Group Title: CARIFESTA Newspaper Clippings
Title: 5 new folk discs out today
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA00199969/00001
 Material Information
Title: 5 new folk discs out today
Series Title: CARIFESTA Newspaper Clippings
Physical Description: Book
Publisher: Guyana Graphic
Publication Date: 9/12/1972
 Subjects
Subject: Carifesta (1st : 1972 : Guyana), Festivals - Caribbean Area
Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: South America -- Guyana -- Georgetown
Caribbean
 Notes
Funding: Support for the development of the technical infrastructure and partner training provided by the United States Department of Education TICFIA program.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA00199969
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat
Holding Location: Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: CARIFESTA I 1972

Full Text




FIVE new Guyana folk re-
cords are being launched at
midday today at a simple
ceremony at Festival City.
With the label "Our Kind of
Folk" they carry a total of
20 pieces of Amerindian,
Indian, African and creole
ainsic and songs' of Guyana.
,These records will be
unique in the field of re-
cord production in Guyana,
in that for the first tune
ever they are produced from
material that was recorded,
notin a studio, but from
field recordings actually
made by people irt the vil-
lages in their own homes,
or at their "works" or at
jolifications, etc.
The reeardwngs were made
by JARAI, the Independent
Fidklatlon Unit which has
been produoinf radio Wolk
programmed on both radio
tsetious over the pat 18
ead of Jail. Guanew e
autOs, broadcaster and ed
eationist, Peter Lauch-


monen Kempadoo, explained
that the issuing of these
records is a part of a pro-
granmme that has been
worked out for the National
Folk Development Unit
which Jarai has recently
launched.
Another function that this
unit has been carrying out
over the past couple of
months has been the organ-
siing of cultural entertain-
ment sessions in various vil-
lages all over Guyana.
DOCUMENTATION
Arrangements are now be-
Xtfg made for the detailed
documealtafton of all the
material which Jarai has re-
corded over the past two
years (well over 200 hours
of it). This is being done so
as to make the material
available to the general
public, the Guyanese writer
said.
T'ese five erds now be-
lag released are the first


5 new folk discs


out today
of a series of six exteadd
45's. The sixth record is now
being ananfatctured a nd
should be out very abortl.
The stampers have all
been made in Hollywood and
the pressing of the records
has been done in Guyana by
a locall record company. The
complete album of 6 records
features 23 pieces in all, and
gives a good cross-section of
Guyanese music and songs,
including Indo-Guyanese fun
songs, work songs, queh-
queh. shanto, Amerindian
mari-mari, forest songs.
Included are such favou-
rites like "Dis Time Na Lan
Time", "Ring, ding, n'
"Beagalee Bafbu" "LdAtbat.
tiO", '"Kalohodhf Dq'iU
"Boomba", etc. The sinidi
and playing groups. trteh
across the country from ?*1k
don rigit through to
bo, the Pomeroon and MoeW
Sand up-river as far Wa
es.~tol


























































* The 21-day Caribbean Festival of
Creative Arts (CARIFESTA), which was
held in Guyana from August 25 to Sep-
tember 15, has been deemed an outstand-
ing cultural success by all those who
participated, including performers and
those who attended
CARIFESTA was the first such attempt
at bringing together artists from through-
out the Caribbean area in one place to
display their talents.
The festival was held in an effort to
depict the life of the people of the region.
Their heroes, morale, myths, folklore,
motives, traditions, customs, manners,
beliefs, creativeness and ways of expres-
sions.
This cultural awareness festival stimu-
lated those who took part as performers
and created a climate which will flourish
throughout the region in years to come.
During the festival, the various groups
from the participating countries projected
their particular cultural identity.
The three-week cultural extravaganza
featured splendid stage performances, art
exhibitions, sculpture and literature from
over 30 countries, including Cuba, and
Venezuela.
Barbados' contingent to the festival
included 21 members of the highly
acclaimed Writers' Workshop production
"Unchained".
This experimental musical, which
thrilled Barbadian audiences as well as
the thousands who attended CARIFESTA,
formed the main part of Barbados'
representation at the festival.
Barbados was also represented by 15
members of the Barbados Dance Theatre;
who were accompanied by art commis-
sioner Basil Jones and group co-ordinatot


.~rtur jljaynard; and tne Quavers Quartet.
Chief Justice, Sir William Douglas ano
Lady Douglas, Senator Dennis Hunte,
Parliamentary Secretary in the Ministry
of Education, also attended the festival.
So great was the public response to
CARIFESTA that a group of writers, and
creative and performing artists has urged
all regional governments to take an early
decision on the venue for the next festival.
The group presented its proposals to
Prime Minister Forbes Burnham of Guyana,
with the reqcest that he place the
proposals on the agenda of a meeting of
Caribbean heads of Governments due to
be held in Trinidad, next month.
The artists pointed out that the staging
of a Caribbean festival of creative arts was
an imperative need in the area and positive
action must be taken for the regular and
periodical staging of this event.
T'he statement, which was drafted,
following a two-day conference of writers
and artists at the University of Guyana,
suggested that initial steps be taken for
the ultimate establishment of a Caribbean
Secretariat for the Arts. modelled along
the lines of the CARIFTA Secretariat, and
charged with the responsibility of ensuring
that the festival be staged every three years.

In the'photo above, members of the
Barbados Writers' Workshop, who were
responsible for the production "Unchain-
ed", are seen shortly after their return
at Seawell International Airport.

Holding a plaque inscribed with the
CARIFESTA insignia depicting a "dark
brown hand reaching for the sun of en-
lightment, is Miss Daphne Joseph*
Hackett (third from left in the front row).


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