welterweight Champion, Emile
Griffith, a Virgin Islander. Several athletic organizations, both men
and women, financed competition with off-island teams.
The sports program, under the Bureau of Recreation's sponsorship,
had a total participation for the three islands of 150 teams. One
thousand, three hundred and fifty games were played, involving 2,756
players. With the installation of lights at the Emile Griffith Park at
the close of the year, it is expected that sports in the Virgin Islands
will increase even more.
The sports program received a healthy boost with the inauguration
of a sports promotion program under a sports committee and a Sports
Promoter. Working with the Commissioner of Education and the
Bureau of Recreation, the Sports Promoter organized and con-
ducted a most successful Track and Field Meet in St. Thomas.
(2) Bureau of Public Libraries and .11, i,,,.-The Virgin Is-
lands have three public libraries administered by the Department of
Education through its Bureau of Libraries headed by a chief. The
largest, with a book collection of approximately 30,000, is located in
Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas. One library with 17,500 volumes is
located in Christiansted, and another with 20,000 books is in Fred-
eriksted, St. Croix.
The Virgin Islands libraries received more visitors and circulated
more books during the year than in any previous year. The number
of calls made by adults increased from 2,100 in 1960-1961 to 6,250
in 1961-1962, and by juveniles from 5,100 to 13,500 for the same years.
The attendance record showed an increase of 12,550 calls or 74.3 per
cent over the previous year's total of 7,200. Total circulation went







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 41

up from 12,485 in 1961 to 41,536 in 1962. Adult circulation went up
from 4,472 to 13,428 and juvenile circulation jumped from 8,013 to
28,108.
The libraries continued to increase their collections as approxi-
mately 700 new titles were obtained during the year. Close to 300
volumes were received as gifts from various groups and individuals.
(3) Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation.-The 1962 fiscal year saw
the establishment of the first Sheltered Workshop in the Virgin Is-
lands. The Sheltered Workshop was an experimental project made
possible through a Federal grant in the amount of $17,600 matched
by $4,400 of local funds. The shop, located at the Herbert E. Grigg
Home for the Aged in St. Croix, operated with a professional staff
of two people. Designed to serve 15 persons, it provided service to
nine during the year. They made reed baskets, fish scale beads and
earrings, floor mats and place mats. Almost all the raw materials
used were secured from local sources.
The year ended the downward trend of caseloads which started
three years before. This year saw an increase in the number of cases
referred for vocational rehabilitation services. Twenty-seven new
active cases were added to the 59 on hand at the beginning of the
period (July, 1961), making a total active caseload of 86 for the
period. Of this number, 31 were provided services and placed on
jobs. This left a total of 55 active cases at the close of the year.
Of those 55 cases, 14 were ready for employment. The number of
cases rehabilitated this fiscal year exceeded the previous year by ten.
Plans were underway to conduct a comprehensive survey of voca-
tional rehabilitation needs with a view toward making a more positive
effort in finding and assisting all potential clients. The United States
Office of Vocational Rehabilitation had expressed vital interest in the
project.
D. Grants and Contributions
The Department administered the following grants and contribu-
tions during the year:
Boy Scouts _------------------------------- $8, 000
Girl Scouts------------- ---------- 5,000
Territorial Scholarship------------------------------------------- 45, 000
St. John Scholarship --------------- ----- 4,400
Wilmot Blyden---- --- -------------------- 4, 000
Virgin Islands Museum ------------------------------ 1, 500
Community Bands-------------- ----------------- 7, 200
V.I. Carnival Committee----- ------------- 1,500
St. Croix Museumn------ --- ----- 5, 000
St. John 4th-of-July celebration------------------------ ------ 500
Grant to J. Antonio Jarvis---------------------- 2, 000







42 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

St. Croix Festival Committee-------------- -------------- $1, 500

Total ----------------------------------- ------- 85, 600

Problem Areas

The foregoing report demonstrates that the Department of Educa-
tion is fully aware of the driving necessity for educational betterment
and is coming to grips with the problem on a wide front. The con-
tinually rising educational requirements of a dynamic society like
the Virgin Islands are a challenge to the entire educational system.
The magniture of the unfinished task is shown in part in the number
and variety of problems which the schools face in the islands.
1. Sites and Facilities for Education.-Many of the school facilities,
especially in St. Thomas, are inadequate, from the standpoint of
quantity, to accommodate the number of students enrolled in the sys-
tem and from the standpoint of quality to provide for effective edu-
cation. While 42 classrooms were opened during the year, the number
of classrooms lags far behind requirements. For the school year 1963,
there will be a shortage of approximately 38 classrooms in St. Croix,
22 in St. Thomas, and 4 in St. John. Funds have been provided for
the construction in fiscal year 1963 of about 20 classrooms in St. Croix,
15 classrooms in St. Thomas, and 4 in St. John. None of these are
expected to be ready for occupancy during the school year 1963.
The result is over-crowding of classrooms and over-taxing of other
school facilities. Scores of students are housed in rented buildings,
lunch rooms, auditoriums and other make-shift classrooms. Several
hundred are being taught in some 28 substandard classrooms all over
St. Thomas. These classrooms are incapable of renovation except at
excessive cost, and the locations are inadequate.
To provide classrooms in adequate number and in quality for ef-
fective education, the islands need about 64 classrooms to meet cur-
rent enrollment figures and 34 classrooms to replace substandard
rooms and about eight to ten classrooms annually for the next few
years. The latter are needed to house new enrollment as well as
the ever-increasing number of students who remain in school until
they graduate from high school.
On the basis of enrollment estimates, the following table projects ad-
ditional classroom needs for the next five years in all three islands:

Island 1961- 1962- 1963- 1966-
1962 1963 1964 1967

St. Thomas..-------- ---- ------------------------- 64 22 15 35
St. John-.______________-------------------- 4 4 0 4
St. Croix_._____ -- __-__-------------- ---- 30 38 24 36







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 43

This estimate is most conservative as it takes into consideration
only normal increase. It does not take into consideration any increase
due to migration nor does it take into account the replacements of
about 28 classrooms in St. Thomas which are substandard.
In addition to the classrooms, the public school system is behind in
playground and other educational facilities essential to the
educational processes.
The problem of inadequate school facilities boils down to two
solutions:
(1) More funds for construction.
(2) Acquisition of sites for new schools, especially in St. Thomas.
Estimates of costs to meet current enrollment and replace sub-
standard classrooms and build special educational facilities are in ex-
cess of $4,000,000. Appropriations of $1,434,000 were made for
construction in fiscal year 1963. Something like $2,205,000 is needed
to house adequately the educational program strictly for students who
are currently enrolled. To replace substandard classrooms in St.
Thomas, close to a million dollars will be needed for buildings alone,
exclusive of cost for land and site development. These figures are
1963 estimates and may be too low a few years hence.
Acquisition of school sites for expansion of schools and for con-
solidation of existing small units is something that is now being
planned. There are several schools in St. Thomas which are poorly
located. Some rural schools are located in areas which are not likely
to grow extensively and on sites that are too small for any expansion
of facilities.
2. The Teacher: Quantity and Quality.-For many years the is-
lands have had a shortage of qualified teachers. Despite some im-
provement in salaries, teaching requirements, and recruitment
programs, the shortage continues.
During the school year 1962, approximately 60 percent of the teach-
ing and other professional personnel held a bachelor's degree or a
higher degree. This represented an increase of 10 percent over the
previous year. It is expected that in 1963 the percentage of teachers
with bachelor's degrees or higher will be about 70 percent. Since the
Department is making no effort to employ on a permanent basis new
teachers with less than a 4-year college degree, it is anticipated that
the percentage of nondegreed teachers will not exceed 10 percent
within the next 3 to 5 years. While some of the best teachers in the
system are nondegreed teachers, the times demand that no less than a
college degree will be the minimum requirements for all new teachers.
The solution to the problem of teacher shortage can be resolved by
providing conditions of employment which will attract qualified
teachers into the system and retain them for a long period of time.








44 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

3. Fhiancial Support.-The problem of financial support will loom
larger as the schools move toward quality education. Already the cost
of educating the children and youth has increased from $326.18 per
pupil in 1961 to $344.89 in 1962, and it is expected to cost $365 in 1963
and perhaps in excess of $400 by 1963-64.
The per pupil cost of public education will continue to increase in
the Virgin Islands, reflecting the increase in the number of pupils as
well as the effects of inflationary forces and program improvement.
The increasing operating costs and abnormal building requirements
will put strains on local resources. While the Department of Educa-
tion has been fortunate in receiving its requirements of funds in recent
years, it is imperative that the territory continue in the future to sup-
port education with equal farsightedness. Expenditures for education
are really investments in people, hence investments in the future of
these islands.

Number of teachers employed, including vocational and kindergarten programs
Year Number
1957-58 ------------------------------------ 207
1958-59 ------__------------- ------_- 214
1959-60--------- --------------------------- 242
1960-61 --_____----------------------------- 255
1961-62 -__________------------__----- 256

Professional training, including vocational as of December 1961

Principal, As-
sistant Princi- Teachers Total Percentage
pal, Principal
Teachers

MA or S ---------- -------- 10 32 42 16.4
BA orBS_ ------ ------ 7 103 110 43.0
RN ______ ----- ------- 0 3 3 1.2
Two years or more of college---------- 7 64 71 27.7
Less than two years -- --------- ----- 1 28 29 11.3
No college training.------------------ 0 1 1 4
Total-_-. _____----------------------- 25 231 256 100.0


By September 1963 it is expected that 70 percent of the teachers
will have at least a Bachelor's degree.

Virgin Islands Average Annual Salary per Teacher
Year Amount
1957-58 ------------------------- $3,167.76
1958-59 --- ------ _______-_ --------- 3,514.08
1959-60 -- ___ _____----------------- 3, 455.04
1960-61 --------_-------------------_ 4,152. 94
1961-62 _________ __------------ ------ 4,276.76









REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 45


1961-62 Public School Attendance and Membership

Average daily attendance___-_-__-_-------------
Average daily membership__ _-------------------------
Average number of pupils per classroom teacher -----__-__
Rural elementary-________________---- -----
Urban elementary ________-_----_--------
High school----------------------------------

School enrollment summary


6,821
7,399
37
37
41
31


Number of schools 1957-58 1958-59 1959-60 1960-61 1961-62

Public (including kindergartens) -------------- 28 29 29 28 28
Parochial -------- 8 10 10 10 10
Private.. ---------- 5 4 4 4 4
Total ------ 41 43 43 42 42
School enrollment:
Public -------------- 6,391 6,466 6, 549 7,132 7,624
Parochial ------------------- 2,077 2,185 2,584 2,611 2,732
Private__. ---------------- 288 170 232 302 408
Total -- --- -- -- 8,756 8,821 9,565 10,045 10,764


Public school enrollment 1957-58 1958-59 1959-60 1960-61 1961-62

Kindergartens --------- 312 420 422 426 495
Grades 1 through 6 --- 4, 122 4,098 4,229 4,507 4, 740
Grades 7 through 12 --------------_.. ... -.- 1,957 1,976 2,198 2,199 2,389
Total-. ...---- ----------- 6,391 6,494 6,849 7,132 7,624



Virgin Islands public schools five-year enrollment projections


School year Actual 1962-63 1963-64 1965-66 1967-68 Increase Percent
1961-62 Increase

St. Thomas:
Elementary 2,743 2, 62 2,998 3,404 3,786 1,043 38.02
Secondary-....---..-.- 1,521 1,511 1,594 1,707 1,759 238 15.65
Total.. ----- 4,264 4,373 4,592 5,111 5.545 1,281 30.04
St. Croix:
Elementary------------ 2,092 2,304 2,432 2,736 2,849 757 36.19
Secondary....--- 810 863 939 1.016 1,271 461 56.92
Total ----- 2,902 3,167 3.371 3,752 4,120 1,218 41.97
St. John:
Elementary___ 200 216 235 270 323 123 61.50
Secondary ...-- -------- 44 41 40 44 45 1 2.27
Total ___- --- 244 257 275 314 368 124 50.82
Public Schools of the Virgin
Islands:
Elementary -- 5,035 5,382 5, 665 6,410 6, 958 1,923 38.19
Secondary.. ---------- 2,375 2,415 2,573 2,767 3,075 700 29.47
Total -- 7,410 7,797 8,238 9,177 10,033 2,623 35.40


677738-63-4







46 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Expenditures by years (1955-62, inclusive) Virgin Islands
Year Total
1955-56 ----------------------------------------- ---- $1, 180, 397. 94
1956-57 --------------------------------------- --------- 1, 107,254.32
1957-58 ---------------------------------------- -- 1, 286, 009. 36
1958-59 ------------------------------------- ------ 1, 540, 727. 21
1959-60 ---------------------------------------- 2, 049, 619.15
1960-61 --------------------------------- -- ---- 2, 623, 131. 71
1961-62 ---------------------------------------------- 2, 790, 820. 43

Average Cost per Pupil (1955-62, inclusive) Virgin Islands
Year Total
1955-56 --_---- ----------------------------- $141. 00
1956-57 ------------------------------- 137. 30
1957-58 -------------------------------- 151.84
1958-59 ------ ----------------- ----- -----216. 97
1959-60 --__ ----- ---______--- 266. 00
1960-61 -------------------------------- 326.18
1961-62 ------------------------- --------------------344. 89


Department of Finance

Revenues collected and expenditures made by the Government of the
Virgin Islands during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1962, were the
highest ever recorded.
Total revenues amounted to $17,443,684.57 of which $11,099,933.55,
or 63.63 percent, were for the account of the General Fund, and
$6,343,751.02, or 36.37 percent, were for the account of the Internal
Revenue Matching Fund. In the case of the General Fund, revenues
collected in fiscal year 1962 represented an increase of 26.59 percent
over those collected the previous fiscal year. Matching Fund revenues
collected represented a decrease of 5.46 percent under revenues collected
in the previous fiscal year, due to the fact that Congress appropri-
ated $669,000 from this fund to cover losses of the Virgin Islands
Corporation.
The increase in the General Fund follows a trend established over
recent years, and which is illustrated in the Comparative Statement of
General and Matching Fund Revenues included in this report as
Exhibit "A". For the first time since fiscal year 1955, the Matching
Fund revenues have registered a decrease.
In the comparative statement of revenues and receipts (exhibit A)
is presented a picture, in considerable detail, of the revenues collected
into the General and Matching Funds over the 5-year period beginning
with fiscal year 1958 and ending with fiscal year 1962. The statement
shows in the top portion the amount of revenues derived each fiscal
year by source, and the percentage of each item in relation to the total







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 47

revenues collected. In the lower portion, the percentage of increase or
decrease of each revenue item and the total are shown.
Total expenditures for fiscal year 1962 amounted to $14,891,082.98
of which $10,336,786.34, or 69.42 percent were from the general fund
and $4,554,296.64, or 30.58 percent were from the matching fund.
General fund expenditures represented an increase of 12.15 percent
over the previous fiscal year. Matching fund exepnditures repre-
sented an increase of 15.66 percent over the previous fiscal year and is
due mainly to the fact that the amount allocated to be spent from this
fund for government operations in fiscal year 1962 was higher than the
previous fiscal year.
In addition to the comparative statement of revenues and receipts
and the comparative statement of expenditures, which furnish detailed
financial information by activity and program for a 5-year period,
a summary comparative statement of revenues, expenditures and sur-
plus (exhibit C) is presented in this report to show the results of the
financial activity of the government's major operations over the same
5-year period. This statement also illustrates how each fiscal year's







.,. ;- .L. ..






ST
.A .'. .." .. .









Sugar Estate Elementary School, Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas. Completed in
April 1962, at a cost of $850,000. The 32-room elementary school contains a
complete kitchen and cafeteria and independent water supply. The design pro-
vides for addition of eight classrooms.







48 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE, VIRGIN ISLANDS

surplus is utilized in the succeeding fiscal year, together with revenues
collected for that year to finance the cost of the government's opera-
tions. Also shown in this statement is the amount due to be trans-
ferred from the matching fund to the essential projects fund each fiscal
year in accordance with the requirements of the Revised Organic Act.
Since the general fund and the matching fund account for the
revenues and expenditures which reflects the government's general
operations, they are highlighted in the statements presented in this
report. The other funds not represented in these statements repre-
sent funds which are segregated for specific programs and func-
tions not generally connected with normal government operations.
However, the financial information on certain other funds which
are considered significant are reported in the following paragraphs.

Double "I" Essential Public Projects Fund
Under the provisions of the Organic Act (subsec. 28(b)), at the
beginning of each fiscal year, the excess of funds in the single "i"
matching fund not needed to liquidate obligations incurred during
the fiscal year, or outstanding encumbrances of previous fiscal
years, is transferred to the double "i" essential public projects
fund. This year the receipts into the fund from this source
amounted to $2,551,169.12, compared with $2,291,541.47 received
during fiscal year 1961, a decrease of $259,627.65, or 11.33 percent.
Total expenditures for the fiscal year amounted to $2,425,709.29,
compared with $1,982,458.57 for fiscal year 1961, an increase of
$443,250.72, or 22.36 percent.

Road Fund
This fund was established in 1957 by legislative enactment which
provided that all taxes upon the sale of gasoline and all fines im-
posed by the courts for violation of traffic laws should be deposited
therein. During the fiscal year revenues collected and deposited
into the road fund amounted to $284,706.12, an increase of $49,149.54
or 20.87 percent over those of fiscal year 1961. Of this amount,
$259,383.12 represented collections from taxes on the sale of gasoline,
and $25,323 from the collection of fines imposed for violation of traffic
laws.

Marine and Aviation Fund
The marine and aviation fund was established in October 1960
by legislative enactment which provided that all revenues and re-







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 49

ceipts collected from activities applicable to the harbors and air-
ports of the Virgin Islands be deposited into this fund. During
the fiscal year revenues deposited into the marine and aviation
fund amounted to $238,074.46. Of this amount $184,552 repre-
sented fees collected for harbor services, and $53,522.46 represented
collections for rentals and concessions, sale of government property,
and other miscellaneous service charges.
Expenditures for the same period amounted to $236,195.66. The
fund is used for the operation of harbors and airports within the
Virgin Islands owned by the territorial government.

Federal Contributions
During the fiscal year the Federal Government's contribution to
grant-in-aid programs and other programs amounted to $1,351,725.76,
an increase of .-':.:.,:.:.4.26 or 23.31 percent over similar contributions
of the previous fiscal year.

Department's Operations, Programs, and Policies
During fiscal year 1962 a renovation and building project was
undertaken to provide more adequate accommodations for the De-
partment of Finance. During the latter half of the year the Pay-
roll and Data Processing Divisions moved into the new location.
It is anticipated that the entire Department will be relocated by
the end of fiscal year 1963. This move should relieve much of the
crowding which exists at the present time and enable the Depart-
ment to operate more efficiently.
The Tax Division of the Department was completely reorganized
during the latter part of fiscal year 1962 with the view towards
improving the tax administration program. This organization
was accomplished with the assistance of the US Internal Revenue
Service.
Plans for the change-over from a decentralized to a centralized
system of accounts were completed during fiscal year 1962. Imple-
mentation of the new system was scheduled to begin on July 1,
1962.
Certain changes in salary tables contributed to a slight easement
in the personnel recruitment program. Generally, however, the
problem of recruiting and retaining qualified personnel continued
during the year.








50 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Expenses incurred by the Department of Finance during fiscal
year 1962 were as follows:
Office of the Commissioner --- ------ --- $111,477.66
Accounting Division---------------- 69, 882.96
Treasury Division__---------------- 77, 029. 54
Tax Division------------------------- 131,208.50
Internal Audit Division-------------- 35,430. 23
Payroll Division_----------------- 22, 272.08
Machine Data Processing Division-- ------------- 125, 562. 74

Total ------------------------------------------ $572,863.71
















EXHIBIT "A"

GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Comparative statement of revenues and receipts
Fiscal years 1958-62


General and matching funds-Source of
revenues and receipts


REVENUES AND RECEIPTS
General fund:
Real property taxes................ ....
Income taxes ---------------------------------
Inheritance taxes. ..............
Stamp taxes....---------- ------
Trade, excise, and gross receipts taxes-.....- .
Custom duties -------------......__ .........
Licenses, fees and permits .........------....
Corporation franchise tax.........-.........-
Fines, forfeits and penalties....--- ..--...-...
Interest on government funds ..........__.
Other income.----------------

Total general fund -.......................

Matching fund:
Internal Revenue matching contributions ....
Contributions from other funds (reimburse-
ments).. ..------------------------------
Interest on Government funds....---...-..-

Total matching fund......---..............
Grand total ................................


1958 Percent
of total


$278,587.49
2,239,414.96
13,304.82
50,498.17
719,961.74
295,000. 00
260,227.93
--------:i----
15, 264. 12
356.94
288,773.10


6.69
53.81
.32
1.21
17.30
7.09
6.26

.37
.01
6.94


$276,349.18
3,054,223.06
37,960.44
97,151.92
886,513.22
284,000.00
269,747.30
4,518.00
29,155.49
548.44
284,410.79


Percent
of total



5.29
58.46
.72
1.86
16.97
5.45
5.16
.08
.56
.01
5.44


$372, 724.81
4,329,017. 86
23,011.19
71,495.93
1,185,743.54
487,000.00
331,377.55
16,702.63
39,549.05
100.68
395,144.70


Percent
of total



5.14
59,69
.32
.99
16.35
6.72
4.57
.23
.54
.00
5.45


1961


$348,174. 57
5,619,721.00
42,541.45
112,883.01
1,357,491.33
431 780. 70
372,391. 70
16,491.33
33,709.72
26, 567.07
406, 411.95


4,161,389.27 100 5,224,577.84 100 7,251,867.94 100 8.768,163.83

3,379,133.21 97.46 3,872,865.16 96.94 4,917,952.15 97.79 6,494,445.33
77,106.27 2.22 117,198.01 2.94 101,752.63 2.02 185,171.37
11,121.78 .32 5,070.71 .12 9,358.08 .19 30.454.49


3,467,361.26


100 3,995,133.88


100 5,029,062. 86


100 6,710,071.19


_______________________________ I I I -I- I ----


7,628,750.53 --....... 9, 219,711.72 -......... 12,280, 930. 80 ----......15,478,235. 02


0



0




Percent 1962 Percent C
of total of total O



3.97 $499,413.87 4.50 Z
64.09 7,221,085.92 65.05 0
.49 37,529.94 .34 d
1.29 135,719.28 1.22
15.48 1,655,595.56 14.92 0
4.92 747,085.00 6.73 P:J
4.25 433,987.80 3.91
.19 20,237.56 .18 -
.38 39,450.43 .36 w
.30 439.14 .00 M
4.64 309,389.05 2.79
100 11,099,933.55 100

96.79 6,173,477.87 97.32

2.76 128,796.80 2.03
.45 41,476.35 .65

100 6,343,751.02 100
--- 17,443,684.57 -...--....
Cd,

+

1-1
















EXHIBIT "A"-Continued

GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Comparative statement of revenues and receipts
Fiscal years 1958-62

PERCENTAGE OF ANNUAL INCREASE (DECREASE)


General and matching funds


General fund:
Real property taxes ----------- _______
Income taxes-.----------------..
Inheritance taxes...-----....... ..----..._....-----
Stamp taxes...... ---------.----
Trade excise, and gross receipts taxes....-------------------
Custom duties.............----------------------
Licenses, fees and permits.. -----------.............................
Corporation franchise tax.--....................................-
Fines, forfeits and penalties....-- -....-...._........_. .........
Interest on Government funds ------------_.-____.__
Other income... ---------------------- ._

Total general fund-...------------------------------------

Matching fund:
Internal Revenue matching contribution ........------------------
Interest on Government funds..--.-..-..-- ----------------------
Contributions from other funds (reimbursements).------------------
Total matching fund..-................. ...-...................-

Grand total ........---------------- -------------... .......


1957-58


3.71
20.17
1.37
41.37
7.57
32.88
36. 83

-----------------
10.15

12.93

36.84
28.53

37.64

23.73


1958-59 1959-60


(.80)
36.38
185.31
92.39
23.13
(3.48)
3.66
91.01
53.65
(1.51)


34.87
41.74
(39.38)
(26. 41)
33.75
71.03
22.85
269.69
35. 65
(81.64)
38.94


1960-61 1961-6


(6. 59)
29.82
84.87
57.89
14.48
11.34
12.38
(1.70)
(14.76)
263.87
28.51


25.55 38.80 20.91
=L


14.61
(54.41)
52.00

15. 22
20.85


26.98
84.56
(13.18)


33. 20


32.06
224.67
81.98


2

0
43.44
28.50
(11.78)
20.23
21.96 O
73.02 W
16. 54
23.25 O
17.03 hj
(98.35)
23.87

26.59 M

(4.94)
(30.44)
36.19

(5.46) Z
12.70



0
en


_~____I------------i-----


--











EXHIBIT "B"

GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Comparative statement of expenditures

General and matching funds
Fiscal years 1958-62

DISTRIBUTION OF EXPENDITURES


Standard government expenditures


Legislative..---..--- ------- --..... .......
Judiciary (Courts)--------- ---................

Executive:
Administrative departments and agencies .. .
Service departments:
Public Works Department .......-----.-
Health Department..-....-.............-
Education Department -...-. _-_---.-
Social Welfare Department ....- ..
Public Safety Department.--...-.........
Commerce Department..................
Agriculture and Labor Department.... -

Total executive expenditures........-..

Other governmental expenditures.................

Total standard government expenditures-..

Special or essential public projects expenditures:
Public Works Department...--....-- ...-
Health Department----......__..... .........
Education Department ----------.. ----------
Welfare Department .....-....-.... .....
Governor's Consulting Service....---......---

Total special or essential projects expendi-
tures--...........-........-......__ ____..

Total expenditures.....----------


1958


$75,912.36
45,657.95

770,713.33

1,172,289.49
1,444,890.48
1.181,366.34
424.901.60
456,225.73
111,147.64
72,897.75

5,634.432.36

433,494.65


Percent
of total
expend-
itures


1.21
.72

12.24

18.61
22.94
18.75
6.75
7.24
1.76
1.16

89 45

6.88


Percent
of total
expend-
itures


Percent
of total
expend-
itures


Percent
of total
expend-
itures


1962


I -i..- -I I I--------'-- -----'


$126,168.02
49,589.52

1,091,676.71

1.481,676.17
1,555,461.81
1,428,629.12
464, 232. 73
457,920. 45
163.463.80
69, 564.55

6,712,625.34

1,056, 790.83


6,189,497.32 98. 26 7,945,173.71


106.837.44
. 2, 832. 52


1.70 32,040.20


-. 04- ------ ------------ ...----_-
- - . - - -- - -- --. - - - --.. . .


1.58
.62

13.69

18.57
19.50
17.91
5.82
5.74
2.05
.87


$196,190.66
59,244.54

1,443, 836.54

2, 155.141.89
2,097.018. 42
1,859.452.82
550,434.99
554,265.32
227,682.37
143,168.13


84. 15 9 031,000.48


99.60

.40


296, 110. 29


9,582 545.97

370,166.08


1.96
.59

14.44

21. 55
20.97
18.60
5.50
5.54
2.28
1.43


$194,103.66
62,188.18

1,503, 788.37

1,854,961.77
2,533,674. 72
2,107,840.76
601,857. 55
698, 533.79
340,917.48
167,723.53


90.31 9,809,297.97

2.96 197,666.79


95.82

3.70
.48


1.48
.47

11.43

14.10
19.26
16.02
4.58
5.31
2.59
1.28


$236,967.44
72,656.44

1,812,480.40

2,361,639.59
2,634,032.27
2,413,884.61
837,884.45
788,665.09
576,265.31
256,136.41


74. 57 11,680 988.13

1.50 548,852.58


------ -


2,856, 053.86
35, 434. 45
251. 44


21.71
.27
.00


2,321,189.90
2,819.00
6,457.73
604.63
20.547.13


-- I I-I- I I -f-- -1--- -1


109,669.96 1, 74 32,040. 20

6,299,167.28 100 7,977,213.91


100


417,562.17 4.18 2,891,739.75 21.98 2,351,618.39

10,000,108.14 100 13,154,996.35 100 14,891,082.98


Percent i
of total 0
expend-
itures C
O
1.59 B
.49 p

12.17
15.86
17.69
16. 21
5.63
5.29
3.87
1.72

78. 44

3.69

84.21

15.59
.02
.04

.14


15. 79 +
100
____ 0


--------- '---


I


-I-


ill


'=


-- -


- ----- -










EXHIBIT "B"-Continued

SOURCE OF EXPENDITURES

Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent
Standard government expenditures 1958 of total 1959 of total 1960 of total 1961 of total 1962 of total
expend- expend- expend- expend- expend-
itures itures itures itures itures

General fund ...... --------------$3,736,172.90 59.30 $5,497,437.92 68.91 $7,278,122.04 72.78 $9,217,329.15 70.07 $10,336,786.34 69.42
Matching fund ----------------------- 2,562,994.38 40.70 2,479,775.99 31.09 2,721,9$6.10 27.22 3,937,667.20 29.93 4,554,296.64 30.58
Total expenditures-..-------------- 6,299,167.28 100 7,977,213.91 100 10,000,108.14 100 13,154,996.35 100 14,891,082.98 100










EXHIBIT "B"-Continued

GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Comparative statement of expenditures

General and matching funds
Fiscal years 1958-62
PERCENTAGE OF ANNUAL INCREASE (DECREASE)
DISTRIBUTION OF EXPENDITURES

Standard Government Expenditures 1957-58 1958-59 1959-60 1960-61 1961-62

Legislative-.--- -- --.------------- --- ---------------- (16.51) 66. 20 55.50 (1.06) 22.08
Judiciary ------ --------------------------- 13.27 8.61 19.47 4. 97 16.83
Executive:
Administrative Departments.---------------------- 26. 93 41.64 32.26 4.15 20.53
Service Departments:
Public Works Department ------------------ 36. 75 26.39 45.45 (13. 93) 27.31
Health Department.-- ----...-..--------- 13.95 7.65 34.82 20. 82 3.96
Education Department ................................. 12. 78 20. 93 30. 16 13.36 14.52
Social Welfare Department --.. --................... -... 8.95 9. 26 18.57 9.34 39.22
Public Safety Department--- ---.... ---------- 26.77 .37 21.04 26.03 12.90
Commerce Department... .----------.- 83. 16 47.07 39.29 49.73 69.03
Agriculture and Labor Department--..-...-- ---- 31.39 (.46) 105.81 17.15 52.71
Total executive expenditures ------------------...-. 21.27 19.14 34.54 8.62 15.27
Other Government expenditures-------.-------- ------ 74.08 143.78 (71.98) (33.25) 177.67
Total standard Government expenditures--------..-------...-.-.. 23.14 28.37 20.61 7.10 22.18
Special or essential public projects expenditures:
Public Works Department -..-....---.... ..- (70.01) 1,055.32 671.56 (18.73)
Health Department--..--..... ----------------- ------------------ -. -..i .
Education Department.--------------... .---------------- --------- ------------------ (81 78)
Social Welfare Department -...--- ---------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -- -- ----- -----140.
Governor's Consulting Service---...-----------.-------... ------------------ ---------------- --------- .
Total special or essential projects expenditures .. ...-----------------. ----. ----.------ 70.78 1,203.24 592.53 (18.68)
Total expenditures----. ---.--------------.------------------------ 25.32 26.64 25.36 31.55 13.20









EXHIBIT "B"-Continued

SOURCE OF EXPENDITURES

Standard Government Expenditures 1957-58 1958-59 1959-60 1960-61 1961-62

General fnnd --..--...........------------------------------------------ 44.24 47.14 32. 39 26 64 12.15 d
Matching fund.....-------------------------- ----------------------------- 5. 21 (.2) 9.76 __44. 15. 66 0
Total expenditures........---- -----.----------------------. 25.32 26.64 25.36 31.55 13.20
O





M
o



O


o




C









EXHIBIT "C"

GOVERNMENT OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Comparative statement of revenues, expenditures and surplus

General and matching funds

Fiscal years 1958-62


1958


Revenues:
General fund.......------------........--------- $4,161,389.27
Matching fund........----- --.----------.. 3,467,361.26
Total revenues-.......--------- --------. 7,628,750.53
Expenditures:
General fund---.... .........-----------.. ---- 3,736,172.90
Matching fund...--------.. .--------------.. 2,562,994.38
Total expenditures-..........---.---------- 6,299,167. 28
Excess (deficiency) of revenues over
expenditures.__-----.........-- -------- 1,329,583.25
Surplus:
ADD:
Cancelled previous year's obligations-....- ......--- --..
Previous years' unappropriated surplus-- 546, 488. 51
Adjustments to surplus.. -....----. -- -..............
Total additions...........--- .-- ..--- 546,488.51
DEDUCT:
Due to essential public projects fund .... 772,963.14
Appropriations carried forward.--..--.--.. 8,650.51
Adjustments to surplus..--..--..---.... --22,924. 25
Total deductions.......--..-....---..-- 884,537.90
Unappropriated surplus at the close of fiscal
year...... ...------------- -------------. 991,533.86


Percent
of total 1959
revenues


54.55 $5,224,577.84
45. 45 3,995,133. 88


Percent
of total
revenues


Percent Percent
1960 of total 1961 of total 1962
revenues revenues


56.67 $7, 251,867.94 59.05 $8,768,163.83
43.33 5,029,062.86 40.95 6,710.071.19


56.65 $11,099,933.55
43.35 6,343, 751.02


Per
of
revel


cent
total
enues


63.63
36. 37


100.00 9,219,711.72 100.00 12,280,930.80 100.00 15,478,235.02 100.00 17,443, 6b4. 57 100.00

48.97 5,497,437.92 59.63 7,278,122.04 59.26 9,217,329.15 59.55 10,336,786.34 59.26
33.60 2,479,775. 99 26.89 2,721,986.10 22.17 3,937,667.20 25.44 4,554,296.64 26.11
82.57 7,977,213.91 86.52 10,000,108.14 81.43 13,154,996.35 84.99 14,891,082.98 85.37

17.43 1,242,497.81 13.48 2,280,822.66 1. 57 2,323,238.67 15.01 2,552,601.59 14.63

...----- 11,509.26 .------. 72,386.69 -----..... 69,232.96 --------- 82,001.27 .......
........- 991,533.86 --------. 717,960.38 .......... 747,007.85 ......... 534,179.23 ----
.............. ....---- .......... 42,072.90 _.-------- 42,596.55 --.._---_ 8,103.57 ---


1,003,343.12

1,463,275.17
49,237.56
15,367.82
1,527,880. 55

717,960.38


832,419.97

2,291,541.47
69,043.31
5,650.00
2,366,234.78

747,007.85


858,837.36

2,551.169.12
71,624.11
18,103.57
2,647,896.80

534,179.23


624,284.07

2,012,433.82
685,051.83
6,963.52
2,704,449.17

472,436.49


0
Hf

0

H


0,


1o



z











C,,


zl


_







58 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Department of Health

Broadly speaking, the duties, responsibilities and areas of operation
of the Department of Health in the Virgin Islands have remained
unchanged. One of the weakest areas of operation, namely that of
the Herbert Grigg Home for the Aged, has been transferred out of
the Department of Health to the Department of Social Welfare, since
it is not a medical, but a welfare institution.
Careful analyses during the past year have shown several significant
factors and trends. The leading causes of death in the Virgin Islands
have become identical with those in the continental United States in
that diseases of the heart and blood vessels form the first cause of
death and cancer the second.
As we continue to attempt to improve the quality of medical care
rendered, while at the same time meeting the increased needs of the
community as it grows, certain indications of the need for a change in
direction of emphasis have become evident. The number of deaths
occurring outside of the hospital or within the first 72 hours of ad-
mission to the hospital has increased to the point where it seems clearly
to indicate that the need of emphasizing community services, par-
ticularly of a preventative nature is increasing.
During the past year, many dreams have become realities. The new
outpatient annex to the Charles Harwood Memorial Hospital is now
in operation. A modern, clean, air-conditioned building, it provides
a marked improvement over services previously offered, and permits
more efficient use of the medical and paramedical personnel. It
may well serve as an example of what can be accomplished by close
cooperation between the planners and the users of a facility.
The long and urgently needed increase in the facilities of the
Knud-Hansen Memorial Hospital has now reached the stage where
bids will be shortly invited, and this facility should become available
during the fiscal year 1963.
The modern X-ray for the Knud-Hansen Memorial Hospital has
been in operation for the past 7 months, and the quality or radiological
work has correspondingly improved.
With the occupation of the new annex in St. Croix the storage
facilities, long needed, became available. Thus, the storage of drugs
and foodstuff, a long time unsatisfactory situation because of the
obsolete and impractical facilities formerly used, has now been placed
on a modern up-to-date basis.
The increase in cold storage facilities and additional storage areas
for the Charles Harwood Memorial Hospital, together with an out-
door recreation area, will become a reality during the next several
months.







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 59
In the Public Health area, conditions have continued basically good.
As the past year has been one of above average rainfall in the Virgin
Islands, the need for the stepping up of the insect control program,
particularly the mosquito control program, has. become evident.
There has been no apparent increase in the incidence of potentially
disease bearing mosquitoes, such as the Anopheles, Aedes Aegypti
and Culex. Indeed, there is no knowledge that at the present time
any focus of Anopheles mosquito exists. However, the much more
common swamp and tree type of mosquito has flourished, due to the
increase in vegetation and moisture, and its nuisance potential is be-
coming more evident. Here, again, while an increase in mechanical
and chemical control of these insects by the Health Department is
planned, it is quite evident that community education must play an
important role in the control of these insects as well as wide scale
brush and swamp eradication.
During the year, epidemics of measles, mumps, and chickenpox
developed. Because of the long interval since the last epidemics
and the large number of susceptible individuals, these epidemics were
rather severe. In addition, the strain of measles virus appeared to
be unusually virulent. Nevertheless, there were no deaths as a result
of these epidemics and at year's end they had waned. Sporadic cases
of infectious hepatitis continue to develop.
During the year, several major steps to improve the economy of
the Virgin Islands occurred, which have definite bearing on the prob-
lems and planning of the Health Department. The runway at the
airport in St. Thomas was lengthened to handle larger aircraft, and
the runway at the Alexander Hamilton Airport in St. Croix began
to handle jets, and nonstop flights from the mainland are in the
offing. A new deep water dock, at the port of Frederiksted, was
completed and will be attracting large cruise ships this coming year,
and a large aluminum company completed plans to establish an
alumina processing plant on the island of St. Croix. This plant plans
to employ about 500 permanent workers, while employing 1,500
workers during the construction stages. These major accomplish-
ments point to the fact that planning to meet these problems must be
bold and visionary.
Finally, it appears that the problems of health insurance for the
people of the Virgin Islands may not be settled solely on the need or
lack of need for such a program here, but rather on the fact that this
is becoming one of the fringe benefits which employees are expecting
from employers, whether government or private. As such, it seems
obvious that a very definite program will become a reality soon.








60 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Boards and Commissions
The Board of Dental Examiners issued two licenses. The Board of
Medical Examiners issued 7 licenses as well as temporary licenses
to 16 physicians on the medical staff of the Government of the Virgin
Islands. The Board of Nurse-Midwife Examiners reported 21 li-
censed nurse-midwives in the Virgin Islands. The Nursing Scholar-
ship Advisory Board awarded nursing scholarships to 12 students in
the amount of $13,900 for 1961-62 school year. The Board of Nurses
Registration administered the National League Test Pool examina-
tion to 16 practical nurse students. Licenses were renewed during
the year for 83 registered nurses and 43 practical nurses. The Board
of Veterinary Medicine issued one license during the year.

Bureau of Vital Records and Statistical Services
During 1961, 1,194 live births were recorded-an increase of 14 live
births over the old record high of the previous year. The birth rate
was 34.7 per 1,000 population. The figures by islands are as follows:
St. Croix, 505 live births with a rate of 32.6; St. Thomas, 661 live
births with a rate of 36.7, a record high for that island, the previous
high being 628 with a rate of 36.2 in 1960; and St. John, 28 live births
with a rate of 29.5 In St. Croix, 95.2 percent of all live births oc-
curred in hospitals, in St. John, 71.4 percent, and in St. Thomas 99.2
percent. The figure for the Virgin Islands is 96.9 percent.
General Mortality.-There was a slight improvement in the mor-
tality experience during 1961, there being 326 deaths with a rate of
9.5 per 1,000 estimated population, against 333 deaths in 1960 with a
death rate of 10.0. In St. Croix there were 164 deaths with a rate
of 10.6. This was a decrease in rate from 1960 when the deaths were
also 164, but the rate was 10.9. In St. John there were 10 deaths
and a rate of 10.5 in 1961, compared to two deaths with a rate of 2.2
in 1960. There were 152 deaths in St. Thomas with a rate of 8.4,
a marked improvement over 1960 when there were 167 deaths with a
rate of 9.6.
Of deaths in the Virgin Islands 18 were nonresidents-7 deaths oc-
curring in St. Croix and 11 in St. Thomas. Of the nonresident deaths
one occurred at sea in a ship's hospital, but was registered in St.
Thomas as the first port of call following the death.
For the Virgin Islands 50.0 percent of all deaths were of persons
65 years and over. Figures for St. Thomas and St. 'Croix were 42.0
percent and 57.9 percent, respectively.
The age distribution by percentage of total and the leading causes
of death follow:









REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 61

Age distribution

Virgin Islands St. Croix St. Thomas and
St. John

Total Percent Total Percent Total Percent

Total. --- ---------- 326 1CO.O 164 100.0 162 100.0
Under 1 year- ----- -----_ 50 15.3 21 12.8 29 17.9
1-4 years _------------ 6 1.8 2 1.2 4 2.5
5-14 years. -------------- 2 0.6 1 0.6 1 0.6
15-24 years -------- -- 7 2.1 3 1.8 4 2.5
25-44 years ----- ----- ---- --- -- ------- 30 9.2 12 7.3 18 11.1
45-64 years .--------..- ----- 66 20.2 29 17.7 37 22.8
65-74 years ----... ........----------- 70 21.5 38 23.2 32 19.8
75 years and over .....-___. ...------- 93 28.5 57 34.8 36 22.2
Age unknown --.. ----------- 2 0.6 1 0.6 1 0.6

Leading causes of death, Virgin Islands

Number Rate I P....i. .. ..r


1. Diseases, heart .--- -_- ____...-- _---__-.-. -- 77 223.5 23.6
2. Malignant ..------------------------------------ 34 98.7 10.4
3. Cerebral hemorrage and other vascular lesions affecting
nervous system .-------_-__ __ 32 92.9 9.8
4. Certain diseases of early infancy ......-------- __ ______ 30 87. 1 9.2
5. Accidents ---------------------- -- 20 58.1 6.1
6. Diabetes mellitus ------------- -----...--- 15 43.5 4.6

1 Rate per 100,000 estimated population.

Infant Miortality.-There was no improvement in the infant mor-
tality figures for 1961 compared with the 1960 figures. In 1961 there
were 50 infant deaths with a rate of 41.9, against 39 infant deaths in
1960 with a rate of 33.0 per 1,000 live births. For St. Croix there
were 21 infant deaths with a rate of 22.6 in 1960. St. John had one
infant death with a rate of 35.7, and St. Thomas, 28 infant deaths with
a rate of 42.3, against 27 infant deaths with a rate of 42.9 in 1960. The
leading causes of infant deaths for the Virgin Islands are as follows:


Number Rate I Percentage of
Total

1. Prematurity----- ----------------- 14 11.7 28.0
2. Gastor-enteritis and colitis ..- ------_ ------.. -__- 8 6.7 16.0
3. Asphyxia and atelectosis .---.-------------------- --------- 8 6.7 16.0
4. Pneumonia .....----------------------.- 6 5.0 12.0

i Rate per 1,000 live births.

Of the 50 infant deaths 21 or 62.0 percent were neonatal deaths in
1961, as compared to 29 or 74.4 percent in 1960.
Fetal Deaths.-There were 50 fetal deaths in 1961 with a rate of
41.9 per 1,000 live births, a decrease of nine fetal deaths over 1960
when there were 59 fetal deaths with a rate of 50.0. Of fetal deaths
677738-63--5







62 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

reported nine were of fetuses under 20 weeks gestation, and five with
gestation period not started.
Maternal Deaths.-There was just one maternal death in 1961 with a
rate of 0.8 per 1,000 live births. That death was for the island of St.
Croix, the rate for that island being 1.9. No maternal deaths were
reported in 1960.
Marriages, Divorces and Adoptions.-There was a marked increase
in marriages in 1961, and an increase also in divorces. Marriage
figures are 397 for 1961 compared to 359 in 1960. The figures for
divorces are 152 for 1961 and 138 for 1960. The 152 divorces include
one annulment for the island of St. Thomas. Of the marriages dis-
solved 43.4 percent had been performed in the Virgin Islands. Only
three adoptions took place in the Virgin Islands in 1961, against 12
in 1960.
Population Estimates.-For the Virgin Islands the estimated popu-
lation is 34,450; for St. Croix, 15,500; for St. John, 950; for St.
Thomas, 18,000. Population estimates are based chiefly upon natural
increase with as slight adjustment for migration figures, particularly
in St. Thomas. However, consideration was given to the fact that the
U.S. Naturalization and Immigration Office reported 3,726 contract
workers in the Virgin Islands on March 15, 1961, an increase of 1,216
over the number present in September 1960. Of these, 500 were sugar
cane workers in St. Croix who left later in the year.
From migration figures available, it seems safe to assume that with
the number of job opportunities available, fewer people leave the
islands than in previous years, and to assume that the aliens plus
American citizens who established residence here during the year
more than compensate for the loss of outgoing residents.

Printing and Graphic Section
During the fall of 1961 the Printing and Graphic Section expanded
with the addition of new equipment, including a Varityper, a Meteor-
ite photographic camera, a Headliner and a new electric typewriter.
Since the addition of these items of equipment, this section has been
printing most of the forms in the Department of Health. With the
activities of the darkroom, the process will be accomplished with
less effort.

Bureau of Maternal and Child Health
and Crippled Children's Services
During the past year there has been an increase in many areas of the
Maternal and Child Health and Crippled Children's Services Clinics,







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 63

and notable improvement has been achieved in many of the clinics
and in the caliber of services rendered.
Both islands are now receiving the services of a resident ophthal-
mologist and an otologist. There are weekly otology clinics in both
towns in St. Croix and the weekly clinics continue in St. Thomas.
It St. Thomas there is a weekly opthalmology clinic. In St. Croix,
however, no special day has yet been set aside for children. They are
now seen every day along with the other clinic patients.
A physical therapist was employed by the Knud-Hansen Memorial
Hospital, thus filling a great need.
The cardiac clinic for diagnosis and treatment of children with car-
diac conditions is held weekly in St. Thomas. The clinician is a staff
physician with special preparation in heart disease. During the year
35 children were followed for rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart
disease.
The orthopedic clinic is still being held weekly in St. Thomas and
bi-weekly in St. Croix. The attendance has increased in St. Thomas
to such an extent that it may be necessary to plan for additional clinics
in the very near future.
Plastic surgery clinic is held monthly in St. Thomas. Patients
from St. Croix and St. John are referred to St. Thomas for services.
Brace and speech clinics are also held monthly and patients are sent
from St. Croix and St. John for this clinic.
Twenty pediatric patients were sent to Puerto Rico and the United
States for medical treatment. Sixteen were sent to Puerto Rico and
four to the United States. Two were admitted at Johns Hopkins
Hospital, Baltimore, Md., for heart surgery and one for evaluation
and correction of an eye condition. The other patient was admitted
to Resser's Clinic for correction of scoliosis. She was accompanied
by the medical and social worker on the staff. Foster home services
were arranged for her in California while she received medical
treatment.
The maternity services program in St. Thomas continues with clinics
held twice a week. There has been a great increase in the number
attending this clinic and the program of services is quite extensive
with persistent followup by the Public Health nurses. Both clinics
in St. Croix were relocated.
Well-child conferences are still held in the five districts and at the
hospital in St. Thomas and also in the five districts and both hospitals
in St. Croix.







64 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Hospital Services
The Knud-Hansen Memorial Hospital experienced one of its worst
periods of strain on all its physical facilities. Every department had
to undergo unusual demands for more service, and at a time when the
operating budget at the beginning of the fiscal year was known to
meet approximately 71 percent of its needs. Admissions to the hos-
pital reached an all-time high of 3,388-an increase of 310 over 1961
and an increase of 510 over 1960. Discharges of 3,268 patients also
represented an increase of 306 over last year. Hospital deaths de-
clined from 106 to 97. Out-patient clinic visits representing services
performed inside the hospital totaled 23,011 although an additional
842 required services of either the Record Room or Hospital Medical
Staff. The increase in clinic visits was 3,150 for the fiscal year. The
hospital staff's problems included concern over the over-crowding on
the medical and surgical wards; difficulty in handling the volume of
out-patients crowding the clinics every day, and inability to recruit
qualified capable staff in every section. The same demands on the
facilities referred to in the discussion of the Knud-Hansen Hospital
also apply to the St. Croix facilities. These facilities, as those in
St. Thomas, were designed for a much smaller population than now
exists, and did not take into consideration the influx of residents,
both tourists and aliens. Services on St. John continued to increase,
with clinic visits and home visits reflecting the increase in service.

Division of Public Health Services
During the past fiscal year, the evaluation of the services pointed out
the need for emphasis on the development of local health services units
in Christiansted, Frederiksted and St. Thomas-St. John Districts.
The unit should be staffed with a local health officer. The need for in-
creased community health services in order to reduce accidents, and
other conditions amenable to good health practices is becoming more
apparent. Improvements and record-keeping, including the utiliza-
tion of accounting machines, will undoubtedly make this service more
efficient. A study of chronic diseases in the Virgin Islands was
initiated during the latter part of the fiscal year and will continue
until completed. Again, in keeping with the emphasis on community
health services plans are now under way to provide additional physi-
cians to work exclusively in the Public Health Services on a full-
time basis.
The Home Care program is in the fourth year of operation. The
regular case load has been on the average of 76 patients. The major-
ity of cases represent cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and para-







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 65

plegias. A specific diabetic control program was reactivated this
year to provide better supervision of the diabetes clinic, better follow-
up of the patients, better patient education and more instruction in the
self-administration of insulin. A recent diabetic survey revealed
over 200 cases of diabetes and some of these have been placed on the
Home Care program. As is true elsewhere in the United States, heart
disease was the leading cause of death in the Virgin Islands. Cancer
is the second leading cause of death in the Virgin Islands. Principal
among the various sites and types is that of cancer of the cervix.
The Cancer Screening program was initiated during May 1962.
Weekly clinics are held in St. Thomas and St. Croix.
Due to outbreak of smallpox in Europe, a mass immunization pro-
gram was instituted in the Virgin Islands. To date, 8,714 persons
have been immunized. The Bureau of Chronic and Communicable
Diseases also conducted routine immunizations for the entire Virgin
Islands. Two important surveys were made in an attempt to eradi-
cate venereal disease. Alien cane cutters, brought into St. Croix by
the Virgin Islands Corporation, were examined for venereal disease
and filariasis in the first survey. As a result, 110 V.D. cases were
discovered in St. Croix and 27 V.D. cases were discovered in St.
Thomas. This survey also revealed a total of 17 positive cases of
filariasis. The second survey was a venereal disease examination of
the high school population in St. Thomas. Ten positive cases were
detected in a total of 858 students examined. As a result of both
surveys, intensive followup on cases and contacts has been instituted
to control the incidence of venereal disease and effective measures are
being instituted to prevent the reintroduction of filariasis into the
Virgin Islands.

Bureau of Environmental Sanitation
The lack of an adequate water supply, inadequate sewage disposal
and substandard housing continue to provide real problems in en-
vironmental sanitation in the Virgin Islands. While this is typical
of any community of low economic standing, the development of tour-
ism in the Virgin Islands is dependent on accelerated progress in
eliminating these major sources of sanitation problems.
The problem of nightsoil elimination is complex. The majority,
of the houses now receiving nightsoil services are substandard. The
cost of installing adequate sanitary facilities in these homes is, in most
cases, equal to more than the assessed valuation of the house. As a
result, most landlords prefer to withdraw the property from the
rental market and evict the tenants, rather than install the facilities.







66 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

The acute housing shortage, particularly in St. Thomas, ties nightsoil
elimination closely to the housing problem.
Routine inspections were made of 212 dairy farms, restaurants,
taverns, bars, hotels, and other eating and drinking establishments
in St. Thomas. Similar inspections were done at 26 places on St.
John and 109 in St. Croix. A total of 3,047 inspections were made
this year.
While refuse collection improved tremendously, no improvement
was made in the method of its disposal until the latter part of the
year. A garbage collection barge was secured and placed in opera-
tion during the month of April. An incinerator for the disposal of
garbage and refuse was finally completed and installed at the site
of the dump in Cruz Bay, St. John.
A drastic change was made in the method of operating the Aedes
Aegypti Eradication during the year. The present incidence of in-
festation in St. Thomas is now 52 percent in the town area and 35
percent in the country districts, with an average of 43 percent for the
island as a whole. Some ground was lost in St. John; the incidence of
infestation increased to 33 percent in June, after hitting a low of 10
percent in September 1961.

Bureau of Public Health Laboratories
With the beginning of the fiscal year 1962 the Bureau of Labora-
tories and the central laboratory occupied the new physical facilities
in St. Thomas. During the year the Public Health Laboratories made
17,957 examinations of 15,756 specimens. There were increases in the
laboratory findings of ascariasis, amoebic dysentery, gonorrhea,
syphilis, trichuriasis and schistosomiasis. Increased findings can be
attributed to the new procedures instituted and surveys done on im-
ported cane cutters, food handlers and bonded workers. For example,
of the nine cases of schistosomiasis, six were food handlers believed
to be aliens.
In the Sanitary Bacteriology section, improvements were made in
the techniques used for the examination of bacterial content and
chemical purity in milk and water. A manual was prepared incorpo-
rating all procedures and normal values.

Bureau of Mental Health
The staff of the Bureau was organized to provide intensive services
in essential areas, i.e., School Mental Health, Consultation, Clinics,
Community Education and Research. While emphasis has been







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 67

shifted from clinics to the broader bases of community services, clinics
will receive more professional man-hours than in the past, as the staff
will be available to provide increased clinic hours. Cooperative rela-
tionship between the Department of Education and the Mental Health
program has been made possible to move rapidly in the direction of
an excellent pilot study in a school mental health program and the
integration of mental health in the pupil personnel services of the
schools of the Virgin Islands.
At least 75 percent of the 78 new cases received this year were young
adults and children. Referrals from the Department of Education,
the largest source of referrals, consisted largely of children who were
presenting behavior problems in school, either in the form of truancy,
learning difficulty or disturbances in the classroom to other children
and the teachers. Investigation of family situation and psychological
testing revealed that in many cases the children were either pseudo
or actually mentally retarded; and the home situation was not condu-
cive to stability. It was discovered also that in many instances the
schools were not equipped to handle either retarded or emotionally
disturbed children.

Bureau of Dental Health Services
The Bureau's program places emphasis on four main aspects of
dental care: prevention, correction, education, and research. Topical
fluoride application clinics have been activated during the school year
in St. Thomas, St. Croix and St. John. A system of periodic screening
for detection of caries and other defects has been in practice and oral
hygiene instructions are given in the schools. Visits from the school
population continue to increase.

Bureau of Health Education
As in previous years, the Bureau of Health Education has continued
its program of developing working relationships with community
groups. Activities included direct service to such groups by speaking
or providing them with speakers for meetings and radio programs
or with such audiovisual aids as pamphlets, posters, films, filmstrips,
and transcription. Information and announcements regarding health
programs were sent out to all schools, civic and religious groups. Sev-
eral group meetings, workshop and discussion groups were held dur-
ing the year. The Bureau continued the sponsorship of radio and
television programs on health and related topics for weekly broadcast.







68 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Division of Veterinary Medicine
During the year a brucellosis eradication program was initiated in
St. Thomas and St. John. As the program neared completion at the
close of the fiscal year, it appeared that these would be the first two
islands declared brucellosis free. Another decrease in anaplasmosis
was noted in St. Croix with only 25 new cases reported. A decrease
was also noted in piroplasmosis. No bovine tuberculosis has been
found or reported in the Virgin Islands. Although no cases of hog
cholera were reported in any of the Virgin Islands, 1,140 pigs on St.
Thomas and St. John were vaccinated simultaneously with hog
cholera serum and hog cholera vaccine. An alarming increase in tet-
anus was noted in St. Croix. A noted improvement in the meat
inspection program in St. Thomas was made during the past fiscal
year. A federally approved animal quarantine station was estab-
lished, six quarantine pens were fenced in, and adequate watering
facilities were provided for each pen. In addition, the entire abattoir
area was enclosed with chain link fencing. No modern processing
equipment was added, but the entire abattoir was cleaned and painted,
both inside and outside, the grounds around the building were cleared
of brush and stumps, and the terrain smoothed by bulldozing. The
abattoir is being operated as efficiently and hygenically as possible, but
with obsolete equipment. Modern equipment for efficient plant oper-
ation and disposal of waste products is of cardinal importance. The
new abattoir in St. Croix with its modern equipment will be completed
soon.











REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 69


Statement of appropriations and/or allocations

Virgin Islands Department of Health

Fiscal period July 1, 1961-June 30, 1962


Source


General fund ------------------
Internal Revenue.---------------
Health revolving fund.-----------
Maternal and child health-Fund
A >---------------------
Maternal and child health-Fund
B .........------... --------
Crippled children services-Fund
A 1 --..-- --------------
Crippled children services-Fund
B ----------------------
General health 1 ----------- -.
Venereal disease 1..--------------
Tuberculosis control 1 _--
Chronically ill and aged ----------
Mental health I -- ------
Heart disease control ------------
Cancer control 1 ----------
Private contributions (T) --------
Private contributions (C)--.-----.
Water pollution......------------
Venereal disease-Matching -----
Tuberculosis-Matching.....------
Mental health-Matching--....--
Heart disease control-Matching-.
Cancer control-Matching.......
General health-Matching .----
N.C.H.-Matching _--___ -
C.C.-Matching --------......
Water pollution-Matching ----
Medical assistance fund --........
Hospital construction ......-----
Medical practice fund ..----------
Home care program-Matching -


Appropria- Re-
tions and/or imburse-
allocations ments


$1, 104, 802. 69
1,629,926.87
100,000.00

72,591.46

36,704.00

71, 689. 32

37,472.75
7,886.06
6,143.66
8, 263.00
12,000.00
39,968.87
9,675.85
5, 242. 79
30,933.91
4,414.16
5,477.00
6,932.89
8,300. 00
40,000.10
6,400.00
6,000.39
8, 491.45
37, 547.99
28,551.95
3, 977. 29
22, 045. 53
65, 301.00
13,954.05
13, 800. 97


----------

415 184.01

- - -

- - -

---------

- - -
- - -
- - -
- - -
- - -
-- -
- - -
- - -
- - -
- - -
- - -
- - -
- - -
- - -
- - -
- - -
- -
---------
- - -
- - -
- - -


3,444,496. O0 415,184. 01 100


SUMMARY OF OPERATIONAL COST


Gross operational cost ........- .. .......- ----.------ 3,777,710.41 ----
Less assets:
Cash-Medical care ....-- ..--.--. 387, 798.00 -- ---
Cash-Veterinary serv-
ices and services of envi-
ronmental sanitation-.....__ .---.. 1,898.42-- --------
Accounts receivable ...... 320,829.00 ...--- ----- --- -
Less 40 percent of the
amount that be de-
termined medically
indigent ..------.. 128,331.60 192, 497. 40 -----. 192,497.40 582,193.82 ..
Net operational cost------ ----_ -----_ ------___ 3,195, 516. 59 1 ------- ----..
Per capital gloss, $106.62.
Per capital net, $90.19.


1 Matching requirements: $1.00 State for $1.00 Matching.


Percent-
age of
appro-
priations
and/or
alloca-
tions


Obligated
and/or
expended




$1,058, 546. 47
1,629,926.87
499,463.56

72, 91.46


36,704.00 .......----

71,689.32 ........


37,472.75
7,886.06
6,143.66
8, 263.00
12. 000.00
39,968.87
9, 675. 85
5, 242. 79
27,115.29
3,107. 25
5, 477. 00
6,932.89
8, 300.00
40, 000.10
6,400.00
6,000.39
8,491.45
37, 547. 99
28, 551.95
3,977.29
22,045.53
62, 004. 86
2,382. 79
13,800.97

3,777, 710.41


Percent-
age of
obliga-
tions
and/or
expendi-
tures


0.2857
.4400
.1348

.0196

.0099

.0194

.0101
.0021
.0017
.0022
.0032
.0108
.0026
.0014
.0073
.0008






.0023
.0101
.0077
.0011
.0060
.0167
.0045


100


Balance





$46,256.22

15, 720.45


3,818 62
~~"s~,sw~.fa




1,306. 91











3, 296. 14
11,571.26


81,969. 60
- - -
- - -
- - -







- - -
- - -
- - -
- - -
- - -
- - -










70 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


Division of Hospitals and Medical Services

Summary comparison of services and earnings

Fiscal years 1961-62


Section and service


Receipts for the year:
Hospital collections offices -----. _--.-----
Payments for contract services rendered
Federal programs _____--------__ ___----
Payments based on statistical information-

Total receipts for the year --------------

Services rendered:
Room and board ----------
Surgical operations -------------
Dental services _--------------------------
Outside calls ----------------
Drugs and medicines ------------
Physiotherapy -___ ---- _____
X-ray services _....----------- -__-._----.
Ambulance services ---------.-__.._--.---
Laboratory services -------------------.--
Examinations .__--------------------..--.
All other services -----------------

Gross earnings---------------------
Less free services.-- ---------------. --

Net earnings ---------------
Less receipts (see line 4 above) --------

Additions to accounts receivable --.----


Total Total Increase or Percentage
Code fiscal 1961 fiscal 1962 decrease ofincrease
or decrease


7703
7704
7705
7706
7708
7709
7710
7711
7712
7713
7714

7702


88, 640.00

158, 904. 00

247, 544.00

281,113.00
24,090.00
28,714.00
114.00
58,268.00
1,109.00
23, 716.00
1,057.00
43,893.00
32,892.00
36,294.00


198, 923. 00

108,000.00
80,875.00

387, 798.00


400,208.00
30,315.00
41,497.00

49,955.00
1,078.00
29,157.00
1,020.00
75,853.00
64,395.00
39,604.00


110,283.00

108,000.00
-78,029.00

140,254.00


119,095.00
6,225.00
12,783.00
-114.00
-8,313.00
-31.00
5,441.00
-37.00
31,960.00
31,503.00
3,310.00


124.4


-49.1

56. 7


42.4
25.8
44.5
-100.0
-1. 4
-2.8
22. 9
-3.5
72.8
95. 7
9.1


531,260.00 733,082.00 201,822.00 38.0
250,544.00 329,842.00 79,298.00 31.6

280,716.00 403,240.00 122,524.00 43.6
247,544.00 387,798.00 140,254.00 56.6


33,172.00


15,442.00 -17,730.00 -53.4


Statistical data on medical institutions

Fiscal year ended June 30, 1962


Number of hospital beds .---------
Number of bassinets ----------------
Maximum occupancy_----------
Minimum occupancy ------------
Average occupancy _--------- ----------
Number of physicians------------
Number of graduate nurses ---------
Number of practical nurses --.
Number of nurse aides ------
Number of orderlies- ---------------------
Live births in hospital --- ..-----
Still births in hospital -- ---- ----
Deaths in hospital ------ --------.- -
Deaths out of hospital..------- -----------
Admissions to hospital.-------------------
Patient days in hospital --------------
Clinic visits .---------------------------
Major surgical cases -_ --------------_
Minor surgical cases .. -----.-------------
Number of X-ray examinations _-----
Number of laboratory examinations -----

I Transferred to Department of Welfare.
2 Part-time.


Charlotte
Amalie


119
23
121
70
81
24
36
30
27
9
739
37
97
55
3,388
34, 574
30, 960
320
398
5,239
52,108


Christian-
sted Frederiksted


60 10
10 4
-----. ---- -------

54 12
9 3
27 8
17 4
23 4
3 -----.
358 133
16 2
53 38
35 3
2,185 644
19,858 4, 506
21,097 14,126
241 --- --
239 786
2,872 394
38,171 17,633


Herbert
Grigg
Home 1


120
118
104
110
21
4
2

-- - -

-- - -

23
21,094


-- - -







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 71

Department of Housing and Community Renewal

The creation of the Department of Housing and Community Re-
newal by Act. No. 903, approved June 18, 1962, was the culmination of
an examination by a professional firm of the overall management of
the public programs in the field of housing.
Under this department all housing activities of the Government
were centralized. The homestead and home loan programs were trans-
ferred from the Department of Property and Procurement, and the
emergency housing program was transferred from the Department of
Social Welfare. The Altona Community Development and the Bor-
deaux Community Development were also transferred from the Office
of the Governor and the Office of the Government Secretary,
respectively.
The head of the department is, by law, chairman of the Virgin
Islands Housing Authority, which has the responsibility of construct-
ing and administering low rent public housing projects partly financed
with Federal funds. He is also chairman of the newly created Virgin
Islands Urban Renewal Board which is responsible for urban renewal
projects financed by local and Federal funds. Thus, related housing
and community renewal activities are coordinated and represented on
the cabinet level of the Government.
Although the Department of Housing and Community Renewal
was created late in the fiscal year, a great deal of work was accom-
plished in coordinating and initiating a middle income housing de-
velopment and advancing the emergency housing program through
the assignment of a special assistant to the Governor as Housing
Coordinator.

The Altona Community Development

By the end of the previous fiscal year, 15.64 acres of land had been
acquired in St. Thomas for the Altona Community Development, for
the purpose of resettling occupants of superficiary houses in safe,
sanitary and decent owner occupied dwellings.
A rather unique method of stimulating competition among private
contractors was initiated for construction of the dwelling units. Pri-
vate contractors were encouraged to submit plans and specifications
for a dwelling unit and quote a price for the construction of the build-
ing ready for occupancy. The minimum requirements were: (1) a
three-bedroom unit; (2) not less than a 10,000 gallon cistern; (3) ade-
quate sanitary facilities, including hot and cold running water; and
(4) a price of not more than $9,000.







72 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


Clinical Annex, Charles Harwood Memorial Hospital, Christiansted, St. Croix.
Completed in July, 1961, at a cost of $260,000. The building contains clinical
offices, laboratory and other facilities accessory to the basic hospital.

Seven construction firms took part in this unique competition
quoting prices ranging from $8,000 to $9,000, for construction of houses
of asbestos cement panels, steel or wood frames, and concrete blocks.
A larger building for demonstration purposes was constructed for
$10,000. The first construction order was given on September 1, 1961.
Before the end of the fiscal year the eight buildings were completed
and ready to be evaluated by a team of experts. The evaluation team
will select the model house which is the most feasible offer, taking into
consideration building materials, workmanship, type of construction,
engineering and architectural features, and price quotations.
At the close of the fiscal year the site lay-out plan for the develop-
ment project was being reviewed by the Planning Board. It is ex-
pected that work on the first 40 or 50 dwelling units will begin early
in the next fiscal year.

Workable Program for Community Improvement
The Government of the Virgin Islands is required by local law to
prepare annually a workable program for community improvement.







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 73

This program is required to include provisions for the prevention of
the spead of blight into areas of the community through enforcement
of housing, zoning and occupancy controls and standards. A work-
able program is also required in order that the Virgin Islands may be
eligible for public housing, urban renewal and other special assistance
programs of the Federal Housing and Home Finance Agency.
For the first time a workable program, prepared in accordance with
Federal requirements was submitted to the Housing and Home Fi-
nance Agency. The goals and objectives under this workable program
to be achieved during the next fiscal year include:
(1) Approval by the Legislature of the zoning maps and subdi-
vision regulations,
(2) Revision of the building code,
(3) Adoption of a housing code,
(4) Revision of the master plans for which Federal funds have
been provided, and
(5) A Community Renewal program study, for which Federal
funds will be made available.

General Comments
During this fiscal year a great deal of time and effort were expended
in analyzing the housing problems, determining the administrative
organization needed to tackle the problem effectively, and in initiating
short range plans for immediate relief.
In the next fiscal year more emphasis will be placed on actual con-
struction of houses and in devising long range plans for housing and
community development.

Virgin Islands Housing and Urban Renewal Authority
During the fiscal year, the Housing Authority was engaged in the
management of six developments on St. 'TlImii and St. Croix,
namely: Paul M. Pearson Gardens and H. H. Berg Homes in St.
Thomas; D. Hamilton Jackson Terrace, and Bassin Triangle in
Christiansted; and Marley Homes and Ludvig E. Harrigan Court in
Frederiksted, St. Croix. The total number of apartments in this pro-
gram is 530.
The average contract rent as of June 30, 1962 was $26.63 per month.
Nevertheless, more than 40 percent of the tenants are paying less than
$20 per month. Because of the relatively low income from tenant
families as compared with rentals on the mainland, the Public Hous-
ing program in the Virgin Islands is very much dependent upon the







74 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Federal contribution which amounts to about $2 for each $1 derived
from rentals.
Turnover in public housing is very low. This is easily understood
when it is considered that rentals are as low as they are in the Virgin
Islands projects. Because of this small turnover and the absence of
adequate housing on the private market, the waiting list of applicants
is ever increasing on both islands. It is feared that even with the com-
pletion of the projects now in the development stage there will be little
change in the seriousness of the housing shortage, inasmuch as the new
projects will be used in part as relocation facilities for families
presently living in the proposed urban renewal areas. The problem
of inadequate housing would be :aL:'.,::ih.,l by effective closing or
demolition of buildings which are in such poor condition as to be
considered hazards.

The Public Housing Program
The Oswald E. Harris Court, a 300-unit development on the Island
of St. Thomas, is considerably behind schedule and according to
present estimate will not be completed before the end of the calendar
year 1962. Approximately 25 percent of the units in this project will
be reserved as a relocation facility for families living in the Barracks
Yard Urban Renewal area. At least another 12 percent will be re-
quired for the transfer of families residing in the Berg Homes and
Pearson Gardens whose size require larger apartments.
The Ralph de Chabert Place, a 264-unit development on the Island
of St. Croix, is scheduled to be completed and ready for occupancy by
January 1963. Slightly over 30 percent of the units in this project
will be required for the families living in the Water Gut Urban Re-
newal area and about 10 percent of the remaining units will be re-
quired for the transfer of families living in public housing.
The Authority is planning for four new projects with a total of 480
units, all of which should enter the construction stage during the
calendar year 1963. Planning work is proceeding rapidly on three of
the four projects. The fourth project, which will be comprised of 168
units, is to be located in the Lindbergh Bay Area on the island of St.
Thomas.
At the request of the Governor, the chairman and executive director
of the Authority, together with the regional director of the Public
Housing Administration, made a study of the housing conditions in
the various villages operated by the Virgin Islands Corporation for its
field workers on the Island of St. Croix. The purpose of this inves-
tigation was to determine whether it would be feasible to effect exten-
sive renovation to the structures being used to house the families of







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 75

workers. In a report submitted to the Governor it was stated that
renovation was not feasible and it was strongly recommended that
consideration be given to requesting public housing units to replace
the dilapidated slum structures in the various villages.
During the month of May 1962, the Authority sold its third issue
of new housing bonds amounting to $7,495,000.

Urban Renewal
Preliminary planning work on three urban renewal projects was
completed, and Part I of Applications for Loans and Grants were
filed with the Urban Renewal Administration during the last week of
the fiscal year covered by this report.
It is expected that the proposed projects, namely: the Barracks
Yard area in Charlotte Amalie, the Water Gut and Lagoon Street
areas in Christiansted and Frederiksted, St. Croix, respectively, will
be determined to be feasible and that approval of the applications by
the Housing and Home Finance Agency will be forthcoming.
Legislation has been adopted and approved by the Governor which
would separate the urban renewal and public housing functions. The
enactment provides for the creation of a new agency to be known as
"The Virgin Islands Urban Renewal Board" which will administer
the urban renewal program. The agency known as the Virgin Islands
Housing and Urban Renewal Authority will be renamed "The Virgin
Islands Housing Authority" and will be concerned with the federally-
aided low rent housing program only.

Department of Law

Act No. 855 of the Fourth Legislature, approved March 29, 1962,
established the Department of Law as an executive department in the
Government of the Virgin Islands, effective April 1, 1962. The newly
created department took over the functions, property and personnel
of the former Department of Law attached to the Office of the Gov-
ernor. The approval of the Secretary of the Interior, as required
by section 16(a) of the Revised Organic Act of the Virgin Islands,
was obtained prior to the creation of the new department.
As the fiscal year 1962 commenced, the legal staff of the Depart-
ment was comprised of the Attorney General and one assistant. In
the course of the year another assistant Attorney General was added,
and in anticipation of increasing work loads, two more assistants,
one for St. Croix, were authorized for the next fiscal year.
The Department of Law appeared for the Government in over
3,000 criminal matters before the Municipal Courts in Charlotte






76 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Amalie, Cruz Bay, Christiansted, and Frederiksted. In addition,
34 civil cases in the District Court were handled by the department.
Opinion writing and counselling services to the departments, par-
ticularly in connection with stepped up activities in procurement,
public works, and the tax incentive programs, continued to show a
marked increase. Over 100 separate items of legislation were drafted
or reviewed for the regular session and four special sessions of the
legislature which occurred in the fiscal year.

Department of Property and Procurement

Division of Procurement and Supply
This Division experienced a tremendous increase in workload dur-
ing the year, 'as evidenced by the fact that direct orders, telephonic
bids, Federal supply purchases, and contracts processed totalled
,.",:::.~ )7, which figure does not include "more or less" contracts
for which purchase orders are issued by the individual departments.
Of the above amount, $2,621,056.64 was spent for construction con-
tracts; $1,201,801.11 for St. Thomas; $1,092,009.53 for St. Croix; and
$327,246 for St. John.
Toward the close of the fiscal year, the Legislature of the Virgin
Islands passed, and the Governor approved, Act No. 886 which per-
mits the purchase of supplies and equipment, without advertising for
bids under existing contracts of the General Services Administration,
Federal Supply Service, which gives greater flexibility to the various
departments and agencies in acquiring their needs.

Property Division
During fiscal year 1962 a property manual was prepared by the
Property Division, with the assistance of the Government Comp-
troller for the Virgin Islands. This manual was approved by the
Governor on December 28, 1961.
Physical inventories of government property were conducted and
record cards prepared for each item. Departmental listings are now
being prepared and departments will be furnished with this informa-
tion shortly.
A more active part is being taken in the matter of surplus property
which is available to the Government of the Virgin Islands as a result
of conferences held with the Puerto Rico State Agency for Surplus
Property.







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 77

Land Division
The activities of this Division were curtailed.to a great extent dur-
ing the fiscal year 1962 as far as the Homestead and Home Loan pro-
gram was concerned. This was due largely to the lack of funds for
Home Loans.
With the reduction of work in this area, attention was directed to the
matter of a much needed weights and measures program.
Top personnel received training in this field in Puerto Rico, several
pieces of equipment needed for this program were purchased, and an
appropriate Weights and Measures Law was presented to the Legisla-
ture for study.
In the field of price and rent control appropriate legislation was
prepared and sent to the Legislature, which referred it to a Committee
for study and recommendation.
Operating expenses in the Department of Property and Procure-
ment were as follows:
Office of the Commissioner -__--- ---- -- $100, 595. 68
Division of Procurement and Supply___ ---------- --- 64, 310. 19
Property Division --------------------- ------- 83, 591. 89
Land Division --------------------------------- 47, 360. 94
Total ---------------------------------------------- 295, 858.70

Department of Public Safety
With the designation of a new Commissioner on February 19, 1962,
the work of the Department was stepped up and by the end of the fiscal
year improvements had been noted. The Police Division was reor-
ganized and the number of patrolmen increased to a complement more
adequate for community needs: the Traffic Bureau was expanded: in-
service training for policemen and firemen was intensified; surveys for
a new penitentiary were completed; and the Civil Rights Panel and
Traffic Advisory and Safety Committee were organized. However,
there is still much more to be done before the Department can render
the type of service required of it.

Bureau of Criminal Investigation
The position of Investigator, St. Croix, was added to the staff in
order to enhance the work of the Bureau. During the year 1,242
criminal cases were investigated as compared with 669 for the previ-
ous year. Although the increase was considerable, the proportion to
total population is still minute and is a situation to be expected in a


67773S-63-6








78 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

community which is fast developing industrially and depends largely
upon the importation of alien labor. The following chart gives a
summary of the types of cases handled during 1962:

Number of criminal cases handled

Type St. Thomas St. Croix Total

Criminal homicide ...-----------------------------........ 3 3
Rape... .- ------------------------------------------------ 11 11 22
Robbery ~_------------- ------------- 5 5 t1
Aggravated assault .. ------ -------- ---- 14 37 51
Burglary --------------------------- 152 106 258
Petty larceny------------------------- --- 243 129 372
Grand larceny..------------- ------------------------ 85 43 128
Auto thefts_ --- ----------- ----- 7 16 23
Other assaults -- ----------- ----- 10 17 27
Forgery----------------------------------------------- -- 30 16 46
Embezzlement and fraud --------------------------- ---- 19 --------- 19
Stolen property ....---------------------------------------- 1 8 9
Weapon-possession _..----------------------- --- 8 16 24
Sex offenses --------------------------- 3 .-- 3
Offenses against family......----.-------- ---------- .... 1 1
Drunkenness ........-------............-------------------------------------------------.............. 1 1
Disorderly conduct.--------- -------------------------- 1 24 25
Gambling and vagrancy -----.............-------- -------- --..----------- 3 3
All other offenses---------- ------------------ 72 145 217
Total.--- ----------- -----------662 580 1,242


Patrol Bureau

The tremendous growth of the Virgin Islands has increased the
need for more patrolmen, and in an effort to meet this requirement
25 men were added to the force. A reorganization of the Bureau and
promotions within the ranks improved morale and general efficiency.
Added to this, in-service training of the men by members of the Fed-
eral Bureau of Investigation continued this year and brought en-
couraging results by permitting a small police force to deal effectively
with the general public.


Highway Patrol

The campaign to provide more safety on the public highways was
intensified this year, but in spite of this effort the number of traffic
accidents increased to 924 as compared with 600 for the previous year.
The number of deaths from accidents decreased from eight to four
this year. A total of 248 drivers' licenses were suspended. The sit-
uation is growing serious as the number of vehicles increase at an
alarmingly fast rate and congest the streets and roads. To meet this
problem in part, four new motorcycles have been acquired in order
to provide greater mobility so that a limited Highway Patrol unit
could control the movements of more than 7,369 registered vehicles.









REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 79

Vehicular registration and licensing-Virgin Islands


1958



Motor vehicles-private 2,517
Taxicabs and rented
cars .---------------- 644
Trucks-pickups ...--- 644
Buses ----------- 13
Trailers --------------- --------
Motorcycles- .-------- 29
Motorbicycles--- -- -------
Motorscooters ..---- 35
Tractors--------------- --------
Bicycles --------- 508
Drivers' licenses:
Private..---- -- --- 3,577
Taxi....--- ------ 702
Learners' permits.- 842
Motor vehicle transfers- 331
Traffic tickets issued .. -----
Fees from registration.-- $94,630
Fines for traffic viola-
tions--... .---------. 3,392
Visitors' permits..----. 6,371


1959



3,414
1,009
479
32
24
511
665
3,578
859
769
825

$95,674
10,005
9, 719


1960



3,027
1,237
1,206
30
47
136
713
6,064
600
1,026
1,005
1,877


1961



3,610
1,339
1,537
35
28
91
16
82
11
385
6,772
1,063
1, 131
1,061
2,888


1961

St.
Thomas I

2,030
976
664
20
48

41
6
48
3,469
554
746
495
2,112


$117, 078 $136, 2751$163, 7361-- -


S15,429 21,785
14,846 15,194


25,215 ---
21,907 --


Law Enforcement

The following figures show the activities of the Police Division as
compared with the previous fiscal year:
(a) Handled by foot patrol bureau: 1961 1962
St. Thomas and St. John-------------------------- 270 211
St. Croix------------------------------- 454 527
(b) Handled by Bureau of Criminal Investigation---_ ----- 669 1,242
(c) Traffic violations brought to Court:
St. Thomas--------------------------------- 2,104 1,784
St. John ----------------------------- 26 21
St. Croix-------------------------- 776 1, 051
Marshal service to the Municipal Courts was provided on an aver-

age of 434 days a week as follows:


Criminal summons_----- ---------
Civil summons --- -------- --
Writs of execution --------- -----_ -------------
Conciliations- -----------------------
Automobile liens----- ----------------------
Traffic summons ------ ------------------
Warrants of arrest-- ----------


St. St.
Croix Thomas
4,321 7,968
895 1,324
204 493
549 341
42
221 35
11 96


Insular Boys' Shelter

Since the shelter opened in St. Croix on July 22, 1960 to receive
delinquent boys committed by the Juvenile Court, 42 boys have been
admitted. Of these, 17 were released to their homes, 10 were sent to


1962


St.
Thomas

2,251
951
803
10
11
29
46
5
410
3,780
650
1,021
997
1,784


St.
Croix

1,934
420
979
21
17
43
24
50
440
4,068
569
540
643
898


-----------------







80 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

the Insular Training School, 1 was returned to Puerto Rico, 1 was
sent to a Federal detention home in the United States, and 1 alien boy
was returned to his home island, leaving 12 boys resident at year end.
During the year it was possible to add another counsellor to the staff
of carpenters and painters. Projects were primarily installation of
plumbing facilities in various properties and extensive wood-work
repairs to nine offices in the Welfare Building.

Richmond Penitentiary
During the year there were 143 admissions and at the end of the year
there were 38 inmates. Through the program, Richmond Prison
Industries, inmates continued to receive training in new skills and
trades and were able to earn a small income of $1,837.58 while learn-
ing. The prison farm project produced much of the food used by the
penitentiary as well as many hours of useful occupation for the
inmates.
A highlight of 1962 was the survey and report by the Director of
Federal Prisons in which the present penitentiary built in 1836 was
declared obsolete and unsuitable to the purpose for which it was being
used. It is hoped that soon measures may be instituted to implement
the recommendations for the construction of a new prison and its relo-
cation to a more adaptable area.

Fire Division
The Fire Division responded to 178 fire calls, an increase of 69
fires over the figure for the previous year. Fire losses in St. Thomas
and St. Croix amounted to $34,378 as against last year's loss of $26,972.
One fire occurred in St. John, with a loss of $1,200.
The Division continued its schedule of weekly drills and in addition
provided intensive training in extinguishing flammable liquid fire
and the use of fire entry and proximity suits. Plans are being made
to send two men for advanced study at the New York City Fire Col-
lege. A reorganization of the Division by establishment of two new
positions of captain and promotions from within the ranks have
improved morale and the service in general.
With the population increasing as rapidly as it has been in recent
years, there is dire need for a reliable alarm system whereby boxes
could be conveniently located throughout the city so that fires may be
reported quickly. The present method of calls through the telephone
operator is time-losing, resulting in greater exposure of life and prop-
erty before assistance can be given.







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS 4 81

Civil Defense
This program is concerned with developing potential to meet man-
caused or natural emergencies. During the year, a basic plan of oper-
ations was designed to coordinate the activities of various agencies
such as the American Red Cross and the Department of Social Wel-
fare to serve with Civil Defense in disaster relief, particularly from
hurricanes which are annual threats to the islands; improvements
were made with regard to inter-island communication and the system
was expanded to include the National Park Service; a number of
emergency and fallout shelter areas were designated. Air raid and
other drills were carried out from time to time. An officer was ap-
pointed to the St. Croix staff in order to advance the program in that
island. The local office maintained close contact throughout the year
with National Headquarters so as to be certain of new developments
and techniques in Civil Defense plans or operations.

Home Guard
The St. Thomas Home Guard assisted the local police with auxil-
iary duties such as directing traffic, patrolling highways, and serving
as wardens in Civil Defense. This year the St. Croix Home Guard
was reactivated with the formation of a unit in Christiansted. A
training program in the use of firearms is being initiated. The major
problem still remains that of finding suitable quarters for both the
St. Thomas and St. Croix units.

Police and Fire Commission
The Commission held five hearings for the year involving charges
of insubordination or conduct unbecoming an officer. Suspensions
ranging from one to ten days were ordered in all five cases.

Parole Board
The Parole Board held its regular twice-a-year meetings and appli-
cants for parole were heard and cases reviewed. At the December
1961 meeting at Richmond Penitentiary 14 cases came before the
Board for recommendation. Of that number five were recom-
mended for parole and later approved by the Governor. In June
1962, eleven cases came before the Board for examination; of that
number eight were recommended for parole and later granted parole
by the Governor.
During the year, under the Interstate Compact Agreement four
cases were accepted for supervision from outside the Virgin Islands.







82 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

One case from St. Thomas was accepted for supervision by the New
York Parole Board. At present the Board has a total of 12 cases
under supervision. Two were terminated, one by expiration of sen-
tence and the other because of death. This present load case of 12
also represents the Interstate Compact cases.

Budget
The actual obligations incurred for operating the Department of
Public Safety over the past 5 fiscal years may be observed from the
following comparative chart:

1958 1959 1960 1961 1962
Commissioner's office ...---- ____. ___- _____..... ..- $26,084 $29,715 $31,018 $80,751 $98,789
Police and Prison Department ---. -. ---- -__..._... 257,346 335,256 401,382 482,998 548,293
Fire Division --- -. ------ ... -... 53,162 90,944 116,731 129,660 134,003
Police and Fire Commission ------.-...----____.. __ 89 29 110 251 261
Parole Board --- --------_-.. -...___ .__.._... 69 68 192 112 95
Home Guard-. ---- --------_-_ _....--__ ...._ 16 396 1,267 3,951 2,683
Civil Defense ------------- --.----------------- 3,928 1,518 2,618 2,434 5,617
Total......------ ..._._ .._._.._ _._.____--_ -- 340,694 457,926 553,318 700,157 789,741

Department of Public Works
General
In fiscal year 1962, certain changes in the functional structure of the
department were necessary to properly allocate the services and cope
more effectively with the ever increasing work load. The Division of
Construction and Maintenance was abolished and replaced by three
new divisions-Engineering, Real Property Maintenance, and Equip-
ment Maintenance. Accomplishment of the increased work load of
the department is greatly handicapped by inability to attract compe-
tent field project supervisors due to the generally lower wage scale than
is offered by private contractors.
The sum of $2,391,652 was obligated for routine functions in St.
Thomas, St. Croix and St. John, including administration, mainte-
nance of streets and highways, collection and disposal of garbage and
rubbish, operation of the salt and potable water systems, night soil
removal service, and maintenance of public buildings and structures.
The sum of $2,219,500 was obligated for essential public projects
under the Internal Revenue Matching Fund.

Roads and Highways
General improvement in the local economy and tourist trade in-
creased tremendously the number of vehicles operating on the public
roads and highways. As a result, maintenance of existing roads has







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 83

become a serious and taxing problem, and the demand for new and im-
proved roads is now urgent. This year, in St. Thomas, 4.37 miles of
streets were repaired, and 9.82 miles of roads were paved. While this
represented special emphasis on road work as compared with other
fiscal years, there is much more to be done. Actually, the most logical
solution to the problem appears to be a master road plan considering
the load and volume of all types of vehicles, followed by a coordinated
program of construction.

Street Cleaning and Garbage Removal Service
This year, the Sanitary Division in St. Thomas made appreciable
progress with the major problem of keeping the city of Charlotte
Amalie and its environs free from garbage and rubbish. This was
accomplished by the use of mechanical sweepers together with a special
dump truck which loaded and disposed of garbage collected in large
storage bins distributed throughout the island. Further improvement
was brought about by elimination of the city dump and transporting
garbage and refuse out to sea by barge. In St. Croix, five new garbage
trucks acquired during this year have greatly increased the efficiency
of the service.

Night Soil Removal Service
Plans had been made to make connections to the sewer system
gradually, so that an orderly and complete elimination of the Night
Soil Removal Service would be accomplished by December 31, 1962.
This target date could not be met due, primarily, to refusal on the part
of owners of low-rent properties to install relatively high cost fixtures.
Progress has been too slow, even though loans were provided to assist
persons otherwise unable to make the required installations. While
some delay was occasioned by the difficulty of laying sewer lines
through rocky substrata, the general reason may be attributed to an
acute housing shortage which made it virtually impossible to relocate
tenants from areas where connections were to be made.

Water Supply
The total annual rainfall this year was 46.95 inches as compared
with 33.47 inches in 1961. Each year this source has to be supple-
mented in order to meet the heavy domestic and commercial require-
ments of the islands. In St. Thomas where the situation is especially
serious, water has to be hauled daily from Puerto Rico by a self-
propelled barge of approximately 250,000 gallon capacity. In addi-







84 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

tion, potable water from the airport iiii :i l has to be pumped into
the city area. This year 103,165,140 gallons were delivered through
underground lines while the barge brought in 84,354,300 gallons on a
total of 312 trips.
Installation of a salt water distribution plant by the Virgin
Islands Corporation was a major contribution in the efforts of the
Government to solve the water problem. This plant, put into opera-
tion on February 28, 1962, produced 25,671,700 gallons of water for
use principally by hotels and business places. However, even with
implementation of the water supply from the distillation plant, the
demand has increased to a point where no substantial reserve storage
can be maintained.
A 1,000,000-gallon cistern was constructed to increase the storage of
potable water to 11,147,000 gallons. New pumps were installed to
increase the pressure in the distribution system.

Matching Funds Program
A major activity of the department involves the p11 ini:ii,. design,
administration and construction of essential public projects author-
ized under the Internal Revenue Matching Fund. This year the prin-
cipal projects in St. Thomas included construction of roads, comple-
tion of two elementary schools, extension of the airport and remodeling
of buildings to house government agencies. On St. Croix, precedence
was given to dredging of the harbor, completion of the Frederiksted
Pier, starting of the pier and bulkhead in Christiansted Harbor, and
extension of airport runway to facilitate landing of jet aircraft. Com-
pletion of the Christiansted Pier, together with the Corps of Engineers
dredging project now in progress in the harbor, will effectively convert
Christiansted Harbor into a major port. On St. John, additions were
made to the water supply system and paving of the Centerline Road
started. Plans were finalized for the addition to the schools and
quarters for nurses.

Public Buildings
In St. Thomas, this work covered the complete renovation of a build-
ing to provide adequate space for the Department of Finance and the
newly installed IBM data-processing equipment. In St. Croix, ex-
tensive repairs were made at the Herbert Grigg Home, Department of
Social Welfare and at the Department of Finance to install service
facilities, enlarge office space and improve the general working
environment.














PUBLIC WORKS STATISTICS
Utilities and inspection

1958 1959 1960 1951 1962
Building permits Number Estimated Number Estimated Number Estimated Number Estimated Number Estimated
construction construction construction construction construction
costs costs costs costs costs

St. Croix.. ......... .....------------ 141 $1,912,236.00 124 $1,253,214.00 210 $2,288,719.00 224 $3,019,441.00 271 $4,176,536.00
St. Thomas and St. John --------------. 330 927,896.00 340 3,258,753.00 378 5,190,527.00 460 6,363,482.00 50) 7,017,972.00

NUMBER OF SANITARY INSTALLATION PERMITS

1958 1959 1960 1961 1962

Installation permits-St. Thomas.--....----........----------------------- 116 182 135 187 324
Sewer connection permits ... ...----------------------------------------.-------77 84 68 72 132
Water connection permits .. ------------------------------------------------------------ 20 35 19 42 91
Electric installation permits-St. Croix .-- .------------------------------------------------281 263 299 343 470
Electric installation permits-St. Thomas and St. John---..-...---------.....------------ 206 249 311 302 422

NUMBER OF PROPERTIES CONNECTED TO SALT WATER SYSTEM

St. Croix ----------------------- -------------- --------16 16 16 16 16
St. Thomas -- ----------------------------------------- --- --- 320 326 326 382 430
St. Thomas-new connections ----------------------------------------- --- ---------------- ------------- 19 91

NUMBER OF POTABLE WATER CONNECTIONS


St. Croix-new connections .......-------------------------------- ---------- --- 52 46 70 79 78
St. Thomas-new connections --------------------------------- 46 18 17 68 172
Total number of potable water connections -------------------------------------------------- 586 640 727 864 1016












POTABLE WATER CONSUMPTION
+
Potable water pumped from wells- .----.............---------------........--.... 30, 270, 923 30,110,766 43, 503,928 47,628, 528 48, 501,765
Potable water brought in by barges----....---------------------- 39, 349, 600 49,665,800 67, 740,800 89,103, 300 84, 354,300
Potable water hauled by trucks to consumers.... ...------- ---------------..... 602, 250 556,250 25, 785 625, 500 1,573, 000
Potable water used by consumers by meters.--. ------.---------.---------.. ----- 58, 439, 070 64, 204,620 87,400,006 90, 475,685 103, 165, 400
Average daily consumption-St. Thomas------....-.....------ --------- 190,000 200,000 220,000 250,000 300,000
Average daily consumption-St. Croix ..-------- -------.------------.--82,934 82,495 120,000 130,516 132,880
Potable water received from Distillation Plant.... --------...... ------------------ -------......_ -------------------... ..-_ ---------- ------_- 25, 671,700

GARBAGE AND RUBBISH IIHAULED 0

St. Thomas .--...---............--------.............................. Cubic yards.. 30,534 34, 884 43, 220 39, 990 97,008 m
St. Croix --..-------------------- -----. -----.-----. ------Cubic yards-. 15,300 17,562 22,950 40,896 33,058 ti

NITE SOIL REMOVAL
0

St. Thomas.---.----..-......-.....----------------------- .............. Gallons.._ 468,192 469,260 479,520 458,336 378,950 5
St. Thomas -....---.------------------------ ----------------...... Cans in use-- 800 850 900 900 900
St. Croix---.........- --------- ------------- --------------....Gallons-. 322,000 312,400 254, 280 242, 986 231,000
St. Croix __--- -------.--.----------- ------------_--_ Cans in use-. 460 500 489 433 375 O

MILES OF ROADS MAINTAINED O

St. Croix..----.... ... __..---- ---------------.--..---------.-------- 170 170 170 170 170
St. Thomas and St. John ..---..--...... ._. _.__--------- ------------------------- 90 90 90 90 90

MILES OF STREETS MAINTAINED

St. Croix------------------------------------------------------------------------ 16.4 16.4 16.4 16.4 16.4
St. Croix........._.. ..... ......................... ........ 16.4 16. 4 16. 4 16.4 16. 4
St. Thomas and St. John ....--------........--------------..------13 13 13 13 13

MILES OF OPEN DRAINS MAINTAINED

St. Thomas -----..- ----.--..... --..-----....------- __ 25 2 2 25 25 25
- - - -O







REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 87

Department of Social Welfare
General
The U.S. Social Security Act of 1943 provided a legal base for
extending to the Virgin Islands several titles of the Federal Social
Security program: in 1947, Child Welfare Services; in 1950, Public
Assistance; in 1951, Old Age and Survivors Insurance; and in 1961,
Unemployment Compensation.
The powers and responsibilities of the Department as established
by the Virgin Islands Code included general authority over, and
jurisdiction to administer, all public social welfare programs in the
Virgin Islands; general control over the enforcement of the laws
relating to social welfare; authority to make studies of, recommenda-
tions for, and develop plans and programs aimed at achieving a high
level of social welfare throughout the territory.
In fiscal year 1962, consistent with the foregoing, the Department
continued its Federal and insular activities and made much progress.
However, local effort in Public Assistance was hampered by the limi-
tation of Federal participation to $320,000 for the year and the fact
that the matching formula allowed only one Federal dollar to each
Virgin Islands dollar instead of the much more liberal formula of four
Federal dollars to each State dollar as is the case on the mainland
of the United States.

Public Assistance
This program provided financial assistance to needy individuals and
families so that none may be forced to exist below a minimum level
of living; it rendered social services which would strengthen family
life and assist them to attain self-support and self-care; it extended
Medical Assistance to the Aged and OAA Recipients. In November
1961, the program was expanded to include the distribution of Fed-
eral Surplus Commodities.
During the year, the Department concentrated on analysis of the
caseload in an effort to rehabilitate all possible employables, to estab-
lish eligibility on a prompt and sound basis and to improve services.
The following table shows the caseload distribution and expenditures
by category:









88 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS


Caseload distribution by districts


During year Closed
St. Thomas- St. Croix
St. John

38 66
69 65
2 1
3 16
38 24
65 27
215 199


During year Caseload June 3, 1961
St. Thomas- St. Croix St. Thomas-
St. John St. John


32 312
51 214
3 13
4 57
36 76
65 0
191 672


214
85
3
38
68
0
408


Comparison of caseloads and expenditures


Old age assistance-----......
Aid to dependent children....
Aid to the blind.---
Aid to the disabled. ......
General assistance---- -- ....
Medical assistance to the aged -----


Number of persons aided

June 1961 June 1962

527 532
865 1,043
19 16
98 96
124 140
235 451
1,868 2,278


The movement of this program during the past 6 years is reflected
in the caseload changes noted in the following table:


Comparison of caseloads, 1957-62


Number of Persons

Old age assistance .-- ---...
Aid to dependent children__--
Aid to the blind.... ---... .
Aid to the disabled ---.------- .....
Total Federal categories .---------
General Assistance ----------_ --.------
Grand total-------------- --


1957 1958

659 620
1,007 785
25 21
105 103
1,796 1,529
139 128
1,935 1,657


1959

584
777
20
101
1,482
118

1,600


1960 1961

561 527
922 865
19 19
107 98
1,609 1,509
107 124
1,716 1,633


1962

532
1,043
16
96
1,687
140

1,827


During the year, the program continued grants to assistance clients,
who were not hospitalized, to cover medicines and medical appliances
prescribed by physicians, clients received free hospitalization and
medicines while they were in-patients of the public hospitals. This
limited medical care program for assisting clients has been advanta-
geously handled through the prepayment plan operated by the De-
partment's pooled medical fund. Payments for medical care services
in 1962 totaled $60,211.85 as compared with $9,979.34 in 1961. The
large increase in 1962 is due to the new Medical Assistance to the

Aged program.
Under the provisions of Act 651, Third Legislature, the Depart-
ment of Social Welfare purchased medical care from the Department


Category


OAA _......
ADC.
AB --.......
DA.._
GA -.
EA ..
Total-- .


Caseload
St. Croix


325
198
14
60
68
0
665


July 1,1961
St. Thomas-
St. John

208
67
4
41
64
0
384


Added
St. Croix


53
87
0
3
36
27
206


Expenditures


1961

$183,554.78
169,649.15
6,199.02
38,324.70
39,192.48
2,880.19
$439,800.32


1962

$227,370.25
205,507.85
6,499.00
40,935.75
56,449.41
25,215.19
$561,977.45








REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 89

of Health for individuals 65 years of age or older whose income and
resources were not sufficient to meet the costs of necessary medical
care whether or not they were receiving assistance for other needs.
By June 30, 1962, 451 persons had received care and services under
the program as compared with 288 persons in 1961.
Total expenditures under the Public Assistance program amounted
to $719,211.17, an increase of 25.2 percent over last year's $574,612.54.
Federal matching funds this year amounted to $308,317.31 as com-
pared with $251,154.02 for 1961. The local share of costs was $410,-
894.47 this year and $313,818.86 last year. The cost of Public Assist-
ance over the past 5 years and the distribution of this between the
Federal and local governments may be observed from the following
charts:
Total cost of assistance program-1958-62

Category 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962

0Oldage assistance ------------ $184,023.50 $199,824.92 $200,763.47 $222,690.29 $265,529.05
Aid to dependent children ------. 142,857.27 151,113.88 182,509.79 213,981.57 256,519.50
Aid to the blind _----------. 7, 721.27 7,637.51 8,005.86 7,941.73 8,041.52
Aid to the disabled--- 31,970.84 36,684.08 41,357.30 47,308.70 47, 049.87
Medical assistance to the aged ---- -- -- --- -- 11,523.76 44, 540.86
Total Federal categories ... 366, 572.88 395, 260.39 432, 636.42 503,446.05 621,680.80
General assistance -_ ----. 47, 849.63 49, 11.84 49, 092. 69 60. 047. 77 76, 655. 70
Trustfunds_ _-- --------- 561.00 586.00 822.00 716.00 1,132.75
Emergency and special aid ----.. 4,080.06 6,482. 76 5, 777. 57 763.06 19, 742. 53
Total local categories ...- 52, 490. 69 56, 980.60 55, 692.26 61,526. 83 97, 530.98
Grand total .....------ 419, 063. 57 452, 240. 99 488,328. 68 564, 972.88 719,211.78

Sharing of total cost of assistance program

Agency 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962

Federal ------ --------- $182,108.91 $195,248.58 $216.116.23 $251,154.02 $308,317.31
Local --------------------- 236,954.66 256,992.41 272, 212.45 313,818.86 410.894.47
Total -...........------- 419, 063. 57 452, 240. 99 488, 328.68 564,972.88 719.211.78


Child Welfare Services

Adoption service, foster family care, day care and institutional care
were provided for homeless, dependent, neglected or delinquent
children. Particular emphasis was placed on services to children
living in their own homes. The main objective in all instances, how-
ever, was to promote security for children and help them to grow and
develop in a normal manner.
In 1962, casework service was provided to 906 children as compared
with 756 last year. Below are tables showing the type of services and
caseload distribution:








90 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Caseload distribution by district offices
St. Croix St. Thomas Total

Children receiving service, July 1, 1961 ----------..---------- 276 328 604
Children accepted for service during year ..-----------. ------ 148 154 302
Children receiving service, June 30.1962___. ----------- 389 343 732
Total number of dependent children receiving services during
year -...-------.----------------.------------- 424 482 906

Whereabouts of children receiving service, June 30, 1962

St. Croix St. Thomas Total

In home of parents ---..-------------------------------- 176 186 362
In home of relatives ..-------------------- ---------- 68 29 97
In boarding homes -___ --------------------------- --- 60 54 114
In free foster homes--------- ----------------------------- 33 20 53
In adoptive homes..----------------- -------------- 6 15 21
In institutions ---.----------- --------------- 27 37 64
Juvenile Center ------------------- .----- 12 12
Elsewhere... ------------------------------------ 7 2 9
Total... ------------------------------------ 389 343 732


Foster Family Care
The program continued actively during the year and remained one
of the most encouraging operations. The foster care caseload was
188 of which 21 were in adoptive homes, 53 in free foster homes, and
114 in boarding houses.

Insular Training Schools

The schools continued to achieve heartening improvement in serv-
ices and in child and staff morale. The Department of Education
provided academic services to the schools through two full-time
teachers. The Mental Health Bureau of the Department of Health
provided psychological and psychiatric services to the children.
The Boys School maintained 69 boys, the average age being 14.
Vocational projects such as poultry raising, gardening and animal
husbandry were expanded. Fifteen boys attended high school in
town.
The Girls School established in March 1958 cared for 17 girls at
an average age of 15 years. Eight girls attended high school in town.
Detention facilities continued to be an area of great concern to the
Department and to citizens of both islands. A temporary center for
delinquent boys 16 to 21 years of age is still in operation at the fort in
Frederiksted. Funds were appropriated for the construction of a
Detention Center in St. Thomas and construction plans are being
completed. During the year 49 children were in detention care as
compared with 110 in 1961.









REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 91

Other Services

In 1962, there were 28 adoption petitions processed and 10 place-
ments completed. The "Fresh-Air Fund," a private undertaking,
permitted 200 needy boys to attend camp in St. John. Four Day-Care
Centers are now established and plans have been initiated for opening
one in St. John. An average of 47 children per month ranging from
two months to four and a half years used this service. The Citizens
Advisory Commission on Youth organized Youth Councils in each
island and worked throughout the year on White House Conference
projects related to promoting youth participation in community af-
fairs. Proceedings of the Governor's Conference on Juvenile Delin-
quency held in February 1961 were published during 1962.
The Child Welfare program is summarized in the following tables:

Cost of child welfare program

Insular St. Croix St. Thomas Virgin
Islands

Local funds:
Child welfare services ..---- -- $964. 84 $17, 441.33 $7, 943. 70 $26, 349. 87
Foster home payments-------------------------- 23,096.99 25,420.37 48, 517. 3
Insular training schools:
For boys ---- ----- -- 106,574.09 --------------... .---------- 106,574.09
For girls -- ----------.. ----- 17,718. 97 ---------- 17,718.97
Day care centers .------------------------- ---------- 1,608.85 10, 735. 70 12,344.55
125,257.90 42,147.17 44,099.77 211,504.84
Federal funds:
Child welfare services------------ 18.243.54 19,046. 92 19,695.51 56, 985. 97
Grand total..------------------------- 143,501.44 61,194.09 63,795.28 268,490.81

Cost of child welfare program-1958-62

1958 1959 1960 1961 1962

Local funds:
Child welfare services ...--------- -- $23,640.89 $12,970.82 $16,976.96 $24,295.74 $26,349.87
Foster home payments...........----- 28,306.48 32,869.42 34,386.30 48,060.60 48, 517. 36
Insular training schools:
For boys....- --.---------- 54,013.33 66,293.77 67,265.29 81,014.53 106,574.09
For girls -.7.0..------- 7,550.98 13,898.29 16,271.45 19,037.51 17,718.97
Day care centers -.. .. -.-------- 3,374.95 11,980.51 12,344.55
113,511.68 126,032.30 138,274.95 184,388.89 211,504.84
Federal funds:
Child welfare services -------- 33,273.78 29,139.89 49,442.59 50,707.72 56,985.97
Grand total...-- -------.----------- 146.785.45 165,172.19 187,717.54 235,096.61 268,490.81



Division of Institutions and Special Programs

Homes for the Aged

St. Thomas.-The Queen Louise Home, an institution of 24 beds
and facilities, provided custodial care for the aged and infirm. There
were 7 admissions, 5 deaths and at year's end 18 persons were in resi-







92 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

dence. More adaptable quarters and an activity program remain
prime needs at the Home. The feebler residents have difficulty nego-
tiating the stairways between the dining and bath rooms on the lower
floor and the dormitories on the upper floor. Plans have been de-
veloped to construct a new wing and add 18 beds, sanitary facilities,
a laundry and storage space.
The Corneiro Home is a shelter care home of 25 rooms. There
were no admissions, 1 death and 1 discharge, leaving 32 residents at
year's end. The buildings are old and need extensive rehabilitation.
St. Croix.-The Aldershville Home is a shelter care home of 31
rooms. There were 3 admissions, 1 death, 2 transfers, leaving 30 resi-
dents at year's end. All cottages were repaired and painted.
The Herbert Grigg Home for the Aged, an institution of 140 bed
capacity, formerly administered by the Department of Health, was
transferred to the Department of Social Welfare on January 1, 1962.
There were 6 admissions, 7 deaths, and 2 discharges, leaving 106 resi-
dents at year's end. Full custodial care was provided for all residents.
Extensive repairs were made to the main building; new beds were
ordered; an administrator, matron, and a physician were added to
the staff; diet and care were improved. The quality of care has been
greatly improved by an increase in nursing, housekeeping and cus-
todial service. More adequate care and a more nutritive diet gave
a decided boost to the morale of staff and patients.

Special Program
Cancer Care.-It was necessary to continue to send Virgin Islands
patients, referred by the Department of Health, for care at the Puerto
Rico Cancer League. There were 12 new cases in St. Croix and 8 in
St. Thomas. This program is financed by the Community Chest,
Government Funds and Lottery appropriations.
Services to the Mentally Ill.-A limited amount of casework serv-
ice was provided for mental patients, under institutional care, while
they were hospitalized in the Virgin Islands and after being dis-
charged. The Division continued to have responsibility for planning
and arranging the return of mental patients from St. Elizabeths Hos-
pital, YWashington, D.C., where 133 persons were hospitalized. Dur-
ing the year 15 studies on mental patients were completed. Fourteen
were residents of St. Elizabeths Hospital and 1 of a New York State
hospital. One patient returned from St. Elizabeths Hospital and
was provided with aftercare services.
Emergency H,,'. "-,i.-The building boom continues to create dif-
ficulty for low-income tenants who find it increasingly impossible to
find suitable quarters within their capacity to pay. The local legis-








REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS + 93

lature made funds available to the Department of Social Welfare
to assist with this problem through the construction of Emergency
Housing. During the year, four eight-room units were built bringing
the total prefabricated houses to 20. The following chart shows the
progress of the program in St. Thomas:


Report of emergency housing

Total Men Women Girls Boys Infants Total
families persons

St. Thomas:
Applications pending July 1, 1961. 369 260 401 442 459 95 1,655
Received during year -.------- 118 91 120 114 118 66 509
Closed during year..---------- 23 15 27 26 33 17 118
Applications pending June 30,
1962 ---------_-- ----- 464 336 494 30 4 44 908
Persons housed July 1, 1961------ 33 29 39 57 61 14 200
Housed during year---- 18 14 21 23 28 15 101
Moved during year ._----------- 1 1 1 1 3 0 6
Total housed June 30, 1962. --- 50 42 59 79 86 29 295
St. Croix:
Applications pending July 1, 1961 54 23 48 54 43 1 169
Received during year .-------- 205 152 172 208 225 35 792
Closed during year ...----------- 21 15 14 22 21 6 78
Applications pending June 30,
1962---- --------- 238 160 206 240 247 30 883
Total housed July 1, 1961:
Housed during year _------ 85 53 60 69 78 20 280
Moved during year---------- 5 5 2 1 6 0 14
Total housed June 30, 1962_. 80 48 58 68 72 20 266


In St. Croix, the emergency situation was met by renovating 13 old
units and leasing 56 units from the Virgin Islands Corporation.
Surplus Food Distribution Program.-The distribution of Federal
surplus commodities to needy individuals, hospitals, Homes for the
Aged, Baby Clinics and other institutions began on July 5, 1961.
The initial caseloads of 1,936 persons increased to 2,385 at year end.
The following chart shows the kind and amount of commodities re-
ceived and the wholesale and retail value thereof:


Federal surplus commodities received

Commodity Pounds Wholesale Retail
Value Value

Cornmeal...---.__-__-. ---.-.....---. --.....- 71.885 $5, 031.95 $6, 469.65
Wheat flour---- ---------- 84, 030 6,722.40 8, 403. 00
Dry pea and pinto beans-....--- -------------- 45, 319 4, 531.90 8,610.71
Lard ..--- ----__------- ------- --.. .--.-.- 49, 068 7,360.20 12,267. 00
Rolled oats.--------------....-- ------__ ------- 20,052 2,406.24 7,018.20
Chopped meat.---... -- ------------------- 46.421 20,425.24 27,709.44
Milk .....--- ..-----------------._ -.. -- 134,392 26,878.40 88,698.72
Rice ----- -..-------------- .. 102,054 10,205.40 16,328.64
Butter.- --------------.___..._ --------- 5,071 3,042.60 5,071.00
Cheese.. ..--. 16,303 9,781.80 11,901.19
Rolled wheat.. ------ --------- 16,380 1,965.60 4, 586.40
Total .-.___. -_______-- ---.-_-..---_ 590,975 98,351.73 197,063.95


677738-63--7








94 + REPORT OF THE GOVERNOR OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Community Chest

The 1962 drive was highly successful in that the goal of $15,000 was
surpassed by pledges and contributions in the amount of $16,972.05.
The following is a summary of traditional Chest services provided
during this fiscal year:

Program Cost Services rendered

Housekeeping and laundry........ $2,651. 52 2,715 cleanings-1,119 pieces.
Home nursing __-----.. -------- 4,508. 96 Increased caseload.
Cancer care.------------------- .. 2,667.00 Hospital bills and travel costs.
Emergency needs- ..--------------- 482.30 Cash grants, furniture, etc.
Special aid to patients in institu- 502.00 Monthly grants, etc.
tions.
Homemaker service-St. John ...- 348.96 Care of aged.



Expenditures
The growth of the Department of Social Welfare may be sum-
marized in the following chart which shows appropriations by the
local legislature for social welfare over the past five fiscal years:

Operating budget-Local appropriations

1958 1959 1960 1961 1962

Office of the Commissioner.--. ------------ $23,600 $24,400 $27,000 $29,977 $30,032
Bureau of Business Management ---...---------- 38, 200 40,000 41,628 45, 614 67, 039
Division of Public Assistance ------------------ 211,000 214,800 254,558 308,558 376,781
Division of Child Welfare&. ---.- ---------- 113,400 118,000 138,275 172,487 199,163
Division of Institutions and Special Programs...... 39,700 40,000 70,600 91,030 1192,142
865,15---
425,900 437,200 532,061 647,696 865, 157

I Herbert Grigg Home for the Aged transferred from the Department of Health to Social Welfare on Janu-
ary 1, 1962.

Human Relations

The Legislature of the Virgin Islands at the end of the fiscal year
1961 enacted and the Governor approved an amended and compre-
hensive civil rights code for the Virgin Islands, intended to guarantee
to every citizen of the Virgin Islands, whether native-born or adopted,
the equal and full enjoyment of all rights and privileges of all other
citizens of the Virgin Islands, regardless of race, creed, color, or
national origin.
The Governor also appointed the Governor's Commission on
Human Relations to work toward promoting and keeping good will
among all the citizenry of these islands to the end that the Virgin
Islands may remain a place where every citizen or group of citizens
may continue to retain the dignity of person and respect of his fellow
citizens, and where all groups may work and live together in harmony.