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'We must delve deeply into our cultural heritage'
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA00199963/00001
 Material Information
Title: 'We must delve deeply into our cultural heritage'
Series Title: CARIFESTA Newspaper Clippings
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Claudette Earle
Publisher: Guyana Graphic
Publication Date: 9/11/1972
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Carifesta (1st : 1972 : Guyana), Festivals - Caribbean Area
Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: South America -- Guyana -- Georgetown
Caribbean
 Notes
Funding: Support for the development of the technical infrastructure and partner training provided by the United States Department of Education TICFIA program.
 Record Information
Source Institution: Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat
Holding Location: Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: CARIFESTA I 1972
System ID: CA00199963:00001

Full Text





We mu!


into our

By CLAUDETTE EARL
CARIFESTA '72 the first
such Widay organised Carib-
bean exposition of the fine
and prfoQ= -arts h-- has
been aresoiing successand
while x twist and art-lovers
in these parts pack their bags
and thI iaUde thlbir eyes 'to
scan the vistas for the.future
Iof this uitursal festival, ponli-
(ticians 'would do well to
harken i the advice .of Ja-
maica folk-nmuse researacter
,Olive Lewin. who was-a guest
of the government for the last
week or the Festival.
S"Oarifeba will only sur-
vive". bie said, "if govern-
nments in the Caribbean terri-
tories aZe prepared id ,make a
ncerfmd 'effort at muder-
starding anid, unearthing 'the
history of Solk-art instead of
regarding it- as mere -eanter-
tainmaent. .
I "We must' try to get be-
Imeaah the surface o0f .fok Io-
iture in order.,to .disqovr the
wealth of our' cmlturalheri-
tage and to .develop it pro*
perly."
Olive is the Eilk Musrc Re-
seareh Officer oI the Jamni-
can Governm~ent.and- jhe lead-
er of a folk group. of eight
members who have toured the
U.S. as group twice and who
have also won top places- at a
folk-art festival staged in the
Andes, Argenia, .last year.
A neat. if reservedly 'groomed
figure, Oive possesses a warm,
enegairr personality that
poitve'y glows-wi't happy,
natribaflist farvour ,hen she
'has to soak on her favourite
.topI wgieh is of course, folk
rmusic..
She fees that more gov-
ernments in the region should.
take stpSS to have folk music
of their country taniascribed
and doc6tnelted and dissemn-
inated afoong the people.
"Gove Swniants should offer
as mudch as possible financial
and tec&ii1a~ assistance to the
Iolklorits to have the- heri-
tage of 'te country preserv-
e", said Olive, who for the
last sevei years,.., s been
c~~tfl, ramscribing, re-
seardhing a'nd cataitogu-
iag the aisic of the Ja-
maican folk experience and.
sone of th. pieces. are 200
ears od and are direct pro-
iuets o the sla
Her ipecietijt 6e wike
MOngs. eUa, Longs,
,elairatios songs and the
angs *Ia tle slaves sang to
take ixe~ mn;ds off their
'.-^


;t delve deeply


cultural heritage'

"Let us face St". Oave res- mnts :pr her folk-group re-
so"ed, "we in th aaibbean ~ tpei'bli which, has bookings
have a common heritage of in the Scandinavian countries
slayery And music is an im- for 'later this year.'
porta.t manife3taton of this She is a faithful student of
herita-. Music moulded the Jamaica -culb music and em-
liyes of the people. They used ploys the simple prmitive in-
their sgogs to communicate struments like the bamboo.
with each other. fife an various drums for
I the grgup's accompaniment.'
S"Our people over the years The- pstumes. and move-,
have forgotten. their music. ments ~o are ancient and sa
We.went backwards by aping admnaa~ stuited,to the folk U
the mnyie of the other cul- song'ank aarrangeiment.
tires instead of tryiAg to iler conclixling comment
learn inare of our own folk- on the future of Carfesta; ..
cul-tuzre. 't. A _ft make"it possible. OLIVE LIEWI
"I0 this techniea, age, a:pe'B i odie ting. 'We have..
just fick a swtei -and you, muh. heire- to show to echov IXI pd apprecatlng our
will be .ombatrded with music other aid ;to the w&'ld. 'e.r snebtru of culture and
24 hoais no.-stcp. hyb ould int preserve -a i de a afl d that the' nter*
we acept thia when we-have w"a n Cte. 2 .a thaiemd hrafforded by theafesti
our o n mushc?' Ii t ita2t not dercited,
Ove cooedes that, eheri i ft ita coupiept
is need in the .West Indies-
for _eple. of certain ethrni
backgi~ans to be resctful
apn, aqpreiative of each
other's culture.
"We must_ respect each,
other's music. It we are go-
ing to 'ive '~ a coun-tiy with
diverse cultures, then we
must try and understand one
another's art."
Yet, however, much she Is
an advocate or tolerance and
respect of ethnic traditional
customs and art, Olive. is
totally against cultural inte-
gration if it 'means an inter-
change of roles, like for in-
stance black 'people perform-
ing East Indian. dances. *
"It is slt nattiral,"' Olive
said wiilt a decided shake of
her hea. "I don't like it. The
malnner in which an Indian
sings and dance is the end
resi'ltt Qf hundriids of years
of culture and when a Negro
or biftlk person tries to eimi-
tate hria he einds up being a
:oor iiiritator.
"A is like a Jamniaia try-
ing -t sing 'a Triniidladan
calyso1-It does not aome out
the same. Physically, we can
try o sig or'dance like other
ethne groups if.we learnthe
basdis, but we must db It with.
the, uderi~tsaming that we
can't eally do it' with the
depth t style inherent in the
culture of the persons we. are;
trying to imitate, if you know:.
what I inean.' s'
SOMve, who works. ia the
capitIL Kingsta', and l:vesv
in the south oCthe Island, has.
beoe studying ana research-
Ing mus4b from her youth and
now doap al the arrange-






















.i


'". :~*
) J,~-
i
~'"8~h :^:.~lf~
4 r- :r?, i~~-_ s


PM with 'Banjo

Man' cast

PRIME Minister Forbes
Burnham (second r o m
right) went backstage to
meet "The Banjo Man" cast
at the Ursuline Convent on
Saturday night and congratu-
lated the cast for a stunning
performance of the famous
Roderick Walcott play. With
the banjo is player Egbert
Mathurin who plays the Ban-
jo Man in St. Lucia's contri-
bution to Carifesta.


T `1



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