Group Title: CARIFESTA Newspaper Clippings
Title: Speak, Brother Speak - a profound piece of work
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/CA00199927/00001
 Material Information
Title: Speak, Brother Speak - a profound piece of work
Series Title: CARIFESTA Newspaper Clippings
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Earle, Claudette
Publisher: Guyana Graphic
Publication Date: 9/4/1972
 Subjects
Subject: Carifesta (1st : 1972 : Guyana), Festivals - Caribbean Area
Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: South America -- Guyana -- Georgetown
Caribbean
 Notes
Funding: Support for the development of the technical infrastructure and partner training provided by the United States Department of Education TICFIA program.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: CA00199927
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat
Holding Location: Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: CARIFESTA I 1972

Full Text





Speak, Brother Speak-a


profound piece of work


By CLAUDETTE EARLE
"SPEAK, B T R E R.
SPEAK," the play written by
Dominican folklorist Daniel
Caudeiron and staged for. a
three-night run at the Ursu-
line Convent in Georgetown
as part of the Carifesta pro-
gramme, is a profound piece
of work that seeks to ex-
plore the minds,. the motives
and the mentalities of .both
the militants of the Black
Power concept and "the up-
holders .of the status quo be
they black, white or col-
oured.
The play which is a pre-
sentation of the Arts Council
of Dominica with the partici-
pation: of the: Little lTheatre
Group, the Siffleur MIontagne
Chorale and the La Belle
Theatre, is directed by youth-
ful Alwin .Bully who can be
remembered for his talented
performance in "The Rape of
Fair. Helen"- which was
staged at the Theatre Guild
Playhouse last year when a
drama group from Dofini-
ca toured these parts.
EXCITING GLIMPSES


The story revolves around
OJu (Lennox Royer) who
brings sorrow and shame to
his mother Mrs. Brookes
(Joan Mallalieu) when he
joins'the Black Power move-
ment changes his name and
starts shouting "Power to
the People."
His sister Athene (Rose
Caines) is also upset at Oju's
decision, because she is in
love with a white man and
dreams of an afternoon gar-
den party wedding. Athene
gets her white boyfriend Don
(Danieu Caudeiron) author of
the play, to persaude another
white man to beat her
brother up so that he would
stop his power ratings and
behave like a good middle-
class young man again.
But after the beating, Oju
is more than ever convinced
that the system has got to be
changed whether it means es-
trangement from his family
or not.
The play ends on a note


of tragedy when Oju is
stabbed accidently when one
of the brothers goes for the
white man who. had beat up
Oju. As one of the actors said
in his lines, "It -was due to a
breakdown in communica-
tions."
The play touches on the
very contemporary trouble-
spots and asks rhetorical
questions about these issues.
"You shout 'Power to the
People' ". snarled one of the
young girls of the Black
Power limers, "Power for
what: for whom?" And in
the tirade that followed she
echoed the universal cry of
black women for respect
from black men.
The acting was very good.
even if overdone by some
members of the cast. The co-
ordination smooth, the light-
ing which was done by Alwin
Bully and the sound effects
were imaginative. The music
was taken from a number of
Recorded works.


"Speak, Brother, Speak",
is a healthy put together of
harsh, revolutionary mouth-
ings: middle-class sedateness,
comic dialogue enriched by
island dialect, colorful and
exciting glimpses of Domini-
can folk art all woven with
the diverse threats of con-
flicts between mother and son,
between brother and sister
and between black and white.
The drama was introduced
with an angry.mnonologue on
the-. .o.pression. --. economicc
social and cultural-of the
black people. It was deliv-
ered by the strong voice of a
young man in the total dark-
ness of hall and stage to the
haunting a nd frightening
crescendo of drum rhythms.




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