• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 1995 agriculture and food fair...
 Message from Governor Roy...
 Message from Lieutenant Governor...
 Advertising
 Preserving our cultural heritage...
 New products to control silverleaf...
 The village ovens - A tradition...
 Assisting V.I. crop farmers with...
 Rudolph Schulterbrandt, former...
 The Africanized honey bee in the...
 St. Croix handicrafts - Reviving...
 Learning from the culture...
 Advertising














Group Title: Agrifest
Title: Agrifest. 1995.
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 Material Information
Title: Agrifest. 1995.
Series Title: Agrifest
Physical Description: Serial
Publisher: Virgin Islands Department of Economic Development and Agriculture ; University of the Virgin Islands
Publication Date: 1995
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Bibliographic ID: CA01300011
Volume ID: VID00001
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 20948561

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    1995 agriculture and food fair board of directors
        Page 4
    Message from Governor Roy L. Schneider
        Page 5
    Message from Lieutenant Governor Kenneth E. Mapp
        Page 6
    Advertising
        Page 7
    Preserving our cultural heritage - An interview with Leona Watson
        Page 8
        Page 9
    New products to control silverleaf whitefly
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The village ovens - A tradition worth saving
        Page 12
    Assisting V.I. crop farmers with water shortages
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Rudolph Schulterbrandt, former commissioner of agricultre, talks about the fair
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    The Africanized honey bee in the Caribbean
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    St. Croix handicrafts - Reviving an old Caribbean craft
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Learning from the culture bearers
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Advertising
        Page 39
        Page 40
Full Text


24th Annual


Virgin Islands Agriculture & Food Fair


February 1


20, 1995


CARIB
S
5M5
.V5
A3
1995
Jointly Sponsored by
The V.I Department of Economic Development and Agriculture
and
The University of the Virgin Islands
Cooperative Extension Service Agri:ultural Experiment Station
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AGRIFEST 1995


Editor...................................................Clarice C. Clarke
Editorial Committee.........................Dr. Erika Waters, Larry Bough, Raquel Silver







Jointly Sponsored by
The Virgin Islands Department of Economic Development and Agriculture
and
The University of the Virgin Islands
Cooperative Extension Service Agricultural Experiment Station


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Reprinting of articles is permitted as long as the Agriculture and Food Fair Bulletin is credited; mention of
product names in this book in no way implies endorsement by the authors or the Agriculture and Food Fair
Board of Directors.


















A Publication of the 24th Annual Virgin Islands
SAgriculture and Food Fair
1995
Bulletin Number 9
Table of Contents


1995 Agriculture and Food Fair Board of Directors......................................................... ..................4

Message from Governor Roy L. Schneider ...................................................................................5

Message from Lieutenant Governor Kenneth E. Mapp ............................................................... 6

Preserving Our Cultural Heritage--An Interview With Leona Watson .......................................8
Clarice C. Clarke and Judy Salter

New Products to Control Silverleaf Whitefly ......................................................................10
JeffKeularts, Ph.D.

The Village Ovens--A Tradition Worth Saving ............................................................................12
Clarice C. Clarke and Judy Salter

Assisting V.I. Crop Farmers With Water Shortages......................... ........................................13
Clinton George

Rudolph Schulterbrandt, Former Commissioner Of Agriculture, Talks About The Fair...........15
Rudolph Schulterbrandt and Clarice C. Clarke

The Africanized Honey Bee In The Caribbean ................................................ ............... 19
JeffKeularts, Ph.D.

St. Croix Handicrafts--Reviving An Old Caribbean Craft ...................................... ............ 26
Clarice C. Clarke and Judy Salter

Learning From The Culture Bearers .............................................................................................. 33
Zoraida E. Jacobs







1995 Agriculture and Food


1995 Agriculture and Food

Fair Board of Directors


Il


Arthur C. Petersen, Jr., Ph.D.
President


Pholconah Edwards
Treasurer


Clinton George
Director of UVI Exhibits


Dorothy Walcott
Director of Food Exhibits


Kwame Garcia
Executive Vice President


Sharon D. Hill Petersen
Recording Secretary/Director of
Off-Island Participants


Errol Chichester
Director of Farm Crops




Ia


Kofi Boateng
Director of Livestock Exhibits


Clarice C. Clarke
Executive Secretary/Director of
Publicity& Publications


Willard John
Director of Special Activities


Zoraida Jacobs
Director of Youth Activities
4 L- M^BkO


Dorothy Gibbs Eric L. Bough
Director of Ground Decorations Fair Consultant































THE VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES
OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR
GOVERNMENT HOUSE

Agriculture has always played an important role in the Virgin
Islands, and I am delighted that the Agriculture and Food Fair has
become such a successful annual event.

One of the key changes that you will see in my administration
is the reorganization of the Department of Economic Development and
Agriculture. This will result in a Department of Agriculture with
its own commissioner.

As a former trustee of the University of the Virgin Islands.
I am well aware of the fine contributions made by the people at the
Land Grant Program, Cooperative Extension Service and Agricultural
Experiment Station toward fostering a better understanding of how
Agriculture benefits us.

And I congratulate the members of the Agriculture and Food
Fair Board of Directors for their excellent work in organizing the
1995 Fair, "From Drought to Harvest."


\-C.,

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THE VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES
OFFICE OF THE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR


I look forward to the Agriculture and Food Fair each year. This
is a true showcase for the territory.

From family gardening to commercial farming, agriculture has
always played a prominent role in Virgin Islands culture.

The governor is working to re-establish" a Department of
Agriculture in our administration, and I fully support him. It is
important that we explore opportunities in this area, to give our
local farmers the best chance to be successful.

Agriculture and cultural fairs such as this give our people a
chance to show the results of their labors and, perhaps, inspire
others to get involved in this tradition.

I commend all of the people who have worked so hard to make the
Agriculture and Food Fair a success, and encourage all Virgin
Islanders to participate in this event. Good luck, and I look forward
to working with you all.








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Preserving Our Cultural Heritage--

An interview With Leona Watson

By
Clarice C. Clarke, Public Information Specialist
UVI Cooperative Extension Service and Judy Salter


If there's anyone who makes a
room vibrate with enthusiasm and
energy, it's Leona Watson. Mrs.
Watson is a Crucian with a mission--
to preserve the culture of her home-
land. According to her, songs, food,
clothing and morals are all part of our
culture. Some are rapidly changing,
and others are disappearing alto-
gether.
"So many West Indians are
ashamed of their heritage, especially
in the rural areas which is so rich,"
she exclaims. The country districts,
she maintains, were the richest
cultures in this hemisphere because
they maintained the link with places
such as Senegal, Sierra Leone and
Nigeria.
Her sense of West Indian culture
is based on personal experiences. At
an early age, Mrs. Watson attended
schools in the U.S. mainland and
spent her summers with her grand-
parents on St. Croix. Because of the
mixed messages she got as a child,
she said, "I was ashamed to sit under
the tamarind tree with my grand-
father." However, she listened as he
told stories and slowly began to
understand the lessons in them. For
instance, "I noticed that certain
people of my village had two syllable
words like ne-ne, me-me, ta-ta, and I
never knew until I was almost grown
that they were signals that came from
two different tribes.
"Now for years," Mrs. Watson tells
us, my grandfather would say, 'We
have Manding here. I'm a proud
descendent of Manding.' Later, she
realized he was explaining he
descended from the Mandingo. "That
was the reason I was able to connect


with the people from Sierra Leone at the
Smithsonian."


Mrs. Leona Watson is a proud Crucian dedicated
to preserving the cultural heritage of the Virgin
Islands.

There was such richness at home,
Mrs. Watson says, as she remembers
going to the fields in Bethlehem where
her aunt worked. "My aunt and the
people who worked in the fields were
singing to each other there. It was
hard work. My Auntie Melda would
be cutting cane when I came home,
and I really wanted to be there with
her. The school holidays of six weeks
came to a close so early, I would go
back to school longing for the day I
could get back into those fields."
"And that's something our people
are ashamed of," she laments. "The
earth is like the womb of the universe.
You've got to put your hand in the
womb, you know," she advises.
At home on St. Croix, Mrs. Watson


learned the lessons of giving and
sharing, of thrift, and the importance
of working in the "womb of the
universe" by growing her own food.
The annual fair which she has so
strongly supported became part of
those lessons.
The agriculture fair in Mrs.
Watson's childhood days was far
different from the three-day event of
the present. Children would go to
the Experiment Station in Anna's
Hope, where they would receive
plant slips.
She explains, "We in the country
would mulch our plants. We would
take sheep, goat and cow dung and
mix it into the soil. We would also
get seaweed that came up to the
shore to mix into the soil. The
greatest thing was to bring a bag of
seaweed home to grandfather."
Mrs. Watson recalls an onion she
took to the fair. She grew it from a
slip she got from the Experiment
Station. This onion was so big that
her grandmother didn't want to use
it. "That's a jumbie onion," her
grandmother said.
After the fair, Mrs. Watson
remembers going to Tibet Grove,
where there was story telling, the
elders would play games, and the
children were put in tug-of-war
teams to keep them busy.
She wants the agriculture fair to
be as she knew it: "At the Experi-
ment station, what you saw in the
field was alive with healthy veg-
etables, healthy produce, healthy
mangoes. That was agriculture."
She'd prefer to see a return to the
old days, when children brought the
fruits of their labor to the fair and








families shared the tarts, sweet
cakes, royal and bang-bang so rarely
seen today.
Today, she says, you don't have
the sheep and goats that our people
used to bring to the fair. She
surmises "it is because the emphasis
is to make money; so you throw
together any little garbage you can
pick up and that's why the children
of the Virgin Islands are losing love
for one another, because their ability
to first love the land is taken away."


"What do we have now, really?" she
asks, and then answers her own
question. "We have plastic tents, and
there's no tree to sit under--the
tamarind tree--to tell stories to the
children!"
Her connection to the land is so
intimate, she says, "I will die for my
land." Her heritage, she maintains, is
"my story, not his story." And it should
be so for each Virgin Islander. What
our people have done, she says, is to
acquire the European, barbaric type of


culture. Me! Mine! like the Vikings-
-our people have always shared and
cared for each other, its called
"casting your bread."
Leona Watson is an admired and
treasured Crucian, a bearer of the
Virgin Islands culture, particularly
that of St. Croix. Her rich cultural
knowledge must be recorded, so
future Virgin Islanders can know
their past, and, thus, learn to
appreciate their cultural heritage. m


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Localfarmer proudly display his giant-size cassava at the 1994
Agfair.


Coconuts were just one of the many local fruits available for
fairgoers to enjoyed.


(right) The EDA Urban Forestry Program provided a wealth
of information on vegetation and St. Croix ecosystem to fairgoers


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New Products to Control Silverleaf Whitefly

By
Jeff Keularts, Ph.D.
Program Supervisor, Plant Protection
UVI Cooperative Extension Service


M ost registered insecticides are
not very effective in control-
ling the most troublesome whitefly in
the Virgin Islands: the silverleaf
whitefly. A new product may be the
answer to the problem, at least for
now.
Many persons have found out that
most registered pesticides and home
remedies are not effective in keeping
the number of silverleaf whiteflies at
acceptable levels. Unfortunately,
Virgin Islands parasites and predators
cannot achieve this level of control
either.
A recently developed chemical
compound, with the common name
of imidacloprid, is a very effective
material. It not only controls this


whitefly species, but also the citrus leaf
miner and Thrips palmi, a very
troublesome thrips species especially on
cucumber and pepper.
The pesticide, manufactured by Miles
Inc., is currently available (unfortunately
not yet in the Virgin Islands) under the
trade names MarathonR for use on
ornamentals and MeritR for use on turf.
The companies market these products
as 1% granular formulations to be
incorporated into the soil. The
formulation, containing imidacloprid
labeled for vegetable use named-
AdmireR, will become available in the
next few months once the registrant has
obtained EPA approval.
Imidacloprid is a strongly systemic
material, i.e., taken up by the plants and


transported to all of its parts,
including the leaves where it is very
effective in killing all live stages of
the whitefly for a period of 8 to 10
weeks.
Only one application per season is
allowed and, although it may be
applied as a foliar spray, soil
application at the time of planting is
the most effective and provides
protection for the longest period.
Applying AdmireRto 1000 feet of
row of tomato plants would cost
approximately $7.50. The product is,
therefore,very expensive and its uses
seem economical only on high-value
crops. I


T he citrus blackfly, a pest ofcitrus.
mango. avocado and other fruit
trees. is well established in the Virgin
Islands. At least one of its natural
enemies, a parasite, is now present in
the islands This parasite. called
Encarsia opulent. is a tiny wasp (I/
30" long) that lays its eggs in the
young whitefly (the nymph).
The developing wasp will
eventually kill its host. Telling healthy
blackfly nymphs from parasitized ones
is, however, very difficult.. Until an
adult whitefly or parasite emerges
from the nymphal body, these nymphs
look alike from the outside. Observing
the adult wasps either on the leaf
surface or while emerging from the
dead nymph's body is the quickest way
of confirming any activity by the


parasite. Vetr close observation (with
magnifying glass or microscope) of
empty nymphal skins can also tell
whether the emerged adult was a whiteBh
or a wasp.
The shape of the exit hole is the clue.
An adult wasp will chew a circular hole
in the nvmphal skin while whitefly will
leave a T-shaped opening upon emerging
Knowing the percentage of parasitized
citrus blackfly nymphs will determine
whether to apply pesticides or not.







After a long wait. neem extract
formulaltons are now available for
use on food crops, ornamentals and turf
In many countries. various portions and
other mixtures are prepared from the


fruits of the neem tree to be used for
many purposes One of these uses is
insect control The neem tree is
gaining in popularity because of its
fast growth and use as a shade tree
and a windbreak.
The commercial production of
neem seed extract for insect control
started several years ago. However,
until recently, products such as
Ma rgosan-OR, Neemes isRa nd
BioNeenR. which contain the active
ingredient azadirachtin extracted
from the neem fruit were only labeled
for use on ornamentals. Now, new
formulations with trade names such
as AzatinR and NeemExR can be used
on a variety of food crops to control
numerous insect species








' Vialco
Virgin Islands Alumina Corporation
P.O. Box 1525, Kingshill, St. Croix, U.S.V.I. 00851


QUALITY PEOPLE



QUALITY PRODUCT








The Village Ovens--A Tradition Worth Saving

By
Clarice C. Clarke, Public Information Specialist
UVI Cooperative Extension Service and Judy Salter


Heritage is what ties you to the
past, and steers you to the
future. Some aspects of Virgin Islands
culture can be practiced--the love of
the land, the art of story telling and
the preserving of ethnic foods through
recipes. Others, however, can only be
demonstrated.
Certain aspects of our culture will
be lost if steps are not taken to
preserve them. For example, the
community ovens have almost
disappeared, but one Crucian,
Melbourne Petersen, has taken steps
to preserve the baker's art.
Stone ovens, such as the one
constructed on the grounds at the
Division of Agriculture, once were
central to village life. Petersen
explains that kitchens were usually
sheds outside the house. They had
hard, dirt floors, and the "stove" was
a hole in the ground where a fire was
built for a coalpot. With the advent
of stoves, cooking moved inside.
The outdoor kitchens lacked one
thing-an oven. Usually, Petersen
explains, only one or two people in
the village had an oven; in fact, he
remembers there were four or five in
the entire Christiansted area. The
bakers kept the ovens going because
neighbors would bring their baking
to them. If, for instance, you had
potato stuffing, macaroni and cheese,
cakes, tarts or even meat to be roasted,
people would take them to the baker,
and pick them up later in the day.
Petersen learned about the stone
ovens and the neighborhood bakers
as a boy. He'd hang around, watched,
and was welcomed because he'd run
errands for the bakers. "I'd get sea
grape leaves or almond leaves for
them to put the bread on," he explains.


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Melbourne Petersen uses hard woods to fire-up the stone oven on the grounds at the
Division of Agriculture.


The grape and almond leaves served
as baking pans and also added flavor to
the bread.
Today, Petersen's own stone oven
was built using stones from ruins which
were being demolished, and a mortar
much like the old lime, sand and
molasses mixture used long ago. The
floor and crown of the oven are lined
with firebricks he got from Vialco.
Having no directions, he designed and,
with the help of a friend, built the oven
after the ones he knew as a child.
Stone ovens are fired with wood, and
Petersen uses hard woods for this
purpose. Temperatures can reach up to
1,200 degrees before the wood is burned.
After the oven cools to a reasonable
temperature, he either removes the ashes
or sweeps them to the side in order to do
his baking.
Petersen does not fill the old
position of village baker. However, he
has cooked for friends on holidays,


such as Thanksgiving and
Christmas. He says there may be a
few ovens still in operation, but
most of the old-time bakers are
gone.
Fairgoers got a treat when he
roasted two pigs at the 1994
Agriculture and Food Fair. This
year, he plans to repeat that
demonstration. u








Assisting V.I. Crop Farmers

With Water Shortages


Clinton George
Program Leader, Agriculture and Natural Resources
UVI Cooperative Extension Service


W after required for growing crops
Son a planned and steady ba-
sis is a major concern to crop farm-
ers in the Virgin Islands. Over the
past 20 years, St. Croix experienced
an average annual rainfall of 42.9
inches. However, with only two
months left in 1994, the
rainfall has been only 19.8
inches, according to USDA
Agricultural Research Ser-
vice. The drought reached
such a magnitude that the
Governor declared the
Virgin Islands a drought
disaster area.
Each year, farmers are
digging more wells on
St. Croix. The V.I. De-
partment of Planning
and Natural Resources
(DPNR) records show
over 600 wells on St.
Croix. As a result of the
amount of wells being dug and the
prolonged droughts being experi-
enced each year, our ground water
resource on St. Croix is depleting. It
has reached the point where some
farmers' wells are experiencing salt
water intrusion, while others are dry-
ing up. Also, the Water and Power
Authority (WAPA) regularly pumps
large amounts of water from wells on
St. Croix, further depleting our
ground water resource. This prac-
tice continues even though WAPA
has the capacity to supply potable
water from their desalination plant
to the entire St. Croix community.
What can crop farmers do to adjust
to this water shortage? First, crop
farmers should drastically reduce the


amount of water being pumped from
their wells during prolonged droughts,
especially if the yield of water is reduced
significantly or water quality starts to
deteriorate. Every grower should
consider building a concrete storage tank
(cistern) or purchasing a fiberglass tank.


An emergency program could be
developed to assist farmers in obtaining
water from the Hess oil refinery or
WAPA. The storage tank or cistern
should be equipped with some kind of
cover to prevent evaporative loss. The
topography of the farm will determine
whether a small jet pump to pump water
from the tank is needed. On sloping
land, water can be gravity-fed from the
tank to the field. Farmers should ask
about the cost-sharing program at the
V.I. Division of Agriculture to subsidize
the cost of the tanks and pumps, if
needed.
Secondly, all crop farmers should in-
vest in a drip irrigation system. Today,
practically all horticultural crops depend
on water, and the "drip" concept has be-


come a valuable tool for increasing
production while conserving water.
Growers may contact the UVI Coopera-
tive Extension Service Agriculture and
Natural Resources Program at 692-
4069 for assistance in designing and
purchasing drip irrigation systems.
How can our local
government assist
farmers with this wa-
ter shortage? The
DPNR is charged
with the administra-
tion and enforcement
of all laws relating to
water resources and
water pollution under
Title 3, Chapter 22, of
the V.I. Code. This
agency also has control
over well construction
permits and water ap-
propriation. In my
opinion, DPNR needs
to better regulate and monitor the
granting of permits for the digging of
new wells and the pumping of water
from existing wells, especially during
prolonged dry periods. I believe that
the V.I. Department of Economic De-
velopment and Agriculture can use
the cost-sharing program to subsidize
the cost of storage tanks, as well as
assist qualified farmers to transport
water to refill their storage facilities.
This will keep farmers in production
during the prolong drought.
In the long term, a well-planned
study of our existing water resources
is critical if we are to save the aquifers
from over-pumping and salt water
intrusion. Harvesting of water should
be given more emphasis. Also, we







should request assistance from the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to
build mini-damrs across most of our
hills. This is done by the Corps in
many developing countries in the
world. Water collected from these
new dams prevents erosion of top-.
soil and can either be used to re-
charge our aquifers or for irrigation
purposes in dry season months.
Dams, such as Creque dam and
reservoirs throughout the Virgin
Islands should be reactivated and
maintained for water collection in the
rainy season.l


The topography of the farm will determine whether a pump is needed. On sloping land, water can be
gravity-fed from the storage tank to thefield.


(809) 778-0404


the tool box

Hardware Store


The Island's Best Selection

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Rudolph Shulterbrandt, Former

Commissioner Of Agriculture,

Talks About The Fair Ik


M y knowledge of the Agriculture
and Food Fair dates from the
year 1971. This was the first year of
the rebirth of the new fairs on St.
Croix. This was in response to a
request of the Christiansted Christmas
Festival Committee. People have told
me that many good fairs were held
annually at Estate Anna's Hope before
my taking up residence on St. Croix.
I did not come to St. Croix until 1954.
The first fair was held in the
Christiansted vegetable market or
what is now called Christian (Shan)
Hendricks Market. Though it was only
a microcosm of today's fairs, it was
quite a success. All areas of agriculture
were represented and the available
space was used effectively. It was only
a one-day affair, and well received by
all who attended.
As expected, the Frederiksted
Christmas Fiesta Committee also
wanted to hold the fair. They
approached us to do the fair the
following year at their festival in
Frederiksted. After considering their
request, we decided to go along with
Harold Clum's suggestion to use our
large garage or equipment center for


future fairs. Thus began the major
expansion of the fair. I am happy to see
that this basic center continues to exist.
What I remember and admire most
was the spirit of the old days, wherein
hardly any employee worked for mon-
etary compensation. Our friends with
special artistic talents worked late into
the nights and enjoyed doing so. The
bands were happy to perform without
compensation. Antigua and St. Kitts
brought tremendous displays, often
larger than what they bring nowadays.
The cultural performers did their acts
on Sunday afternoons and drew tremen-
dous enthusiasm. The main reason for
inviting our Caribbean neighbors was
to expose our citizens to alternative us-
ages of the same agricultural resources
that we possess but allow to go unused.
I must admit that the fairs of today
have grown in size, but that little spirit
always seems to be missing. The old
timers remind me of this every year. The
employees of the Division of Agriculture
were happy to work for time off or
compensatory time. I can recall only one
incident when one employee demanded
pay. This was for very personal reasons.
These days, most of the employees have


I
to be- paid for;the services. This
attitude amazes me. I feel that the
members of the Division of Agriculture
should have some natural obligation
to give their best effort towards the
success of this three-day agricultural
show. As I look back over the years of
past fairs, I remember the year that
Island Dairies Farm staged live
demonstrations in milking cows with
machines. They brought their cows
to the fair grounds and gave
demonstration twice daily. This was
a great educational hit with the
fairgoers. We were grateful to the late
Mr. Stacey Lloyd for this show.
I am suggesting that a staff member
of the V.I. Division of Agriculture or
the University of the Virgin Islands
attend one of the better fairs in the
United States. This would be a source
for new ideas and agricultural
information. N


ST. GFE ROAD SIDE


t- '"~














Island


Dairies


DAIRY PRODUCTS
Island Dairies Milk is 100'% pure milk,
directly from the cows.


Tel. 778-5050
MILK

Lowfat ( ) ..
Eggnoge '"'


-* f *
* ., -- ~- ,, *


JUICES
(//2 pint, 10 o2.,
Orange
Passion Fruit
Q uleineapple
Fruit Punch
Citru Punch
Grape`: Puri.c


ICE CREAM (,oz,,:pint quart, 1/2 gallon, 2 1/2 gallon)


W illa
Chocolate
Strawberry,
R in Raisin :
Pistachio
Coffee
Butter Pecan'-


Butter Almond
Coconut
P P eapple
en Fruit
WEry Vanilla
:Chocolate Chip
.j ;nana


- *. FROZEN N-[EZEN
Assdrted Juice Pops IcOCream Cones
Flintsrone Pushups ce Cream Sandwich
S-.. K di ke Bars. 'te Barse
S ." Deluxe Ice Cream Bars


]BUTTER
LurpakButirer


9 ,. ~~t*


-4


Fax. 778-5060


112 gallon)




iL A


CORN HILL FARM .......... HENRY NELTHROPP
MON BIJOU FARM ............... OLIVER SKOV
MOUNTAIN MINT FARM ..... RICHARD RIDGWAY
SIGHT FARM ............. CHARLES SCHUSTER
WINDSOR FARM............. ST. CROIX DAIRY ,
PRODUCTS, INC.
HOLSTEIN COWS PRODUCING
ISLAND DAIRIES FRESH MILK





VIRGIN ISLANDS DAIRYMES ASSOC
VIRGIN ISLANDS DAIRYMEN'S ASSOC.


"The Best is Fresh
Naturally"


r





'~,v"~7 ~S -1
j~c '.IIl d


It's events like this

that make

the Virgin Islands a

smart place to live.

Makig a pi tie c ctin th ut the c it
Making a positive connection throughout the community.







The Africanized Honey Bee

In The Caribbean
By
Jeff Keularts, Ph.D.
Program Supervisor, Plant Protection
UVI Cooperative Extension Service


Africanized honey bees were
recently discovered by Howard
Francis in the Estate Cane Bay
area of St. Croix. The U. S. De-
partment of Agriculture's Animal
and Plant Health Inspection Ser-
vice and Plant Protection and
Quarantine Service made positive
identification. According to the
agency, the hive was destroyed.
However, traps were placed in the
area to monitor for any additional
bees. The Department of Eco-
nomic Development and Agricul-
ture and UVI Cooperative Exten-
sion Service are also working to-
gether to address the arrival of
the bees.
With the introduction of
several colonies into Brazil in
1957, the Africanized honey bee
became permanently established
on the American continent. A


continuous land mass makes their
movement from one area to the
next easy. Most islands are difficult
to reach by Africanized honey bee
swarms. They cannot fly long
distances without rest periods and,
therefore, depend on seagoing
vessels to transport them. The bees
eventually made their entrance into
Puerto Rico and may become
established on other islands in the
Caribbean.
This type of bee is particularly ef-
ficient in gathering its food and sur-
viving in unfavorable tropical con-
ditions. Africanized honey bees can
collect more honey than European
bees under poor conditions. They
are also more fit to cope with
predators in the tropical environ-
ment. Several characteristics of
Africanized honey bee colonies will
require a significant change in their


management once this bee has
become established in an area.
The most conspicuous of these
characteristics are the frequent
swarming and absconding of
established colonies. The bees'
very noticeable defensive behavior
is another factor to consider
when handling bee colonies.
For thousands of years mil-
lions of people have lived in har-
mony with the Africanized
honey bee on the African conti-
nent. Like the peoples of Africa,
we can live harmoniously with
these new residents. For more
information on the Africanized
honey bees, contact UVI Coop-
erative Extension Service at
778-9491 or the Division of
Agriculture at 778-0991. m


I


QUALITY
GROCERS

Salutes the 1995 Agriculture
& Food Fair
(809) 773-6307
21-E La Grande Princesse
Christiansted, St. Croix
U.S. Virgin Islands 00820




A look back at Agrifest '94.....


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.....where local produce, food and culture were enjoyed.


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Fairgoers enjoyed the cultural performances by the St. Croix Heritage Dancers.


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A new petfor the home was exhibited at the 1994 Fair The Vietnamese pot-bellied have become
popular pets in the U.S. They sell at high prices and are kept indoors. Purportedly, they love to take
baths, never have fleas and do not shed their hair


23











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Representatives from the Central Marketing Corporation of St. Kitts were among the participants at Agrifest '94. The group won
first place in the off-island display category.


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Fairgoers were amazed at the variety of items that can be made from breadfruit. A representative from Martinique provided
samples for tasting.








St. Croix Handicrafts--Reviving An

Old Caribbean Craft
By
Clarice C. Clarke, Public Information Specialist
UVI Cooperative Extension Service and Judy Salter


A wisp of straw! That's all it took
to start what may be a thriving
industry on St. Croix. While some
people campaign for more hotels,
convention centers, gambling, theme
parks and the like, a small group
called the St. Croix Handicrafts Inc.
has quietly formed to revive the
island's craft ofbasket weaving.
The group's mission is to revitalize
the Caribbean craft by teaching and
making straw items that reflect not
only the Virgin Islands but also the
diverse Caribbean culture. The baskets
and other folkloric items are available
locally, however, they are produced
mainly for the tourist industry.


Primary shareholder and master-
mind Judy Bain says that "St. Croix's
location in the Caribbean could very
well be the cultural doorway to the
Caribbean." According to Bain, many
people from the Caribbean have


moved here and can offer their expertise
to the production of goods representing
their islands. Tourists who are exposed
to these products might decide to visit
those islands, too, but they'd find out
about them on St. Croix.
While she is currently looking for a
Caribbean supplier, the materials are
ordered from the mainland because
rattan does not grow here. Years ago,
when local people made their own
baskets, she says, they used a plant
known as "whisks." When it can be
found, it is difficult to reap and the
preparation is a long process and
ultimately expensive. "It is simply more
cost effective to import materials," she
explains.
The group's inventory ranges from
large hamper-like baskets to ornamentals
such as rattan fish and rum miniature
holders. The group is considering a line
of cultural dolls, starting with the rattan
Quadrille dancers and the locust seed
mocko jumbies. Under consideration,
too, is the "papeboise" (father of the
woods), a figure in St. Lucia and
Trinidad folklore, and the Heel and Toe
or Belleaire dancers from Tobago. The
Heel and Toe dances are similar to
Quadrille, but more lively, and the
Belleaire are not as formal as Quadrille,
according to Mrs. Bain. She'd also like
to create a "storyteller" doll and other
figures from Caribbean folklore.
Mrs. Bain, a native of Trinidad and
an occupational therapist, was taught
basket weaving in school. She has used
this craft as a therapy for mentally ill
patients in Canada, then again in
Trinidad in a hospital's industrial unit.
On St. Croix, she works with Department
of Human Services three days a week,
teaching basketry to disabled people.


,






Mrs. Judy Bain with samples of the group's
cultural dolls and hats.

When she first moved to St. Croix
in 1982, Mrs. Bain grew and sold
ornamental plants. She decided to sell
the plants as gift items by placing them
in baskets. No one on the island was
making baskets, she said, except the
Kingshill Sheltered Workshop, and
that was on a very irregular basis. She
then decided to revive the art of
basketry by teaching the craft and
forming St. Croix Handicrafts Inc.
with Edith Moore, Edna Delamos.
Monica Nesbith and Priscilla Watkins.
The group is operating primarily as
a cottage industry. People who take
basket-weaving courses (nearly 80
adults and children) work with Mrs.
Bain to make products for sale.
According to Mrs. Bain, the
ornaments and cultural items, such as
the Quadrille dancers, are the most
popular with the tourists. For instance,
she says, the rattan Quadrille dancers
were done with the traditional peaked
head ties. "We explain to the tourists
that the way the woman wears the scarf







is important--the points are down for
a married woman, and up if she is
available." Everything we sell has a
story behind it, she said.
Almost every culture used basketry,
Mrs. Bain explains. However, there
is no basket exclusive to St. Croix,
but there is a rounded fisherman's
basket made on St. John which she
does not want to copy. A new
challenge for the group will be to
produce African-type baskets, using
African shapes and colors and
creating some art pieces for display.
You can see how straw can turn into
a cultural link at the St. Croix
Handicrafts' booth in this year's V.I.
Agriculture and Food Fair. .


2 CUPS Sugar Coconta Sugar Cakes
1/2 cup water
1 1/4 cups coconut

Mix to-ether all the inoredlents in a heavy alurninurn sauce pan or pot. Cook slowly, stirring only
occasionally to avoid stickIIII-1, Until Mixture forms' a soft ball when dropped in water that is rooni
temperature, Remove fironi heat and beat a while. Drop by spoonful on cookie sheet that lias been lined
with waxed paper. Let COO] to f'01-111 Sugar cakes,

1/2 teaspoon of vanilla essence may be added and a drop or two of food colorin" to vary color of
Sugar cakes.

Serves 8.

Calories Fat 11rotein Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol
(g) 0
224 4 0 50 3 0




Rcprliltcd froin Native Recipes







The Frame Up


Fine
Custom Framing
Craft and Art Supplies

Daniel N. Holm, CPF
Owner


RFD 1, Box 6108
Kingshill, St. Croix U.S.V.I. 00850
(809) 778-3995

Member of:
Professional Picture Framers Association


ANNALY FARMS

Breeders ofSenepol Cattle


,Q


ANNALY FARMS INC.
Food Headquarters
WHOLESALE RETAIL
Fresh Beef
(Local and U.S. Choice)


Pork 0 Chicken 0 Fish 0 Vegetables
Quality at low prices


Estate Upper Love RT#72
Monday Friday 8:00 -5:30, Saturday 8:00-12:30
TEL. 778-2229







AWARDS


Mr Eustace Simon(right)
receiving the Farmer of the
Year Award at the 1994
Agriculture and Food Fair
from Senator Osbert Potter
(center) and Kofi Boateng,
(left).


Mr. Henry Nelthropp Sr.
(right) receiving the Dis-
tinguished Farm Family of
the YearAward at the 1994
Agriculture and Food Fair
from former Governor Al-
exander A. Farrelly (cen-
ter) and Dr. Darshan S.
Padda, (left).


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Mr DavidSchuster (right) receivingtheAgriculturalBusiness
Award at the 1994 Agriculture and Food Fair from former
Senator Bingley Richardson.


Lii


Dr Darshan S. Padda presenting Ms. Ruth Lang with an
award for her years of dedication and commitment to the
Virgin Islands Agriculture and Food Fair as the director of
food exhibits for the past ten years.


\~



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Dr Orville Kean, UVI President, presenting Keith Garcia with the 1994 Youth Award.


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$ .'"'-""-?-~-~91-"~"~Fcl~~~ -~
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"POEM







V.I. AGRICUITUnE
a V0
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4..
'I:
F


ANTHONY
PLUMBING, INC.
D/B/A
NEWFIELD CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY


Charles Anthony, President

DON'T GET IN OVER YOUR HEAD,
CALL A LICENSED PLUMBING &
GENERAL CONTRACTOR INSTEAD
PHONE: (809) 778-7073 FAX: (809) 773-0991
P.O. BOX 7725
SUNNY ISLE, ST. CROIX
U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS 00823-7725


THE ONLY LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER
SERVING THE VIRGIN ISLANDS SINCE 1844


We are proud to be a part of
the 24th Annual Virgin
Islands Agriculture and
Food Fair
and we are proud of our 150
years of service to the St.
Croix community.


1 773-2300 F ax: 7-51







UNITE CORPORATIO


PHONE: (809) 778-6240
FAX: (809) 778-1200


P.O. BOX 763, CHRISTIANSTED
ST. CROIX, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS 00821


CONGRATULATIONS
TO ALL PARTICIPATING IN THE 1995 AGRICULTURE AND FOOD FAIR


UNITED SHOPPING PLAZA


PLAZA EXTRA
& JERRY'S (SANDRA JOHNSON)
SUBWAY SANDWICHES
J.P. SALES
NATTY'S CAFETERIA
KAY TRAVELS
MAZOUZ HANNUN PHOTOS
EILEEN'S FASHION BOUTIQUE
PLAZA CAFE
HAIR AFFAIR
LUCY'S PLAZA FLORIST
BEE'S RECORD SHOP
P.C. BOOKSTORE
JR. 'S JEWELRY
PLAZA LAUNDROMAT, UNLTD.
DAISY'S TAVERN & BAR
MID-ISLAND MEN'S WEAR
ISLAND FINANCE
BEST FURNITURE STORE
NUTRARAMA (DR. DIAZ)
MUTUAL OF OMAHA INSURANCE AGENCY
RANGOS RESEARCH CENTER
UNITED STEELWORKERS UNION-LOCAL #8248
UNITED STEELWORKERS UNION-LOCAL #8526
UNITED INDUSTRIAL WORKERS UNION-S.I.U.
UNITED STEELWORKERS UNION-NATIONAL
CYTO-CLINICAL LABORATORY
SHANNON'S BOUTIQUE


SUPERMARKET & PHARMACY NICK
ICE CREAM SHOP
SANDWICHES & SALAD
SHOES AND BAGS
DELI & SNACK BAR
TRAVEL AGENCY
PHOTO STUDIO
DRESS & FORMAL WEAR
CAFE & RESTAURANT
BEAUTY SALON & ACCESSORIES
FLOWER SHOP & ACCESSORIES
RECORDS, TAPES & ACCESSORIES
BOOKS, NEWSPAPERS & MAGAZINES
JEWELRY SHOP & GIFTS
LAUNDRY
BAR & RESTAURANT
MEN'S CLOTHING STORE
LOAN FINANCE COMPANY
FURNITURE & HOME APPLIANCES
NATURAL HEALTH FOOD CLINIC
LIFE INSURANCE OFFICE
CHRONIC DISEASES OFFICE
WORKERS' UNION
WORKERS' UNION
WORKERS' UNION
WORKERS' UNION
MEDICAL LABORATORY
LINGERIE & ACCESSORIES


FROM:


4C & ESTTE SIN VAM, CHISTINSTE







Learning From The Culture Bearers
By
Zoraida E. Jacobs
Program Leader, 4-H\Youth Development
UVI Cooperative Extension Service


Mrs. Thelma Clarke has spent
a lifetime living and loving the
culture of the Virgin Islands, in
particular that of St. Croix. At
a golden age, she continues to
share this culture at the Whim
Museum and at various events
throughout the community.
Mrs. Clarke shared with us the
details of making a Virgin
Islands traditional dress. The
dress includes a lace petticoat,
lace or eyelet blouse, a madras
skirt and head piece. According
to Mrs. Clarke, the skirt will
need a minimum of two yards
of material. The skirt waist is
gathered with elastic or
drawstring and two or more
inserts of lace or eyelet can be
sewn into the skirt in matching
or contrasting color.
The petticoat can be made
with wide or narrow rows of
lace. When the skirt is worn
over the petticoat, it is raised
and pinned so that it has a
scalloped edge to show the lace
of the petticoat. Ribbons or
bows can be added as an accent.
The blouse is made of white
eyelet or lace material. It has
elastic around the neckline and
has the shape of a peasant
blouse (scooped neckline and
short sleeves). It has tiers of lace
beginning in the neckline.


i I


Because of the elastic, the blouse
can be worn on or offthe shoulder.
Many traditional dresses throughout
the Caribbean, Puerto Rico and
Latin America have a similar
blouse.
The attire is worn with a madras
head tie which is starched to make
it very stiff. The head tie is pinned
or tied to show from one to four
points. Mrs. Clarke stated that the
number points on the head tie
explains a woman's status: one-
single, two- married, three-married
and looking, and four-the woman
will take anyone who comes along.


The traditional dress is
usually worn during the holi-
days and at cultural events.
The Quadrille dancers, such
as the Heritage Dancers,
wear this type of attire.
Mrs. Clarke stated that
Virgin Islands culture should
be part of the schools' cur-
riculum. "Ofwhat use would
the cultural bearers be if they
do not have anyone to pass
this tradition on to."E





4 ran


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1A1


The madras head tie is pinned or tied to show one or four points.


Atetin VI
usnmse


Th 2tAnivrayoth
Agiutr and FodFi


-ilb4elbae i 96

Yo anb a part of thi s
celbraio byavetsigi
th 19 FarBlein.


Available in Bookstores on St Croi and St Thomas


WAUFE QUELBE AND t'ing
FUNGI
KALLALOO
ST. CROIX IN ANOTHER TIME
VOTES OF A CRUCIAN SON









SS~lri~r~~l~l~L ~ ~ ~


The Fair gave local farmers the opportunity to display and sell their produce tofairgoers.


F -r.


The second place entry was submitted by Luis Munozfrom
the Evelyn Williams School.


The winning entry in the 1994 Agrifest poster contest was
submitted by Laticha Harley of the Evelyn Williams School.








Sunny Isle Shopping Center


American Bankers Ins.
Antilles Broadcasting
Applause
AVCO Finance Co.
Banco Popular
Banco Popular Consumer
Banco Popular Mortgage
Bank of Nova Scotia Mtg.
Baskin Robbins
Benjamin's Treasure
Boutique Avant Garde
Burger King
Carimar
Clara's Special Occasion
Cleopatra Gift Shop
Commoloco Inc.
Department of Labor
Diamond Cinemas
El Patio Flower Shop
Everything's A $1.25
Footlocker
Gannet Hardware
GERS


778-5600
778-5008
778-9301
178-6666
778-5955
778-6225
778-5660
778-5494
778-1699
none
778-6122
778-6688
778-7209
778-8700
778-6234
778-6510
778-0429
778-5200
778-5365
778-6141
778-3585
773-5600
773-5480


Grand Union Supermarket 778-5005
Hodge & Sheen. PC 773-7725
Hosanna Book & Gift Ctr 778-7784
Hughes Photo 778-6827
Ideal Touch Beauty Salon 778-5815
Island Finance 778-2750
Island Medical Center 778-5100
Junior's Jewelry 778-5237
Kentucky Fried 778-5018
Kinney Shoe Store 778-5287
L.A. Sports & Things 778-6446
Le Baron 778-5800
Marcia's Educational Ctr 773-5801
Marianne's 778-5225
Marianne Kids 778-6985
Marshack, Bruce Z, Esq. 778-5484


Me Salve 778-7747
Minni Shop & Mini World 778-6464
Mr. Dollar 778-5069
Ole's Deli & Grill 778-8766
Oyake, Augustine, MD 778-8870
Payless Shoe 778-3550
Pedersen, Walter, MD 778-6110
Peoples Drug Store 778-5537
Perfection Gift Store 778-4653
Radio Shack 778-5667
Rave 778-5575
Reflections 778-5750
S & B Gift Store 778-3111
Sam Goody 778-3200
Social Security 778-5946
Southern Optical 778-6565
Speedy Secretarial 778-6807
St. X Cancer Society 778-6335
St. X Jazz Festival 778-3312
Stride Rite Shoes 778-5216
Sunny Isle Barber Shop. 778-0632
Sunny Isle Mgt. Office 778-5830
Sunny Isle Post Office 778-6805
Sunny Isle Public Library 778-1599
Sunny Isle Theaters 778-5620
Terry's Children Wear 778-5538
Thom Mc An 773-4410
Tops & Bottoms 778-6020
Town & Country 778-6205
Ultima Galleria 778-6883
Unique Shop 778-6955
U.S. Immigration 778-6559
V.L Board of Education 772-4144
Vitel Cellular 773-9991
V.I. Telephone Corp. 778-9950
V.I. Water & Power 778-5064
Wendy's 778-5999
Woolworth 778-5466


"Your Number One Stop for Shopping"








FROM OUR ARCHIVES


















T or


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Im !


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HO RT I rcllt !
HEAIOIS LOCAL PROFUCrTIVITy
WITH .
THE APPROpAThE rI4AJARn-


p, I, ANT o
2110 11 1, i 'l
I Ou I 0
**op


" We specialize


in tomorrow"


Marshall


&Sterling

INSURANCE


21 Anchor Way, Gallows Bay Market Place, Christiansted, St. Croix
U.S. Virgin Islands 00820


(809) 773-2170


Telex # 3473266 MARSTER


Fax (809) 773-9550


I P



























The Quality of
Our Beef
Reflects the clean shore breezes
that freshens our pastures and blue
sea that frames them.
Our healthy flocks of cattle give
St. Croix the taste treat and
eye appeal
to please islander and tourist alike.



SUPPORT ALL LOCAL AGRICULTURE


CASTLE NUGENT FARMS : GASPERI




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