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Group Title: Agrifest
Title: Agrifest : agriculture and food fair of St. Croix, Virgin Islands. Feb. 20-22, 1971.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA01300011/00004
 Material Information
Title: Agrifest : agriculture and food fair of St. Croix, Virgin Islands. Feb. 20-22, 1971.
Series Title: Agrifest : agriculture and food fair of St. Croix, Virgin Islands.
Physical Description: Serial
Publication Date: 1971
 Subjects
Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- United States Virgin Islands -- St. Croix -- Caribbean
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA01300011
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of the Virgin Islands
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 20948561

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover 1
    Main
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Full Text

AGRICULTURE


FOOD A IR
OF ST CROIX
VIRGIN ISLANDS .


COLLE1



SSEP


FEB. O Z, 12.1971


, VAD
1.3:
2/5
197f


CROiX CCAPqS
IE OF THE V. I.


' 1982


AND








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ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

AGRICULTURE AND FOOD FAIR OF ST. CROIX


SECRETARY
Isabelle Williams

ANIMALS
Reuben Roebuck
Owen Schjang

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS
Erica Wulff


CONSERVATION
Henry Williamson
Bent Lawaetz


Otis Hicks
Doug Covey




Annie J. Postell
Charlotte Palmer





Samuel Whitaker


Honorable Rudolph Shulterbrandt, Chairman

VICE CHAIRMEN
Samuel Whitaker Harold Clum

FINANCE COMMITTEE FOOD & NUTRITION
Lauritz E. Gibbs Edith Bond Charlotte Sosa
Austin W. Fisher, Jr. Isabelle Williams

HANDICRAFT FRUIT & VEGETABLES
Otis Hicks Henry Carter
Edith Bond Roy Rodgers
ENVIRONMENT & ECOLOGY
Jean D. Larsen
Charlotte Whittaker

YOUTH GROUPS PARTICIPATING
F. F. A. 4-H Clubs
Boy & Girl Scouts F. H. A.


FACILITIES
Wilfred Finch and Staff V. I. Department of Agriculture

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STEERING COMMITTEE
Lena Shulterbrandt Theodore Coley Charles Petersen
Herbert Grigg Georgene Whitney
COOPERATING AGENCY
St. Croix Mobile X-Ray Unit Service & Display
Frank Peterson, Supervisor X-Ray Services
4-H STEERING COMMITTEE
Julia Pankey Winifred Jarrell Nancy Kelley
Agatha Ross Freya Noah Carlos Rodriguez
ENTERTAINMENT
Helen 1. Joseph, Music Dept. of Education
FAIR BOOKLET
Austin W. Fisher, Jr. Cedric Gardine Isabelle Williams


TYPIS
Betty-Mae Petersen


Lorraine S. Todmann


ARTIST
Robert Lattin LI IARY"

PUBLICITY ST. CRO X BRP,,CH,
Morris Henderson V. I. Extension Service COLLEGE OF TH VL


V, 012 59



























MESSAGE FROM THE GOVERNOR


Although the passing years have dimmed the

importance of farming here, and the fields of

cultivated sugar cane have vanished from the

scene, the soil of our native land is still a precious

possession. The farmers, who have remained close

to the earth must be admired for their apprecia-

tion and understanding of the more basic values

of life. Their yields are not only a material reward

of such endeavors, but also the spiritual and

aesthetic benefits. A well kept garden, whether

of flowers or vegetables and fruit trees, adorns

any landscape.


The Agricultural and Food Fair serves as an

admirable vehicle for informing the public of new

developments in agricultural techniques and

equipment, and of stimulating interest in their

adaptation. I hope it will continue to be an annual

event in the Virgin Islands for many years to

come.

The staff of the Agriculture Department is

to be commended for its constant dedicated effort

to bring new and more productive records to the

growing of vegetables, plants and fruit trees, and

the raising of livestock.


THE HONORABLE MELVIN H. EVANS


"p~

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MANY THANKS TO
- THE DEPARTMENT OF
[ AGRICULTURE









VITAI




ISLAND DAIRIES
ST. CROIX, VIRGIN ISLANDS































Rudolph Shulterbrandt


Our job here in the Virgin Islands is to re-
cognize and isolate our problems. We should
then devise plans and procedures to solve them.
This is what our neighbors did and are doing
continuously. We already know that some foods
can be produced here. Therefor, let's stop saying
it can't be done.

Let us continue to do those things that can
be done. Let us do them better by applying the
scientific and approved practices to achieve the
desired results. Let us continue the search for
new crops that will grow well here, there are


MESSAGE OF THE COMMISSIONER


We who love the field of agriculture, are also challenged
to keep our field of livelihood alive on our islands. We have
many problems, but these are not too different from the
problems of our neighbors near and far.

They too are challenged by adverse weather; too cold,
too hot, too wet, too dry. They are also challenged by adverse
condition of soils; too acid, too alkaline, too little drainage, too
much drainage, soil borne disease, nematodes. They are cha-
llenged by the forces of economics: rising costs, rising land
values, shortage of good labor, changes in supply and demand,
and marketing technology. They must compete with insects, dis-
eases, and weeds. All of these challenges are met and solved.
They never say it can't be done.


many more. New discoveries in the industry may
also be to our advantage. Federal programs that
we have not used need to be brought into focus.

Let us recognize and be ever conscious that
the God given fertile acreage of St. Croix, now
lying idle, is still our greatest natural resource.
This was certainly meant to produce the food
that supports a healthful, happy life as our his-
tory has shown.

Let's blast off into the 70's by putting our
productive resources to work.


,AI
\j IL\






GOVERNMENT OF
THE VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
CHRISTIANSTED, ST. CROIX, V. I.


January 29, 1971



Mr. Rudolph Shulterbrandt
Commissioner
Department of Agriculture
Estate Lower Love, St. Croix




Dear Mr. Shulterbrandt:

In these times of rapid change and great unrest, public education is faced with the

obligation of finding innovative methods of instructing students. This requires the cooper-

ation of all branches of government and the community.


Your invitation to participate in the Annual Agricultural and Food Fair, sponsored

by the Department of Agriculture is a prime example of what is needed. It provides an

opportunity for meaningful learning experience for our students, both as participants and

spectators. Additionally, it gives the public a chance to observe what their schools are

capable of producing.


On behalf of The Staff and Students of the Department of Education, I say, "Thank

You."


Best Wishes for an outstanding and successful Fair.

Very truly yours,

Gloria H. Canegata
Acting District Superintendent


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AGRICULTURAL CONSUMER SERVICES IN THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
By HAROLD CLUM Director of V.I. Extension Service


Most people are aware that Government
agencies are increasingly responsive to Consumer
concerns and problems. The news media devoted
a lot of time and space to the appointment of a
Director of Consumer Affairs in the office of the
President. Consumers are making their wants and
particularly their problems and gripes known. Go-
vernments at all levels have taken a good look
at these consumer problems with a view to
finding the best laws, organization and programs
to protect the consumer and keep them (her)
happy.

With problems concentrated in the food and
agricultural areas many of the State Departments
of Agriculture have responded by changing their
name to Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Affairs in order to more correctly describe an
ever increasing work load in Consumer help and
protection.

The V.I. Department of Agriculture has to
face the same consumer problems as well as the
need to make available to V.I. residents many
services and programs which the Congress or
the President assigns responsibility through the
United States Department of Agriculture.


The V.I. was among the first States to come
under Federal Inspection as part of the whole-
some meat Act of 1967. In January 1971, the
Virgin Islands was thirtieth in coming under Title
II of the Wholesome Meat and Poultry Act.

These programs administered by the V.I.
Department of Agriculture under agreement with
consumer and marketing service furnish Virgin
Islands Consumers maximum protection for all
meat and poultry from slaughter to consumer
against unwholesomeness, adulteration or decep-
tive labeling.

There are several additional consumer protec-
tion and other services included in the Agricul-
tural Marketing Act of 1946, the egg product act
passed in December 1970 and others on which
Commissioner Shulterbrandt is currently working
to bring to Virgin Islands residents. These pro-
grams will help protect health and make sure
consumers are getting fair treatment.




























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CONSERVATION & ENVIRONMENT
By: HENRY WILLIAMSON
Soil Conservation Service


Soil and Water Conservation Districts and
the Soil Conservation Service have been working
in the field of Conservation and Environment for
more than thirty years. When ponds are built,
they store water, which helps to improve the
quality of our environment. When farmland is
terraced, contoured, or planted to crops that pre-
vent soil erosion and water run-off, we are again
helping to maintain or improve the quality of our
environment.

When soil is left bare, with no protective
cover, it immediately becomes vulnerable to both
wind and water erosion. If the soil is allowed
to blow, we have air pollution; if it is allowed
to wash, then we have pollution in the form of
silt and mud dumping into streams, beaches, and
even into our homes and cities. Unfortunately,
silt or mud is one of our greatest pollutants.


Soil and Water Conservation Districts, assisted
by the Soil Conservation Service and the Virgin
Islands Department of Agriculture, have been
successful in controlling to a great extent, soil
erosion and water run-off on agricultural land and,
at the same time, maintaining or increasing its
productivity. The Virgin Islands can be proud of
the fact that there is little or no erosion origina-
ting on agricultural land.

There are many acres of good agricultural
land on the Virgin Islands that are not producing
needed food crops for local use. Non-use of land
does not mean good use of land. Good agricul-
tural land should be put to an agricultural use,
rather than lie idle and return to "bush." Produc-
tive farm land growing needed crops will improve
the natural beauty of our islands, as well as help
improve the quality of our environment and make






better use of our limited rainfall. Technical
knowledge and skills are available from many
sources to produce needed crops for human
consumption; what is needed is the desire to
produce, using modern know-how.

The fact that erosion control has been suc-
cessful on farm land does not mean we have
controlled erosion on all the land. The greatest
source of soil erosion, pollution, and damage to
our environment on the Virgin Islands comes
from our rapidly expanded urban and industrial
development. Large acreages have been cleared
(bull dozed); many miles of new roads have been
built, with little attention being paid to the soil,
slope of land, and hydrology. As a result, we now
have flooding, silting of our beaches, reef destruc-
tion, roads washed out, polluted underground
water, and many other side effects.

Housing is needed; orderly development of
trade and industry is desirable. Transportation
systems are a must. Can we have large acreages
of new housing, industry, and many miles of new
road without creating problems of erosion and
environment? The answer is yes. Many of the
same principles that control erosion and protect
our environment on agricultural land can be used
or modified to control erosion on land undergoing
rapid development for housing and commercial
uses, including installation of roads and neces-
sary utilities.

Listed are some practices that will help
prevent soil loses on non-agricultural land:

1. Choose the land that has the right natural
drainage pattern, topography, and soils
for the intended development.


2. Use areas
intensified
other open


with soils not well suited to
development for parks and
space use.


3. Save trees and other existing vegetation
wherever possible. They enhance the
beauty of the development which has a
dollar value. They provide shade for
lawns, and they help control erosion.

4. Expose as small an area as practical at
any one time during development.


5. Expose the land for as short a period as
possible.

6. Hold lot grading to a minimum.

7. Plan roads and streets to avoid long
stretches of excessive grade and to fit
the comtour of the land.

8. Provide adequate drainage to streets and
roads and from streets and roads to storm
sewers or other run-off disposal that does
not erode the land or flood property
below.

9. Plant temporary vegetation during deve-
lopment in critical areas subject to erosion.

10. Build sediment basins to remove sediment
from run-off waters during development.

11. Provide for disposing of increased run-off
caused by changed land formation.


12. Plant permanent vegetation
needed structures as early as
the development process.


and install
possible in


Urbanization problems are evident. We must
act at once to prevent further environmental
damage. It is not necessary to write a whole new
conservation program for suburban areas. The
basic principles of sound water and soil conser-
vation are the same wherever they may be ap-
plied. It is necessary only that the people under-
stand and support sound conservation policy -
that government establishes policy guidelines,
codes, and ordinances, and provides the staff
necessary to assure sound land-use planning and
development.

The Virgin Islands Soil and Water Conserva-
tion District, along with other agencies, groups,
and individuals, is encouraging the adoption of
Environmental Protection Legislation to help meet
the needs of our rapidly developing islands.








THE VIRGIN ISLANDS FORESTRY PROGRAM

By Axel L. Frederiksen
U. S. Forest Service


The Virgin Islands Forestry Program is a joint
effort of the Virgin Islands Department of Agri-
culture and the United States Department of Agri-
culture Forest Service to promote the planting of
trees throughout these islands. The overall objec-
tives of the program are as follows:

Develop a formal forest policy to provide
coordination between forestry and other pu-
blic activities; Officially recognize those lands,
which for physical and economic reasons
should remain in forests; protect these lands
from conflicting uses and encourage the land
owners with economic incentives and techni-
cal assistance; acquire deforested areas criti-
cal for the protection of our environment
and reforest them; teach forest conservation
at all levels and develop those lands suitable


for forest recreation; intensify the utilization
of forest products-high quality craftwood
products for the Tourist Trade and fence posts
for the farmer and land owner; lead a coord-
inated community effort for the maintenance,
protection and establishment of public area
trees-wherever trees form a vital part of
our environment.

Of the approximate 83,000 acres in the U. S
Virgin Islands, about 21,000-exclusive of the
National Park in St. John-are in some type of
forest or should be. Of these 21,000 acres at least
5000 are of commercial value and the remaining
16,000 acres are vital to the protection of the
natural environment. On the island of St. Croix
there are about 500 acres of West Indies Mahogany
occurring in natural stands. This area is one of
four in which this highly-prized mahogany grows
naturally and is found in commercially valuable
stands. The other areas-all in the West Indies-
are Cuba, Jamaica, and the island of Hispaniola.
















( ---


- -


1Ir


0* S


ENVIRONMENTAL & ECOLOGICAL PROBLEMS II


It is difficult to think of adverse changes oc-
curing in the environment in an area as pictur-
esque as the U. S. Virgin Islands. Nevertheless,
such changes are occurring at an ever-quickening
pace.

The old method of raw sewage disposal into
local harbor and beyond reefs, intolerable even at
low population levels, is now totally inadequate at
the present population density.
The increased use of disposable containers has
added significantly to the per capital production of
garbage. The attendant littering, induced by an
all too literal interpretation of the term "dispos-


By: Jean D. Larsen
Caribbean Research Institute


able", has turned streets and highways into un-
sightly linear garbage dumps.

The insensitive expansionary schemes of large
tract developers decimate the island flora and fauna
and cause innumerable tons of precious top soil to
be washed into the sea.

Industrial pollutants are now commonplace. To
name but a few: soot from factory stacks; wind-
blown caustic soda; tailings leached out of settling
ponds; millions of gallons of hot brine and the
constantly heightening level 'of background noise.


OOF.i


7*401


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The pall of smog,. for which many U. C. ci-
ties are now infamous, can already be seen down
stream of St. Croix. A mere shift in wind direction
to Southeast, South or Southwest would put a
similar dome over the population centers of St.
Croix, St. Thomas and St. John.

Expansion of the large industrial plants on the
South shore will produce a geometrical growth in
the amount of pollution fed into the ecosystem in
the next decade.

The myth that pollutants out of sight are for-
ever out of mind has been shattered by the alarm-
ing discovery of mercury first in Great Lake stur-
geons, and more recently in tuna from remote areas
of the oceans. Mercury, a waste product of the
paper industry, moves up the food chain with in-
creasing concentration to the ultimate consumer,
man.

This situation has arisen because of several
presuppositions in our culture, firstly, that there is
a separation of man from nature and, secondly,
that everything in nature exists to serve man.


It is now abundantly clear that these presup-
positions have led us to lose sight of the fact that
man is wholly embedded in the tissue of the natural
process -he is part of an ecological chain whose in-
terconnections are delicate, infinitely complex, never
to be severed.

Degradation of the environment not only has
the immediate effect of lowering the quality of life;
it has the remote effect of affecting the very via-
bility of the life we all hold dear.

Fortunately, the constraints of our insular life
enable a large majority of our people to see the
changes as they occur. Thus, an awareness of what
the price to be paid is in terms of degradation of
the environment can evolve rapidly. This must be
followed in turn by collective action through all
possible and practical means to stop this conspi-
cuous consumption of natural resources.

It may ultimately require that the kind of
society we have built be restructured and the kind
of people we are be changed....but this is a small
price to pay for our survival.


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WILDLIFE OF ST. CROIX


The mongoose was introduced to St. Croix
in 1882 to control rats in the cane fields. It found,
as have many other recent visitors, that St. Croix
provides a salubrious environment. Living on an
isolated island with no previous terrestrial preda-
tors, the native animals were very susceptible to
a vigorous carnivore such as the mongoose. In
combination with man's alteration of the land-
scape, the mongoose has eliminated or greatly
reduced most of the terrestrial animals on St.
Croix. Peculiarly, there are no native terrestrial
mammals remaining on St. Croix. The Norway rat,


Fruit bat, Mouse, Mongoose and deer have all
been introduced by man; and all have thrived.
The four species of bats are the only native mam-
mals on the island. The two species of fruit bats
are abundant and will continue their nightly ex-
cursions as long as wild or cultivated fruit trees


By: DAVID W. NELLIS
Wildlife Biologist


FRUIT BAT


exist on the island. The small ubiquitous roof bat
is the first bat out in the evening as it searches
the air for the insects it preys upon. Fish-eating
bats occur throughout the new world tropics, but
few people have heard of them. This unique
winged mammal flys low over the water and
locates fish near the surface with its sonar; it
then swoops down and catches them with its long
clawed hind feet.
Lizards are of course an everyday occurrence
as they scuttle about the house and garden eating
insect pests; the green or brown anoles in the
day being replaced by the transparent gray gec-
kos at night.
In addition to the bluegill, tilapia and bass
stocked by the Department of Agriculture, the
fresh waters of St. Croix contain a giant shrimp
with claws like a Maine lobster which grows to
be over a pound in weight.







BEEF CHART


"A LIFETIME OF FOOD"
The amount of food a person con-
sumes in a lifetime of 70 years-
150 cattle
2400 chickens
225 lambs
26 sheep
310 hogs
26 acres of grain
50 acres of fruits and vegetables


CARE OF FRUITS
AND VEGETABLES
For information am bow
to plant and care for fruit,
vegetable and field crops
contact the local County
Exter ion Agent or the Col-
lege of Agriculture and
Forestry, West Virginia
University, Morgantown,
West Virginia 26506.

















Y




Y
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"A1


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WEST INDIES RESTAURANT (Mini Mall)


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FRUITS, ONE OF THE ANS\

Good fruits grown on St. Croix can command
good prices and a ready market. The records of
our Department of Commerce show that (40) tons
of fruit were imported in the Virgin Islands during
the year.

Most of the different species of tropical fruit
now imported can be grown on the Virgin Islands.
It is true that we will have to be very selective when
investing in relatively large plantings. It is also
true that high yields from fruit trees are dependent
on good rainfall. At this time, we cannot predict
what the rainfall will be in the future. Neverthe-
less, we have seen that certain fruits grow very
easily, and without much help from mankind.

During the last decade, the fruit tree popula-
tion has dwindled. This may be charged to many
reasons, among which are: the demand for land for
real estate development, tree destruction by
drought, willful destruction, negligence, old age
of trees, and lack of a proper program for re-
plenishment.

More fruits can be produced on the Virgin
Islands if our citizens would increase backyard
planting, and programs to put idle acres into
production.

During the last decade our permanent and
temporary population has virtually tripled. This has
gone unnoticed in our agricultural planning. Pos-
sibilities that did not exist at the close of the 60's


S1 By Isabelle Williams
III Marketing Agent


are now possible. Our hotels can hardly get sup-
plies of our easily produced papayas for their tour-
ist trade.
The papaya and mango afford wide usage and
unlimited markets. Papayas sell for as high as
900 per pound in the United States markets. The
chemical extract from the papaya (papein) is the
base of many products. Meat tenderizers and cos-
metics are among the products of the papaya. As
food, it is used as a fresh fruit, beverage, candied
preserve, and salad sidedishes.


The following is a list
of them are quite familiar.
some of them?
Avocado
Banana
Barbados Cherry
Grapes
Cherry
Figs
Kei Apple
Mango
Passion Fruit
Pineapple


of tropical fruit, some
Why not try growing

Sea grape
Soursop
Tropical Apricot
Guava
Custard Apple
Persimmon
Loguat
Mulberry
Papaya
Coconut.


With the increase of fruit tree production, we
should think of what we are going to do with the
surplus and unattractive, but nutrionally good
fruits.
Small canning kitchens or light manufacturing
of the juices from the various fruits should be in-
itiated in our community.








IMPORTED FOODS
By Lauritz E. Gibbs
District Director
Trade and Industry
Dept. of Commerce


I have been given the responsibility of discuss-
ing foods, as it relates to import.

As you are well aware by now, St. Croix is
an agricultural area with vast land acreage parti-
cularly suited to the growing of food to feed its
citizens. The present compliment of persons
residing here are broken down for our convenience
into:

(a) Citizens
(b) Aliens

The sum total of the people who must be
provided daily meals on St. Croix are approximat-
ed in the following manner:


Citizens About
Aliens


29,000
5,500


In other words, the food in a sufficient amount
must be available to feed about 34,500 persons daily.
This for our economy is a staggering figure. St
Croix produces very little of the portion required.
The vast majority has to come from the outside.

Years ago St. Croix once produced some of the
following in large amounts:


Yams
Tomatoes
Cabbage
Farm Animals


Potatoes
Celery
Eggs
Poultry Meat


Just to mention a few. At that time it was
unnecessary to import large quantities of these
staples.
The situation today has reversed itself to such
an extent that little of the food now found on the


lunch and dinner table can be labeled produced in
St. Croix. This in itself is a complete reversal from
the good old days when St. Croix was considered the
"Garden of the West Indies."

To further develop the idea of our "Do Little"
trend let us take a peak at what we are doing as
far as importing food is concerned. Statistics now
show that as high as 90% of all food placed before
us for consumption and feeding of our dairy and
poultry industries come from the outside. This
mean that a "Poor 10%" is produced locally.

What is more frightening is the fact that items
like tomatoes, yams, tanias, potatoes (sweet) are
also brought in large amounts. We have practical-
ly folded our hands and taken the attitude that
"God will Provide".

It is true that we still have agricultural lands
that could be harnessed and pressed into service if
we dared to.

Let us look at our imports and see where
most of our precious circulating funds go and for
what items.


Rice
Corn & Related Products
Fresh Fruits & Nuts
Coffee
Fresh & Frozen Vegetable
Meats (Fresh & Frozen)
Dairy Products
Dried Milk & Cream
Wheat Flour
Sugar
Other Groceries


131 Tons.
26
1,856
8 "
1,437
1,698
217
61
67
424
8,097








With the cost of foodstuff so high, I need not
remind the housewife that her dollar could go a
little further if some of the foods were grown on the
island, so as to give her dollar a little more mobili-
ty.
For ages the British and other islands have
made a considerable fortune off these, our Virgin
Islands by selling us what we can and will not or
feel too proud to produce. Things have been "Well",
with neighboring Tortola because it has found a
ready market for every product it brings into our
island.
This that I've just said should make you wor-
ry even more if our Great United States should find
itself in a national crisis and food could not readi-
ly be shipped to our shores. Just where will St.
Croix or the Virgin Islands for that matter find
itself. The thought is too horrible to mention.

To superimpose upon what I have said is the
fact the population is not static by far but seems
to be moving upward in a rapid manner. By 1980
if the population trend continues, St. Croix could
very well exceed St. Thomas by a good 5,000 or
even 10,000 people.

Now I believe is the time to give our stock
inventory serious consideration and do something
very positive about it.
We can start by getting off the proverbial
"stick" and dig into the soil a little more. We


must help ourselves and this help must begin no
later than "now". The situation is both chronic
and frightening.

Our leaders should make known to "The Pow-
ers That Be" that the situation calls for drastic and
immediate action if we are to survive any tremor
radiating from our great country.

I hope that what I've said here will help to
stimulate all of us to do something positive about
our future livelihood.

COMPARATIVE STATISTICS
OF IMPORTS FROM & EXPORT TO PUERTO RICO


Year


Import from Export to
Puerto Rico Puerto Rico


Trade
Deficit


1963 $15,900,000 $14,000,000 $ 1,900,000
1966 52,400,000 17,500,000 34,900,000
1967 85,100,000 21,600,000 63,500,000


Trade deficit took a decided downward trend
when big industries came into the Virgin Islands,
especially in St. Croix.

A sizeable amount of the import shown above
represented food. With the advent of Harvey and
Hess the new statistics will show a healthy export
picture. This of course does not alter the food
situation which still is plaguing St. Croix and the
Virgin Islands as a whole.








COMPLIMENTS OF


gflzg[7/ 54^//7JL/7/
IJL J 7 LJ J=7 /NL

A CHECCHI SUBSIDIARY
CABLE: FROZEN
P. 0. BOX 429, CHRISTIANSTED; ST. CROIX, U. S.;
VIRGIN ISLANDS
P. O. BOX 1796 CHARLOTTE AMALIE ST. THOMAS, U. S.;
VIRGIN ISLANDS






REPRESENTING PURVEYORS TO THE HOTEL AND
RESTAURANT INDUSTRY




SOTTMAN GENERAL FOODS

* H. J. HEINZ TULIP HAMS

CARNATION SEAFOODS MRS. SMITH'S PIES

CORN PRODUCTS ADAMS ORANGE JUICE

0 SOILAX PRODUCTS MT. VALLEY WATER

LOWENBRAU MILLER HIGH LIFE BEER








PRACTICE GRAFTING YOUR OWN


II


I


A I




A


For successful union of the stock and scion
it is essential that the cambium or growing tis-
sues of the stock and scion be in contact or very
close to one another. Not all kinds of plants can
be grafted on to all stocks or roots. There must be
certain inherent characteristics common to the
two plants before a satisfactory union will take
place. These characteristics are generally spoken
of as "botanical relationships".


The cleft graft. A, cleft graft completed ready
for waxing; B, side view showing bevel of scion;
C, back view showing wedge-shaped bevel of
scion; D, cross section of cleft graft: a, incorrect
method of setting scion, no cambium contact;
b, scion correctly set to insure cambium contact.







II '






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SuDSTriC


Of all the types of budding methods that have
been devised, the most used is the "inverted T".
Budding is usually done just prior to a new growth
flush when the buds of the plant have begun to
swell. A matured hardwood branch tip of the
"parent plant," about 12 inches long, is removed
as a source of the budwood. The petioles of all
the leaves on the bud stick are cut with shears,
leaving about 1/4 inch of the petioles still attach-
ed. Then, using a razor-sharp knife slice about 3/4
inch above the bud, down past the bud 1/4 to 1/2
inch, but not completely cutting the bud from the
stick. (See picture above). Then make a cross cut
at the base of this cut to remove the bud from
the stick. The plant to be used as the rootstock
should be about a year old seedling, about as
thick as a pencil, of the same species as the
parent plant. Make an inverted "T" incision


through the bark of the trunk of the selected
rootstock seedling about ten inches above the
soil line. Make this cut slightly longer than the
bud itself. Peel the flaps of the incision back
slightly, starting at the base of the vertical cut.
Insert the bud into the base of the incision and
push the bud all the way up so that it fits com-
pletely beneath the bark with only the bud and
piece of petiole protruding. To prevent the new
bud from drying out, the entire area must be
wrapped with either a special budding rubber or
a 1/4" by 10" strip of plastic. Starting below the
bud, wrap the material tight up and around the
bud with overlapping layers. Complete the wrap
by slipping the end of the material under the last
wrap and pulling up tightly to lock the strip in
place. Cut off any excess wrapping material.


SToCK


I
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LL


WE SHOULD USE WEEDKILLERS OR HERBICIDES CORRECTLY
By Rudolph Shulterbrandt


Effective weed control using chemical weed-
killers is no easy job for the novice or beginner
Proper guidance or assistance should be negotiated
until this practice has been mastered. To make this
venture without consultation could result in a
rather heartbreaking or costly situation. The in-
correct application of the wrong chemical for a
given situation could ruin a piece of land for many
years.

If a home gardener had a one-half acre garden
with rows of tomato, pepper, cabbage, cucumber,
beans, carrots, sweet corn, and it was badly infest-
ed with weeds and in need of cultivation; it would
be wonderful to be able to fill a knapsack sprayer
with water, add about eight or ten tablespoonful
of a chemical weedkiller, spray over everything,
then in a few days watch the weeds die and the
desirable crops remain. Sorry to say, but at this


time, this is wishful thinking, and is not possible
for many reasons. Mainly, there is no single weed-
killer that would control weeds in all of the differ-
ent families mentioned above. This applies either
to pre-emergence or post emergence applications.

Since it is important to use the right herbicide
or weedkiller to a specific crop, about two hundred
herbicides has been developed to meet the needs
of these demands. For the purpose of chemical
weedkilling, plants may be grouped into two main
classes: 1. Plants with broadleaf, or 2. The true
grasses. True grasses have long narrow leaves.
The herbicides may be further classified based
on the application practices by which they are
most effective:

Group I. Contact foliage treatment: These kill
any soft green plant growth on which they
are sprayed or come in contact. Weedkillers






in this group are, Reglone and Gramaxone.
These are quick acting sprays.

Group II. Systemic foliage treatment: These
chemicals travel throughout the plants affect-
ing both shoots and roots. This type of weed-
killer is usually selective. They generally only
affect broadleaf plants or grasses, but not
both. Some weedkillers in this group are 2,
4, 5, -T,. 2, 4, -D., Kuron, Tordon, and Dalaphon.
Group III. The Residual (soil acting) treat-
ment: Weedkillers in this group are mainly
used as pre-emergence treatments. (That is, it
is applied to well-prepared field after the
seeds have been sown, but before it or the
weeds emerges) the tolerant crop emerges


normally, but the seeds do not. Weedkillers of
the group include; diphenamid, simazine, ami-
ben, tok, Karmex, dachtoe, and others.

Methods of Application

Weedkillers generally come in different forms;
oils, solids, granules, or powders. They are gene-
rally mixed with water and applied as sprays. Some
weedkillers for use on paths are sold as granules.
These may be dispensed by hand, by a special
applicator.

For additional information on the use of her-
bicides, contact your department of Agriculture or
Extension Service of the College of the Virgin
Islands.


SABROSURA
CON LA FRESCURA DE
HARINAS AMAPOLA
sorullitos de maiz
bacalaitos fritos
Sricos "caprichitos"
t .,,' dp Ina neina ..: -.


El secret del
horneo estd en
usar frescas
harinas de absolute
pureza.. como las
que le garantizan
sus molinos...
nuestros molinos...
FRESCAS
PURAS
NUTRITIVAS


MOLINOS DE PUERTO RICO

























PREVENTING AND TREATING DISEASES OF FARM ANIMALS


By: Charles C. Crago, D.V.M.


Animal Husbandry poses many problems, not
normal to many mainland areas. Therefore, it be-
comes necessary that all owners observe a few
cardinal principles.
Usually in dry weather, many of the problems
brought about by ticks and internal parasites, do
not present themselves. However, during prolonged
rainy weather, tick eggs hatch out in a shorter
period of time and a greater percentage of the eggs
hatch. This means that routine dippings become
difficult to carry out. This year has been such a
year. There are two tick-borne diseases in cattle,
namely, "Piroplasmosis" and "Anaplasmosis." The
former is a very severe disease for which there is
no known vaccine; for the latter the vaccine which
costs about $2.00 per head; should be given every
year. Most beef herd owners feel that this expense
is too great to carry out. Practically all dairy herds
make use of this vaccine.
Owners of beef cattle particularly in the Bont
Tick Eradication area, find themselves in a danger-
ous position, since routine dipping has caused the
cattle to lose their temporary immunity or toler-
ance to Piroplasmosis. Now they are running a
severe risk if animals are not dipped regularly.
This is one of the strong reasons for an all island-
wide Tick Eradication Program. All animals should
be maintained tickfree in which case such a program
could be carried out with greater ease.
Internal parasites are greater source of trouble
for goat and sheep, mainly because of the com-
mon practice of the use of night pastures. It is
highly recommended that night pasture not be
used. This of course, exposes the herds to the rav-
age of dogs and the pilfering of some persons. If
night pastures are used, they should be well-drained
and frequently rotated. Where emergency measures
warrant individual treatment with Thibengale
boluses may be carried out as necessary. The cost


of this treatment is about 25 per head. A more
economical approach to the problem is the use of
Plenothiazine Powder mixed with salt and provid-
ed for the animals as freechoice about 1/3 of the
time.
Not allowing young goats or sheeps to breed
until reasonable growth is attained, would prod-
uce a much better animal with greater stamina.
Free and frequent exchange of herd rams will add
stature and stamina to any herd.
Swine are generally heavily parasitised in this
island because of restricted areas in which they
are kept with unsanitary conditions. Since there
are no real effective (economically feasible) worm
medicines for swine, it becomes rather important
to keep all animals on clean ground. Otherwise
the pens should be kept clean or moved to new
ground frequently.
All owners of all animals should be on the
lookout for Screwworm infestation. As yet, it has
not reached the island of St. Croix and every pos-
sible precaution is being carried out to prevent it.
Where it already occurs all wounds, as well as the
navels of newly borns animals, should be treated
immediately with a preparation available at the
Veterinary Clinincs. Furthermore, samples of the
worms should also be taken, so that they may
be sent to laboratories to be properly identified.
Where any question about a wound occurs,
your Veterinarian or his technician should im-
mediately be called in. It is hoped that a Fly-
drop can be carried out by the U. S. Animal
Health Division before the condition becomes worse.
It should be remembered that to legally bring
into these islands horses, cattle, sheep, goats,
swine or any exotic animal, one must receive
permission from the Division. Certainly, it should
be in the interest of everyone to abide by this
procedure.











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II II

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II II


* BETTY'S HOPE FARM
*CANE GARDEN FARM
* CORN HILL FARM ....
* LAREINE FARM .......
*MON BIJOU FARM ....
*SIGHT FARM ..........
* SOLITUDE FARM ......


....... WALTER HODGE
....... MARIO GASPERI
....... HENRY NELTHROPP
........STACY LLOYD
....... OLIVER SKOV
....... CHARLES SCHUSTER
....... RICHARD ROEBUCK


VIRGIN ISLANDS DAIRYMEN'S ASSOCIATION


WHERE THE GOOD
GRADE "A" FRESH
MILK
COMES FROM


-7






COURTESY OF
l WEST INDIA MACHINERY & SUPPLY CO.
SlEXCLUSIVE REPRESENTATIVES OF:
S.* ALLIS CHALMERS-CRAWLER TRACTOR DOZERS AND
S 0 CRAWLER LOADERS
J* CLARK MICHIGAN WHEEL TRACTOR LOADERS, BULLDOZERS
S AND SCRAPERS
ONAN STUDEBAKER- ELECTRIC GENERATING SETS, ELECTRIC
WELDERS GASOLINE DIESEL & LPG GAS
-e HUBER AMERICAN ROAD ROLLERS, COMPACTORS MOTOR GRADERS
GRAVELY INTERNATIONAL- GARDEN & LAWN UTILITY TRACTORS
,,* .IOWA MFG. CO.-CRUSHING EQUIPMENT GRAVEL PLANTS-
S ASPHALT PLANTS
S- G. P. 0. BOX 4308
SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO
TELEPHONE 782-2850
rL


Por que'p gar mis?

COMPARE EN PUEBLO


DONDE LO MEJOR
CUESTA MEMOS


Ir -~ f '-rii E~I~~T


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TICK ERADICATION PROGRAM
By: Dr. Richard Evinger
Officer-in-Charge, ARS
Puerto Rico Virgin Islands


For more than forty years the cattle fever tick
(Boophilus microplus) has been recognized as an
obstacle to the development of the livestock in-
dustry in the U. S. Virgin Islands. These ticks can
spread diseases such as cattle tick fever (piroplas-
mosis) and anaplasmosis. The ticks themselves also
produce a general unthriftiness from the continuous
loss of blood and "Tick worry". Milk flow can
be reduced by as much as 25%. Restrictions on
movement of animals from the Virgin Islands be-
cause of the ticks, also causes a loss of foreign
and U. S. markets for all types of livestock.

About a year ago a renewed interest by the
agricultural industry in an eradication program
was expressed. A committee of livestock people,


conservationists, tourist interest, and Department
of Agriculture officials was formed. Money was
appropriated by the Virgin Islands Government.
And after many months of planning an eradication
program was developed. The program is to be
conducted in cooperation with the Animal Health
Division, U. S. D. A., using both Virgin Islands
and Federal funds and personnel.

This must be an eradication program. Every
tick on the islands must be killed. Even if only a
few are left, it will not be many months until they
are again spread through the herds and flocks.
The almost successful program in the late 1930's
and early 40,s is an example of what can happen.


HOW THE PROGRAM WILL WORK


All animals that ticks can live on must be
regularly treated or be destroyed. These animals
include all cattle, sheep, goats, horses, donkeys
and deer. Since a tick cannot mature and drop
off to lay her eggs in less than fifteen days, the
animals must be treated at fourteen-day intervals.
Most cattle, sheep and goats will be dipped in a
permanent or portable dipping vat.

Some cattle may be treated using spray-dip
machine. Many of the horses will be sprayed using
portable power sprayers. The chemicals are used
to kill the ticks on the animals before they can


mature, drop off and lay their eggs. Those ticks
that do not attach to an animal, will eventually
starve.

As herds, flocks and areas become free of
ticks, movement of animals or contaminated ma-
terials into these areas must be restricted. All deer
that cannot be regularly treated must be destroyed.
The eradication program is planned to begin in
March, 1971 on St. Croix. As the program becomes
successful on St. Croix, crews and equipment will
be moved to St. Thomas and St. John to free the
entire U. S. Virgin Islands of livestock ticks.





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CoMPLI METs OF LYOUR

FRIENDS AGr


POULTRY HEALTH
SERVICE

OF

JACKSONVILLE., FLORIDA

fD TDISTIRIUTORg FORO
eCOMpJLnGLG LIE9 OF
SL LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT
A HND MEDICATION
+ IMJLlII DIlMe
INCLUDING
AN ISECTICIDES
w4f^ AMD SPRAVERef















One of the most important steps to success-
ful crop production is knowing the specific cons-
tituent of that body of soil, in relation to the con-
templated crop. Soil tests attempt to assess the
fertility status of soils and in this way provide
information useful in predicting fertilizer needs.
If this step is eliminated, we are playing games
of hit or miss or trial and error.
There is only one scientific way of finding
out this relationship, and that is by performing
reliable soil test. One of the most important


SOIL TESTING
By: ROY A. RODGERS

features of a soil test is that it can be made
weeks'before the crop is planted so that fertilizer
can be properly applied at planting time.
At least sixteen elements are considered
necessary for the growth of green plants -
nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, oxygen, hydro-
gen, sulfur, calcium, magnesium, iron, man-
ganese, zinc, copper, molybdenum, boron, and
chlorine. These elements are commonly referred
to as essential plant nutrient. An element is said
to be essential if the plant cannot complete its
life cycle without it.
Plants obtain carbon, hydrogen and oxygen
from water and carbon dioxide and the other
nutrients from the soil.
If you desire any information concerning Soil
Testing please call on the V. I. Department of
Agriculture, and we will be happy to assist you.


BLUE MOUNTAIN NURSERY

WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD

Retail Sales Budget Landscaping

Located at Mon Bijou Road

1/4' mile north of Project


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VIRGIN ISLANDS EXTENSION SERVICE
COLLEGE OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS
FEDERAL EXTENSION SERVICE
OF -THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATING






4-H YOUTH DEVELOPMENT


Four-H Youth Development is the youth part
of the Virgin Islands Extension Service program
conducted cooperatively with the U. S. Department
of Agriculture and the College of the Virgin Islands.

Four-H is for all boys and girls between the
ages of 9 and 19, who want to Go Places, Make
Things, Share Ideas, and Have Fun. In the Virgin
Islands, boys and girls 8 years of age can get a
headstart through participation in 4-H Mini groups.

Four-H helps young people learn about science
and scientific methods; explore careers and improve
their employability; learn agricultural production
and management principles; and improve home and
family living.

More than this 4-H helps young people create
desirable relationships with others; promote safety,
and health, engage in community development and
conserve natural resources; appreciate cultural arts
and use leisure time constructively; increase leader-
ship competence; and become productive and re-
sponsible citizens.

Four-H joins with the home, school, church and
community in the development of boys and girls
into finer individuals and citizens.

The Virgin Islands 4-H program is carried out
through clubs or groups set up in cooperation with
schools, housing developments, churches, communi-
ty centers, parents and community leaders.

What does 4-H membership cost? There are
no state or national dues. Some local clubs may
have a few cents dues each year to provide money
for local programs and activities. The cost of
membership is mainly the interest and dedication
of parents and the willingness on the part of the
boy or girl to follow the 4-H ideals and standards
and to do project work according to his ability and
the resources available in his home.


Last year in the Virgin Islands 360 young people
took part in 4-H. The term "4-H" is much more
inclusive than "4-H club" and is used to denote
that not all of the 360 participants were members
of an organized club. Though the organized club
is the chief way of serving youth through Extension,
there are other ways young people can participate
in 4-H.

Boys and girls who want to carry out activities
aimed toward some special interest may form
"special interest groups".

The boy or girl can do 4-H work alone. He
may live too far away from other youths to particip-
ate in a group or he may be the only one interest-
ed in 4-H and later be able to encourage others to
join with him.

The success of 4-H depends on volunteer lead-
ers who work with local 4-H groups. In the Virgin
Islands some 23 men and women donate their serv-
ices as leaders. A leader counsels and encourages
members, observes progress of projects and makes
suggestions when needed. He not only teaches
youth and serve his community but also learns
and gains as a person.

Many firms, organizations and individuals
provide generous contributions for leader training
and other incentive awards.

Four-H groups are meeting in three schools,
three housing centers and in the homes of two
adult leaders in the Virgin Islands.

Soon 4-H will be happening all over the map
of the Virgin Islands.

By: Mrs. Anne J. Postell


Home Economics & 4-H Leader























FUTURE


HOMEMADE


AMERI


By Lena Shulterbrandt


"A Dare of the Decade: To promote com-
munication for enrichment of human
relationships", was the challenge offered
to the delegates of the National Future
Homemakers of America Clubs at it's
annual convention, New York City in the
summer of 1970.

The Future Homemakers of America is a
private non-profit national organization of students
of Home Economics. It is an integral part of the
Home Economics Program providing opportunities
for enriched learning. Amongst it's purposes is
R S the promotion of the appreciation of the joys and
satisfactions of homemaking; encouragement of
democracy in home and community life; good
O F home and family life for all; development of
creative leadership in home and community life;
and furthering interest in Home Economics. In the
CA year 1969-70 the V.I. had an enrollment of 269
members in 3 chapters.

The Future Homemakers Club of the Virgin
Islands has the power to grow by accepting "the
challenge of the 70's". By using the challenge in
(1) Communication that is sending and receiving
messages of peers, teachers, parents and the
community. This exchange of thoughts enriches
our human relationships. (2) By the involvement
of our members in the F.H.A. through which they
learn by doing. Being involved helps one to adjust
better and more quickly to many varied situations.
Knowing that our society depends upon us we
must prepare ourselves to get involved in ac-
tivities that lead to a better Virgin Islands.











SNAIAL OAIAIN F S S O VAIAL AI


THE NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STUDENTS OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE


CHRISTIANSTED CHAPTER
CHRISTIANSTED HIGH SCHOOL
ST. CROIX, VIRGIN ISLANDS
00820


By OTIS HICKS F.F.A. ADVISOR


THE FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA, of
"FFA" as it is commonly known, is the national
organization of, by and for students studying
vocational agriculture in public secondary schools
under the provisions of the National Vocational
Education Act.
As an integral part of the program of voca-
tional education in agriculture in the public school
system of America, the FFA has become well
known in recent years. No national student or-
ganization enjoys greater freedom of self-govern-
ment under adult counsel and guidance, than the
FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA. Organized in
November 1928, it has served to motivate and
vitalize the systematic instruction offered to
students of vocational agriculture, and to provide
further training in agriculture, leadership, coopera-
tion and citizenship. Organized in St. Croix 1959.
The FFA is an intra-curricular activity having
its origin and root in a definite part of the school
curriculum-vocational agriculture. Among other
things, members learn through active participation
how to conduct and take part in a public meeting;
to speak in public; to buy and sell cooperatively;
to solve their problems; to finance themselves;
and to assume civic responsibility. The foundation
upon which the FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA
organization is built includes leadership and
character development, sportsmanship, coopera-
tion, service, thrift, scholarship, improved agricul-
ture, organized recreation, citizenship and patrio-
tism.
The FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA is a
non-profit, non-political, non-sectarian rural youth
organization of voluntary membership, designed


to take its place along with other organizations
striving for the development of leadership, the
building of a more permanent agriculture, and
the improvement of country life. It constitutes
one of the most efficient agricultural teaching
devices that has been discovered up to the
present time. The FFA is 100% American in its
Ideals and outlook and has no outside affiliations.
There is no secrecy in connection with any of its
activities.


--- IB".--'r, '..L .-.? .- o
The FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA exits
today because of a cooperative spirit and a desire
on the part of students, 14 to about 21 years of
age, preparing for a career in agriculture through
vocational agriculture, to have a national organi-
zation in which they may secure practical business
experience, act as their own instructors, and en-
joy the fellowship of one another. It is organized
vocational education on a farm youth level, im-
proved agriculture, better local communities, a
more satisfying home life, and responsible
citizens are emerging as a result of the students'
experiences in FFA.











America's manpower begins with BOYPOWER



VIRGIN ISLANDS COUNCIL
ST. CROIX DISTRICT
BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA


Youth is the product with which we build the
future of our communities and our nation. Along
with Church, School and the Home, the Boy Scouts
of America play a major part in the development
of boys into participating citizen.

For over 20 years the Virgin Islands Council,
working with the institutions of St. Croix has
provided a program for its boys. We have been
able to do this through the dedication of men and
women who have served as volunteer leaders, and
the financial support of the Islands.

Scouting is exciting to boys and is needed
more on our Island than anytime in the past.

Our projection is a growth in boy population
of our council and district. To meet this challenge
we must keep our program current and relevant
to the needs of today's boys, and enrollment
must be truly representative of our Island.

Scouting is a volunteer program and leader-
ship is essential to the success of our program.

To actively involve a significant number of
boys, we need to expand our efforts in working
with community organizations to become partners
with us in providing Cub Packs, Boy Scout Troops,
and explorer Posts for boys to join.

Scouting joins with community organizations,
churches, synagogues, schools, businesses, labor,
and fraternal groups in providing a program for
boys of the community.


The Virgin Islands Council, Boy Scouts of
America, was chartered as a corporation of the
U. S. Virgin Islands and granted a charter by the
National Council Boy Scouts of America on Jan.
1, 1965.

Today, the scout program has grown to
where over 25% of all the boys of scout age
are now members. An office is maintained at
Diamond Center for service to the volunteer
scouters on St. Croix.

Wall scout camp has been established for
camping on a long and short term basis. One of
our goals is to develop this camp to its fullest,
in order to enhance the camping aspects of
scouting. Most scouters believe that 75% of
scouting is outing.

We, the Virgin Island Council St. Croix Dis-
trict, are committed to provide the necessary
support and guidance to any organization wishing
to use the program and accept the basic prin-
ciples of the Boy Scouts of America. Thousands of
boys lives have been guided and influenced by a
code of living which scouts subscribe THE
SCOUT OATH: On my honor I will do my best
to do my duty to God and my country, and to obey
the scout law, to help other people at all
times, keep myself physically strong, mentally
awake, and morally straight."


Boy Scouts of America











GIRL SCOUTS OF AMERICA

By EDITH DIAZ


The Girl Scouts of America was reorganized in February 1957, with
the help of Mrs. Pearl Byrd Larsen and Mrs. Englarth of the Puerto Rico
Council.

At the time of this reorganization there were five troops. in
Christiansted and four troops in Frederiksted. These nine troops repre-
sented a total of 147 girls and about 25 adults.

Today we have 27 troops in St. Croix, Virgin Islands with over 400
girls, 30 adults and an Advisory Committee. Through the kindness of Mr.
F6lix Pittersen who donated the land, and the members of the Legislature
who made monies available for a building, we now have our own camp
which is named "EDITH CONSUELO"

The girls enjoy camping and are always active in Civic Affairs.

The following persons are very active in this organization: Mrs.
Edith Diaz, Mrs. Theodora Dunbavin, Mrs. Elena Christian, Mrs. Beryl
Francis, and Miss Ina James.



BANK OF AMERICA











MAN ON THE SPOT

IN THE VIRGIN ISLANDS

Branches


Frederiksted Charlotte Amalie


Christiansted





Compliments
of
GRAND UNION


The Most Modern Supermarket
in the Virgin Islands!








AGRICULTURE AND FOOD PRODUCTION
By Harold V. Clum


What is Agriculture? Webster's says it is "the
science and art of farming; work of cultivating the
soil, producing crops and raising livestock". Few
if any agriculturists today would be satisfied with
Websters' definition.

Do you really know what agriculture is or are
you like most of the rest of us? Most of us could
and would define agriculture but it would be a limit-
ed definition and probably out of date in relation
to present conditions. It is hard to believe that
so many do not understand agriculture since it was
Agriculture that started man on the road to civil-
ization?

Agriculture in America is an extremely com-
plex business involving nearly 40% of the total
work force in production and operation of the
functions of producing and marketing food and fiber.

One man defined agriculture as, "the business
of putting 615 million meals a day on the table for
205 million Americans." While important this
leaves out many important segments of the total
Agriculture such as: export import, production
supplies, fiber, housing, research, chemicals and
many other necessary aspects of the total modern
agriculture. Changes are occurring in Agriculture.
Its relationships to the rest of society are not well
enough understood.

We frequently equate things that are not equal
and we are careless in the use of statistics. Today
there are only 3,000,000 farmers in the USA. An
important minority? Yes! They not only produce
our abundance but also contribute the largest
chunk of our favorable balance of trade. Farm ef-
ficiency has risen much faster than industrial ef-
ficiency. This has led to criticism instead of de-
served praise. It usually comes as a schock to non-
farm people to learn that agriculture is by a wide
margin the largest single industry in America. The
total farm assets of about $300 billion equals two-
thrids of the value of all U. S. Corporations. Just
to survive a farmer needs to have or control about
' of a million dollars of capital.

History has been very unkind to peoples who
have neglected their Agriculture. Agriculture and


farm people are important to a balanced economy.
Failure to develop the Agricultural resources of the
Virgin Islands has been of great concern to many
people. To continue to neglect this important sector
of the Virgin Islands economy may be a luxury
which we can no longer afford. The only way to do
something about it is to get more people to under-
stand the facts and for the Government to take
action in the planning programs.

With so many unused resources it doesn't make
much sense to be importing over 90% of our food.
Agricultural production has always been a primary
generator of new real wealth. Why throw away a
rich heritage of food production and an opportuni-
ty to develop more beauty in the island and to
generate real wealth for uncontrolled growth and
development that inevitably brings unwanted
problems? Why not enjoy a better diet and stand-
ard of living by raising your own food? There are
L not many in the Virgin Islands who can't raise
some food. Why leave our selves vulnerable with
only a 2 or 3 week supply of food on hand? How
long will it be before the exploding world popula-
tion will cause us some serious food procure-
ment problems? What about some disaster? Disast-
ers have been rather numerous in recent years.

The Virgin Islands are in a period of major
transition and readjustment. Readjustment from
a one crop sugar economy to an agriculture that
meets the needs and opportunities of the 1970's
has been painful and slow and often delayed by
misinformation and prejudice that has discouraged
constructive modernization of production methods.

A major limiting and challenging factor in St.
Croix agricultural development has been the wide
variety of soils and climatic conditions which re-
quire constant adjustment and high levels of man-
agement to keep up efficient production. With
hand labor and animal power it was possible to
treat small patches differently but this is much
less possible with modern methods.

Bureaucracy that is not structured to agri-
cultural needs has delayed the completion of start-
ed projects, the repair of equipment, procurement






of new equipment and supplies for new enter-
prises and personnel changes for new conditions.

Difficulties in procuring new seed stock and the
virtual quarantine on livestock export limit op-
portunities for development of markets for the out-
standing animals produced in St. Croix.

In spite of all the problems much progress is
occurring in St. Croix Agriculture. The eight oper-
ating producers are able to produce almost enough
flud milk for the basic population. Production per
cow probably tripled in the last 10 years.

A recent census by the V. I. Department of
Agriculture on St. Croix found:


Beef and dairy cattle
Goats
Sheep
Pigs
Horses
Cow milked daily
Milk produced
(July 1, 1969-June 3


6225 head
5160 head
2780 head
1,705 head
620
530 head


10, 1970) 2,007,500 quarts


Sorghum planted
Planning Service
Land cleaning
Brush and Grass cutting
Fruit trees and plants purchased
Seeds for vegetable crops
Applications for farmland
Tax Exemption
Soil tests
Land cleared


780 acres
127 citizens
92 citizens
51 citizens
1,450 citizens
328 citizens

133 citizens
50 citizens
438 citizens


The V. I. Department of Agriculture is making
progress toward supplying services many farmers
cannot afford for themselves such as land pre-
paration. The Department has taken the lead in
the eradication of the "Bont" tick. In March the
Department and USDA will cooperate in a program
to eradicate the cattle fever tick and the screw
worms.

Improved breeding animals are being import-
ed and made available to producers. Improved
feeds, plants and agricultural chemicals are being
added.

Started chicks and pigs can be purchased. Proj-
etcs such as the marketing building are being


completed. Equipment is being put back into
operation. Expensive, scarce equipment is operat-
ing more of the working hours each day.

Reforestation and research in tree produc-
tion and use is making progress. It has been
estimated that the idle brush covered land would
today be producing well over 1 million dollars
worth of timber annually if these areas had been
properly seeded to mahogany when they were
abandoned for sugar cane some 30 or 40 years ago.
This would be real new wealth and the basic re-
source for many small businesses.

Soil and Water Conservation equipment is
preforming a vital service. From October 1969
through June 1970 the dams constructed have a
holding capacity of nearly 6,000,000 gallons. The
over 200 dams now on the island have a storage
capacity of almost a half billion gallons.

An important reserve on a dry island as well
as preventing erosion pollution and recharging the
aquifer. Many of these ponds are being prepared
for recreation use. The equipment does many
things including construction of the Profit ball field.

Agriculture is and will continue to be important
to this island notwithstanding the neglect and active
disparagment by some selfish and unknowledgable
individuals. The beauty of a productive, well man-
aged island agriculture could very well attract more
tourists than all of the advertising. A good agri-
cultural community has always been tops in quality
of living factors.

How much of the land can you afford to cover
with houses, industry and shopping centers? Do
these have to be put on good productive land?

Many people are still using an out of date
economic cliches the land is too high priced to
farm" you'd better take a good look at the one.
There isn't any more land and the forecasters tell us
the world's population will double in 30 years.
Will you still want real estate on your best land
when you start worrying not about price of food
but where is enough food to be obtained?

Last year food was the best buy ever. Food
purchases took only 16.4% of the average Amer-
ican's dispensable income (a record low). Don't
expect new technology and increased efficiency
to continue the trend much farther.











YOU CAN'T------
EAT TOURISTS
(They wouldn't come back)
OR
ALUMINUM (you wouldn't like it)
OR


DRINK REFINED OIL


(bad for ulcers)


.. 'U, 1 4 "


n \-
~?


UT YOU CAN----

EAT FRESH BEEF

("No problem" with the cows)

AND

DRINK FRESH MILK

(good for the day after)


CANE GARDEN FARM-ST. CROIX
REGISTERED HOLSTEIN PUREBRED SENEPOL
REGISTERED CHAROLAIS THOROUGHBRED HORSES


Am m MN&Am Aw MR _Am mt A m 0 AAM&AnAm


~"~ b'-

















MONTACARGASl'
TOWMOTOR


f A


CONSTRUCT(
S. .KING CASE 58
)$pe \


:ON

COMPRESSOR S'
PORTABLE LE ROI


TEL. 783-3066
ASERRADORA
DeWALT
PLANTS
ELECTRICAL
KOHLER


TELEKRANE BY '
BANTAM 15 TON
HYDRAULIC CRANE
17 TON HYDRAULIC
CRANE
Distribuidores Generales"

GARCIA MACHINERY, INC.
CARR. #2 KM. 4.8 PUEBLO VIEJO




















.-.


/
/ A


"IS THIS A GOOD CHOICE"? A YOUNG VIRGIN ISLANDER SEEMS TO BE ASKING THE NUTRITIONIST.


NUTRITION PROBLEMS

During the years 1933 to 1939 malnutrition
was listed by the Commissioner Of Health, Dr.
Knud-Hansen as one of the major Public Health
problems in the Virgin Islands. In his monthly
reports to the Governor, problems of malnutrition
were described and possible means of correction
discussed, especially among children. The "School
Lunch Program" of the early thirties, using pro-
duce from selected gardens was located on the
present site of Knud-Hansen Memorial Hospital
in St. Thomas.

The Department of Health established its
Nutrition Unit in 1948 and employed a Public
Health Nutritionist, Miss Trandailer Jones. Miss
Jones developed programs in Nutrition Education


By: JULIA TAYLOR WALLACE
SDirector, Bureau of Nutrition Services

to bring about an appreciation of the importance
of local produce to good health. As a means of
providing immediate improvements in health
through better nutrition, the following programs
were established in 1949 to 1950 by the Health
Department:

1. Distribution of non-fat milk and multi-
vitamins to all infants and pre-school
children attending Well-Child Clinics and
to those attending pediatric clinics having
a diagnosis of malnutrition.

2. Distribution of milk, green and yellow
vegetables and food rich in Vitamin C to
needy children with orthopedic conditions.


i1 -s
'-'*^
P


icd


S ;* \







Other programs established during the late
forties and early fifties included:

1. A type "A" lunch served to all school
children.

2. The use of enriched flour by local com-
mercial bakeries.

At the same time Nutrition Education Programs
on a community-wide basis in cooperation with
schools, Health Department personnel and staff
from other Governmental Agencies, Extension
Service and Civic Organizations contributed
greatly to removing malnutrition from the list of
major Public Health problems.

When the Nutrition Unit of the Health Depart-
ment was established in 1948, the Nutritionist
was also responsible for improving the diets ser-
ved in the hospitals. At the present time, the
Department of Health has a staff of three
Dieticians, two Nutrionists and one Home Econo-
mist in the Children and Youth Project and four
Nutritionists who provide services to regular
Health Programs. Nutritionists provide direct
dietary education counselling to patients in diabe-
tic, cardiac, prenatal and well-child clinics and to
patients referred from other clinics, programs and
services and referred by private physicians.
Patients are counselled regarding foods needed
for proper nutrition, with special emphasis on
food selection, food buying and nutritional needs
during times of stress, such as pregnancy or
rapid growth, with therapeutic modifications
when necessary and as prescribed by the physi-
cian. Dietary counselling is provided to institu-
tions not employing a dietician and to pre-school


centers. Nutrition services are also provided to
the staffs of other Health Department disciplines,
other Governmental Agencies and community
groups through consultations, workshops, and
specially arranged educational meetings. The
Health Department Dieticians, Home Economist
and Nutritionists work with other agencies and
groups in planning and conducting community-
wide educational programs to assist in improving
the nutritional health of all Virgin Islanders. One
of these programs involves increasing local food
production, especially of fruits and vegetables.
This program, spear-headed buy the Virgin Islands
Department of Agriculture, hopefully will increase
the availability of foods rich in Vitamin A and
Vitamin C at a cost within the reach of everyone.

Nutrition education programs have expanded
into the community through the Department of
Education integrating nutrition into special sub-
ject areas; through educational programs conduct-
ed by Extension Service, College of the Virgin
Islands with 4H Clubs, adult groups and the
Nutrition-Aide program; through educational pro-
grams of the Family Education Program, Tuber-
culosis and Health Committee, Health Outreach
Program and Head Start Parents groups as well
as educational programs sponsored by the Com-
mission on Aging to mention only a few. Health
Department nutritionist have cooperated with the
above Agencies, programs and groups as well as
with many others, in an effort to develop an effec-
tive Virgin Islands Nutrition Program comprised
of information and activities to meet areas of
greatest need. It is only through the combined
efforts of all concerned that we will have
healthier, happier and economically-productive
Virgin Islanders.


CRUZAN


RUM


TOASTS


V. I. AGRICULTURE








Purina Chows
feed
them all.


PURINA DEALERS
ST. THOMAS-Andrew Bornn
ST. CROIX-Ludvig Jorgensen









INCREASE YOUR HORTICULTURAL VOCABULARY:


Annual A plant which completes its life cycle within one year and then dies.

Biennial Continuing or lasting for two years. Plants that produce leaves the first year storing up
food to be used the second year in development of seeds and fruit.
Broadleaf Plants whose leaves are wide In relation to the length of leaf. Not needle or scale-like
or long and narrow as in grasses.
Bulb A thickened, fleshy, and commonly subterranean bud, usually emitting roots from its under
side, and which functions as a means of propagating plants.
Coniferous Trees and shrubs which bear cones.
Corms A short, solid, enlarged stem, above or underground in which food is stored, e. g.,
gladiolus or crocus.
Deciduous Trees and shrubs having leaves which fall off during the dormant season. Dormant -
Plant in a resting or inactive state.
Evergreen Remaining green or verdant in its dormant season.
Grade The degree of slope of the ground around the home.
Ground cover A plant or group of plants of special value for covering the ground. This may be
done to prevent washing or erosion and to beautify.
Heeling in The placing of young plants temporarily in a trench in order to prevent the drying
out of roots.
Herb A seed plant that does not develop woody persistent tissue; any plant which dies to the
ground, as distinguished from shrubs and trees which have woody stems living from year
to year. Herbaceous Having the characteristics of an herb.
Lateral A part of a plant growing from the side of a main stem.
Liming The operation of applying lime to soil.
Mulch Any substance such as straw used to cover the soil.
Organic matter All living things either plants or animals, possessing the capacities of growth or
matter which has once been alive as compost and manure.

Ornamental horticulture The study and culture of decorative plants.
pH The symbol used to express the acidity or alkalinity. A soil pH of 7 is neutral, a pH of less
than 7 indicates a soil in the acid range. A pH of greater than 7 one in the alkaline range.
Perennial Plants which live three or more years.
Propagate To cause to continue or multiply by generation, or successive production.
Root pruning Process of trimming around a plant so as to sever the roots.
Shrub Woody plants freely branched, frequently having no single main stem.
Terminal Growing at the end of a branch or stem.
Topsoil Surface layer of soil. It usually has the most desirable structure for plant growth as a
result of the activity of roots, insects, soil organanisms and the presence of decaying organic
matter. It may, how ever, be exhausted of its mineral content and its structure destroyed by
cropping in which case it may be the least desirable layer of the soil.
Tubers A short enlarged stem usually underground, with one or more buds.







SUMMARY OF AGRICULTURAL SERVICES RENDERED BY THE DE-
PARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


WHAT THEY ARE


HOW THEY FUNCTION


1. SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION
SERVICE
2. THE FORESTRY PROGRAM

3. SOIL TESTING
4. GRAIN SORGHUM

5. LAND PREPARATION SERVICE

6. VETERINARY SERVICES

7. BEEF CATTLE INDUSTRY

8. DAIRYING

9. SMALL LIVESTOCK PROGRAM

10. ABATTOIR
11. POULTRY INDUSTRY

12. TICK ERADICATION
13. WILDLIFE PROGRAM

14. MARKETING

15. FARMLAND TAX EXEMPTION
16. LOANS TO FARMERS AND
FISHERMEN
17. SUBSIDY FEED PROGRAM
18. SALE OF SEEDS, FRUIT TREES,
AND SLIPS
19. SALE OF FERTILIZER, INSECT-
ICIDES, AND HERBICIDES
20. COMMUNITY GARDENS

21. PEST CONTROL
22. USDA PROGRAMS
a. Meat Inspection
b. Program Review and
Compliance
c. Tick Eradication
PENDING I
a. 1946 Marketing Act
b. 1970 Egg Act


Building Dams and Cutting Ditches.

Transplanting seedlings, and maintain-
ing general nursery for them.
Making soil analysis.
Assisting farmers with planting and
harvesting.
Bulldozing, brush or grass cutting,
plowing and banking land.
Treating animals for prevention and con-
trol of diseases and parasites.
Assisting with cutting green feed and pas-
ture management.
Implementing an Artificial Insemination
Program.
Maintaining a Breeding Program for
small livestock.
Slaughtering all livestock.
Assisting individuals with securing and
starting a flock.
Dipping or spraying animals in the V. I.
Maintaining surveillance on all wildlife
and re-stocking fish ponds.
Assisting farmers with marketing their
products.
Certifying eligibilityfor exemption.
Loans of $750.00 maximum to promote and
encourage farming and fishing industries.
Selling feed to farmers at cost.
Assisting farmer with starting a garden.

Improving production and by controlling
insects and pest.
Giving non-farm citizens experience in
vegetable production.
Spraying farms and homes.

Providing a Federal Meat Inspector.
Providing 50% of the total cost of
operation.
Sharing cost.
JSDA PROGRAMS
Providing 50% matching fund.
Sharing cost.














"IN APPRECIATION"


By:

SAMUEL WHITAKER

Director of Agricultural Services



As chairman of this booklet committee, I'm pleased to greet you and to express
my personal thanks and appreciation, along with that of the Department of Agriculture,
for the dynamic interest and cooperation shown us by the many government agencies,
business firms -local and Puerto Rico- as well as individuals. This booklet and the
Fair would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of the entire Fair Com-
mittee and the contribution of the advertisers. A special "thanks" to the following:

Mrs. Gloria Canegata Acting Superintendent of St. Croix Schools

Mr. Frank Petersen Department of Health

Mr. Wilfred Finch & Staff Department of Agriculture

Dr. Austin Fisher, Jr. Northeastern University (on leave)

Poultry Health Service, Jacksonville, Florida and the Puerto Rico Firms;

Casco Sales Agency; U. S. Industries; Grand Union; Nicolds Correa
Carrillo; Garcia Commercial & Machinery

We believe the consumers of St. Croix should have a much greater supply and
choice of locally produced foods. Your support can make this a reality and Agriculture
can take its place in the development of a balanced economy.

As we look ahead into the 70's, my feeling is one of decided optimism about
the favorable prospects in store for agriculture. It is taking a turn-around into an era of
promise for farmers as well as consumers. With careful planning and hard work, many
gains can be realized and economic activity stimulated.

The new U. S. farm laws have given us here in the Virgin Islands better means
of tackling agriculture's problems. Therefore, we feel confident that in time, the results
will prove gratifying and help to put and keep Agriculture on a more sound business
basis





























































Legend:
1. Administration Bldg.
2. Marketing
3. Warehouse
4. Veterinarian
5. Garage & Shops


UNIVERSITY OF VIRGIN ISLANDS


3 3138 00125 6519


DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
ESTATE LOWER LOVE


6. Forestry Bldg.
7. Piggery
8. Tire Shop
9. Silo
10. Crop Trials
21. Banana


11. Crop Trials
12. "
13. Mango Orchard
14. Goat Corral
15. Banana Orchard
Orchard


Crop


Farm
11


Trials


Pond
& Gut




1 Yw


- Aft

U0 USI PUERTO RIOO INO.
G.P.O. BOX 2529, SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO 00936



SALES SERVICE PARTS


3~


Caterpillar, Cat and B are Trademarks of Caterpillar Tractor Co.


ustRIPRY
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OUirEIFTtliY


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